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West: "Don’t Kid Yourselves, This Isn’t 1968"
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From UnHerd:

Don’t kid yourselves, this isn’t 1968
BY ED WEST
Monday, 8 June 2020

Today’s disturbances in the United States have drawn parallels with the French protests of 1968, generally seen as the start of a great cultural shift in social mores. It was the year of the sexual and cultural revolution when the baby-boomers came of age, and the conservative cultural dominance of the American, French and British elites were swept aside (although in each case in a slightly different way). …

In contrast the 2020 protests, and the Great Awokening of which they are part of, have almost universal establishment approval. …

The only institution not in favour is the police.

Perhaps most bizarrely, even health officials overturned their own advice about demonstrations in the middle of a deadly pandemic because racism is a “public health crisis”. When Star Wars actor John Boyega bravely declares that “I don’t know if I’m going to have a career after this” because of his support for BLM, he can’t honestly think he’ll be blacklisted in Hollywood for voicing approval for something universally supported by America’s elite?

In contrast a number of people have lost their jobs just in the past few days for daring to question this progressive orthodoxy. As Scott Alexander wrote of the Great Awokening, the student protests in American universities like Yale, Missouri and Evergreen were not young people protesting against society’s norms or values. They were demanding that society adopts more of its norms, more stringently, and punishes people who disobey them.

They’re not saying ‘Down with Stalin!’ They’re saying ‘we need two Stalins! No, 50 Stalins!’

Anti-racism is not just the norm in polite American society, it’s a religion. The reason that we obsess over the idea of American racism is not because the country is more racist than other parts of the world, such as India, China or the Middle East, but because it’s obsessively less racist.

If you espouse conventional anti-racism, like Ta-Nehisi Coates, you get paid $41,500 to speak for 40 minutes and showered with plaudits and approval. In contrast, perhaps the most interesting critic of mainstream thinking, Steve Sailer, is relegated to a hugely obscure blog and has to beg readers to keep him going; many mainstream conservatives read Sailer, but they don’t dare to reveal the fact. If an actor admitted to it, he genuinely wouldn’t have a career.

 
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  1. Anonymous[166] • Disclaimer says:

    Insane Millennial Nonsense:

    https://theweek.com/articles/923326/hamilton-already-feels-outdated

    “Hamilton feels, anyway, like a relic from a different era. In a sense, it is: Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Pulitzer Prize-winning musical emerged during the sunny optimism of the late Obama era, when empowering applause-lines like “immigrants, we get the job done!” were as much a part of the cultural zeitgeist as “I’m With Her” stickers and the push to get Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. “

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @Anonymous

    https://www.weseeyouwat.com/

    Replies: @Roderick Spode, @Whiskey

    , @anonymous
    @Anonymous

    The black people of color were still selling out movie theaters showing Tyler Perry's latest productions when Lin's stage-play was all the rage.

    Tyler Perry got his start writing and producing stage-plays that drew in huge crowds of black people and only black people.

  2. Anonymous[166] • Disclaimer says:

    https://theweek.com/articles/923326/hamilton-already-feels-outdated

    “ Hamilton feels, anyway, like a relic from a different era. In a sense, it is: Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Pulitzer Prize-winning musical emerged during the sunny optimism of the late Obama era, when empowering applause-lines like “immigrants, we get the job done!” were as much a part of the cultural zeitgeist as “I’m With Her” stickers and the push to get Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. ”

    Author went to Bennington. Probably yelled at Charles Murray.

    • Replies: @Peterike
    @Anonymous

    “Hamilton feels, anyway, like a relic from a different era.”

    Hamilton is dreadful crap. Nobody ever liked it as much as they said they did.

    Replies: @Bumpkin

  3. Tucker definitely reads you, and more importantly, agrees with you on a lot of things.

    I’d say Ann Coulter but she’s been banished to obscurity. You legitimately might have more influence than ol’ Ironsides Ann. She’s evidence of what happens when you push a little too hard with the iSteve/paleocon views.

    • Replies: @DextersLabRat
    @Aeronerauk

    Ann Coulter obviously reads him since they're both columnists for Taki Mag. Has she been blacklisted from mainstream media? She still has a Twitter account with 2.2m followers at least. That's more than a lot of people these days.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    , @Anonymous
    @Aeronerauk


    I’d say Ann Coulter but she’s been banished to obscurity. You legitimately might have more influence than ol’ Ironsides Ann. She’s evidence of what happens when you push a little too hard with the iSteve/paleocon views.
     
    Give it up, middle-aged incel!

    Ann is as popular as ever, especially amongst men who love slender, hot blondes chock full of intelligent sass. The line of men who would like to marry her, and women who wish they were her, would stretch to the moon and back, with plenty to spare!
    , @The Wild Geese Howard
    @Aeronerauk


    I’d say Ann Coulter but she’s been banished to obscurity.
     
    Coulter has always been suspect due to her mudsharking.

    Same applies to Lauren Southern, though her documentary about white South African farmers was a quality piece.
    , @Cloudbuster
    @Aeronerauk

    She hasn't been banished from mainstream media, but she has been banished from the Conservatism, Inc. publications that nobody on the right cares about anymore.

  4. It is indeed a sin of the current moment that Steve doesn’t have a sinecure or endowed perch somewhere.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Percy Gryce


    It is indeed a sin of the current moment that Steve doesn’t have a sinecure or endowed perch somewhere.
     
    A sin and an indictment of our entire academic system and our information and culture industries.
    , @njguy73
    @Percy Gryce

    I'm sure you've seen the cartoon with the two desks. One labelled "Comforting Lies" and the other labelled "Unpleasant Truths."

    One has a line as far as the eye can see, the other is abandoned.

    , @John Derbyshire
    @Percy Gryce

    "In a sane republic, Steve would have some highly-paid position advising the government, or a professorship in social science at some prestigious university. In the nation we actually live in, Steve can only be a guerrilla intellectual, emerging from the maquis now and then to take a few sniping shots at what George Orwell — Steve's greatest hero, and mine — called "the smelly little orthodoxies which are now contending for our souls." https://tinyurl.com/y4clk5cv

  5. Here’s to staying “hugely obscure” which, after all, does beat being deplatformed.

  6. Your secret is out Steve!

  7. In contrast, perhaps the most interesting critic of mainstream thinking, Steve Sailer, is relegated to a hugely obscure blog

    Better called a huge, obscure blog.

    • Agree: San Fernando Curt
  8. “Steve Sailer, is relegated to a hugely obscure blog and has to beg readers to keep him going; many mainstream conservatives read Sailer, but they don’t dare to reveal the fact. ”

    I recall reading in the NYT about the “popular Vdare” website. I listen to Dan Proft on WIND-AM(560) and he must read SS because I hear exactly the same subjects being discussed on his program, even though he tries to stay in the National Review lane. We know Mark Steyn reads Vdare, and that is a direct link to Unz.

    • Replies: @William Middleton
    @Joe Stalin

    Mark Steyn certainly reads Steve Sailer. He’s mentioned him on the Mark Steyn Show before (I believe two years ago).

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax

  9. Ed West dares shining light on the political world’s dark matter.

    Btw, as I mentioned on Z-Man’s blog, I’ve been sending money to Steve for years and will continue to do so as long as Steve or I am alive. I might wish that Steve realized that we’re not debating (or voting) our way out of this and started talking about organizing, but his courage and insights over the decades are undeniable.

    Best to Steve and Ed West.

  10. hugely obscure blog … many mainstream conservatives read Sailer,

    • LOL: LondonBob
  11. Reminiscent of what the late Bob Whitaker wrote on his blog back in 2009:

    If you know anything about the Stalin Era, you get the same laugh I do out of one of the slogans they used, “Have the courage to support Comrade Stalin.” That is like telling a sheep “Have the COURAGE not to get eaten by a lion.”

    But we have exactly the same thing today. If you hear that someone “has the COURAGE to SPEAK OUT” you know very well which side they are taking.

    No one who openly fights for white survival “has the courage to speak out.” Only anti-whites are ever described as “having the courage to speak out.”

    In fact, this is one sure sign of a despotic society. It used to be the height of courage in America for someone to say, “I do not agree with your opinion, but I will fight to the death for your right to express it.” You don’t hear that since the WWII Generation learned that Goodspeak is the only way to go.

    The media only praised McCain for Courage when he agreed with them on policy. No one in authority today does anything but denounce anyone who disagrees with The Party Line.

    In totalitarian environments the only “spontaneous demonstrations” are those that have been prepared by professionals for reasons everybody can predict. In America, there are no exceptions to day at all.

  12. To me, the most frightening difference between the situation in 1968 and the present situation is that 1968’s student protesters graduated into an economy that rewarded them richly for giving up their radical pretensions. The senior leader of SDS at Brandeis University in 1969, when I graduated, entered Harvard Law School and wound up a partner in a Wall Street Law firm. I myself had no trouble landing a plumb job as an actuarial trainee that paid a starting salary of some $65,000 (in today’s dollars) with almost guaranteed annual increments of $10,000. When I left that job for grad school and got my Ph.D., my advisor provided me with several tenure track teaching options at first rank schools.

    Many of today’s protesters are facing an extremely grim economic future. There is no incentive to tone down their disruptive behavior. They envision a bleak future for themselves unless there are radical changes in our society. That they are tools for elite globalists like Soros, Bezos and Gates does not concern them. Neither do they care that the changes they envision will only make things worse for themselves. In any event these changes will imiserate many of those whom they blame for their poor prospects, e.g., middle class boomers.

    A good economy damped the revolutionary fervor of 1968s rioters. No such damping is likely in the coming decades.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    @Jus' Sayin'...


