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USA Has a Big Murder Problem with Handguns But a Small Murder Problem with Rifles
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From FBI crime statistics for the 71% of murder victims of 2014-2018 (sample size 49,808) for which there is a known and specified weapon:

Murder Victims 2014-2018
Known weapons 100.0%
Handguns 64.1%
Rifles 2.9%
Shotguns 2.5%
Knives or cutting instruments 15.6%
Blunt objects (clubs, hammers, etc.) 4.5%
Personal weapons (hands, fists, feet, etc.)1 6.7%
Poison 0.1%
Explosives 0.0%
Fire 0.7%
Narcotics 0.9%
Drowning 0.1%
Strangulation 0.9%
Asphyxiation 1.0%

Murder victims are 22 times more likely to be killed with a handgun as with a rifle, but most of the gun control energy in recent years has been paid to rifles.

 
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  1. Of course they are, Steve. That’s the Narrative. Didn’t you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there’s a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn’t it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    • Replies: @PseudoNhymm
    And Virginia? Where a bunch of blue state elites took over and are forcing the rural counties to disarm, 95% of which disagree. Do they all just pack up and move to Texas? And when Texas turns blue in 8 years, do they move again? At what point is an inalienable right inalienable?
    , @MBlanc46
    The Founders thought of that. It didn’t take.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    A Constitutional Republic doesn't work like that.
    , @RichardTaylor

    Joking aside, there’s a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be.
     
    In theory, that's a possibility. The problem is, the Left is eager to ban guns nationwide, so we have to be hyper-vigilant. But yes, if you live in an areas with a problem population, you might rationally choose that. I believe gun ownership to Blacks used to be severely limited.

    But any slack we give the Left, they will just use to demand more.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    America is a big place. Isn’t it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away?
     
    Huh? Population density should have no bearing on fundamental rights.

    In fact, legal carrying of handguns can be especially justified based on violent crime rates in urban areas. Are you against shall-issue/Constitutional legal concealed carry for NYC residents?


    Joking aside, there’s a simple solution to the whole gun control issue:
     
    Right. Fully restore the 2nd Amendment to all areas of the USA. The Bill of Rights applies to all law-abiding (adult) residents within said territory, through incorporation and the Privileges or Immunities Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

    Don’t be Jack D, who was unclear on the legal preeminence of the BoR:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/have-white-men-committed-the-majority-of-the-521-mass-shootings-since-orlando/#comment-2032228 (#393)

    Just for fun, here’s me and Reg Cæsar arguing about the Fourteenth:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/beto-pledges-to-sharpton-to-pass-reparations-bill/#comment-3140526 (#63)

    , @Bill Jones
    " Our house, our rules"

    I have strict criteria for who I allow into my house.

    How does that work for you?
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    I like the idea. I will submit the following law to my local town board:

    "No negro or mulatto whatsoever, shall keep or carry any gun, powder, shot, club or other weapon whatsoever, offensive or defensive, but all and every gun weapon and ammunition found in the possession or custody of any negro or mulatto, may be seized by any person, and upon due proof thereof made before any justice of the peace of the district where such seizure shall be, shall by his order be forfeited to the seizor, for his own use."
    , @Wilmingtonian
    For those of us who commute into a big city that is politically controlled by the Left's vote banks (which is approximately all of them), letting cities enact their own firearm regulations is a non-starter. We all know what happens: first thing the city council does is disarm the commuters, your state-issued CCW permit is no good here. And yes, we have a database of CCW holders and their license plates, for officer safety, don't you know, so your fender-bender or targeted enforcement speeding citation turns into jail time if you ignore the ordinance, and having a CCW license means you get a search of your car and a patdown if you ever interact with a cop. (Of course, if you follow the city's ordinance, you might pay the Reginald Denny tax, so choose wisely.)

    If your region has a lot of municipalities around the big Leftist city, they all adopt different asinine regulations that add up to no realistic possibility of compliance. City 1 says no magazines >10 rounds, city 2 says no mags >8 rounds, city 3 says no hollow-point bullets, city 4 says no night sights, city 5 says revolvers are fine but semiautos are bad, city 6 bans anything over .380 caliber, city 7 bans anything centerfire, and by the way you have to drive through all of them to get to and from work, or just going about your daily life.

    Then there's enforcement on the interstate. Drive through our town, even at 65 mph with no intention of stopping, follow our rules. The patchwork-of-municipalities problem above is now nationwide.

    This is what will happen, because it's what has happened, and why NRA-ILA spent so much time pushing statewide preemption of local firearm regulation. The incentives pushing urban pols to do this haven't gone away.
    , @Jonathan Mason

    Isn’t it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away?
     
    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.

    Another way to apply your theory would be to allow guns only to non felons who are married homeowners or mortgagees. Anyone selling or gifting a gun to a felon, incel, or a renter or homeless person would automatically be guilty of a felony and this would be a strict liability offense.

    All gun sales would have to be sold with third party liability insurance, just like when you rent a car.

    This could be started as a trial project in one small state, say Maryland, to see if it reduces the number of murders, and then rolled out over larger areas if effective.

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting, so they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.

    , @njguy73


    Oh, I see. You want to let states have rights.

    So you want to bring back slavery, too?

    What are you, a racist?

    , @Yngvar

    If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there
     
    But they do. Chicago as an example has very restrictive gun laws. (After Heller they were forced to allow individuals to own handguns, but they required anyone applying for a permit to take a gun safety course at a gun range within city jurisdiction. And then no permits for opening a gun range was given.) The Alders claim handguns brought in illegally from adjoining districts is the cause of the mayhem, but that fails to explain why there is no such turmoil in those adjoining districts.

    Stop-and-frisk is the only way to curb killings in some neighborhoods.
    , @J1234
    Nebulafox is more correct than many of you who responded to him. The recognition of regional culture is one of the more important, yet less explicit, elements in our form of government as well as in the founding of our country. The importance of regional culture even reveals itself in the name of our country (to one degree or another): "The United States." Why use the concept of states as a foundation for a national identity? It's more than just being an evolutionary step from the Articles of Confederation, which were more in the vein of a treaty between states than a form of governance.

    One of the main problems that colonists had with the Crown and Parliament was representation; not just the absence of representation, but the nature of representation, when it existed. Many representatives of the colonies in Parliament had never even visited the colonies, let alone lived there. Three thousand miles of ocean and 170 years of salutary neglect (in one form or another, to one degree or another) had resulted in a colonial culture that was different from the culture of England, and that was a source of contention with the colonists. The founders wanted to address this "rule from afar" problem when forming their new secessionist polity...hence, maintaining colonial identities (which colonists had long been loyal to) as states.

    The thing is - as many of you rightly point out - there's also a national legal culture and tradition in the US that recognizes (for the time being) essential rights of individual citizens at the federal level, and protects them with constitutional authority. The supremacy clause correctly puts those rights ahead of state laws, but you have to ask yourself these questions: Why does the US Constitution allow states to have their own constitution? Why does the US Constitution allow those state constitutions to have their own wording and interpretation of the Second Amendment? (By my count, more than half the states have their own interpretation of the Second Amendment, some of which seem to be more restrictive than the wording in the Bill of Rights.)

    The answer to those questions is, in a word, culture. Should North Dakota or South Carolina be required to have the same obscenity laws (First Amendment) or alcohol laws as California? I don't think so. Even if those laws might become more uniform as time goes on, it should be the state's prerogative. Culture is too important, but there has to be a delicate dance between the rights of individuals and the rights of regional cultures to exist. Not an easy path to follow. Dodge City, KS in the 19th century could tell people to turn over their firearms when entering the city limits, and that was probably an appropriate thing to do because it probably wasn't part of coordinated national or statewide effort to nullify the Second Amendment. I'm guessing the new Virginia policy probably is.

    The NRA (which I'm a supporting member of) has been effective in getting concealed carry laws passed in most states. I support that effort and have a permit myself, but I also have to recognize that localities have the right to be different from the nation at large in terms of values and priorities, even when those values and priorities lean to the left. There's a necessary balancing act, and just because the left has dedicated itself to cultural destruction and a profound lack of balance through radicalism doesn't mean the right should also forsake the concept of culture in retaliation. It's for this reason I didn't support the national reciprocity law endorsed by the NRA a while back.

  2. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    And Virginia? Where a bunch of blue state elites took over and are forcing the rural counties to disarm, 95% of which disagree. Do they all just pack up and move to Texas? And when Texas turns blue in 8 years, do they move again? At what point is an inalienable right inalienable?

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, TWS
    • Replies: @Mr McKenna

    Do they all just pack up and move to Texas?
     
    No, they just join with their compatriots in the mountains.
    Did you not see this?

    West Virginia Lawmakers Invite Virginia Counties Fed Up With Gun Control to Secede

    The offer to the counties of western Virginia ought to be fulfilled without any issue beyond a plebiscite. If freedom means anything at all, it means freedom of association–for both people and polities.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/white-virginia-is-rising-west-virginia-one-of-americas-whitest-states-offers-overwhelmingly-white-virginia-counties-declaring-themselves-2nd-amendment-sanctuaries-the-opportunity-for-secession-fr/

    , @nebulafox
    Hence the word "localities". Think about it: does it make sense to govern upstate New York by the same rules as NYC?

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.

    , @Obamahotep
    Texas has the right to bear arms codified in its state constitution. The state would have to do a lot more than turn blue to get rid of RKBA.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    At what point is an inalienable right inalienable?
     
    It becomes quite alienable when you apply it to peoples for whom it was never meant, and those people grow to be a majority.
  3. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    The Founders thought of that. It didn’t take.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  4. Cracking down on handguns would require law enforcement to crack down on negroes. Cracking down on negroes is bad publicity. Politicians, bureaucrats, and media honchos know this.

    Easier to invent a crisis (like frat boy campus rape culture) than to honestly deal with one (college negro athletes raping white coeds on campus.)

    • Agree: Bubba, Kronos, fish
    • Replies: @Kronos
    Gun control organizations/policies were initially designed to limit gun access to blacks so to curb black-on-black gun violence. Which during the 1980s and 1990s reached its crescendo in the big cities.

    https://youtu.be/J4sKiGkzKJo

    The majority of urban white liberals never went hunting or enjoyed recreational shooting so gun restriction was a low impact self-governing policy. But in rural areas shooting was/is a staple of family life. Thus, you had potential compromises on laws that cracked down on handguns and rifles remained minimally restricted.

    But the Democratic Party’s “Coalition of the Fringes” isn’t doing too well (ask Hillary.) It needs black votes to remain at 90% levels for Democratic candidates to win nationally. So Democratic leaders on the national level are likely steering the anti-gun lobby machine toward rural areas to avoid showdowns with urban black leaderships. Thankfully, school shootings are extremely rare. But it gives the anti-gun lobby something to use against whites other than black gang violence. (Which strangely enough, make whites want to arm themselves.) So they go after targets that are so exceptionally rare it’s newsworthy.

    https://youtu.be/uel1vfAQ52M

    , @PiltdownMan
    The FBI puts out some variant of this table every year.

    Murder Race, Ethnicity, and Sex of Victim by Race, Ethnicity, and Sex of Offender, 2016 (Single victim,single offender)

    https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/tables/expanded-homicide-data-table-3.xls

     

    , @hardbargin
    Could not have said it any better. The truth right there!
    , @CrunchyButRealistCon
    Funny thing, but the Elites see the high IQ ethnostate of Japan as a role model for enlightened gun control. No mention of Japan being a homogeneous, high achieving, low violence nation to begin with. Noticed that Jake Adelstein was quoted in the story. More intra-Hive circlejerkery. Adelstein was noted recently for articles which fete the half-Haitian, half-Japanese Tennis star "Osaka" and why Japan needs more diversity & immigration.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-38365729
  5. @PseudoNhymm
    And Virginia? Where a bunch of blue state elites took over and are forcing the rural counties to disarm, 95% of which disagree. Do they all just pack up and move to Texas? And when Texas turns blue in 8 years, do they move again? At what point is an inalienable right inalienable?

    Do they all just pack up and move to Texas?

    No, they just join with their compatriots in the mountains.
    Did you not see this?

    West Virginia Lawmakers Invite Virginia Counties Fed Up With Gun Control to Secede

    The offer to the counties of western Virginia ought to be fulfilled without any issue beyond a plebiscite. If freedom means anything at all, it means freedom of association–for both people and polities.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/white-virginia-is-rising-west-virginia-one-of-americas-whitest-states-offers-overwhelmingly-white-virginia-counties-declaring-themselves-2nd-amendment-sanctuaries-the-opportunity-for-secession-fr/

    • Replies: @Prof. Woland
    The next frontier will be larger darker political entities annexing smaller whiter ones so they can grab the revenues. The need is insatiable and as long as there are resources to be plundered liberals will continue to try and get their hands on them.