    I myself had no trouble landing a plumb job
     
    Those used to pay, better than academia did, back in the day.


    https://lirp-cdn.multiscreensite.com/ca3e9c82c0054ec185f3363f4f17afc0/dms3rep/multi/opt/plumb1-640w.png

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    , @Drew
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I've been listening to the revolutions podcast by Mike Duncan. One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings. Consequently disaffected young people are eager to fight and destroy, figuring things can't get worse. This pretty much solves the broader problem of excess labor supply since a lot of working age people end up dead. I guess the main lesson I'd take away from history is that it's important for the government to be on the ball about managing labor supply. A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to and if no more than 20% of any generation (i.e. high school graduating class) went to college. There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @njguy73, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @RudyM, @anon, @Houston 1992, @Jus' Sayin'...

    , @Almost Missouri
    @Jus' Sayin'...


    1968’s student protesters graduated into an economy that rewarded them richly for giving up their radical pretensions.
     
    That's a good point, but note that a hidden cost of absorbing those 1968 radicals into the Establishment was that the leaders of SDS becoming partners in Wall Street Law are now the corrupt and incompetent New Establishment whose ossified world views and sinecurial dead hands throttle more life from nation than their supposedly oppressive parents ever did.

    Mayor Daley did nothing wrong.

    Replies: @Kronos

    , @Fidelios Automata
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Ha ha, it's just like saying transsexuals are "brave." Now don't get me wrong, I have nothing against transsexuals. I know a few of them personally. But coming out in a culture that celebrates your choices and in fact doesn't tolerate the slightest criticism of them (ask J.K. Rowling) has nothing to do with bravery.

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    The CivNat is strong in this one.

    Hey, Boomer, you might notice another slight difference between now and 1968: the demographics of the country.

    Maybe the most frightening thing now compared to 1968 is the fact that my children are minorities in their age group and will be severely discriminated against.

    But, oh please, let's all bow to the great God economy. If only the economy was better, everything would be fine.

    Do you even think about family? I'd rather earn half of what I earn and l live with my own kind.

    What is wrong with you people?

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Anonymous

  13. @Percy Gryce
    It is indeed a sin of the current moment that Steve doesn't have a sinecure or endowed perch somewhere.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @njguy73, @John Derbyshire

    It is indeed a sin of the current moment that Steve doesn’t have a sinecure or endowed perch somewhere.

    A sin and an indictment of our entire academic system and our information and culture industries.

  14. In contrast.

    Should be edited with extreme prejudice.

  15. Reading Steve can end a career? That’s power, I guess.

  16. of which they are part of

    It would be heaps more betterer if the writer got into the habit of leaving out that last ‘of’.

    Actually, starting a sentence with an adverb is the only thing that ending a sentence with a preposition is as bad as.

    When it’s an unnecessary preposition, it’s clearly more worser, but.

    I am not remotely ashamed of being the shittest proof-reader in the world when it concerns my own govno . It is a very common trait.

    That is why we were always encouraged to get a colleague to review material before committing it to print. NOwadays it’s far lest costly to correct things ex post: back in the olden days it was bad news if someone found an absolute clanger on p7 of a conference paper… just as the last of 250 copies had been hand-collated and stapled together.

    (Yes, I upped my *afinil dose this morning.)

  17. YOU guys are gong down

    We will not stand for white supremacy any longer

    • Replies: @DextersLabRat
    @Redford Bennet

    Agreed, those whites are so dangerous they should all be permanently quarantined. How about this: whites will be forever restricted to a bunch of inhospitable territories such as unbearably hot and teeming with deadly animals Australia, freezing cold Canada, and tiny overcrowded Europe. There they will be kept, forever isolated and separate, so that their horrible racist witchcraft does not destroy the brave and beautiful POC of the world, who will be free to roam and build Wakanda in the rest of the globe. Surely in a couple generations the wicked whites will have destroyed themselves behind their prison gates and then those areas can be turned into nature reserves.

    , @San Fernando Curt
    @Redford Bennet

    The world will shake.

  18. Ano says:

    I demand a House Un-American Activities Committee to root out and blacklist (sorry, Blacklist) any actors who read Steve Sailer!

    Tip: Haul before the House for hard questioning anybody in Hollywood who has suspect views on golf course clubhouse architectural styles.

    PS: Hello, Robert De Niro! Can I have your autograph?

  19. I agree. Not 1968. I lived through that. Although some of the European radicals tended toward Stalinist leanings. What drove people like me was an anarchistic philosophy. Rebellion to eliminate the Big State. Today’s protests favor Big State dictating all aspects of thinking and acting. They also want to rewrite history.

  20. @Aeronerauk
    Tucker definitely reads you, and more importantly, agrees with you on a lot of things.

    I'd say Ann Coulter but she's been banished to obscurity. You legitimately might have more influence than ol' Ironsides Ann. She's evidence of what happens when you push a little too hard with the iSteve/paleocon views.

    Replies: @DextersLabRat, @Anonymous, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Cloudbuster

    Ann Coulter obviously reads him since they’re both columnists for Taki Mag. Has she been blacklisted from mainstream media? She still has a Twitter account with 2.2m followers at least. That’s more than a lot of people these days.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
    @DextersLabRat

    She's on WOR -- NYC's highest-rated radio station -- every Wednesday morning for a 10-minute guest segment. Doesn't get too much more mainstream than that.

  21. The only institution not in favour is the police.

    The NYPD’s flex against De Blasio at the funerals of NYPD Officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu during the last spasm of BLM violence in 2014 appeared to demonstrate that the NYPD still had power over the Mayor. However, the Democrats and De Blasio were playing the long game. At the cost of civil order and the economic future of New York City, De Blasio has avenged himself over the funeral disrespect from the NYPD. The only “conservative” institution left in the United States were the police unions and they have been completely and utterly decimated by this revolution.

    Every American city is now covered in ACAB, F12, 1312 and Kill Pigs graffiti. The planners of this coup knew well that the only organized, effective resistance they would face would be the local police and they carried out their assault brilliantly.

    Nothing now stands in their way.

    • Replies: @San Fernando Curt
    @Clifford Brown

    Nothing stands in their way to do what?

    Actually, we stand in their way. And we're everything. Corrupt, preening politicians can't handle us any better than they can handle antifa, when push ever gets to shove. And I'm beginning to think it's inevitable.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown

    , @Mr. Anon
    @Clifford Brown

    I haven't seem much if any evidence that the police would stand up for ordinary conservative people. Some Sherriffs and their deputies might, but urban police? They only seem to stick up for themselves.

  22. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:
    @Aeronerauk
    Tucker definitely reads you, and more importantly, agrees with you on a lot of things.

    I'd say Ann Coulter but she's been banished to obscurity. You legitimately might have more influence than ol' Ironsides Ann. She's evidence of what happens when you push a little too hard with the iSteve/paleocon views.

    Replies: @DextersLabRat, @Anonymous, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Cloudbuster

    I’d say Ann Coulter but she’s been banished to obscurity. You legitimately might have more influence than ol’ Ironsides Ann. She’s evidence of what happens when you push a little too hard with the iSteve/paleocon views.

    Give it up, middle-aged incel!

    Ann is as popular as ever, especially amongst men who love slender, hot blondes chock full of intelligent sass. The line of men who would like to marry her, and women who wish they were her, would stretch to the moon and back, with plenty to spare!

    • LOL: GoRedWings!
  23. @Jus' Sayin'...
    To me, the most frightening difference between the situation in 1968 and the present situation is that 1968's student protesters graduated into an economy that rewarded them richly for giving up their radical pretensions. The senior leader of SDS at Brandeis University in 1969, when I graduated, entered Harvard Law School and wound up a partner in a Wall Street Law firm. I myself had no trouble landing a plumb job as an actuarial trainee that paid a starting salary of some $65,000 (in today's dollars) with almost guaranteed annual increments of $10,000. When I left that job for grad school and got my Ph.D., my advisor provided me with several tenure track teaching options at first rank schools.

    Many of today's protesters are facing an extremely grim economic future. There is no incentive to tone down their disruptive behavior. They envision a bleak future for themselves unless there are radical changes in our society. That they are tools for elite globalists like Soros, Bezos and Gates does not concern them. Neither do they care that the changes they envision will only make things worse for themselves. In any event these changes will imiserate many of those whom they blame for their poor prospects, e.g., middle class boomers.

    A good economy damped the revolutionary fervor of 1968s rioters. No such damping is likely in the coming decades.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Drew, @Almost Missouri, @Fidelios Automata, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I myself had no trouble landing a plumb job

    Those used to pay, better than academia did, back in the day.

    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Reg Cæsar

    I guess I'd turned off my internal spell checker ;-)

  24. @Redford Bennet
    YOU guys are gong down

    We will not stand for white supremacy any longer

    Replies: @DextersLabRat, @San Fernando Curt

    Agreed, those whites are so dangerous they should all be permanently quarantined. How about this: whites will be forever restricted to a bunch of inhospitable territories such as unbearably hot and teeming with deadly animals Australia, freezing cold Canada, and tiny overcrowded Europe. There they will be kept, forever isolated and separate, so that their horrible racist witchcraft does not destroy the brave and beautiful POC of the world, who will be free to roam and build Wakanda in the rest of the globe. Surely in a couple generations the wicked whites will have destroyed themselves behind their prison gates and then those areas can be turned into nature reserves.

  25. Anonymous[209] • Disclaimer says:

    Anti-racism is not just the norm in polite American society, it’s a religion. The reason that we obsess over the idea of American racism is not because the country is more racist than other parts of the world, such as India, China or the Middle East, but because it’s obsessively less racist.

    No, the reason is that America is a global empire that claims to lead the world on behalf of “human rights”. This results in promoting an egalitarian, anti-racist ideology domestically and abroad.

    India, China, and the Mideast are worlds unto themselves, and currently don’t claim to lead the rest of the world in the name of some universalist ideology. The Mideast did aspire to global empire in the past under the banner of Islam, a universalist ideology in which all adherents were to have an equal status regardless of race.

  26. “…Many mainstream conservatives read Sailer, but they don’t dare to reveal the fact.”

    Oh – you cast your net too near. Don’t kid yourself. Many, many liberals read you, too. Furtively. In the dark of night.

    This is the revolution that won’t be televised.

  27. OK, Steve I sent you some money finally . There are so many worthy causes but besides this donation to you the only other contribution I’ve made has been to AdBlock . BTW a while back I tried to send you a copy of “Skid Marks” the lawyer joke book , but I sent to your PO Box which I subsequently found that PO Boxes don’t accept packages . Sorry . It’s better for all if you’re supported by your Commentariat than one unit that in the end you would have to answer to . And thanks again for the comments you don’t pass as well as the ones you do . I don’t have a filter obviously but I tend to rely on your whims .

  28. @Clifford Brown

    The only institution not in favour is the police.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xZjSNMfrK8

    The NYPD's flex against De Blasio at the funerals of NYPD Officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu during the last spasm of BLM violence in 2014 appeared to demonstrate that the NYPD still had power over the Mayor. However, the Democrats and De Blasio were playing the long game. At the cost of civil order and the economic future of New York City, De Blasio has avenged himself over the funeral disrespect from the NYPD. The only "conservative" institution left in the United States were the police unions and they have been completely and utterly decimated by this revolution.

    Every American city is now covered in ACAB, F12, 1312 and Kill Pigs graffiti. The planners of this coup knew well that the only organized, effective resistance they would face would be the local police and they carried out their assault brilliantly.

    Nothing now stands in their way.

    Replies: @San Fernando Curt, @Mr. Anon

    Nothing stands in their way to do what?

    Actually, we stand in their way. And we’re everything. Corrupt, preening politicians can’t handle us any better than they can handle antifa, when push ever gets to shove. And I’m beginning to think it’s inevitable.

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    @San Fernando Curt

    "We" are not an institution. "We" do not have the state sanctioned right to use violence. BLM and Antifa are state sanctioned violence supported by both political parties, the State Department, the globalist media, the Fortune 500, Silicon Valley, the CIA, the FBI, local Democratic city and state governments and the police. The radicals have strategically seized the District Attorney's offices and the judges. This is a coup. Wake up.

    Your resistance will simply be wiped out while your opponents rule the streets.

    The Revolution will be declared over while law abiding Americans are still in lockdown. Our History has been rewritten, Our Politics have been redefined. Our Identity has been destroyed. The Revolution is happening in real time while normal Americans are social distancing.

    Their cause is morally weak, but they win if normal people do not play.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

  29. I’d argue that the riots of 2020 are more of a response to preserve the existing status quo established in 1968. With the continued demise of the Boomer Yuppies, issues that were once sacrosanct (abortion, free trade) are now potentially in peril. 2020 might become the Battle of Stalingrad for the cultural revolutionaries and financial elites. That they’ll actually decline in terms of political clout.

    1968 seemed like a masterstroke covert operation to destroy the New Deal coalition that provided high paying jobs for both blue collar and white collar workers alike. Elites collaborated with demographic groups like Blacks and Women to destroy the economic gains made under FDR. Both Blacks and Women are entirely dependent on aggressive government programs that provide “protected group” status and thus superior citizenship.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protected_group

    Feminism destroyed the living wage and elites are still pleased with that. Blacks drove out the pesky Catholic ethnics and their political machinery (unions.) Blacks were consequently granted special respect and privileges. Both are groups that can’t function independently and thus viable political pawns.

    Thus 2020 is a battle for keeps. The “revolutionaries” are in fact highly reactionary. The rise of Trump and Sanders are testaments to that political development.

    • Replies: @James Bowery
    @Kronos

    "Protected groups" are the modern holders of priestly sinecures from the supremacist theocracy -- their "victimhood" entitling to the sacral lineage of the Crucifixion.

    The Thirty Years War dealt with that at least to some extent and it was a bargain at only 25% of the population dead.

  30. @Redford Bennet
    YOU guys are gong down

    We will not stand for white supremacy any longer

    Replies: @DextersLabRat, @San Fernando Curt

    The world will shake.

  31. @Jus' Sayin'...
    To me, the most frightening difference between the situation in 1968 and the present situation is that 1968's student protesters graduated into an economy that rewarded them richly for giving up their radical pretensions. The senior leader of SDS at Brandeis University in 1969, when I graduated, entered Harvard Law School and wound up a partner in a Wall Street Law firm. I myself had no trouble landing a plumb job as an actuarial trainee that paid a starting salary of some $65,000 (in today's dollars) with almost guaranteed annual increments of $10,000. When I left that job for grad school and got my Ph.D., my advisor provided me with several tenure track teaching options at first rank schools.

    Many of today's protesters are facing an extremely grim economic future. There is no incentive to tone down their disruptive behavior. They envision a bleak future for themselves unless there are radical changes in our society. That they are tools for elite globalists like Soros, Bezos and Gates does not concern them. Neither do they care that the changes they envision will only make things worse for themselves. In any event these changes will imiserate many of those whom they blame for their poor prospects, e.g., middle class boomers.

    A good economy damped the revolutionary fervor of 1968s rioters. No such damping is likely in the coming decades.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Drew, @Almost Missouri, @Fidelios Automata, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    I’ve been listening to the revolutions podcast by Mike Duncan. One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings. Consequently disaffected young people are eager to fight and destroy, figuring things can’t get worse. This pretty much solves the broader problem of excess labor supply since a lot of working age people end up dead. I guess the main lesson I’d take away from history is that it’s important for the government to be on the ball about managing labor supply. A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to and if no more than 20% of any generation (i.e. high school graduating class) went to college. There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Drew

    Ctrl-F "migra"

    Replies: @Drew

    , @njguy73
    @Drew

    Two words: Elite overproduction.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Hypnotoad666

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Drew

    The Han Dynasty, which was the critical defining moment in Chinese civilization, was founded by some guys who while working under the insane Legalistic Ch'in Dynasty of the lunatic Shi Huang Ti, discovered they were condemned to death for petty bureaucratic reasons, figured they had nothing to lose, went for broke and took over the country.

    That being said, the maniacs Shang Yang, Li Ssu and Han Fei remain intellectual and cultural heroes of mine. But I also like Sun Ra records, so, grain of salt and so forth.

    Replies: @Fidelios Automata

    , @RudyM
    @Drew


    A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to
     
    This is way too repressive. There are all sorts of reasons why people want to continuing working past that age, including financial need. I would much rather see a federal jobs guarantee program.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Alden

    , @anon
    @Drew

    One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings.

    That's been true since the 70's, as far as working class men are concerned.

    There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    That's been true in IT and tech since the 90's.

    How's that open-borders global plan working out for us now?

    , @Houston 1992
    @Drew

    engineers > 63 yo are often the last holders of disappearing skills, and are needed to impart them to the young
    Replacing 63 yo smug Boomers seems tempting , but their Millennial replacements will be worse and more lefty than they are....

    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Drew

    Peter Turchin has a lot to say on this (https://www.amazon.com/Ages-Discord-Peter-Turchin/dp/0996139540/ref=sr_1_1?crid=XLOLNFGQQ399&dchild=1&keywords=peter+turchin+ages+of+discord&qid=1593876205&sprefix=Petyer+Turchin%2Caps%2C158&sr=8-1).

    A man who predicted the current chaos ten years ago is worth reading.

  32. anon[212] • Disclaimer says:

    I hate to say I told you so, but … I told you so. I got into an exchange with Ron Unz on this site a couple of years ago and most people took his side. My thesis at the time was that we’re seeing something develop unlike anything in the past; the current era is fundamentally different with the potential to explode into something really horrible at any moment. Ron argued it wasn’t a big deal because the 1960s were worse. At the time, he was technically correct, but my argument was that the underlying foundation was worse and getting worse every day. We see that on the streets of America now. Something is badly wrong.

    In short, my argument:

    The nation’s demographics have changed to the point where sociopathic, social climbing white leftists have to signal ever harder that they are on the rising minority’s side in order to maintain power and influence. They do this by casting themselves (and POC) as victims of white core Americans, which is totally fictional. This has created the conditions for racial hate and even class warfare against the middle class and the poor (“you don’t even have a college degree” guy in NYC). Conservatives, who see little need to do the same, have remained politically much where they were in the 1990s, maybe even as far back as the mid 1980s, sans only a couple of issues like gay marriage. They are stunned that they’ve been repaid for their good natured efforts to include other races with scorn and hatred. Where is it coming from, they think? It’s coming from the wealthy white upperclass, the people who care first and foremost about power and keeping it for themselves.

    This means that white Americans won’t be okay in a diversifying America. A counter argument at the time was “whites in California still run the place.” I pointed out that white leftists were terrible people and that California would be better off with a conservative Hispanic democrat as governor over an SJW white liberal. Because white liberals are going off the rails, simply having someone with the same skin color as your own doesn’t matter as much as you might think. White leftists hate white conservatives even more than most other demographics, even blacks (80% of these BLM protesters aren’t black; a majority are probably white liberal upper middle-class suburban kids).

    • Thanks: Pop Warner, Sam Malone
    • Replies: @cynthia curran
    @anon

    Most don't come from the suburbs. In California. whites in the suburbs are old think Marin County or Mission Viejo. Most Antifa brats came from the big cities think San Francisco, West La, San Diego, and Sacramento. In fact a recent interview shows the Democrats carrying large cities in the US by 35 percent amd suburbs by 10 percent. Suburbs are older than large cities' In fact New York City has 6.3 percent of the population 5 and under Its the while Long Island is 4.5 percent. In fact lilberqal parents are rising their kids now in large cities not suburbs. In fact, Antifa lives in cities over 500,000 and doesn't like cities like Mission Viejo. Take LM where most the protest were in La not Huntington Beach. Huntington Beach largest BLM group was 300 due to couter protesters while LA City was 10,000. In fact lots of the conservative hispanics made up about 30 percent of the BLM protest in La and about 90 percent of the BLM protest in Santa Ana. Santa Ana even had Antifa and they were not white. Fireworks were set to the cops in Santa Ana which is what antifa does. Not in Huntington Beach or Newport Beach.