    For me, living in the affluent suburbs, just the absence of problems is enough. The truth is our roads are no better than the closest city, the schools are physically no better, we have fewer cops, and so forth. They are not really necessary for success or happiness. It is almost that our well being is measured by what we don't have not by what we do.
    , @newrouter
    I'd like to see one of the Va counties on the WVa border do it. Just to see if a preference cascade follows.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    The big gun rally is tomorrow in Richmond. I've said it before, and I'll say it again: there's power in numbers. If there are 10,000 gun-rights supporters out, they cannot be Charlottesvilled like a few dozen can.
    , @Twinkie
    This is a goofy turn of events. Just a few years ago, a number of WV counties contiguous to VA were discussing leaving WV and joining VA in the hopes of participating in the Northern Virginia economic boom.
    , @Digital Samizdat
    Wow! What a coincidence. Just a few days before this resolution was passed, I was suggesting the exact same thing right here at Unz:

    https://www.unz.com/pbuchanan/the-culture-war-comes-to-the-old-dominion/#comment-3654177

    Are there any W. Virginia state legislators here right now reading my comment? If so, bravo!

    , @Reg Cæsar
    Two quirks with the Commonwealth:

    1. Virginia's counties are unencumbered by cities, by law. They are inherently more suburban or rural than similar counties elsewhere.


    Of the 41 independent U.S. cities, 38 are in Virginia, whose state constitution makes them a special case. The three independent cities outside Virginia are Baltimore, Maryland; St. Louis, Missouri; and Carson City, Nevada.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independent_city_(United_States)
     

    (NB: New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and others are not outside county government, but constitute counties or groups of counties themselves. Miami, Jacksonville, and Indianapolis are city-county mergers.)

    Secession and absorption by West Virginia would leave cities like Roanoke, Charlottesville, and even Richmond as urban exclaves of Virginia.


    http://www.virginiaplaces.org/vacities/graphics/citiesminustwo.png


    2. There is that sticky Article IV, Section 3 of the Constitution:

    New states may be admitted by the Congress into this union; but no new states shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of the states concerned as well as of the Congress.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/articleiv
     

    That's a bit ambiguous, as it refers to "new states". Does the addition of territory to an old state constitute a new state, or merely the new form of an old state?

    But West Virginia was herself a new state, which has apparently never been authorized by Mother Commonwealth, the way Maine was by hers.

    This is the Ellis Island landfill case raised to a Contitutional level. Stock up on popcorn, baked ham, and ramps.


    New Jersey v. New York, 523 U.S. 767 (1998)


    http://www.coinnews.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/2017-S-Proof-Ellis-Island-Quarter-Clad-Reverse-2.jpg

  6. USA Has a Big Murder Problem with Handguns But a Small Murder Problem with Rifles

    Actually, we have a big problem with black people.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Col. Jeff Cooper one said, "America doesn't have a crime problem, it has a race problem."
  7. I remember the old days when all the fuss was on hand guns.

    The difference is, assault rifles are used more often in mass shootings, which are scarier and get more publicity.

    Just as automobiles are more dangerous than airplanes, but you never get car crashes with 100+ people dying.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    Are rifles really used more often in mass shootings? One of the most deadly, the Virginia Tech shooting, was perpetrated entirely with handguns. So was a recent Colorado school shooting.

    The media selectively choose what they emphasize and right now they are pushing a narrative, so it is prudent to be suspicious of media-generated impressions that support that narrative.
    , @Digital Samizdat

    The difference is, assault rifles are used more often in mass shootings, which are scarier and get more publicity.
     
    That may be true, but it's nothing new. Way back in 1966, Charles Whitman, a former Marine sniper, shot and killed 17 people at the UT campus with a hunting rifle.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Whitman

    And while some of the signature assassinations of the era--such as RFK, and the attempted killing of George Wallace--were carried out with handguns, the two that kicked off the trend--JFK and MLK--were committed with rifles instead (although, if it was indeed the CIA that did it, I'm sure they had a permit for them!

    So high-profile crimes committed with rifles are hardly a recent development. But back then, they were understood for what they were: unusual, freakish, and statistically unlikely. Then as now, the vast majority of gun deaths were the result of handguns used in the commission of common crimes, such a liquor-store holdups or drug deals gone bad.
    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    The scary publicity surrounding use of rifles, or more properly "assault rifles", has more to do with removing weaponry from the hands of the citizenry targeted by the left for terrorization & elimination. While I am under no illusions that a citizenry, even one armed with long guns, could go toe to toe with a military/para-military being used to forward the leftist goals of terrorization & elimination in a maximal assault, it still tips the balance away from a state monopoly on deadly violence; maybe the "Good Germans" of those state forces might think twice about their possible deaths if those deaths were a real possibility when they are following the orders of their tyrannical masters against the citizenry.

    After all, lefties have been fond of saying how things might have gone differently if the Gestapo was met with deadly violence when rounding up communists & Jews. Solzhenitsyn had similar things to say about deadly violence against roundups by communist thugs during the Red Terror. And death being dealt to the leaders of persecutions from hundreds of yards away in targeted assassinations using long guns might instill a healthy dose of fear in the apparatchiks, and a fear not limited to the minds of their frontline bully boys only.

    Also, if some death squad of leftist irregulars like antifas got wasted in enfilading fire when assaulting a mobilized, and prepared community, these freelance terrorists might stop their bullshit.

    The day is coming closer, maybe closer than you think, when bastards like Northam are openly gun grabbing like he and his allies want to do so they can grind us under their heels. The Tree of Liberty must from time to time be watered with the blood of Patriots and tyrants. So said my hero Thomas Jefferson.

    Lines are being drawn. As the old union song had it, "Which side are you on?"
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Car crashes on highways that cause pile ups can exceed 100 dead. Germany's autobahn is one example of this happening. The faster a car, the less time to react to having to suddenly hit the break in time, swerve in time, etc.
  8. How many of the rifle murders were mass shootings? Most handgun murders are either domestic or young black men killing young black men, so they don’t capture the imagination and fear of the general public the way “assault” rifles do . And the media plays up the alienated white man with a rifle and a plan in a way they don’t the black man with a pistol and a grudge.

    Explosives got a lot harder to come by after the OKC bombing

    Planes got harder to board after 9/11.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    You never hear from the old media that the majority of serial killers are black.
    And no-one told "Criminal Minds".
  9. @PseudoNhymm
    And Virginia? Where a bunch of blue state elites took over and are forcing the rural counties to disarm, 95% of which disagree. Do they all just pack up and move to Texas? And when Texas turns blue in 8 years, do they move again? At what point is an inalienable right inalienable?

    Hence the word “localities”. Think about it: does it make sense to govern upstate New York by the same rules as NYC?

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.

    • Replies: @Thomas

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.
     
    The other side is finding ever whiter places to dump Somali refugees. They flipped Virginia blue, so a handful of cities near DC and Hampton Roads are now going to lord it over the rest of the state. Texas will go the same within a decade.

    There is no "time to recover." They will not leave us alone, ever.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Hence the word “localities”. Think about it: does it make sense to govern upstate New York by the same rules as NYC?
     
    “Localities” works fine for zoning laws, not so much when it comes to the Bill of Rights. Do you think it would be okay for upstate sheriffs, with the support of locals, to violate travelers’ Fourth Amendment rights?

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.
     
    There can be no “recovery” if equal protection of Constitutional rights is disregarded by local governments. If the Supreme Court doesn’t settle the gun issue in favor of 2A (e.g., striking down carry bans and ‘assault rifle’ bans), there could be war.

    If things start heating up (political violence), there’s an outside chance that Trump gets some quick clarity and issues executive orders nationally nullifying said gun bans in favor of American patriots—of course, it may already be too late and the socio-political pressure cooker explodes anyway, because of guns and other reasons.

    , @Mr. Rational

    Think about it: does it make sense to govern upstate New York by the same rules as NYC?
     
    Think about it:  can you go about your life if what's normal self-protection where you live becomes a crime when you cross some invisible boundary?

    Bernhard Goetz proved that NYC would be a much better place to live if the criminal element had the same fear of their victims as they do in e.g. Florida.  Cuomo and deBlasio are accessories before the fact to all the crimes their policies exacerbate.
  10. I give credit where credit’s due, Steve. Recent posts on this matter indicate you’ve finally dropped your “anti-gun white Dems actually only want to disarm urban blacks, but are are afraid to say so, and thus are lashing out at rural whites” shtick.

    Sailer’s Butterknife, as Jack Hanson called it.

    Eventually you’ll also drop your similar shtick about Jewish fears about Ashkenazi high IQ being ‘revealed’ to the general public. 🙂 …

    Overheard at Schnippers:

    “Oy, Herschel, now dey saying us Jews are clever? Dis can’t get out! Da goyim are really gonna be envious now! Ve must teach da kindergoyim dat Einstein vas a moron!”

    • Thanks: Jack Henson
    • LOL: Thomas
    • Replies: @Kronos

    Eventually you’ll also drop your similar shtick about Jewish fears about Ashkenazi high IQ being ‘revealed’ to the general public. 🙂 …

     

    I think the far more touchier subject is exactly how they got it so high. Many won’t like it getting out that many Eastern European Rabbis (from the Pale of Settlement) played a fast and loose de facto eugenics program. One that while creating some highly intelligent families, led to an absolutely horrific amount of mental disorders and physical abnormalities. I wouldn’t be too surprised that if Schizophrenia were to be successfully genetically decoded into various strains, that the primary ones originated from the Pale of Settlement. If you have friends/family in the medical professions, you’ll often see these Jewish families that can never catch a break.

    https://youtu.be/FgjCS5t3m40

    It’s likely one of the reasons why liberal Ashkenazi Jews have such a love for environmental explanations for human behavior so to blot out this history. Doesn’t help that many German eugenicists copy-and-pasted these ideas into their own future plans and subsequently larger and healthier breeding pools.

    https://www.amazon.com/Jewish-Eugenics-John-Glad/dp/0897030052

  11. @Mr McKenna

    Do they all just pack up and move to Texas?
     
    No, they just join with their compatriots in the mountains.
    Did you not see this?

    West Virginia Lawmakers Invite Virginia Counties Fed Up With Gun Control to Secede

    The offer to the counties of western Virginia ought to be fulfilled without any issue beyond a plebiscite. If freedom means anything at all, it means freedom of association–for both people and polities.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/white-virginia-is-rising-west-virginia-one-of-americas-whitest-states-offers-overwhelmingly-white-virginia-counties-declaring-themselves-2nd-amendment-sanctuaries-the-opportunity-for-secession-fr/

    The next frontier will be larger darker political entities annexing smaller whiter ones so they can grab the revenues. The need is insatiable and as long as there are resources to be plundered liberals will continue to try and get their hands on them.

    For me, living in the affluent suburbs, just the absence of problems is enough. The truth is our roads are no better than the closest city, the schools are physically no better, we have fewer cops, and so forth. They are not really necessary for success or happiness. It is almost that our well being is measured by what we don’t have not by what we do.

  12. @Mr McKenna

    Do they all just pack up and move to Texas?
     
    No, they just join with their compatriots in the mountains.
    Did you not see this?

    West Virginia Lawmakers Invite Virginia Counties Fed Up With Gun Control to Secede

    The offer to the counties of western Virginia ought to be fulfilled without any issue beyond a plebiscite. If freedom means anything at all, it means freedom of association–for both people and polities.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/white-virginia-is-rising-west-virginia-one-of-americas-whitest-states-offers-overwhelmingly-white-virginia-counties-declaring-themselves-2nd-amendment-sanctuaries-the-opportunity-for-secession-fr/

    I’d like to see one of the Va counties on the WVa border do it. Just to see if a preference cascade follows.

    • Agree: houston 1992
  13. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    A Constitutional Republic doesn’t work like that.

  14. @Mr McKenna

    Do they all just pack up and move to Texas?
     
    No, they just join with their compatriots in the mountains.
    Did you not see this?

    West Virginia Lawmakers Invite Virginia Counties Fed Up With Gun Control to Secede

    The offer to the counties of western Virginia ought to be fulfilled without any issue beyond a plebiscite. If freedom means anything at all, it means freedom of association–for both people and polities.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/white-virginia-is-rising-west-virginia-one-of-americas-whitest-states-offers-overwhelmingly-white-virginia-counties-declaring-themselves-2nd-amendment-sanctuaries-the-opportunity-for-secession-fr/

    The big gun rally is tomorrow in Richmond. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: there’s power in numbers. If there are 10,000 gun-rights supporters out, they cannot be Charlottesvilled like a few dozen can.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    I think it will be more than 10,000. Perhaps much more.