  33. @Aeronerauk
    Tucker definitely reads you, and more importantly, agrees with you on a lot of things.

    I'd say Ann Coulter but she's been banished to obscurity. You legitimately might have more influence than ol' Ironsides Ann. She's evidence of what happens when you push a little too hard with the iSteve/paleocon views.

    Replies: @DextersLabRat, @Anonymous, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Cloudbuster

    I’d say Ann Coulter but she’s been banished to obscurity.

    Coulter has always been suspect due to her mudsharking.

    Same applies to Lauren Southern, though her documentary about white South African farmers was a quality piece.

  34. He’s more or less right about the present, but has a terrible understanding of history.

    The 1968 “protests” were establishment to the bone, just like the 2020 riots. The only differences are, first of all, there was more than one establishment in 1968, and second, we didn’t have the internet, so people couldn’t connect it to elites as easily back then in real time. But every “grassroots” movement that actually succeeds is really an elite-on-elite offensive. And that goes back way farther than 1968.

    His handle on Stalinism isn’t much better. The left doesn’t actually want Stalin because Stalin ended the progression of leftism. What they want is more accurately described as somewhere between Pol Pot and Rwandan-style anarchy. And it’s what they’ll get unless stopped by a Stalin (or a Putin-like figure, if we’re lucky).

    • Agree: Ben tillman
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Michael S


    The 1968 “protests” were establishment to the bone, just like the 2020 riots. The only differences are, first of all, there was more than one establishment in 1968
     
    The Jews were the most powerful group by 1968.
  35. @Jus' Sayin'...
    To me, the most frightening difference between the situation in 1968 and the present situation is that 1968's student protesters graduated into an economy that rewarded them richly for giving up their radical pretensions. The senior leader of SDS at Brandeis University in 1969, when I graduated, entered Harvard Law School and wound up a partner in a Wall Street Law firm. I myself had no trouble landing a plumb job as an actuarial trainee that paid a starting salary of some $65,000 (in today's dollars) with almost guaranteed annual increments of $10,000. When I left that job for grad school and got my Ph.D., my advisor provided me with several tenure track teaching options at first rank schools.

    Many of today's protesters are facing an extremely grim economic future. There is no incentive to tone down their disruptive behavior. They envision a bleak future for themselves unless there are radical changes in our society. That they are tools for elite globalists like Soros, Bezos and Gates does not concern them. Neither do they care that the changes they envision will only make things worse for themselves. In any event these changes will imiserate many of those whom they blame for their poor prospects, e.g., middle class boomers.

    A good economy damped the revolutionary fervor of 1968s rioters. No such damping is likely in the coming decades.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Drew, @Almost Missouri, @Fidelios Automata, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    1968’s student protesters graduated into an economy that rewarded them richly for giving up their radical pretensions.

    That’s a good point, but note that a hidden cost of absorbing those 1968 radicals into the Establishment was that the leaders of SDS becoming partners in Wall Street Law are now the corrupt and incompetent New Establishment whose ossified world views and sinecurial dead hands throttle more life from nation than their supposedly oppressive parents ever did.

    Mayor Daley did nothing wrong.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    @Almost Missouri


    Mayor Daley did nothing wrong.
     
    According to Roger Stone’s Nixon book, Daley’s last words before dying were something akin to:

    “May God forgive me for stealing the 1960 election away from Nixon.”

    https://www.amazon.com/Nixons-Secrets-Untold-President-Watergate-ebook/dp/B00L4FSW1E

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

  36. Anonymous[407] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s coming from the wealthy white upperclass, the people who care first and foremost about power and keeping it for themselves.

    This means that white Americans won’t be okay in a diversifying America.

    How things shake out will depend on what is good for the Jews.

  37. @Joe Stalin
    "Steve Sailer, is relegated to a hugely obscure blog and has to beg readers to keep him going; many mainstream conservatives read Sailer, but they don’t dare to reveal the fact. "

    I recall reading in the NYT about the "popular Vdare" website. I listen to Dan Proft on WIND-AM(560) and he must read SS because I hear exactly the same subjects being discussed on his program, even though he tries to stay in the National Review lane. We know Mark Steyn reads Vdare, and that is a direct link to Unz.

    Replies: @William Middleton

    Mark Steyn certainly reads Steve Sailer. He’s mentioned him on the Mark Steyn Show before (I believe two years ago).

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    @William Middleton

    He's also referenced Steve's "world's most important graph" of sub-saharan Africa's population growth over the next half century. Though I don't think he's mentioned it on TV and I don't think he's ever mentioned Sailer by name on Fox. Though Ann Coulter has, at least a couple of times that I've heard myself.

  38. @Drew
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I've been listening to the revolutions podcast by Mike Duncan. One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings. Consequently disaffected young people are eager to fight and destroy, figuring things can't get worse. This pretty much solves the broader problem of excess labor supply since a lot of working age people end up dead. I guess the main lesson I'd take away from history is that it's important for the government to be on the ball about managing labor supply. A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to and if no more than 20% of any generation (i.e. high school graduating class) went to college. There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @njguy73, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @RudyM, @anon, @Houston 1992, @Jus' Sayin'...

    Ctrl-F “migra”

    • Replies: @Drew
    @Almost Missouri

    Immigration isn't as big a deal as you think. Most migrants are low-skilled (think Mexican day laborers), and most millennials going into tech these days are focused on marketing, not hardware and coding. Most millennials are expecting to be managers, not laborers, which is why curtailing college admissions and forced retirements would work better than curtailing immigration. Do you really think a college-educated 20-something is clamoring for a factory job or working in a field?

  39. The exponentially increasing speed with which the American system seems to be declining is really quite shocking to behold. I am quite sure there is no political solution to the intractable problems we have in this country now. The collapse of the Anglosphere in the 21st century is the central historical and cultural event of our lifetimes.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Hockamaw

    From the moon to the CHAZ in two generations.

    We could have had Star Trek: TNG, but instead we get Dirt Trek: TNB

  40. Steve Sailer, the Career Killer

    • LOL: LondonBob
  41. @Percy Gryce
    It is indeed a sin of the current moment that Steve doesn't have a sinecure or endowed perch somewhere.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @njguy73, @John Derbyshire

    I’m sure you’ve seen the cartoon with the two desks. One labelled “Comforting Lies” and the other labelled “Unpleasant Truths.”

    One has a line as far as the eye can see, the other is abandoned.

  42. Ed West writes some OK articles – sometimes – but seeing him complain that the new Russian Cathedral of the Armed Forces was, basically, too badass and that made him uneasy firmly reminded me of why conservatives make me sick. I can even understand antis better – I think they’re wrong, but can see why some people might be attracted to those ideas, and they have the will to power to make them reality which is something I guess – but seeing someone who knows better but condemns anyone with any guts to stand up and fight (he doesn’t seem to like Britain’s nationalists either, because they’re more assertive than sissy conservatives it seems) because actually taking action is unconservative shows a degree of feebleness that literally makes my stomach turn (and yes, I do mean literally) (yeah I know this is a mean spirited comment but I had to get it off my chest…).

    • Agree: al gore rhythms
  43. @Drew
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I've been listening to the revolutions podcast by Mike Duncan. One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings. Consequently disaffected young people are eager to fight and destroy, figuring things can't get worse. This pretty much solves the broader problem of excess labor supply since a lot of working age people end up dead. I guess the main lesson I'd take away from history is that it's important for the government to be on the ball about managing labor supply. A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to and if no more than 20% of any generation (i.e. high school graduating class) went to college. There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @njguy73, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @RudyM, @anon, @Houston 1992, @Jus' Sayin'...

    Two words: Elite overproduction.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @njguy73

    Elite overproduction? Utterly ridiculous.

    Replies: @El Dato

    , @Hypnotoad666
    @njguy73

    Not to quibble, but "elite overproduction" seems like a misnomer since the whole point is that there aren't enough spaces for all the aspirants to actually be elite. "Overproduction of wannabe elites" would be more accurate. But I guess that doesn't have much of a ring to it.

    Replies: @njguy73

  44. The only institution not in favour is the police.

    Um, no, Whitey is the real enemy; police are a proxy.

  45. Cato says:

    Only the suicidal choose to be a martyr. Superior people choose to find the truth. Nietzsche can tell you all about it.

    We are all here because we figured some things out and found that other people who had figured things out were also here. The guy who organized this conclave deserves special credit, but the thing that drew all of us here was not him, but the truth. That’s it: none of us are important, but the truth matters, and our society is so much better off embracing the truth.

    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
  46. Ironically, “Ed West” is an anagram of “stewed”. Yet he’s one of the few that aren’t.

    Also, “Eds” used to seem rare in the UK, other than the occasional music hall “Eddie”, at least among those who caught the attention of Americans. It was always “Ted” or “Ned”.

    Now they’re all over the place– West, Sheeran, Miliband, Balls, Skrein… Is this because it now sounds “cool”, as Derb said about tw0-syllable names (as opposed to three) among young Chinese?

    Don’t kid yourselves, this isn’t 1968

    Certainly not musically.

  47. @Drew
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I've been listening to the revolutions podcast by Mike Duncan. One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings. Consequently disaffected young people are eager to fight and destroy, figuring things can't get worse. This pretty much solves the broader problem of excess labor supply since a lot of working age people end up dead. I guess the main lesson I'd take away from history is that it's important for the government to be on the ball about managing labor supply. A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to and if no more than 20% of any generation (i.e. high school graduating class) went to college. There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @njguy73, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @RudyM, @anon, @Houston 1992, @Jus' Sayin'...

    The Han Dynasty, which was the critical defining moment in Chinese civilization, was founded by some guys who while working under the insane Legalistic Ch’in Dynasty of the lunatic Shi Huang Ti, discovered they were condemned to death for petty bureaucratic reasons, figured they had nothing to lose, went for broke and took over the country.

    That being said, the maniacs Shang Yang, Li Ssu and Han Fei remain intellectual and cultural heroes of mine. But I also like Sun Ra records, so, grain of salt and so forth.