    All props to Virginia Citizens Defense League, the statewide grassroots gun rights lobby - it does the Lord's work (though Mr. Van Cleeve, its leader, should have known better than to fall for Sacha Baron Cohen's trap - apparently some people just can't resist a putative "Friend of Israel" award - sigh).
    , @Mr McKenna
    We'll see. My thought is that it really doesn't matter how many show up, or even what they do. What matters is what the MSM decide to show, and how. And that is relatively predictable.

    In 2003 the MSM were so on-board with Iraq War Now! that they made short shrift of a million protestors in Washington DC.
    , @Twodees Partain
    Obviously, you haven't been watching. The demonization of gun owners has already been pushed in the media, Antifa is coming to the rally with some of them even claiming that they have common cause with Virginia gun owners. The rally is set up to be another Charlottesville, so the rally itself has already been "Charlottesvilled".

    Coonman and the beneficiaries of vote fraud in the state legislature have arranged for violence to happen in Richmond today. Any gun rights people still planning to attend will be sorry that they did, I think.
    , @Digital Samizdat
    Be careful. This could be a trap, just like Charlottesville. Andrew Anglin has been making that case all week:

    https://dailystormer.name/wapo-opens-front-page-article-about-virginia-rally-with-charlottesville-white-supremacists/
    https://dailystormer.name/dont-go-to-this-virginia-gun-rally-it-is-just-charlottesville-all-over-again/
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    "Charlottesvilled"

    It's also a good idea to ban agent provocateurs like DOJ asset and clothes horse Richard Spencer from your rally.
  15. Murder victims are 22 times more likely to be killed with a handgun as with a rifle, but most of the gun control energy in recent years has been paid to rifles.

    This is a purely media-driven phenomenon playing on fear, ignorance and demagoguery.

    Highly-publicized school shootings with rifles, like Sandy Hook, scare the living Bejeezus out of rich, white, suburban soccer moms. They could care less that Negroes murder each other by the boatload every weekend with handguns over in the ‘hood. But they practically wet themselves in fear if they think that their precious little Emma or Madison, who cost them hundred grand in fertility treatments to conceive at age 41, is going to get shot with an evil black AR-15 in a lily-white suburban grade school.

    In point of fact it is MUCH easier to smuggle a couple of pistols into a school than a rifle, and indeed the biggest school shooting in the U.S. was committed at Virginia Tech by the Korean immigrant Seung-Hui Cho, who utilized a 9mm and a .22.

    Not to mention that little Emma and Madison are much more likely to get run over by a bus or hit by a car than be a victim of a school shooting, no matter what type of firearm is used.

    But the politicians are craftily using the ignorance and fear of the female voter to ban rifles, because they are much more of an impediment to the creation of a total police state than handguns are.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  16. @nebulafox
    Hence the word "localities". Think about it: does it make sense to govern upstate New York by the same rules as NYC?

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.

    The other side is finding ever whiter places to dump Somali refugees. They flipped Virginia blue, so a handful of cities near DC and Hampton Roads are now going to lord it over the rest of the state. Texas will go the same within a decade.

    There is no “time to recover.” They will not leave us alone, ever.

    • Replies: @anon
    They flipped Virginia blue, so a handful of cities near DC and Hampton Roads are now going to lord it over the rest of the state.

    Tomorrow's rally in Richmond is gonna be interesting. I totally understand what the Virginia Citizens Defense League is doing; the same thing they've done for years at the opening of the legislature. But I also understand what the Left is doing.

    The Left from Governor Blackface to the capitol security to the VSP on down to the average Antifa goon in the street have set up what looks like multiple traps for normal people. There is a fenced-in kill-box reserved rally area with two gates, persons entering will be searched. The FAA has banned all unauthorized drone flights over the area, so one source of real-time video is gone. The Virginia State Police was a big part of the deliberate creation of conflict in Charlottesville so they can be counted on to assist Antifa and ignore violence done to ordinary people just for a start. It is certain that one or more Stingray units are already in place to do fun things with cellular phone communications. Anyone who gets near this event should be using a burner phone and leave their personal device at home. Everyone in the area will be imaged and ID'd by various government agencies.

    There's a law in Virginia that prohibits wearing masks in public except for certain events / situation and none of them match what Antifa is surely planning to do. The first clue on what the Left intends will be shown by masks: if Antifa can stroll around in their hoodies and masks with no problem, even if they have to divest themselves of the usual clubs, chains, pipes, bike locks, etc. then the fix is in. Because that means ordinary people will be imaged, Antifa will be protected. By state forces.

    Interesting times.

    , @Mr McKenna

    They will not leave us alone, ever.
     
    Sadly true, I'm afraid, as the recent experience of Hungary and Poland demonstrates.
  17. It’s called getting the camel’s nose in the tent.

    First, they go after the murderers who use rifles because not too many people will complain.
    Next, they will go after the murderers who use handguns … because murderers are used to having their rights taken away from them.
    After that they will go after the murderers who use knives …

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    You misunderstand the issue. It’s “going after” the rights of non-murderers that’s got people up in arms.
  18. USA Has a Big Murder Problem with Handguns But a Small Murder Problem with Rifles

    No, Black America has a big murder problem with handguns. White America doesn’t have much of a murder problem at all. If you counted White America as its own country, the murder rate would be on par with many European countries.

    • Replies: @Corn
    Ramzpaul linked to a graph on twitter once (I can’t display it here, on my phone and not tech savvy anyway). If that graph was accurate the firearm homicide rate of white Americans was lower than that of Canada, France, Austria and Finland!

    Firearm homicides per 100,000 people:

    US White: 1.7

    Czech Republic: 1.7

    Canada: 1.8

    France: 2.6

    Austria: 2.8

    Finland: 3.3

    However.......

    US Hispanic: 6.4

    US Black: 19.8
  19. anon[292] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomas

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.
     
    The other side is finding ever whiter places to dump Somali refugees. They flipped Virginia blue, so a handful of cities near DC and Hampton Roads are now going to lord it over the rest of the state. Texas will go the same within a decade.

    There is no "time to recover." They will not leave us alone, ever.

    They flipped Virginia blue, so a handful of cities near DC and Hampton Roads are now going to lord it over the rest of the state.

    Tomorrow’s rally in Richmond is gonna be interesting. I totally understand what the Virginia Citizens Defense League is doing; the same thing they’ve done for years at the opening of the legislature. But I also understand what the Left is doing.

    The Left from Governor Blackface to the capitol security to the VSP on down to the average Antifa goon in the street have set up what looks like multiple traps for normal people. There is a fenced-in kill-box reserved rally area with two gates, persons entering will be searched. The FAA has banned all unauthorized drone flights over the area, so one source of real-time video is gone. The Virginia State Police was a big part of the deliberate creation of conflict in Charlottesville so they can be counted on to assist Antifa and ignore violence done to ordinary people just for a start. It is certain that one or more Stingray units are already in place to do fun things with cellular phone communications. Anyone who gets near this event should be using a burner phone and leave their personal device at home. Everyone in the area will be imaged and ID’d by various government agencies.

    There’s a law in Virginia that prohibits wearing masks in public except for certain events / situation and none of them match what Antifa is surely planning to do. The first clue on what the Left intends will be shown by masks: if Antifa can stroll around in their hoodies and masks with no problem, even if they have to divest themselves of the usual clubs, chains, pipes, bike locks, etc. then the fix is in. Because that means ordinary people will be imaged, Antifa will be protected. By state forces.

    Interesting times.

    • Replies: @Thomas
    Eh. Doubt it. The Alex Jones-style paranoia is running thick over tomorrow. With that many cops around, and given the boomer demographics of most 2A supporters, if there were any action, it wouldn't look good for the left at all. This isn't UTR, no matter how much the media is trying that smear out. It isn't even a Proud Boys rally. If tomorrow really does turn into a bunch of fifty-something goobers getting beaten up by Antifa or the state police, that will be a serious own-goal for the left.
  20. @Thomas

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.
     
    The other side is finding ever whiter places to dump Somali refugees. They flipped Virginia blue, so a handful of cities near DC and Hampton Roads are now going to lord it over the rest of the state. Texas will go the same within a decade.

    There is no "time to recover." They will not leave us alone, ever.

    They will not leave us alone, ever.

    Sadly true, I’m afraid, as the recent experience of Hungary and Poland demonstrates.

    • Replies: @Flip
    As the kulaks found out...
    , @BB753
    Simply put, in a police state you're not supposed to own guns or even be allowed to defend yourself. This is what it's all about. The rest is noise.
  21. Off topic but so iSteve:

    Prof. Dershowitz tries to discuss the constitutionality of impeachment.

    Jeffrey Toobin demands, “WHOSE SIDE ARE YOU ON?”

    • Thanks: Harry Baldwin
  22. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    Joking aside, there’s a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be.

    In theory, that’s a possibility. The problem is, the Left is eager to ban guns nationwide, so we have to be hyper-vigilant. But yes, if you live in an areas with a problem population, you might rationally choose that. I believe gun ownership to Blacks used to be severely limited.

    But any slack we give the Left, they will just use to demand more.

  23. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    America is a big place. Isn’t it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away?

    Huh? Population density should have no bearing on fundamental rights.

    In fact, legal carrying of handguns can be especially justified based on violent crime rates in urban areas. Are you against shall-issue/Constitutional legal concealed carry for NYC residents?

    Joking aside, there’s a simple solution to the whole gun control issue:

    Right. Fully restore the 2nd Amendment to all areas of the USA. The Bill of Rights applies to all law-abiding (adult) residents within said territory, through incorporation and the Privileges or Immunities Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

    Don’t be Jack D, who was unclear on the legal preeminence of the BoR:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/have-white-men-committed-the-majority-of-the-521-mass-shootings-since-orlando/#comment-2032228 (#393)

    Just for fun, here’s me and Reg Cæsar arguing about the Fourteenth:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/beto-pledges-to-sharpton-to-pass-reparations-bill/#comment-3140526 (#63)

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Whoops. Last comment link should be: (#263)
  24. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    America is a big place. Isn’t it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away?
     
    Huh? Population density should have no bearing on fundamental rights.

    In fact, legal carrying of handguns can be especially justified based on violent crime rates in urban areas. Are you against shall-issue/Constitutional legal concealed carry for NYC residents?


    Joking aside, there’s a simple solution to the whole gun control issue:
     
    Right. Fully restore the 2nd Amendment to all areas of the USA. The Bill of Rights applies to all law-abiding (adult) residents within said territory, through incorporation and the Privileges or Immunities Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

    Don’t be Jack D, who was unclear on the legal preeminence of the BoR:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/have-white-men-committed-the-majority-of-the-521-mass-shootings-since-orlando/#comment-2032228 (#393)

    Just for fun, here’s me and Reg Cæsar arguing about the Fourteenth:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/beto-pledges-to-sharpton-to-pass-reparations-bill/#comment-3140526 (#63)

    Whoops. Last comment link should be: (#263)

  25. Anonymous[356] • Disclaimer says:

    The real issue is that handguns are not a defense against government/ZOG tyranny, but rifles are. If (bad)whites have to be rounded up and put in gulags, rifles will be the key impediment to doing so.

    Let’s be honest, while pornhub is online and people aren’t being carted off in railroad cars, status quo remains.

    • Replies: @Tomislav II
    USA will be within 20 years like Bosna was in 1990s. Train and prepare.
  26. @anon
    They flipped Virginia blue, so a handful of cities near DC and Hampton Roads are now going to lord it over the rest of the state.

    Tomorrow's rally in Richmond is gonna be interesting. I totally understand what the Virginia Citizens Defense League is doing; the same thing they've done for years at the opening of the legislature. But I also understand what the Left is doing.

    The Left from Governor Blackface to the capitol security to the VSP on down to the average Antifa goon in the street have set up what looks like multiple traps for normal people. There is a fenced-in kill-box reserved rally area with two gates, persons entering will be searched. The FAA has banned all unauthorized drone flights over the area, so one source of real-time video is gone. The Virginia State Police was a big part of the deliberate creation of conflict in Charlottesville so they can be counted on to assist Antifa and ignore violence done to ordinary people just for a start. It is certain that one or more Stingray units are already in place to do fun things with cellular phone communications. Anyone who gets near this event should be using a burner phone and leave their personal device at home. Everyone in the area will be imaged and ID'd by various government agencies.

    There's a law in Virginia that prohibits wearing masks in public except for certain events / situation and none of them match what Antifa is surely planning to do. The first clue on what the Left intends will be shown by masks: if Antifa can stroll around in their hoodies and masks with no problem, even if they have to divest themselves of the usual clubs, chains, pipes, bike locks, etc. then the fix is in. Because that means ordinary people will be imaged, Antifa will be protected. By state forces.

    Interesting times.

    Eh. Doubt it. The Alex Jones-style paranoia is running thick over tomorrow. With that many cops around, and given the boomer demographics of most 2A supporters, if there were any action, it wouldn’t look good for the left at all. This isn’t UTR, no matter how much the media is trying that smear out. It isn’t even a Proud Boys rally. If tomorrow really does turn into a bunch of fifty-something goobers getting beaten up by Antifa or the state police, that will be a serious own-goal for the left.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @fnn
    Maybe, but plenty of old people were beaten up by Antifa and other left/anti-white elements outside Trump rallies.
  27. OT

    MSG in Chinese food isn’t unhealthy — you’re just racist, activists say
    Analysis by Jessie Yeung, CNN
    January 18, 2020

    [MORE]

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/18/asia/chinese-restaurant-syndrome-msg-intl-hnk-scli/index.html

    […] in the spring of 2019, when a white woman opened a Chinese restaurant called Lucky Lee’s in New York. The restaurant would serve “clean” Chinese food, she wrote in a now-deleted Instagram post — food that wasn’t “too oily,” and that wouldn’t make people feel “bloated and icky” afterward.

    Almost immediately, the internet was in uproar. Members of the Asian and Asian American community accused the owner of not just appropriating another culture’s cuisine, but doing it with an offensive rather than appreciative approach.

    […] For many, “Americanized” Chinese food was born from desperation and adapted for American tastes — a way for immigrant families to survive in a society that demanded assimilation. To have that food, and its history of immigrant struggle, dismissed as “icky” or “oily” felt like a slap in the face for many in the Asian American community. […]

    “You know what causes Chinese restaurant syndrome?” he added as he walked through the streets of Sichuan. “Racism.”

    ____________

    Mini-bio for Jessie Yeung, the author, courageous stand-taker against MSG Racism:

    June 2015: Graduates from Phillips Exeter Academy, New Hampshire; admitted to, and attends, NYU from Fall 2015;
    mid and late 2010s: various media-related internships in New York City and Hong Kong;
    May to Aug. 2018: CNN, Digital News Intern;
    Sept. 2018 to May 2019: CNN, Breaking News Intern;
    May 2019: Graduates from New York University, BA, English;
    June 2019 to Present: CNN, “Digital Producer,” Hong Kong

    Steve often jokes about Big Media interns sanctimoniously lording it over us; here is a case “in the wild,” though less SJW than plain-old racial activist berating whites as whites for mistreating her people.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    One interesting thing -- the Asian gals who complain the most about white racism tend to have white boyfriends. They are worried about being criticized as "sellouts" by other Asians, so they go overboard in their anti-white racism. One notorious example was Sarah Jeong, who wrote her most hateful anti-white screeds while in a relationship with a white guy who was active in the alt-right movement.

    I don't know if this Jessie chick is one of them. But having gone to Exeter and NYU, there is certainly that possibility.

    Anyway, I despise people like her. I have a weird MSG allergy, which appears to be cumulative. Most of the time I avoid MSG like the plague, so if I get a little MSG it doesn't hurt me. If I get a lot of MSG over a period of time, it builds up in my system. I get headaches, and I have even gone into shock a few times. The worst was after I lived in Asia for a year. I thing the MSG built up in my system a lot, so even a small amount would trigger me.

    But I think about the times I went into shock from MSG. I would love to have this b*tch, and the other pro-MSG activists, go into shock themselves, and tell them it is all because of their racism.

    These @$$holes are truly dangerous. For a few years, I was in a relationship with a Chinese lady who had actually seen me go into shock, but who later decided it was all way-cism. The b*tch would actually put MSG in my food just to prove I was way-cist, and the times it didn't put me into shock were her "proof". I am so glad to be rid of her.
  28. Is this a victory lap? When noticing pays off big time in spades, boy does it ever.

  29. @MikeatMikedotMike
    Cracking down on handguns would require law enforcement to crack down on negroes. Cracking down on negroes is bad publicity. Politicians, bureaucrats, and media honchos know this.

    Easier to invent a crisis (like frat boy campus rape culture) than to honestly deal with one (college negro athletes raping white coeds on campus.)

    Gun control organizations/policies were initially designed to limit gun access to blacks so to curb black-on-black gun violence. Which during the 1980s and 1990s reached its crescendo in the big cities.

    The majority of urban white liberals never went hunting or enjoyed recreational shooting so gun restriction was a low impact self-governing policy. But in rural areas shooting was/is a staple of family life. Thus, you had potential compromises on laws that cracked down on handguns and rifles remained minimally restricted.

    But the Democratic Party’s “Coalition of the Fringes” isn’t doing too well (ask Hillary.) It needs black votes to remain at 90% levels for Democratic candidates to win nationally. So Democratic leaders on the national level are likely steering the anti-gun lobby machine toward rural areas to avoid showdowns with urban black leaderships. Thankfully, school shootings are extremely rare. But it gives the anti-gun lobby something to use against whites other than black gang violence. (Which strangely enough, make whites want to arm themselves.) So they go after targets that are so exceptionally rare it’s newsworthy.

    • Replies: @Medvedev

    Thankfully, school shootings are extremely rare
     
    2019 - no data
    2018 - 27 deaths
    2017 - 6
    2016 - 0
    2015 - 10
    2014 - 5
    2013 - 6
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_school_shootings_in_the_United_States_by_death_toll

    There are 76 million students in US schools. Even if you take the high year (27) the possibility is 1 in almost 3 million (2,814,814).

    For comparison

    In 2017, 2,364 teens in the United States aged 16-19 were killed, and about 300,000 were treated in emergency departments for injuries suffered in motor vehicle crashes.
     
    MSM doesn't want people to exercise good judgement. Instead they use scare tactics, call it "gun violence, "shooting epidemic" mention that whatever is one the rise ... "school shootings are on the rise, we have an epidemic, we need to take your guns". Of course, they won't back up their words about "one the rise" unless they use statistics that is completely twisted or in their favor. Like 'rise' of hate crimes where the majority of the 'rise' comes from hoaxes or anti-Semitic/homophobic attacks by Blacks.
    , @Paleo Liberal

    But the Democratic Party’s “Coalition of the Fringes” isn’t doing too well (ask Hillary.)
     
    That doesn't necessarily follow. Hillary probably could have won the election if she had known how to run a decent campaign. She was at least as popular as Obama in 2008, but ran a campaign more designed to the GOP rules rather than the Democratic Party rules. (The two parties use different rules for selecting delegates. Had both parties used the Dem rules, the candidates would've been Obama and Romney. Had both parties used the GOP rules, the candidates would have been H. Clinton and McCain. Seeing as how Romney was, in fact, a better candidate than McCain, a case can be made that the Dems used the "better" rules, based on one data point).

    Hillary Clinton was more popular than Trump in 2016, but completely punted the Great Lakes area. Local Dem leaders were begging her campaign to send money for Get Out The Vote drives. As in driving voters to the polls, etc. A strong case can be made that H. Clinton would have won in 2016 if she had actually run a decent campaign.

    As for evidence for trouble in the Democratic Party, the loss of 1000 local seats during the Obama years is probably a far better indicator. To be fair to you, the loss of party structure in those years was probably a huge factor in Mrs. Clinton's electoral college loss, so your example was not a BAD example. It just was a case where there was a very glaring case that showed other causes for her loss.

    I am not denying there is trouble in the Democratic Party. My family has been Dems since the days of Andy Jackson, and I hope my party can recover. I just think the one example you used was not the BEST example.
  30. @nebulafox
    Hence the word "localities". Think about it: does it make sense to govern upstate New York by the same rules as NYC?

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.

    Hence the word “localities”. Think about it: does it make sense to govern upstate New York by the same rules as NYC?

    “Localities” works fine for zoning laws, not so much when it comes to the Bill of Rights. Do you think it would be okay for upstate sheriffs, with the support of locals, to violate travelers’ Fourth Amendment rights?

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.

    There can be no “recovery” if equal protection of Constitutional rights is disregarded by local governments. If the Supreme Court doesn’t settle the gun issue in favor of 2A (e.g., striking down carry bans and ‘assault rifle’ bans), there could be war.

    If things start heating up (political violence), there’s an outside chance that Trump gets some quick clarity and issues executive orders nationally nullifying said gun bans in favor of American patriots—of course, it may already be too late and the socio-political pressure cooker explodes anyway, because of guns and other reasons.

  31. The U.S. doesn’t have a “big murder problem” at all. Our murder rate has steadily declined for over 2 decades and is now approaching Western European levels.

    Why are so many people seemingly unable to realize this fact, choosing to obsess over who is committing the ever-declining number of homicides (i.e., black males) or what weapons are used? The crime data supports neither a left nor right-wing/white nationalist agenda.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Because policy trends now (eliminating bail, reducing incarceration, decriminalizing various offenses due to disparate impact) threaten to reverse that decline.
    , @Redneck farmer
    1. Some people believe we have a murder problem. So areas do in fact have a murder/attempted murder problem.
    2. These are areas the Left controls, and are committed by groups the Left says it represents.
    , @res

    Our murder rate has steadily declined for over 2 decades and is now approaching Western European levels.
     
    If you were paying attention you might have noticed the recent (last 6 years) increase. This is a common iSteve theme, so I am surprised you missed it. I think it is reasonable to be concerned about that trend.

    Here is an article and graphic covering 1960-2016:
    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-u-s-murder-rate-is-up-but-still-far-below-its-1980-peak/

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/asher-ucr-2016-0922-1-corrected.png

    They used the FBI UCR data: https://www.fbi.gov/services/cjis/ucr/publications
    The following years murder and non-negligent manslaughter rates were:
    2017: 5.4
    2018: 5.0
    Those tables also show:
    2014: 4.5
    2015: 5.0
    2016: 5.4

    The 2015 and 2016 numbers are 0.1 higher than in 538's graphic. Not sure if they somehow excluded non-negligent-manslaughter or what else might explain that difference.
  32. The attack on the second amendment is just a Trojan Horse. Do you think think the Marxists will be satisfied with that? After the second amendment goes down, they will come for the first.

    • Replies: @Brutusale

    After the second amendment goes down, they will come for the first.
     
    What's going to get you arrested in 21st Century America, carrying your handgun (in a concealed carry state) or calling a tranny a tranny?
    , @Harry Baldwin
    After the second amendment goes down, they will come for the first.

    They seem to be working against both simultaneously.
  33. @Peripatetic Commenter
    It's called getting the camel's nose in the tent.

    First, they go after the murderers who use rifles because not too many people will complain.
    Next, they will go after the murderers who use handguns ... because murderers are used to having their rights taken away from them.
    After that they will go after the murderers who use knives ...

    You misunderstand the issue. It’s “going after” the rights of non-murderers that’s got people up in arms.

    • Agree: Bill Jones
  34. @Mr McKenna

    Do they all just pack up and move to Texas?
     
    No, they just join with their compatriots in the mountains.
    Did you not see this?

    West Virginia Lawmakers Invite Virginia Counties Fed Up With Gun Control to Secede

    The offer to the counties of western Virginia ought to be fulfilled without any issue beyond a plebiscite. If freedom means anything at all, it means freedom of association–for both people and polities.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/white-virginia-is-rising-west-virginia-one-of-americas-whitest-states-offers-overwhelmingly-white-virginia-counties-declaring-themselves-2nd-amendment-sanctuaries-the-opportunity-for-secession-fr/

    This is a goofy turn of events. Just a few years ago, a number of WV counties contiguous to VA were discussing leaving WV and joining VA in the hopes of participating in the Northern Virginia economic boom.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    It's our curse to live in ever-more-interesting times.
  35. @Achmed E. Newman
    The big gun rally is tomorrow in Richmond. I've said it before, and I'll say it again: there's power in numbers. If there are 10,000 gun-rights supporters out, they cannot be Charlottesvilled like a few dozen can.

    I think it will be more than 10,000. Perhaps much more.

    All props to Virginia Citizens Defense League, the statewide grassroots gun rights lobby – it does the Lord’s work (though Mr. Van Cleeve, its leader, should have known better than to fall for Sacha Baron Cohen’s trap – apparently some people just can’t resist a putative “Friend of Israel” award – sigh).

  36. @Paleo Liberal
    I remember the old days when all the fuss was on hand guns.

    The difference is, assault rifles are used more often in mass shootings, which are scarier and get more publicity.

    Just as automobiles are more dangerous than airplanes, but you never get car crashes with 100+ people dying.

    Are rifles really used more often in mass shootings? One of the most deadly, the Virginia Tech shooting, was perpetrated entirely with handguns. So was a recent Colorado school shooting.

    The media selectively choose what they emphasize and right now they are pushing a narrative, so it is prudent to be suspicious of media-generated impressions that support that narrative.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Rifles tend to be used in mass shootings by guys who don't intend to escape. A man carrying a rifle calls attention to himself from witnesses, some of whom will survive.