    • Replies: @Fidelios Automata
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Good point. Lessons of history are important, but the Left's too stupid to heed them. Eventually, they'll deplatform the wrong guy, perhaps an Italian with shirttail mob relatives. Or they'll cancel entire families of rednecks (getting more common, disemploying entire families for the sins of one of their members) creating closely-knit kin groups who have absolutely nothing to lose.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

  48. I admit that I read Steve Sailer’s blog. I realize I probably will not ever become president now (not even of La Raza or my HOA), nor an astronaut or surgeon. Or even able to follow my Olympic dreams. In fact, I will probably never even read for a part in Hollywood now. That’s clearly over.

    But I felt it important come out. Some like minded people (who also will never be: president, astronaut, surgeon, Olympian, or an actor/actress), told me “it gets better”. I sure hope they are right.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @OscarWildeLoveChild

    ???? You have a pseudonymous handle, and telling most NPCs "I read iSteve" is going to get blank stares. So whacchu talkin' bout?

    I'm still hiding. At work, I tell people things like "police shootings happen because of all the guns", which is kind of true (most dead suspects are armed) and doesn't actually call for any changes, but normie leftists hear "racist shit happens because the NRA supports the Second Amendment", so I don't get into arguments with people and don't have to go full mao mao. I'm not really proud of myself though.

    Replies: @Fidelios Automata

  49. @Almost Missouri
    @Jus' Sayin'...


    1968’s student protesters graduated into an economy that rewarded them richly for giving up their radical pretensions.
     
    That's a good point, but note that a hidden cost of absorbing those 1968 radicals into the Establishment was that the leaders of SDS becoming partners in Wall Street Law are now the corrupt and incompetent New Establishment whose ossified world views and sinecurial dead hands throttle more life from nation than their supposedly oppressive parents ever did.

    Mayor Daley did nothing wrong.

    Replies: @Kronos

    Mayor Daley did nothing wrong.

    According to Roger Stone’s Nixon book, Daley’s last words before dying were something akin to:

    “May God forgive me for stealing the 1960 election away from Nixon.”

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Kronos

    Good point. I should have said, "Mayor Daley did nothing wrong in 1968." 1960 is another story.

  50. @Drew
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I've been listening to the revolutions podcast by Mike Duncan. One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings. Consequently disaffected young people are eager to fight and destroy, figuring things can't get worse. This pretty much solves the broader problem of excess labor supply since a lot of working age people end up dead. I guess the main lesson I'd take away from history is that it's important for the government to be on the ball about managing labor supply. A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to and if no more than 20% of any generation (i.e. high school graduating class) went to college. There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @njguy73, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @RudyM, @anon, @Houston 1992, @Jus' Sayin'...

    A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to

    This is way too repressive. There are all sorts of reasons why people want to continuing working past that age, including financial need. I would much rather see a federal jobs guarantee program.

    • Replies: @Ben tillman
    @RudyM

    Why would you want people to be less productive? There’s no limit to the amount of work that can be done.

    Replies: @njguy73

    , @Alden
    @RudyM

    You know who’d get the jobs under any federal jobs program; black criminals right out of prison and nonWhite immigrants.

  51. SFG says:

    West’s ‘Small Men on the Wrong Side of History’ is a pretty good read, full of British humour (his dad gets out of a jam in South America by saying he’s a veteran of the Spanish Civil War…which was true, he just didn’t say which side) and actually seems pretty much like he would be an iSteve reader. Quite a bit of research on which personality types lean left or right gets cited, and he mentions Scott Alexander *seven times*.

    He’s a bit of a wimp by people here’s standards, I guess, but I enjoyed the book and would recommend it.

    • Replies: @fnn
    @SFG

    Wikipedia says Richard West was born in 1930, so he couldn't have been a veteran of the Spanish Civil War. But maybe in spirit. Many years ago, I read his obscure book Hurricane in Nicaragua, in which he was quite noticeably happy to run into Peter Kemp, an English volunteer who fought for the Franco side. Two of Kemp's books on his military career, which began with the Spanish Civil War, were recently brought back into print by Mystery Grove Publishing after many years.

    Replies: @LondonBob

  52. @Anonymous
    Insane Millennial Nonsense:

    https://theweek.com/articles/923326/hamilton-already-feels-outdated

    “Hamilton feels, anyway, like a relic from a different era. In a sense, it is: Lin-Manuel Miranda's Pulitzer Prize-winning musical emerged during the sunny optimism of the late Obama era, when empowering applause-lines like "immigrants, we get the job done!" were as much a part of the cultural zeitgeist as "I'm With Her" stickers and the push to get Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. “

    Replies: @Jane Plain, @anonymous

    • Replies: @Roderick Spode
    @Jane Plain

    Oh Jesus.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    , @Whiskey
    @Jane Plain

    Ok so theatre like movies and tv will be stunning and brave and all black all the time and no White people allowed.

    Broadway might as well just close forever. NYC is Taxi Driver anyways. And who will pay $50 for a matinee of Qyanushheee Splains Dat Sheeeeiiiiittttt.

  53. So what happens now? Will this clownshow only end when economic reality bites the graffitilariat in the ass and they die of starvation in a burnt-out subway station transformed into autogynormous zone?

  54. @OscarWildeLoveChild
    I admit that I read Steve Sailer's blog. I realize I probably will not ever become president now (not even of La Raza or my HOA), nor an astronaut or surgeon. Or even able to follow my Olympic dreams. In fact, I will probably never even read for a part in Hollywood now. That's clearly over.

    But I felt it important come out. Some like minded people (who also will never be: president, astronaut, surgeon, Olympian, or an actor/actress), told me "it gets better". I sure hope they are right.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    ???? You have a pseudonymous handle, and telling most NPCs “I read iSteve” is going to get blank stares. So whacchu talkin’ bout?

    I’m still hiding. At work, I tell people things like “police shootings happen because of all the guns”, which is kind of true (most dead suspects are armed) and doesn’t actually call for any changes, but normie leftists hear “racist shit happens because the NRA supports the Second Amendment”, so I don’t get into arguments with people and don’t have to go full mao mao. I’m not really proud of myself though.

    • Replies: @Fidelios Automata
    @Chrisnonymous

    I can't bring myself to spout nonsense like that, so I simply don't talk politics at work. Even two years ago, I didn't worry about it, but now... Funny, I remember a liberal coworker who used to bash Trump, but he'd also say stuff like "I have no sympathy for anyone who gets killed for being an idiot when dealing with the cops." Bet he doesn't say that anymore.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

  55. @San Fernando Curt
    @Clifford Brown

    Nothing stands in their way to do what?

    Actually, we stand in their way. And we're everything. Corrupt, preening politicians can't handle us any better than they can handle antifa, when push ever gets to shove. And I'm beginning to think it's inevitable.

    Replies: @Clifford Brown

    “We” are not an institution. “We” do not have the state sanctioned right to use violence. BLM and Antifa are state sanctioned violence supported by both political parties, the State Department, the globalist media, the Fortune 500, Silicon Valley, the CIA, the FBI, local Democratic city and state governments and the police. The radicals have strategically seized the District Attorney’s offices and the judges. This is a coup. Wake up.

    Your resistance will simply be wiped out while your opponents rule the streets.

    The Revolution will be declared over while law abiding Americans are still in lockdown. Our History has been rewritten, Our Politics have been redefined. Our Identity has been destroyed. The Revolution is happening in real time while normal Americans are social distancing.

    Their cause is morally weak, but they win if normal people do not play.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @Clifford Brown

    Correct. In order to do anything, you need organization. The left has all the institutions.

    What stops the resistance from forming counter-organizations? It's been done.

    Just be discreet about it. No running around waving guns.

  56. anon[383] • Disclaimer says:
    @Drew
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I've been listening to the revolutions podcast by Mike Duncan. One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings. Consequently disaffected young people are eager to fight and destroy, figuring things can't get worse. This pretty much solves the broader problem of excess labor supply since a lot of working age people end up dead. I guess the main lesson I'd take away from history is that it's important for the government to be on the ball about managing labor supply. A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to and if no more than 20% of any generation (i.e. high school graduating class) went to college. There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @njguy73, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @RudyM, @anon, @Houston 1992, @Jus' Sayin'...

    One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings.

    That’s been true since the 70’s, as far as working class men are concerned.

    There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    That’s been true in IT and tech since the 90’s.

    How’s that open-borders global plan working out for us now?

  57. @William Middleton
    @Joe Stalin

    Mark Steyn certainly reads Steve Sailer. He’s mentioned him on the Mark Steyn Show before (I believe two years ago).

    Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax

    He’s also referenced Steve’s “world’s most important graph” of sub-saharan Africa’s population growth over the next half century. Though I don’t think he’s mentioned it on TV and I don’t think he’s ever mentioned Sailer by name on Fox. Though Ann Coulter has, at least a couple of times that I’ve heard myself.

  58. @Drew
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I've been listening to the revolutions podcast by Mike Duncan. One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings. Consequently disaffected young people are eager to fight and destroy, figuring things can't get worse. This pretty much solves the broader problem of excess labor supply since a lot of working age people end up dead. I guess the main lesson I'd take away from history is that it's important for the government to be on the ball about managing labor supply. A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to and if no more than 20% of any generation (i.e. high school graduating class) went to college. There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @njguy73, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @RudyM, @anon, @Houston 1992, @Jus' Sayin'...

    engineers > 63 yo are often the last holders of disappearing skills, and are needed to impart them to the young
    Replacing 63 yo smug Boomers seems tempting , but their Millennial replacements will be worse and more lefty than they are….

  59. Anonymous[407] • Disclaimer says:
    @Michael S
    He's more or less right about the present, but has a terrible understanding of history.

    The 1968 "protests" were establishment to the bone, just like the 2020 riots. The only differences are, first of all, there was more than one establishment in 1968, and second, we didn't have the internet, so people couldn't connect it to elites as easily back then in real time. But every "grassroots" movement that actually succeeds is really an elite-on-elite offensive. And that goes back way farther than 1968.