    Pistols are usually used in mass shootings by guys who intend to escape.

    The first kind of mass shootings tend to have higher death tolls because the shooter sticks around to finish off the wounded.

  37. @Kronos
    Gun control organizations/policies were initially designed to limit gun access to blacks so to curb black-on-black gun violence. Which during the 1980s and 1990s reached its crescendo in the big cities.

    https://youtu.be/J4sKiGkzKJo

    The majority of urban white liberals never went hunting or enjoyed recreational shooting so gun restriction was a low impact self-governing policy. But in rural areas shooting was/is a staple of family life. Thus, you had potential compromises on laws that cracked down on handguns and rifles remained minimally restricted.

    But the Democratic Party’s “Coalition of the Fringes” isn’t doing too well (ask Hillary.) It needs black votes to remain at 90% levels for Democratic candidates to win nationally. So Democratic leaders on the national level are likely steering the anti-gun lobby machine toward rural areas to avoid showdowns with urban black leaderships. Thankfully, school shootings are extremely rare. But it gives the anti-gun lobby something to use against whites other than black gang violence. (Which strangely enough, make whites want to arm themselves.) So they go after targets that are so exceptionally rare it’s newsworthy.

    https://youtu.be/uel1vfAQ52M

    Thankfully, school shootings are extremely rare

    2019 – no data
    2018 – 27 deaths
    2017 – 6
    2016 – 0
    2015 – 10
    2014 – 5
    2013 – 6
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_school_shootings_in_the_United_States_by_death_toll

    There are 76 million students in US schools. Even if you take the high year (27) the possibility is 1 in almost 3 million (2,814,814).

    For comparison

    In 2017, 2,364 teens in the United States aged 16-19 were killed, and about 300,000 were treated in emergency departments for injuries suffered in motor vehicle crashes.

    MSM doesn’t want people to exercise good judgement. Instead they use scare tactics, call it “gun violence, “shooting epidemic” mention that whatever is one the rise … “school shootings are on the rise, we have an epidemic, we need to take your guns”. Of course, they won’t back up their words about “one the rise” unless they use statistics that is completely twisted or in their favor. Like ‘rise’ of hate crimes where the majority of the ‘rise’ comes from hoaxes or anti-Semitic/homophobic attacks by Blacks.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    Now this one go’s waaaaay back...

    The Enoch Brown school massacre[1] was "one of the most notorious incidents"[according to whom?][2] of Pontiac's War. On July 26, 1764, four Delaware (Lenape) American Indians entered a settlers' log schoolhouse in the Province of Pennsylvania and killed the schoolmaster and nine students, wounded 2 other students and kidnapped four others.[3]

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enoch_Brown_school_massacre

    It makes sense urban white liberals will try to terrify soccer moms with white mass shooters (he bypassed my zip code barrier) while in truth that legislation is really aimed (pun hee hee) toward blacks. The geographic/political nature of black dysfunction calls for operating the macro to influence the micro.

    Essentially, you have the reverse story of Sodom and Gomorrah. To “destroy the bad ten men” the whole city needs to be blown up to start anew. So to avoid any claims of racism.

    https://youtu.be/UTdy1Yp1h5A


    In Genesis 18:32, Abraham said to the Lord, “If I can find Ten righteous people In Sodom and Gomorrah will you spare the cities?” The Lord said He would not destroy it for the ten’s sake.
     
    http://franklinchurchofchrist.com/blog/sodom-and-gomorrah-needed-10-righteous-people-what-if-the-usa-did/
    , @Mr McKenna
    Our highway carnage is roughly equivalent to a 9/11 every month.
  38. @Cloudbuster
    Are rifles really used more often in mass shootings? One of the most deadly, the Virginia Tech shooting, was perpetrated entirely with handguns. So was a recent Colorado school shooting.

    The media selectively choose what they emphasize and right now they are pushing a narrative, so it is prudent to be suspicious of media-generated impressions that support that narrative.

    Rifles tend to be used in mass shootings by guys who don’t intend to escape. A man carrying a rifle calls attention to himself from witnesses, some of whom will survive.

    Pistols are usually used in mass shootings by guys who intend to escape.

    The first kind of mass shootings tend to have higher death tolls because the shooter sticks around to finish off the wounded.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Had a big one in kc last night. Ratio of dead to wounded and venue was a dead giveaway about poc related activity.
    They did drop the guy its believed though.

    Think 15 wounded but only 2 or 3 fatally..
  39. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    I give credit where credit’s due, Steve. Recent posts on this matter indicate you’ve finally dropped your “anti-gun white Dems actually only want to disarm urban blacks, but are are afraid to say so, and thus are lashing out at rural whites” shtick.

    Sailer’s Butterknife, as Jack Hanson called it.

    Eventually you’ll also drop your similar shtick about Jewish fears about Ashkenazi high IQ being ‘revealed’ to the general public. :) ...

    Overheard at Schnippers:

    “Oy, Herschel, now dey saying us Jews are clever? Dis can’t get out! Da goyim are really gonna be envious now! Ve must teach da kindergoyim dat Einstein vas a moron!”

    Eventually you’ll also drop your similar shtick about Jewish fears about Ashkenazi high IQ being ‘revealed’ to the general public. 🙂 …

    I think the far more touchier subject is exactly how they got it so high. Many won’t like it getting out that many Eastern European Rabbis (from the Pale of Settlement) played a fast and loose de facto eugenics program. One that while creating some highly intelligent families, led to an absolutely horrific amount of mental disorders and physical abnormalities. I wouldn’t be too surprised that if Schizophrenia were to be successfully genetically decoded into various strains, that the primary ones originated from the Pale of Settlement. If you have friends/family in the medical professions, you’ll often see these Jewish families that can never catch a break.

    It’s likely one of the reasons why liberal Ashkenazi Jews have such a love for environmental explanations for human behavior so to blot out this history. Doesn’t help that many German eugenicists copy-and-pasted these ideas into their own future plans and subsequently larger and healthier breeding pools.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Mockery of inbred gentiles is a staple of Jewish comedy. It's an odd subject for humor.
  40. If anyone thinks that what is going on in VA us even primarily about guns held by rural hillbillies avoid Nigerian prince e-mails.

    It’s a way to seize real estate in rural areas from White people so big shots from Pakistan living in Arlington can have giant family compound s complete with imported hereditary servants just like back home.

    Nationwide White women are united with Blacks to disarm their men to make the semi slaves. Educated women always hate their men. See this weekend FTvlunch with some Korean author who is one giant female grievance about Korean men. While dining in luxury.

    Islam is right about women.

  41. @Medvedev

    Thankfully, school shootings are extremely rare
     
    2019 - no data
    2018 - 27 deaths
    2017 - 6
    2016 - 0
    2015 - 10
    2014 - 5
    2013 - 6
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_school_shootings_in_the_United_States_by_death_toll

    There are 76 million students in US schools. Even if you take the high year (27) the possibility is 1 in almost 3 million (2,814,814).

    For comparison

    In 2017, 2,364 teens in the United States aged 16-19 were killed, and about 300,000 were treated in emergency departments for injuries suffered in motor vehicle crashes.
     
    MSM doesn't want people to exercise good judgement. Instead they use scare tactics, call it "gun violence, "shooting epidemic" mention that whatever is one the rise ... "school shootings are on the rise, we have an epidemic, we need to take your guns". Of course, they won't back up their words about "one the rise" unless they use statistics that is completely twisted or in their favor. Like 'rise' of hate crimes where the majority of the 'rise' comes from hoaxes or anti-Semitic/homophobic attacks by Blacks.

    Now this one go’s waaaaay back…

    The Enoch Brown school massacre[1] was “one of the most notorious incidents”[according to whom?][2] of Pontiac’s War. On July 26, 1764, four Delaware (Lenape) American Indians entered a settlers’ log schoolhouse in the Province of Pennsylvania and killed the schoolmaster and nine students, wounded 2 other students and kidnapped four others.[3]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enoch_Brown_school_massacre

    It makes sense urban white liberals will try to terrify soccer moms with white mass shooters (he bypassed my zip code barrier) while in truth that legislation is really aimed (pun hee hee) toward blacks. The geographic/political nature of black dysfunction calls for operating the macro to influence the micro.

    Essentially, you have the reverse story of Sodom and Gomorrah. To “destroy the bad ten men” the whole city needs to be blown up to start anew. So to avoid any claims of racism.

    In Genesis 18:32, Abraham said to the Lord, “If I can find Ten righteous people In Sodom and Gomorrah will you spare the cities?” The Lord said He would not destroy it for the ten’s sake.

    http://franklinchurchofchrist.com/blog/sodom-and-gomorrah-needed-10-righteous-people-what-if-the-usa-did/

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    The legislation as a matter of definition cannot be aimed at blacks, not even delusionally, because of every fact relevant here. It really is invading Iraq to punish Saudis and Afghans who have never set foot inside Iraq.
  42. @Twinkie
    This is a goofy turn of events. Just a few years ago, a number of WV counties contiguous to VA were discussing leaving WV and joining VA in the hopes of participating in the Northern Virginia economic boom.

    It’s our curse to live in ever-more-interesting times.

  43. @Medvedev

    Thankfully, school shootings are extremely rare
     
    2019 - no data
    2018 - 27 deaths
    2017 - 6
    2016 - 0
    2015 - 10
    2014 - 5
    2013 - 6
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_school_shootings_in_the_United_States_by_death_toll

    There are 76 million students in US schools. Even if you take the high year (27) the possibility is 1 in almost 3 million (2,814,814).

    For comparison

    In 2017, 2,364 teens in the United States aged 16-19 were killed, and about 300,000 were treated in emergency departments for injuries suffered in motor vehicle crashes.
     
    MSM doesn't want people to exercise good judgement. Instead they use scare tactics, call it "gun violence, "shooting epidemic" mention that whatever is one the rise ... "school shootings are on the rise, we have an epidemic, we need to take your guns". Of course, they won't back up their words about "one the rise" unless they use statistics that is completely twisted or in their favor. Like 'rise' of hate crimes where the majority of the 'rise' comes from hoaxes or anti-Semitic/homophobic attacks by Blacks.

    Our highway carnage is roughly equivalent to a 9/11 every month.

  44. @Achmed E. Newman
    The big gun rally is tomorrow in Richmond. I've said it before, and I'll say it again: there's power in numbers. If there are 10,000 gun-rights supporters out, they cannot be Charlottesvilled like a few dozen can.

    We’ll see. My thought is that it really doesn’t matter how many show up, or even what they do. What matters is what the MSM decide to show, and how. And that is relatively predictable.

    In 2003 the MSM were so on-board with Iraq War Now! that they made short shrift of a million protestors in Washington DC.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yep, we'll see this morning. One thing I should mention is that many here seem to have gotten every bit of news about this rally so far from the Lyin' Press to begin with, Twinkie being one exception.

    This is exactly how it's been working to the advantage of the ctrl-left. I went to the 2nd page of search results about the rally yeserday and got to a source I trusted more - the Virginia Citizen's Defense League. It has lots of logistics info. about buses one could sign up to take from all over the state to get to Richmond. There was no "white nationalist" "neo-Nazi" provocateuring, just "this is our yearly rally" and "this one is important", and then logistics info.

    Every blurb off DuckDuckGo before that was to a Lyin' Press source. One can just read the headlines, if not the blurbs, and see where they stand. At least make the effort to get real news.. Anything else is playing into the hands of the other side.
    , @Travis
    It will matter. If few Americans protest then the politicians will eliminate the 2nd amendment via more laws and regulations. If a significant number of protesters demonstrate then some politicians and judges may think twice about banning gun ownership.

    I attended the Persian Gulf War protests in 1991 in Washington DC , which was actually much larger than the protests which took place in 2003. You are correct that the press downplayed the protests. They reported about 100,000 at the 1991 Gulf war protests and less than 50,000 in 2003 protesting the Iraq War in DC. The biggest protest in 2003 was in NYC , when over 400,00 people protested the Iraq War.

    I realized that the anti-war protesters were bunch of Frauds when they mostly supported Clintons military against Iraq. Clinton dropped more bombs on Iraq and fired more cruise missiles on Iraq than Bush did in 1991. Yet there were zero protests. The same people I protested with in 1991 fully supported Clinton and ignored his military actions. Just as they ignored the military interventions done by Obama and kept quiet when he used military actions to promote regime change in Libya and sent troops into Syria to overthrow the Syrian government.

    The anti-war people are just anti-GOP and actually fully support most of the military actions when done by a Democratic President.
  45. @JohnPlywood
    The U.S. doesn't have a "big murder problem" at all. Our murder rate has steadily declined for over 2 decades and is now approaching Western European levels.

    Why are so many people seemingly unable to realize this fact, choosing to obsess over who is committing the ever-declining number of homicides (i.e., black males) or what weapons are used? The crime data supports neither a left nor right-wing/white nationalist agenda.

    Because policy trends now (eliminating bail, reducing incarceration, decriminalizing various offenses due to disparate impact) threaten to reverse that decline.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Because policy trends now (eliminating bail, reducing incarceration, decriminalizing various offenses due to disparate impact) threaten to reverse that decline.
     
    Eliminating pretrial detention.
  46. @Steve Sailer
    Rifles tend to be used in mass shootings by guys who don't intend to escape. A man carrying a rifle calls attention to himself from witnesses, some of whom will survive.

    Pistols are usually used in mass shootings by guys who intend to escape.

    The first kind of mass shootings tend to have higher death tolls because the shooter sticks around to finish off the wounded.

    Had a big one in kc last night. Ratio of dead to wounded and venue was a dead giveaway about poc related activity.
    They did drop the guy its believed though.

    Think 15 wounded but only 2 or 3 fatally..

  47. Anon[174] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Tucker Carlson on the Adam Carolla Show during his book promotion in 2018:

    The first ten minutes might be of interest to Steve “I don’t listen to podcasts” Sailer.

    The beginning of the interview is about Carlson’s California upbringing: Both he and Carolla grew up in the Valley, Studio City for Carlson, North Hollywood for Carolla, the Valley Village part, lots of local inside baseball talk. Carlson’s dad worked for Eyewitness News, channel 7. Carlson talks about how he had to flee; Carolla is still there, and he talks about the place has gone to hell (“barbed wire around freeway signs” to prevent Mexican gang graffiti).

    • Replies: @BB753
    Wait a minute, has Steve Sailer's Studio City become a gangster's paradise?

    https://youtu.be/fPO76Jlnz6c
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    "barbed wire around freeway signs"

    This is something I noticed after moving to LA from NorCal in the late 1990s: the prevalence of barbed wire. Even in such sedate settings (for LA) like Studio City and Burbank, barbed wire spread like ivy around parking lots, strip malls, garbage dumpsters, and so on. There is a siege mentality at work in LA, even in the more desirable areas. I still like LA, but full time residency is not conducive to mental health.
  48. @JohnPlywood
    The U.S. doesn't have a "big murder problem" at all. Our murder rate has steadily declined for over 2 decades and is now approaching Western European levels.

    Why are so many people seemingly unable to realize this fact, choosing to obsess over who is committing the ever-declining number of homicides (i.e., black males) or what weapons are used? The crime data supports neither a left nor right-wing/white nationalist agenda.

    1. Some people believe we have a murder problem. So areas do in fact have a murder/attempted murder problem.
    2. These are areas the Left controls, and are committed by groups the Left says it represents.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood
    Is tbis that Western reason we are supposed to be enthusiastic about preserving?
  49. @Mr McKenna
    We'll see. My thought is that it really doesn't matter how many show up, or even what they do. What matters is what the MSM decide to show, and how. And that is relatively predictable.

    In 2003 the MSM were so on-board with Iraq War Now! that they made short shrift of a million protestors in Washington DC.

    Yep, we’ll see this morning. One thing I should mention is that many here seem to have gotten every bit of news about this rally so far from the Lyin’ Press to begin with, Twinkie being one exception.

    This is exactly how it’s been working to the advantage of the ctrl-left. I went to the 2nd page of search results about the rally yeserday and got to a source I trusted more – the Virginia Citizen’s Defense League. It has lots of logistics info. about buses one could sign up to take from all over the state to get to Richmond. There was no “white nationalist” “neo-Nazi” provocateuring, just “this is our yearly rally” and “this one is important”, and then logistics info.

    Every blurb off DuckDuckGo before that was to a Lyin’ Press source. One can just read the headlines, if not the blurbs, and see where they stand. At least make the effort to get real news.. Anything else is playing into the hands of the other side.

    • Agree: HammerJack
    • Replies: @hooodathunkit
    (post event)
    The lying MSM never got the notice. For that matter, VCDL was scrambling to keep up with the Sanctuary movement; it really was organic. Facebook, PMs, calls, Instagram, texts, etc. The NRA was even slower on the uptake.

    The Richmond event is a yearly ritual for VCDL, it's their Lobby Day to talk to legislators . . . . on the MLK holiday because gun rights are civil rights. This time the Sanctuary movement then drifted into the Lobby Day and it became 'an event'. Just hope VCDL got lots of contact names from all those folks who showed up.

    To your media point, yes, the media made their position clear. NBC stated it was a white supremacist rally with gun groups and militias; posting a video of the crowd reciting the Pledge and headlining it as 'Crowd chants "We won't comply" '.
  50. @Mr McKenna

    Do they all just pack up and move to Texas?
     
    No, they just join with their compatriots in the mountains.
    Did you not see this?

    West Virginia Lawmakers Invite Virginia Counties Fed Up With Gun Control to Secede

    The offer to the counties of western Virginia ought to be fulfilled without any issue beyond a plebiscite. If freedom means anything at all, it means freedom of association–for both people and polities.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/white-virginia-is-rising-west-virginia-one-of-americas-whitest-states-offers-overwhelmingly-white-virginia-counties-declaring-themselves-2nd-amendment-sanctuaries-the-opportunity-for-secession-fr/

    Wow! What a coincidence. Just a few days before this resolution was passed, I was suggesting the exact same thing right here at Unz:

    https://www.unz.com/pbuchanan/the-culture-war-comes-to-the-old-dominion/#comment-3654177

    Are there any W. Virginia state legislators here right now reading my comment? If so, bravo!

  51. @Paleo Liberal
    I remember the old days when all the fuss was on hand guns.

    The difference is, assault rifles are used more often in mass shootings, which are scarier and get more publicity.

    Just as automobiles are more dangerous than airplanes, but you never get car crashes with 100+ people dying.

    The difference is, assault rifles are used more often in mass shootings, which are scarier and get more publicity.

    That may be true, but it’s nothing new. Way back in 1966, Charles Whitman, a former Marine sniper, shot and killed 17 people at the UT campus with a hunting rifle.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Whitman

    And while some of the signature assassinations of the era–such as RFK, and the attempted killing of George Wallace–were carried out with handguns, the two that kicked off the trend–JFK and MLK–were committed with rifles instead (although, if it was indeed the CIA that did it, I’m sure they had a permit for them!

    So high-profile crimes committed with rifles are hardly a recent development. But back then, they were understood for what they were: unusual, freakish, and statistically unlikely. Then as now, the vast majority of gun deaths were the result of handguns used in the commission of common crimes, such a liquor-store holdups or drug deals gone bad.

    • Replies: @Flip
    Well, if you believe James Files, the fatal shot of JFK was with a long range pistol.

    http://www.jfkmurdersolved.com/fireball1.htm
  52. @nebulafox
    Hence the word "localities". Think about it: does it make sense to govern upstate New York by the same rules as NYC?

    In a nation that is clearly socially frayed and will take time to recover, it makes sense to devolve issues that can be devolved to the lowest possible level.

    Think about it: does it make sense to govern upstate New York by the same rules as NYC?

    Think about it:  can you go about your life if what’s normal self-protection where you live becomes a crime when you cross some invisible boundary?

    Bernhard Goetz proved that NYC would be a much better place to live if the criminal element had the same fear of their victims as they do in e.g. Florida.  Cuomo and deBlasio are accessories before the fact to all the crimes their policies exacerbate.

  53. @Achmed E. Newman
    The big gun rally is tomorrow in Richmond. I've said it before, and I'll say it again: there's power in numbers. If there are 10,000 gun-rights supporters out, they cannot be Charlottesvilled like a few dozen can.

    Obviously, you haven’t been watching. The demonization of gun owners has already been pushed in the media, Antifa is coming to the rally with some of them even claiming that they have common cause with Virginia gun owners. The rally is set up to be another Charlottesville, so the rally itself has already been “Charlottesvilled”.

    Coonman and the beneficiaries of vote fraud in the state legislature have arranged for violence to happen in Richmond today. Any gun rights people still planning to attend will be sorry that they did, I think.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I was there this morning. It was very peaceful. I am not some expert on crowds, T.P., but I estimate way over 10,000 just in the immediate area (from my nice vantage point). There were plenty others on the side streets, such as 9th St. (to the West?), but I wasn't that familiar with Richmond.

    4 helicopters flew around, along with a drone. The local GOP politicians, many of them with orange "Guns save lives" stickers on their fancy suits, shook hands with people near them. I saw plenty of people carrying rifles (maybe 1 in 10), some of them in militia type gear, but that's only 5 % of the crowd. All the gun-toters had to stay downhill (outside the fence) from the State House.

    I will put up some pics on my site probably very late tonight (busy day from here on) or tomorrow morning.

    Cool air, great crowd, not a lick of violence. This is from 1130 EST and earlier. I could not stay long.

    What did I write yesterday - They can't mess with 10,000 people. Maybe, there were lots more than that.
  54. @Thomas
    Eh. Doubt it. The Alex Jones-style paranoia is running thick over tomorrow. With that many cops around, and given the boomer demographics of most 2A supporters, if there were any action, it wouldn't look good for the left at all. This isn't UTR, no matter how much the media is trying that smear out. It isn't even a Proud Boys rally. If tomorrow really does turn into a bunch of fifty-something goobers getting beaten up by Antifa or the state police, that will be a serious own-goal for the left.

    Maybe, but plenty of old people were beaten up by Antifa and other left/anti-white elements outside Trump rallies.

  55. @Achmed E. Newman
    The big gun rally is tomorrow in Richmond. I've said it before, and I'll say it again: there's power in numbers. If there are 10,000 gun-rights supporters out, they cannot be Charlottesvilled like a few dozen can.
  56. There is a rifle murder problem, but it’s invisible, because it involves funny blue costumes.
    Now that we’re all set up and waiting for alphabet-addled Virginia State Police rooftop snipers to murder some MLK-commemorating blacks (The FBI remembers, hell, they still have the same gun), to blame it on patriots by way of [theremin] PHANTOM NAZIS [/th], to end the Bill of Rights, but keep such important Constitutional provisions as anchor babies, let’s —
    Shots fired! Policeman down! In Hawaii! Hawaii? What the hell? And they dorniered the guy afterwards. Hawaii is the most overhyped overpriced ghetto in the US.
    https://apnews.com/b30e2f17913fb0fb969bdccddb37d278
    Anyway, back to Virginia, where the “kill cage” concentration of angry Second Amendment —
    There it is! There, in — Missouri?
    https://nypost.com/2020/01/20/two-killed-more-than-a-dozen-wounded-in-shooting-outside-kansas-city-bar/
    15 wounded, two dead; I believe DMX commented on the importance of controlling what’s in your hands. Anyone want to bet it was Yakhuts distressed by library noise?
    Matt Bracken (at his own site and Red Ice and InfoWars) has an excellent reminder of the Twin Peaks biker shootout, which he argues is relevant here; tldr:
    Rooftop police snipers reacting to an apparent undercover officer in trouble initiated shooting and probably fired all of the injurious rounds in the event.
    Sympathetic shooting is instant, reactive, targetless firing because your buddy started shooting.
    Police snipers using the lot from the same manufacturer of the same ammo in the same weapon with the same setup have license to massacre as long as their buddy joins in (see last item) because nobody will ever know who shot who, and that means no convictions.
    At the TPBS, bikers were blamed for the violence and remain blamed in the minds of AC’s who believe everything they hear in the media and do no further research. In fact they were all released and the forensics for the injuries points to rifles.
    But before that happened they were held on impossible bail for long enough to financially ruin them — and all their cell phones were taken as evidence.
    That last bit sure would be a useful thing for certain cakewalking blackface performers.

  57. @Kronos
    Now this one go’s waaaaay back...

    The Enoch Brown school massacre[1] was "one of the most notorious incidents"[according to whom?][2] of Pontiac's War. On July 26, 1764, four Delaware (Lenape) American Indians entered a settlers' log schoolhouse in the Province of Pennsylvania and killed the schoolmaster and nine students, wounded 2 other students and kidnapped four others.[3]

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enoch_Brown_school_massacre

    It makes sense urban white liberals will try to terrify soccer moms with white mass shooters (he bypassed my zip code barrier) while in truth that legislation is really aimed (pun hee hee) toward blacks. The geographic/political nature of black dysfunction calls for operating the macro to influence the micro.