    His handle on Stalinism isn't much better. The left doesn't actually want Stalin because Stalin ended the progression of leftism. What they want is more accurately described as somewhere between Pol Pot and Rwandan-style anarchy. And it's what they'll get unless stopped by a Stalin (or a Putin-like figure, if we're lucky).

    Replies: @Anonymous

    The 1968 “protests” were establishment to the bone, just like the 2020 riots. The only differences are, first of all, there was more than one establishment in 1968

    The Jews were the most powerful group by 1968.

  60. fnn says:
    @SFG
    West's 'Small Men on the Wrong Side of History' is a pretty good read, full of British humour (his dad gets out of a jam in South America by saying he's a veteran of the Spanish Civil War...which was true, he just didn't say which side) and actually seems pretty much like he would be an iSteve reader. Quite a bit of research on which personality types lean left or right gets cited, and he mentions Scott Alexander *seven times*.

    He's a bit of a wimp by people here's standards, I guess, but I enjoyed the book and would recommend it.

    Replies: @fnn

    Wikipedia says Richard West was born in 1930, so he couldn’t have been a veteran of the Spanish Civil War. But maybe in spirit. Many years ago, I read his obscure book Hurricane in Nicaragua, in which he was quite noticeably happy to run into Peter Kemp, an English volunteer who fought for the Franco side. Two of Kemp’s books on his military career, which began with the Spanish Civil War, were recently brought back into print by Mystery Grove Publishing after many years.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @fnn

    Yes Peter Kemp was the one who declared himself a veteran of the Spanish Civil War to calm down some Sandinistas, not mentioning it was the Carlist Requetes then Spanish Foreign Legion he was fighting with.

  61. @Clifford Brown

    The only institution not in favour is the police.
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xZjSNMfrK8

    The NYPD's flex against De Blasio at the funerals of NYPD Officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu during the last spasm of BLM violence in 2014 appeared to demonstrate that the NYPD still had power over the Mayor. However, the Democrats and De Blasio were playing the long game. At the cost of civil order and the economic future of New York City, De Blasio has avenged himself over the funeral disrespect from the NYPD. The only "conservative" institution left in the United States were the police unions and they have been completely and utterly decimated by this revolution.

    Every American city is now covered in ACAB, F12, 1312 and Kill Pigs graffiti. The planners of this coup knew well that the only organized, effective resistance they would face would be the local police and they carried out their assault brilliantly.

    Nothing now stands in their way.

    Replies: @San Fernando Curt, @Mr. Anon

    I haven’t seem much if any evidence that the police would stand up for ordinary conservative people. Some Sherriffs and their deputies might, but urban police? They only seem to stick up for themselves.

  62. @Jus' Sayin'...
    To me, the most frightening difference between the situation in 1968 and the present situation is that 1968's student protesters graduated into an economy that rewarded them richly for giving up their radical pretensions. The senior leader of SDS at Brandeis University in 1969, when I graduated, entered Harvard Law School and wound up a partner in a Wall Street Law firm. I myself had no trouble landing a plumb job as an actuarial trainee that paid a starting salary of some $65,000 (in today's dollars) with almost guaranteed annual increments of $10,000. When I left that job for grad school and got my Ph.D., my advisor provided me with several tenure track teaching options at first rank schools.

    Many of today's protesters are facing an extremely grim economic future. There is no incentive to tone down their disruptive behavior. They envision a bleak future for themselves unless there are radical changes in our society. That they are tools for elite globalists like Soros, Bezos and Gates does not concern them. Neither do they care that the changes they envision will only make things worse for themselves. In any event these changes will imiserate many of those whom they blame for their poor prospects, e.g., middle class boomers.

    A good economy damped the revolutionary fervor of 1968s rioters. No such damping is likely in the coming decades.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Drew, @Almost Missouri, @Fidelios Automata, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Ha ha, it’s just like saying transsexuals are “brave.” Now don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against transsexuals. I know a few of them personally. But coming out in a culture that celebrates your choices and in fact doesn’t tolerate the slightest criticism of them (ask J.K. Rowling) has nothing to do with bravery.

  63. @Chrisnonymous
    @OscarWildeLoveChild

    ???? You have a pseudonymous handle, and telling most NPCs "I read iSteve" is going to get blank stares. So whacchu talkin' bout?

    I'm still hiding. At work, I tell people things like "police shootings happen because of all the guns", which is kind of true (most dead suspects are armed) and doesn't actually call for any changes, but normie leftists hear "racist shit happens because the NRA supports the Second Amendment", so I don't get into arguments with people and don't have to go full mao mao. I'm not really proud of myself though.

    Replies: @Fidelios Automata

    I can’t bring myself to spout nonsense like that, so I simply don’t talk politics at work. Even two years ago, I didn’t worry about it, but now… Funny, I remember a liberal coworker who used to bash Trump, but he’d also say stuff like “I have no sympathy for anyone who gets killed for being an idiot when dealing with the cops.” Bet he doesn’t say that anymore.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @Fidelios Automata

    Yeah, I try to avoid talking politics, too, but I have a few co-workers who, I think, intentionally engage people when there is something like Floyd in the news to try to corral/flush out opinions. In that case, I give evasive answers as described.

  64. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Drew

    The Han Dynasty, which was the critical defining moment in Chinese civilization, was founded by some guys who while working under the insane Legalistic Ch'in Dynasty of the lunatic Shi Huang Ti, discovered they were condemned to death for petty bureaucratic reasons, figured they had nothing to lose, went for broke and took over the country.

    That being said, the maniacs Shang Yang, Li Ssu and Han Fei remain intellectual and cultural heroes of mine. But I also like Sun Ra records, so, grain of salt and so forth.

    Replies: @Fidelios Automata

    Good point. Lessons of history are important, but the Left’s too stupid to heed them. Eventually, they’ll deplatform the wrong guy, perhaps an Italian with shirttail mob relatives. Or they’ll cancel entire families of rednecks (getting more common, disemploying entire families for the sins of one of their members) creating closely-knit kin groups who have absolutely nothing to lose.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    @Fidelios Automata

    I'll just leave this here.

    https://www.scribd.com/document/89127086/Harold-Covington-The-Brigade

  65. @Anonymous
    https://theweek.com/articles/923326/hamilton-already-feels-outdated

    “ Hamilton feels, anyway, like a relic from a different era. In a sense, it is: Lin-Manuel Miranda's Pulitzer Prize-winning musical emerged during the sunny optimism of the late Obama era, when empowering applause-lines like "immigrants, we get the job done!" were as much a part of the cultural zeitgeist as "I'm With Her" stickers and the push to get Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. ”

    Author went to Bennington. Probably yelled at Charles Murray.

    Replies: @Peterike

    “Hamilton feels, anyway, like a relic from a different era.”

    Hamilton is dreadful crap. Nobody ever liked it as much as they said they did.

    • Replies: @Bumpkin
    @Peterike

    Never saw it, figured as much.

    Burr, on the other hand, is genius.

  66. @DextersLabRat
    @Aeronerauk

    Ann Coulter obviously reads him since they're both columnists for Taki Mag. Has she been blacklisted from mainstream media? She still has a Twitter account with 2.2m followers at least. That's more than a lot of people these days.

    Replies: @Known Fact

    She’s on WOR — NYC’s highest-rated radio station — every Wednesday morning for a 10-minute guest segment. Doesn’t get too much more mainstream than that.

  67. @Hockamaw
    The exponentially increasing speed with which the American system seems to be declining is really quite shocking to behold. I am quite sure there is no political solution to the intractable problems we have in this country now. The collapse of the Anglosphere in the 21st century is the central historical and cultural event of our lifetimes.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

    From the moon to the CHAZ in two generations.

    We could have had Star Trek: TNG, but instead we get Dirt Trek: TNB

    • LOL: El Dato
  68. @Fidelios Automata
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Good point. Lessons of history are important, but the Left's too stupid to heed them. Eventually, they'll deplatform the wrong guy, perhaps an Italian with shirttail mob relatives. Or they'll cancel entire families of rednecks (getting more common, disemploying entire families for the sins of one of their members) creating closely-knit kin groups who have absolutely nothing to lose.

    Replies: @BenKenobi

  69. @Jus' Sayin'...
    To me, the most frightening difference between the situation in 1968 and the present situation is that 1968's student protesters graduated into an economy that rewarded them richly for giving up their radical pretensions. The senior leader of SDS at Brandeis University in 1969, when I graduated, entered Harvard Law School and wound up a partner in a Wall Street Law firm. I myself had no trouble landing a plumb job as an actuarial trainee that paid a starting salary of some $65,000 (in today's dollars) with almost guaranteed annual increments of $10,000. When I left that job for grad school and got my Ph.D., my advisor provided me with several tenure track teaching options at first rank schools.

    Many of today's protesters are facing an extremely grim economic future. There is no incentive to tone down their disruptive behavior. They envision a bleak future for themselves unless there are radical changes in our society. That they are tools for elite globalists like Soros, Bezos and Gates does not concern them. Neither do they care that the changes they envision will only make things worse for themselves. In any event these changes will imiserate many of those whom they blame for their poor prospects, e.g., middle class boomers.

    A good economy damped the revolutionary fervor of 1968s rioters. No such damping is likely in the coming decades.

    Replies: @Reg Cæsar, @Drew, @Almost Missouri, @Fidelios Automata, @Citizen of a Silly Country

    The CivNat is strong in this one.

    Hey, Boomer, you might notice another slight difference between now and 1968: the demographics of the country.

    Maybe the most frightening thing now compared to 1968 is the fact that my children are minorities in their age group and will be severely discriminated against.

    But, oh please, let’s all bow to the great God economy. If only the economy was better, everything would be fine.

    Do you even think about family? I’d rather earn half of what I earn and l live with my own kind.

    What is wrong with you people?

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Of course I know that uncontrolled borders has played a role in destabilizing the USA. I was focusing on one issue. There are many I could have discussed. But I do appreciate your bringing this up despite your hostile attitude.

    , @Anonymous
    @Citizen of a Silly Country


    Do you even think about family? I’d rather earn half of what I earn and l live with my own kind.
     
    What do you mean by this?
  70. and the Great Awokening of which they are part of

    Seriously?!

  71. @Jane Plain
    @Anonymous

    https://www.weseeyouwat.com/

    Replies: @Roderick Spode, @Whiskey

    Oh Jesus.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @Roderick Spode

    Tell me about it.

    Happy Fourth!

    Replies: @Roderick Spode

  72. ’68 seems like a paradise compared to 2020…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @JohnnyD


    ’68 seems like a paradise compared to 2020…
     
    Uhhh... far better music back then, but the same 20-something year old twits telling their betters that "it's different this time!" Same old cult shit. Young folks love cults, since growing up means facing the chaos, and chaos terrifies young minds. Joining some stupid group with "special" insights offsets the terror.

    Free love meant no accountability. Mobbing up implicitly means no accountability. No accountability allows you to put off being an individual.

    Same dog: simple-minded existential terror, different fleas.

    https://youtu.be/vm6DvlZ2O20

  73. @Jane Plain
    @Anonymous

    https://www.weseeyouwat.com/

    Replies: @Roderick Spode, @Whiskey

    Ok so theatre like movies and tv will be stunning and brave and all black all the time and no White people allowed.

    Broadway might as well just close forever. NYC is Taxi Driver anyways. And who will pay $50 for a matinee of Qyanushheee Splains Dat Sheeeeiiiiittttt.

  74. @njguy73
    @Drew

    Two words: Elite overproduction.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Hypnotoad666

    Elite overproduction? Utterly ridiculous.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    @Ben tillman

    It's not "overproduction BY elites", it's "overproduction OF elites".

    Replies: @ben tillman

  75. @RudyM
    @Drew


    A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to
     
    This is way too repressive. There are all sorts of reasons why people want to continuing working past that age, including financial need. I would much rather see a federal jobs guarantee program.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Alden

    Why would you want people to be less productive? There’s no limit to the amount of work that can be done.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @Ben tillman

    Of course there's always work to be done. The question is, who profits off it? Individual citizens acting freely, or governments directing dependent clients?

  76. Anonymous[186] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyD
    '68 seems like a paradise compared to 2020...

    Replies: @Anonymous

    ’68 seems like a paradise compared to 2020…

    Uhhh… far better music back then, but the same 20-something year old twits telling their betters that “it’s different this time!” Same old cult shit. Young folks love cults, since growing up means facing the chaos, and chaos terrifies young minds. Joining some stupid group with “special” insights offsets the terror.

    Free love meant no accountability. Mobbing up implicitly means no accountability. No accountability allows you to put off being an individual.

    Same dog: simple-minded existential terror, different fleas.

  77. anonymous[421] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    Insane Millennial Nonsense:

    https://theweek.com/articles/923326/hamilton-already-feels-outdated

    “Hamilton feels, anyway, like a relic from a different era. In a sense, it is: Lin-Manuel Miranda's Pulitzer Prize-winning musical emerged during the sunny optimism of the late Obama era, when empowering applause-lines like "immigrants, we get the job done!" were as much a part of the cultural zeitgeist as "I'm With Her" stickers and the push to get Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. “

    Replies: @Jane Plain, @anonymous

    The black people of color were still selling out movie theaters showing Tyler Perry’s latest productions when Lin’s stage-play was all the rage.

    Tyler Perry got his start writing and producing stage-plays that drew in huge crowds of black people and only black people.

  78. @njguy73
    @Drew

    Two words: Elite overproduction.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Hypnotoad666

    Not to quibble, but “elite overproduction” seems like a misnomer since the whole point is that there aren’t enough spaces for all the aspirants to actually be elite. “Overproduction of wannabe elites” would be more accurate. But I guess that doesn’t have much of a ring to it.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @Hypnotoad666

    OK, how about "intellectual overproduction?" Or "overproduction of over-educated individuals?"

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

  79. @fnn
    @SFG

    Wikipedia says Richard West was born in 1930, so he couldn't have been a veteran of the Spanish Civil War. But maybe in spirit. Many years ago, I read his obscure book Hurricane in Nicaragua, in which he was quite noticeably happy to run into Peter Kemp, an English volunteer who fought for the Franco side. Two of Kemp's books on his military career, which began with the Spanish Civil War, were recently brought back into print by Mystery Grove Publishing after many years.

    Replies: @LondonBob

    Yes Peter Kemp was the one who declared himself a veteran of the Spanish Civil War to calm down some Sandinistas, not mentioning it was the Carlist Requetes then Spanish Foreign Legion he was fighting with.

  80. @Ben tillman
    @njguy73

    Elite overproduction? Utterly ridiculous.

    Replies: @El Dato

    It’s not “overproduction BY elites”, it’s “overproduction OF elites”.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    @El Dato

    I know. I just don't buy the claim.

  81. “Aside from the demented president…”

    So, who is this Ed West person?

  82. @Aeronerauk
    Tucker definitely reads you, and more importantly, agrees with you on a lot of things.

    I'd say Ann Coulter but she's been banished to obscurity. You legitimately might have more influence than ol' Ironsides Ann. She's evidence of what happens when you push a little too hard with the iSteve/paleocon views.

    Replies: @DextersLabRat, @Anonymous, @The Wild Geese Howard, @Cloudbuster

    She hasn’t been banished from mainstream media, but she has been banished from the Conservatism, Inc. publications that nobody on the right cares about anymore.

  83. I had for a long time of my life wondered about the best way of resistance – the way of resistance which can be kept up over decades without becoming exhausted.
    I became a Sailer addict mostly because I found the answer here: a position of mild sarcasm, aloofness and world-wise-ness. Now, this alone could in the end make a man world-weary and/or blasé, but the counterweight is a thread of real compassion where compassion is at its place, combined with a preparedness to make real proposals for the improvement of society, even if there is not much chance they will be heard or adopted. “Stay well-meaning, but don’t get overly involved” is the formula.
    I still visit iSteve regularly in order to stay in the mood.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    @Stogumber


    but the counterweight is a thread of real compassion where compassion is at its place, combined with a preparedness to make real proposals for the improvement of society
     
    What does this mean?
  84. So I dont have a job because I read this blog? And here I thought I’ve been not working because the panic virus shutdown.

  85. @Fidelios Automata
    @Chrisnonymous

    I can't bring myself to spout nonsense like that, so I simply don't talk politics at work. Even two years ago, I didn't worry about it, but now... Funny, I remember a liberal coworker who used to bash Trump, but he'd also say stuff like "I have no sympathy for anyone who gets killed for being an idiot when dealing with the cops." Bet he doesn't say that anymore.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    Yeah, I try to avoid talking politics, too, but I have a few co-workers who, I think, intentionally engage people when there is something like Floyd in the news to try to corral/flush out opinions. In that case, I give evasive answers as described.

  86. @Roderick Spode
    @Jane Plain

    Oh Jesus.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    Tell me about it.

    Happy Fourth!

    • Replies: @Roderick Spode
    @Jane Plain

    You too Jane

  87. @Reg Cæsar
    @Jus' Sayin'...


    I myself had no trouble landing a plumb job
     
    Those used to pay, better than academia did, back in the day.


    https://lirp-cdn.multiscreensite.com/ca3e9c82c0054ec185f3363f4f17afc0/dms3rep/multi/opt/plumb1-640w.png

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'...

    I guess I’d turned off my internal spell checker 😉

  88. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    The CivNat is strong in this one.

    Hey, Boomer, you might notice another slight difference between now and 1968: the demographics of the country.

    Maybe the most frightening thing now compared to 1968 is the fact that my children are minorities in their age group and will be severely discriminated against.

    But, oh please, let's all bow to the great God economy. If only the economy was better, everything would be fine.

    Do you even think about family? I'd rather earn half of what I earn and l live with my own kind.

    What is wrong with you people?

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Anonymous

    Of course I know that uncontrolled borders has played a role in destabilizing the USA. I was focusing on one issue. There are many I could have discussed. But I do appreciate your bringing this up despite your hostile attitude.

  89. @Drew
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    I've been listening to the revolutions podcast by Mike Duncan. One thing nearly all revolutions have in common is poor financial and economic prospects for twenty-somethings. Consequently disaffected young people are eager to fight and destroy, figuring things can't get worse. This pretty much solves the broader problem of excess labor supply since a lot of working age people end up dead. I guess the main lesson I'd take away from history is that it's important for the government to be on the ball about managing labor supply. A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to and if no more than 20% of any generation (i.e. high school graduating class) went to college. There are a lot of young people expecting to have white collar work, but the supply of workers outstrips demand.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @njguy73, @The Germ Theory of Disease, @RudyM, @anon, @Houston 1992, @Jus' Sayin'...

  90. @El Dato
    @Ben tillman

    It's not "overproduction BY elites", it's "overproduction OF elites".

    Replies: @ben tillman

    I know. I just don’t buy the claim.

  91. @Kronos
    @Almost Missouri


    Mayor Daley did nothing wrong.
     
    According to Roger Stone’s Nixon book, Daley’s last words before dying were something akin to:

    “May God forgive me for stealing the 1960 election away from Nixon.”

    https://www.amazon.com/Nixons-Secrets-Untold-President-Watergate-ebook/dp/B00L4FSW1E

    Replies: @Almost Missouri

    Good point. I should have said, “Mayor Daley did nothing wrong in 1968.” 1960 is another story.

  92. Anonymous[238] • Disclaimer says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    The CivNat is strong in this one.

    Hey, Boomer, you might notice another slight difference between now and 1968: the demographics of the country.

    Maybe the most frightening thing now compared to 1968 is the fact that my children are minorities in their age group and will be severely discriminated against.

    But, oh please, let's all bow to the great God economy. If only the economy was better, everything would be fine.