    Essentially, you have the reverse story of Sodom and Gomorrah. To “destroy the bad ten men” the whole city needs to be blown up to start anew. So to avoid any claims of racism.

    https://youtu.be/UTdy1Yp1h5A


    In Genesis 18:32, Abraham said to the Lord, “If I can find Ten righteous people In Sodom and Gomorrah will you spare the cities?” The Lord said He would not destroy it for the ten’s sake.
     
    http://franklinchurchofchrist.com/blog/sodom-and-gomorrah-needed-10-righteous-people-what-if-the-usa-did/

    The legislation as a matter of definition cannot be aimed at blacks, not even delusionally, because of every fact relevant here. It really is invading Iraq to punish Saudis and Afghans who have never set foot inside Iraq.

  58. Looks like guns are going by to be banned soon because of changing demographics

    I just hope the racists at the rally don’t murder to many people like poor Heather Heyer

  59. When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal. A Texas student said he wouldn’t want to live in a country where he couldn’t ‘defend’ himself. Well, I wouldn’t want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    The problem isn’t the guns. A great many, and perhaps most, Americans are naturally violent. The US is by far the most violent nation in the world (excepting Israel’s actions on Arabs in Palestine). When you aren’t killing each other, you’re killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . . . It never ends. Killing is what you do. You have been at war with someone for about 235 years of your 245 years as a country. What else is there to say? Killing is what you do.

    Chris Kyle, your favorite sniper, killed about 100 people. He said his favorite kill was a head shot of an infant being held in its mother’s arms. He said he loved killing, and wished he could have done more of it. And, he had tattooed a large cross on his shoulder “because I wanted everyone to know I was a Christian”.

    You people will never understand. Shanghai, with 25 million people, has less violent crime, and many fewer murders, in a year than does DC with only 500,000 people, or places like Chicago or Detroit.

    In a conversation with a health insurance executive some years ago, he said the best solution for his company in dealing with long-term disability patients was to “pin a $10 bill to the back of his shirt and send him to a baseball game in Detroit”.

    Nobody in North America has any understanding of life in a safe country. Here are three examples, two from my personal experience, the other related by a friend.

    1. I was walking down a street in Monte Carlo, chatting with a policeman when, in front of an expensive apartment building, we saw a Rolls-Royce convertible with the top down, the keys in the ignition and the engine running, and what looked like a diamond necklace sitting on the seat. The policeman said he knew the woman who owned the car, and he offered this brief commentary:

    “She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it.”

    2. China is still in some ways a cash society, having bypassed cheques and cards for mobile phone payment but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions. In any city in China we see on a daily basis people standing in line at an ATM, patiently waiting while one person is feeding huge wads of bills into the machine, 10,000 RMB at a time, the pile of cash often exceeding perhaps $US50,000. This is such a common transaction as to be completely ignored by everyone. In any city in North America this is begging for a ‘snatch and grab’ robbery, but I have never heard of such a thing occurring in China.

    3. An acquaintance of mine in Tokyo was waiting for a friend at a train station about 100 meters from her office when she remembered some important papers she needed. Her office would be closed within a few minutes, but the train was also arriving within a few minutes. What to do? On a bench just outside the train station exit, she left her bag, knowing her friend would recognise it, and returned to her office to collect her papers. This was her purse – with her wallet, passport, money, credit cards. When she returned to the station, her friend was sitting on the bench beside her bag, waiting for her. Theft is unknown in Japan, and no parents worry about their children being out late at night in even the largest cities.

    As I said, the problem is not guns. The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    • Disagree: Kronos
    • Troll: Mr. Rational, Polynikes
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Say what you will of the late Chris Kyle, afaik 100% of his kills were “legal” under the civil law and the UCMJ of the country whose uniform he wore. Your beef is with those, not Kyle. He was no renegade or non state actor. He wasn’t whacking people for the mob or being a freelance serial killer.

    In other words he was a Mark 1 Mod 1 White Man. For good or for ill.
    , @anon
    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal.

    Lol! What is the "free carry law"? Please point to the relevant part of Texas law code that defines the term. Be sure to note subsection 30.06, ok?

    This isn't even up to Corvinus-level trolling. "Media Matters" clearly isn't sending its very best.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Well, I wouldn’t want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.
     
    We don't want you to either. Get out or stay out, and stop bothering us with your pathetic anecdotes.
    , @Bill P
    Outside of heavily policed inner cities, China is definitely more violent than the US. This idea that it's a peaceful society just isn't true.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    When you aren’t killing each other, you’re killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . .
     
    Strangely, you left out the primary examples of Japan and Germany. We could have ignored the latter, and simply retaliated for Pearl Harbor and let the Japanese have their way with the rest of the Pacific. But no, we had to get involved.

    No excuse for that, you agree? Japan would have been a much nicer hegemon in the Pacific.


    “She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it.”
     
    What good is stealing something you can't possibly use or sell? That's why classic paintings are almost never taken, except by mental cases for emotional reasons.

    At any rate, in many small towns in the US, just about everybody would have knocked on the owner's door to see if anything was wrong. The late Icelandic-American poet Bill Holm not only left the doors to his home in Minneota (sic) unlocked, but those to his car as well-- with the keys in the ignition.


    ...but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions.
     
    Do they still use bills for the tiniest transaction? In 1985, I saw no coins in Canton. There were bills worth pennies.

    https://nickynice.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/China-2-Er-Jiao-1980.jpg


    Counting our change, we were impressed by how honest everyone was. More experienced hands explained that the Chinese cheated each other left and right, but the penalties for doing this to a foreign visitor were so severe that nobody dared. Not for so little return.

    You need to visit other parts of North America than Detroit, Chicago, and the District of Columbia. Which, for your information, look more like the rest of the world than the rest of America.

    , @J.Ross
    >There's no car theft in Europe

    Psiakrew, bzdura, kurwa!
    , @Harry Baldwin
    Well, I wouldn’t want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    What would you rather carry to defend yourself? A rape whistle is an option, if you think that would suffice.

    The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    Not most Americans. The problem is concentrated in 12.7 percent of the populace.
    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    4 comment history.

    http://takingcareofmonkeybusiness.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Make-this-adorable-sock-puppet-in-just-10-minutes.jpg
  60. @Foreign Expert
    The attack on the second amendment is just a Trojan Horse. Do you think think the Marxists will be satisfied with that? After the second amendment goes down, they will come for the first.

    After the second amendment goes down, they will come for the first.

    What’s going to get you arrested in 21st Century America, carrying your handgun (in a concealed carry state) or calling a tranny a tranny?

  61. Happy Robert E. Lee Day!

    Remember, if at first you don’t secede, try, try again.

  62. It’s because murders committed with rifles tend to be journalistically sexy for some reason, while murders committed with handguns aren’t.

  63. @Thomas

    USA Has a Big Murder Problem with Handguns But a Small Murder Problem with Rifles
     
    No, Black America has a big murder problem with handguns. White America doesn't have much of a murder problem at all. If you counted White America as its own country, the murder rate would be on par with many European countries.

    Ramzpaul linked to a graph on twitter once (I can’t display it here, on my phone and not tech savvy anyway). If that graph was accurate the firearm homicide rate of white Americans was lower than that of Canada, France, Austria and Finland!

    Firearm homicides per 100,000 people:

    US White: 1.7

    Czech Republic: 1.7

    Canada: 1.8

    France: 2.6

    Austria: 2.8

    Finland: 3.3

    However…….

    US Hispanic: 6.4

    US Black: 19.8

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Sadly, Canada and Western Europe now have a (completely unnecessary and gratuitously imported) race problem too, so the numbers from Canada, France and Austria also need to be scrubbed to make them comparable to US white numbers. One suspects the universal NW European white rate might be about 1.7.
    , @Twentycent
    Those numbers are way off other than Canada. Euro countries are mostly 1 or less, other than Russia which is twice the US rate. US white homicide rate is something like 2.5. Ann Coulter got some controversy once for pointing out that was the same as Belgium's. Turned out she picked an unusually violent year in one of the most violent West European countries.
    , @Rick Johnsmeyer
    Your numbers are wrong. Canada's TOTAL murder rate in 2018 was 1.8 per 100,000, not the firearms homicide rate specifically. France's total rate was 1.2, so I have no idea where a firearms-only rate of 2.6 would even come from. Austria's murder rate (total, not just firearms) is typically around 0.5 per 100,000. 2.8 would be many multiples of the usual total and would probably result in the Austrian military being deployed. Please use more reliable sources in the future.
  64. @Mr McKenna

    They will not leave us alone, ever.
     
    Sadly true, I'm afraid, as the recent experience of Hungary and Poland demonstrates.

    As the kulaks found out…

  65. @MikeatMikedotMike
    Cracking down on handguns would require law enforcement to crack down on negroes. Cracking down on negroes is bad publicity. Politicians, bureaucrats, and media honchos know this.

    Easier to invent a crisis (like frat boy campus rape culture) than to honestly deal with one (college negro athletes raping white coeds on campus.)

    The FBI puts out some variant of this table every year.

    Murder Race, Ethnicity, and Sex of Victim by Race, Ethnicity, and Sex of Offender, 2016 (Single victim,single offender)

    https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/tables/expanded-homicide-data-table-3.xls

  66. @Hail
    OT

    MSG in Chinese food isn't unhealthy -- you're just racist, activists say
    Analysis by Jessie Yeung, CNN
    January 18, 2020
     

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/18/asia/chinese-restaurant-syndrome-msg-intl-hnk-scli/index.html


    [...] in the spring of 2019, when a white woman opened a Chinese restaurant called Lucky Lee's in New York. The restaurant would serve "clean" Chinese food, she wrote in a now-deleted Instagram post -- food that wasn't "too oily," and that wouldn't make people feel "bloated and icky" afterward.

    Almost immediately, the internet was in uproar. Members of the Asian and Asian American community accused the owner of not just appropriating another culture's cuisine, but doing it with an offensive rather than appreciative approach.

    [...] For many, "Americanized" Chinese food was born from desperation and adapted for American tastes -- a way for immigrant families to survive in a society that demanded assimilation. To have that food, and its history of immigrant struggle, dismissed as "icky" or "oily" felt like a slap in the face for many in the Asian American community. [...]

    "You know what causes Chinese restaurant syndrome?" he added as he walked through the streets of Sichuan. "Racism."
     

    ____________

    Mini-bio for Jessie Yeung, the author, courageous stand-taker against MSG Racism:

    - June 2015: Graduates from Phillips Exeter Academy, New Hampshire; admitted to, and attends, NYU from Fall 2015;
    - mid and late 2010s: various media-related internships in New York City and Hong Kong;
    - May to Aug. 2018: CNN, Digital News Intern;
    - Sept. 2018 to May 2019: CNN, Breaking News Intern;
    - May 2019: Graduates from New York University, BA, English;
    - June 2019 to Present: CNN, "Digital Producer," Hong Kong

    Steve often jokes about Big Media interns sanctimoniously lording it over us; here is a case "in the wild," though less SJW than plain-old racial activist berating whites as whites for mistreating her people.

    One interesting thing — the Asian gals who complain the most about white racism tend to have white boyfriends. They are worried about being criticized as “sellouts” by other Asians, so they go overboard in their anti-white racism. One notorious example was Sarah Jeong, who wrote her most hateful anti-white screeds while in a relationship with a white guy who was active in the alt-right movement.

    I don’t know if this Jessie chick is one of them. But having gone to Exeter and NYU, there is certainly that possibility.

    Anyway, I despise people like her. I have a weird MSG allergy, which appears to be cumulative. Most of the time I avoid MSG like the plague, so if I get a little MSG it doesn’t hurt me. If I get a lot of MSG over a period of time, it builds up in my system. I get headaches, and I have even gone into shock a few times. The worst was after I lived in Asia for a year. I thing the MSG built up in my system a lot, so even a small amount would trigger me.

    But I think about the times I went into shock from MSG. I would love to have this b*tch, and the other pro-MSG activists, go into shock themselves, and tell them it is all because of their racism.

    These @$$holes are truly dangerous. For a few years, I was in a relationship with a Chinese lady who had actually seen me go into shock, but who later decided it was all way-cism. The b*tch would actually put MSG in my food just to prove I was way-cist, and the times it didn’t put me into shock were her “proof”. I am so glad to be rid of her.

    • LOL: Kronos
    • Replies: @Anon
    However annoying the activists may be, you do not have an MSG allergy. It's been studied up the ass.

    If you're going to support a fake disease, you should pick something trendier. Joni Mitchell has Morgelons: Try that one. Or maybe "Chronic Lyme syndrome.," Or "whiplash."
    , @JMcG
    Can we get an “eye-roll” icon?
    , @Hail

    One interesting thing — the Asian gals who complain the most about white racism tend to have white boyfriends. They are worried about being criticized as “sellouts” by other Asians, so they go overboard in their anti-white racism. One notorious example was Sarah Jeong, who wrote her most hateful anti-white screeds while in a relationship with a white guy who was active in the alt-right movement.