    Do you even think about family? I'd rather earn half of what I earn and l live with my own kind.

    What is wrong with you people?

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @Anonymous

    Do you even think about family? I’d rather earn half of what I earn and l live with my own kind.

    What do you mean by this?

  93. @Peterike
    @Anonymous

    “Hamilton feels, anyway, like a relic from a different era.”

    Hamilton is dreadful crap. Nobody ever liked it as much as they said they did.

    Replies: @Bumpkin

    Never saw it, figured as much.

    Burr, on the other hand, is genius.

  94. @Kronos
    I’d argue that the riots of 2020 are more of a response to preserve the existing status quo established in 1968. With the continued demise of the Boomer Yuppies, issues that were once sacrosanct (abortion, free trade) are now potentially in peril. 2020 might become the Battle of Stalingrad for the cultural revolutionaries and financial elites. That they’ll actually decline in terms of political clout.

    1968 seemed like a masterstroke covert operation to destroy the New Deal coalition that provided high paying jobs for both blue collar and white collar workers alike. Elites collaborated with demographic groups like Blacks and Women to destroy the economic gains made under FDR. Both Blacks and Women are entirely dependent on aggressive government programs that provide “protected group” status and thus superior citizenship.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protected_group

    Feminism destroyed the living wage and elites are still pleased with that. Blacks drove out the pesky Catholic ethnics and their political machinery (unions.) Blacks were consequently granted special respect and privileges. Both are groups that can’t function independently and thus viable political pawns.

    Thus 2020 is a battle for keeps. The “revolutionaries” are in fact highly reactionary. The rise of Trump and Sanders are testaments to that political development.

    Replies: @James Bowery

    “Protected groups” are the modern holders of priestly sinecures from the supremacist theocracy — their “victimhood” entitling to the sacral lineage of the Crucifixion.

    The Thirty Years War dealt with that at least to some extent and it was a bargain at only 25% of the population dead.

  95. @Ben tillman
    @RudyM

    Why would you want people to be less productive? There’s no limit to the amount of work that can be done.

    Replies: @njguy73

    Of course there’s always work to be done. The question is, who profits off it? Individual citizens acting freely, or governments directing dependent clients?

  96. @Hypnotoad666
    @njguy73

    Not to quibble, but "elite overproduction" seems like a misnomer since the whole point is that there aren't enough spaces for all the aspirants to actually be elite. "Overproduction of wannabe elites" would be more accurate. But I guess that doesn't have much of a ring to it.

    Replies: @njguy73

    OK, how about “intellectual overproduction?” Or “overproduction of over-educated individuals?”

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    @njguy73


    OK, how about “intellectual overproduction?” Or “overproduction of over-educated individuals?”
     
    I'd go with "Surplus Pseudo-Intellectuals."

    Replies: @njguy73

  97. Drew says:
    @Almost Missouri
    @Drew

    Ctrl-F "migra"

    Replies: @Drew

    Immigration isn’t as big a deal as you think. Most migrants are low-skilled (think Mexican day laborers), and most millennials going into tech these days are focused on marketing, not hardware and coding. Most millennials are expecting to be managers, not laborers, which is why curtailing college admissions and forced retirements would work better than curtailing immigration. Do you really think a college-educated 20-something is clamoring for a factory job or working in a field?

  98. @Jane Plain
    @Roderick Spode

    Tell me about it.

    Happy Fourth!

    Replies: @Roderick Spode

    You too Jane

  99. @RudyM
    @Drew


    A lot of problems could have been avoided right now if all Americans were mandated to retire at 63 regardless of whether they wanted to
     
    This is way too repressive. There are all sorts of reasons why people want to continuing working past that age, including financial need. I would much rather see a federal jobs guarantee program.

    Replies: @Ben tillman, @Alden

    You know who’d get the jobs under any federal jobs program; black criminals right out of prison and nonWhite immigrants.

  100. If you espouse conventional anti-racism, like Ta-Nehisi Coates, you get paid $41,500 to speak for 40 minutes and showered with plaudits and approval. In contrast, perhaps the most interesting critic of mainstream thinking, Steve Sailer, is relegated to a hugely obscure blog and has to beg readers to keep him going

    Gold sinks, but shit floats.

    N.S. Khrushchev

  101. Anonymous[208] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stogumber
    I had for a long time of my life wondered about the best way of resistance - the way of resistance which can be kept up over decades without becoming exhausted.
    I became a Sailer addict mostly because I found the answer here: a position of mild sarcasm, aloofness and world-wise-ness. Now, this alone could in the end make a man world-weary and/or blasé, but the counterweight is a thread of real compassion where compassion is at its place, combined with a preparedness to make real proposals for the improvement of society, even if there is not much chance they will be heard or adopted. "Stay well-meaning, but don't get overly involved" is the formula.
    I still visit iSteve regularly in order to stay in the mood.

    Replies: @Anonymous

    but the counterweight is a thread of real compassion where compassion is at its place, combined with a preparedness to make real proposals for the improvement of society

    What does this mean?

  102. @Percy Gryce
    It is indeed a sin of the current moment that Steve doesn't have a sinecure or endowed perch somewhere.

    Replies: @Jus' Sayin'..., @njguy73, @John Derbyshire

    “In a sane republic, Steve would have some highly-paid position advising the government, or a professorship in social science at some prestigious university. In the nation we actually live in, Steve can only be a guerrilla intellectual, emerging from the maquis now and then to take a few sniping shots at what George Orwell — Steve’s greatest hero, and mine — called “the smelly little orthodoxies which are now contending for our souls.” https://tinyurl.com/y4clk5cv

    • Agree: Percy Gryce
  103. @anon
    I hate to say I told you so, but ... I told you so. I got into an exchange with Ron Unz on this site a couple of years ago and most people took his side. My thesis at the time was that we're seeing something develop unlike anything in the past; the current era is fundamentally different with the potential to explode into something really horrible at any moment. Ron argued it wasn't a big deal because the 1960s were worse. At the time, he was technically correct, but my argument was that the underlying foundation was worse and getting worse every day. We see that on the streets of America now. Something is badly wrong.

    In short, my argument:

    The nation's demographics have changed to the point where sociopathic, social climbing white leftists have to signal ever harder that they are on the rising minority's side in order to maintain power and influence. They do this by casting themselves (and POC) as victims of white core Americans, which is totally fictional. This has created the conditions for racial hate and even class warfare against the middle class and the poor ("you don't even have a college degree" guy in NYC). Conservatives, who see little need to do the same, have remained politically much where they were in the 1990s, maybe even as far back as the mid 1980s, sans only a couple of issues like gay marriage. They are stunned that they've been repaid for their good natured efforts to include other races with scorn and hatred. Where is it coming from, they think? It's coming from the wealthy white upperclass, the people who care first and foremost about power and keeping it for themselves.

    This means that white Americans won't be okay in a diversifying America. A counter argument at the time was "whites in California still run the place." I pointed out that white leftists were terrible people and that California would be better off with a conservative Hispanic democrat as governor over an SJW white liberal. Because white liberals are going off the rails, simply having someone with the same skin color as your own doesn't matter as much as you might think. White leftists hate white conservatives even more than most other demographics, even blacks (80% of these BLM protesters aren't black; a majority are probably white liberal upper middle-class suburban kids).

    Replies: @cynthia curran

    Most don’t come from the suburbs. In California. whites in the suburbs are old think Marin County or Mission Viejo. Most Antifa brats came from the big cities think San Francisco, West La, San Diego, and Sacramento. In fact a recent interview shows the Democrats carrying large cities in the US by 35 percent amd suburbs by 10 percent. Suburbs are older than large cities’ In fact New York City has 6.3 percent of the population 5 and under Its the while Long Island is 4.5 percent. In fact lilberqal parents are rising their kids now in large cities not suburbs. In fact, Antifa lives in cities over 500,000 and doesn’t like cities like Mission Viejo. Take LM where most the protest were in La not Huntington Beach. Huntington Beach largest BLM group was 300 due to couter protesters while LA City was 10,000. In fact lots of the conservative hispanics made up about 30 percent of the BLM protest in La and about 90 percent of the BLM protest in Santa Ana. Santa Ana even had Antifa and they were not white. Fireworks were set to the cops in Santa Ana which is what antifa does. Not in Huntington Beach or Newport Beach.

  104. @njguy73
    @Hypnotoad666

    OK, how about "intellectual overproduction?" Or "overproduction of over-educated individuals?"

    Replies: @Hypnotoad666

    OK, how about “intellectual overproduction?” Or “overproduction of over-educated individuals?”

    I’d go with “Surplus Pseudo-Intellectuals.”

    • Replies: @njguy73
    @Hypnotoad666

    "Surplus pseudo-intellectualls" it is.

    Steve, you might want to go with this one.

  105. @Hypnotoad666
    @njguy73


    OK, how about “intellectual overproduction?” Or “overproduction of over-educated individuals?”
     
    I'd go with "Surplus Pseudo-Intellectuals."

    Replies: @njguy73

    “Surplus pseudo-intellectualls” it is.

    Steve, you might want to go with this one.

  106. @Clifford Brown
    @San Fernando Curt

    "We" are not an institution. "We" do not have the state sanctioned right to use violence. BLM and Antifa are state sanctioned violence supported by both political parties, the State Department, the globalist media, the Fortune 500, Silicon Valley, the CIA, the FBI, local Democratic city and state governments and the police. The radicals have strategically seized the District Attorney's offices and the judges. This is a coup. Wake up.

    Your resistance will simply be wiped out while your opponents rule the streets.

    The Revolution will be declared over while law abiding Americans are still in lockdown. Our History has been rewritten, Our Politics have been redefined. Our Identity has been destroyed. The Revolution is happening in real time while normal Americans are social distancing.

    Their cause is morally weak, but they win if normal people do not play.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    Correct. In order to do anything, you need organization. The left has all the institutions.

    What stops the resistance from forming counter-organizations? It’s been done.

    Just be discreet about it. No running around waving guns.

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