    I don’t know if this Jessie chick is one of them. But having gone to Exeter and NYU, there is certainly that possibility.

    Anyway, I despise people like her.
     
    Your comment seems correct, and reminds me of this from Richmond, Virginia, today:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EOvTvLtWoAAiTPG.jpg

    An East Asian woman next to a N.European man. The East Asian woman's sign says:

    Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?
     
    The conservative activist who posted that on Twitter put it up along with the "Armed Minorities are Harder to Oppress" sign guy, who was standing next to a Black guy with a puzzling "Incel" sign. There were a few others like this from the rally, including the Trans Americans For Gun Rights grouplet and the "I want Gay married couples to be able to protect their marijuana plants with guns" woman.

    If you look at his feed over the past day, this Caleb J. Hull, whoever he is, was obviously scouring the event for "Based Black Guys" and posting pictures of all he found with celebratory accompanying tweet, which constitute a majority of his substantive tweets during the rally. To me he is a clown, but a sincere one, i.e. not a troll/parody; he is almost indistinguishable from the DemsRRealRacist parody (if anyone remembers him; a genius parody account, banned ca. late 2016 or early 2017).

    Anyway, I see the East Asian woman's "Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?" as comparable to your scenario for explaining Sarah Jeong's anti-white invective, as follows:

    In the Sarah Jeong case, and possibly Jessie Yeung case, (you are proposing) the fear of being criticized by their fellows for being too close to another race (romantically) inclines them to politically attack whites as a race, "See, I'm close to my own race after all;" meanwhile, in the Richmond pic, the White man is afraid of being criticized by his fellows for being too close to his own race, so he brings along, or finds along the way somewhere, a nonwhite person, and points to him/her, "See, I'm not so close to my own race after all."

    Similar racial-political dynamics for opposite ends.

    The difference is, Asians are expected/encouraged to be loyal to the race, and, to gain social approval, they can overtly do "racially loyal" things; meanwhile, Whites are expected/encouraged to be disloyal to the race, and, to gain social approval, can perform mini-acts or make statements showing how non-loyal they are.

    (Btw, the people on Reddit r/hapas would definitely disagree with her sign; they would say she is a "white supremacist," as they believe many East Asian women are. It is a fact they lament bitterly as a central cause of psychological problems in the children produced thereby, i.e., themselves; r/hapas is a fascinating but dark place to spend any amount of time.)
  67. @Anonymous
    The real issue is that handguns are not a defense against government/ZOG tyranny, but rifles are. If (bad)whites have to be rounded up and put in gulags, rifles will be the key impediment to doing so.

    Let's be honest, while pornhub is online and people aren't being carted off in railroad cars, status quo remains.

    USA will be within 20 years like Bosna was in 1990s. Train and prepare.

  68. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    ” Our house, our rules”

    I have strict criteria for who I allow into my house.

    How does that work for you?

  69. The liberal obsession with long guns shows they aren’t really serious about reducing gun deaths, they just want to be able to aim rhetoric and policy at whites who are the most common owners of rifles and commit a disproportionate share of the (rare) high publicity mass shootings.

    I’ll know the left is serious about actually preserving lives when they propose enhanced penalties for crimes committed with illegal firearms (or possession of) and stick with it even when it’s pointed out this will disproportionately affect the sons and boyfriends of their most loyal voting bloc.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    The liberal obsession with long guns shows they aren’t really serious about reducing gun deaths, they just want to be able to aim rhetoric and policy at whites who are the most common owners of rifles and commit a disproportionate share of the (rare) high publicity mass shootings.
     
    Disproportionately high, or low?
  70. @Prof. Woland

    USA Has a Big Murder Problem with Handguns But a Small Murder Problem with Rifles
     
    Actually, we have a big problem with black people.

    Col. Jeff Cooper one said, “America doesn’t have a crime problem, it has a race problem.”

  71. @Paleo Liberal
    One interesting thing -- the Asian gals who complain the most about white racism tend to have white boyfriends. They are worried about being criticized as "sellouts" by other Asians, so they go overboard in their anti-white racism. One notorious example was Sarah Jeong, who wrote her most hateful anti-white screeds while in a relationship with a white guy who was active in the alt-right movement.

    I don't know if this Jessie chick is one of them. But having gone to Exeter and NYU, there is certainly that possibility.

    Anyway, I despise people like her. I have a weird MSG allergy, which appears to be cumulative. Most of the time I avoid MSG like the plague, so if I get a little MSG it doesn't hurt me. If I get a lot of MSG over a period of time, it builds up in my system. I get headaches, and I have even gone into shock a few times. The worst was after I lived in Asia for a year. I thing the MSG built up in my system a lot, so even a small amount would trigger me.

    But I think about the times I went into shock from MSG. I would love to have this b*tch, and the other pro-MSG activists, go into shock themselves, and tell them it is all because of their racism.

    These @$$holes are truly dangerous. For a few years, I was in a relationship with a Chinese lady who had actually seen me go into shock, but who later decided it was all way-cism. The b*tch would actually put MSG in my food just to prove I was way-cist, and the times it didn't put me into shock were her "proof". I am so glad to be rid of her.

    However annoying the activists may be, you do not have an MSG allergy. It’s been studied up the ass.

    If you’re going to support a fake disease, you should pick something trendier. Joni Mitchell has Morgelons: Try that one. Or maybe “Chronic Lyme syndrome.,” Or “whiplash.”

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    Except all your "phony" diseases are real diseases.

    Sorry, but you lost all credibility there. You are truly an idiot. You spout out about "phony" diseases without even looking at the scientific evidence. Moron.

    According to the Mayo clinic, there are people who are senstive to MSG:

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196

    The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
     
    And so, I avoid MSG. By avoiding MSG, I have far fewer headaches, and I haven't gone into shock in over 20 years.

    I really don't give a flying f*** if avoiding headaches and other symptoms, up to and including shock, makes me a wayyyyy-cist or not.
  72. @Kronos
    Gun control organizations/policies were initially designed to limit gun access to blacks so to curb black-on-black gun violence. Which during the 1980s and 1990s reached its crescendo in the big cities.

    https://youtu.be/J4sKiGkzKJo

    The majority of urban white liberals never went hunting or enjoyed recreational shooting so gun restriction was a low impact self-governing policy. But in rural areas shooting was/is a staple of family life. Thus, you had potential compromises on laws that cracked down on handguns and rifles remained minimally restricted.

    But the Democratic Party’s “Coalition of the Fringes” isn’t doing too well (ask Hillary.) It needs black votes to remain at 90% levels for Democratic candidates to win nationally. So Democratic leaders on the national level are likely steering the anti-gun lobby machine toward rural areas to avoid showdowns with urban black leaderships. Thankfully, school shootings are extremely rare. But it gives the anti-gun lobby something to use against whites other than black gang violence. (Which strangely enough, make whites want to arm themselves.) So they go after targets that are so exceptionally rare it’s newsworthy.

    https://youtu.be/uel1vfAQ52M

    But the Democratic Party’s “Coalition of the Fringes” isn’t doing too well (ask Hillary.)

    That doesn’t necessarily follow. Hillary probably could have won the election if she had known how to run a decent campaign. She was at least as popular as Obama in 2008, but ran a campaign more designed to the GOP rules rather than the Democratic Party rules. (The two parties use different rules for selecting delegates. Had both parties used the Dem rules, the candidates would’ve been Obama and Romney. Had both parties used the GOP rules, the candidates would have been H. Clinton and McCain. Seeing as how Romney was, in fact, a better candidate than McCain, a case can be made that the Dems used the “better” rules, based on one data point).

    Hillary Clinton was more popular than Trump in 2016, but completely punted the Great Lakes area. Local Dem leaders were begging her campaign to send money for Get Out The Vote drives. As in driving voters to the polls, etc. A strong case can be made that H. Clinton would have won in 2016 if she had actually run a decent campaign.

    As for evidence for trouble in the Democratic Party, the loss of 1000 local seats during the Obama years is probably a far better indicator. To be fair to you, the loss of party structure in those years was probably a huge factor in Mrs. Clinton’s electoral college loss, so your example was not a BAD example. It just was a case where there was a very glaring case that showed other causes for her loss.

    I am not denying there is trouble in the Democratic Party. My family has been Dems since the days of Andy Jackson, and I hope my party can recover. I just think the one example you used was not the BEST example.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    I failed to press the reply button (my bad) and my reply-post is down below. Please see the gentleman being tortured on the rack. He’ll point you in the right direction. Also, if Hillary did win, do you think it would’ve been Bill Clinton’s “third term” or actually Obama’s “third term?”
  73. @Mr McKenna

    They will not leave us alone, ever.
     
    Sadly true, I'm afraid, as the recent experience of Hungary and Poland demonstrates.

    Simply put, in a police state you’re not supposed to own guns or even be allowed to defend yourself. This is what it’s all about. The rest is noise.

  74. @Foreign Expert
    The attack on the second amendment is just a Trojan Horse. Do you think think the Marxists will be satisfied with that? After the second amendment goes down, they will come for the first.

    After the second amendment goes down, they will come for the first.

    They seem to be working against both simultaneously.

  75. @Anon
    OT

    Tucker Carlson on the Adam Carolla Show during his book promotion in 2018:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUnqT1Hg8qo

    The first ten minutes might be of interest to Steve "I don't listen to podcasts" Sailer.

    The beginning of the interview is about Carlson's California upbringing: Both he and Carolla grew up in the Valley, Studio City for Carlson, North Hollywood for Carolla, the Valley Village part, lots of local inside baseball talk. Carlson's dad worked for Eyewitness News, channel 7. Carlson talks about how he had to flee; Carolla is still there, and he talks about the place has gone to hell ("barbed wire around freeway signs" to prevent Mexican gang graffiti).

    Wait a minute, has Steve Sailer’s Studio City become a gangster’s paradise?

  76. @Elli
    How many of the rifle murders were mass shootings? Most handgun murders are either domestic or young black men killing young black men, so they don't capture the imagination and fear of the general public the way "assault" rifles do . And the media plays up the alienated white man with a rifle and a plan in a way they don't the black man with a pistol and a grudge.

    Explosives got a lot harder to come by after the OKC bombing

    Planes got harder to board after 9/11.

    You never hear from the old media that the majority of serial killers are black.
    And no-one told “Criminal Minds”.

  77. In Austria, and a lot of other European countries I suspect, it is very easy for a citizen to get a shotgun, not terribly difficult to get a license to own a rifle, and very difficult to get a pistol. As a result, low IQ criminal types don’t have guns. Muggings and home invasions, while a problem, are simply not as scary as in the US, and cops are not afraid of normal criminals shooting them. Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    I remember reading an article in a UK publication about how criminals were converting Makarov "gas guns" into actual working firearms. (In Europe there is a class of self-defense weapons that have a tear gas expelling cartridge that functions a semi-automatic action.)

    " Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US."

    Translation: We have no Blacks (don't look too closely) but totally attribute our low crime to lack of guns so we can accuse the USA being atavistic.

    Remember, 100 years ago the UK had the same gun rights as Americans.
    , @J.Ross
    This is all nonsense. Many of those countries never had wide gun ownership and almost none had gun culture written into their foundational law. Home invasions and muggings are sufficiently terrifying that arguments about degree are incoherent. Europe only recently had the real issue that causes American crime, the huge and uncontrollable hostile alien population. The European criminal who wants a gun has no difficulty in obtaining one, as we have see time and again. And that difficulty will becomes less and less as police departments are filled more and more by diversity hires. European gun regulation normally means nobility can do whatever they want (gun-grabbers in the US feel the same way; one high level anti-Constitution activist holds a class III license and shoots his full auto rifles in competitions), while normal citizens are stuck, enshrining injustice into the government's DNA. That is a reason beside public safety to hate such laws. European normies are unaware of the Soviet-level anti-gun propaganda which has been written into their entertainments and constricts their news. A European NPC thus brainwashed therefore feels that there is no such thing as the safe handling of any gun even by an instructor, just like an American NPC feels vaguely thanks to CNN that Trump is the devil.
    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    "Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US."

    Wrong. You don't have negroes. Look at the data on murder rates controlled by race, available within this very comments of the post.

    You Euros make yourselves look really silly when you present your opinions of the US based on sitcom reruns.
    , @Polynikes
    You can get arrested for thought crimes in Europe. Any freedom you feel is just an illusion.
    , @JMcG
    The situation you describe is identical to that in Ireland, except it is very difficult to get a non-rimfire rifle. The drug gangs have no difficulty whatsoever in obtaining and using handguns in Dublin. Casual murderers have followed the lead of the Brits and have taken to knives.
    Now, knives have been freely available in both countries since time immemorial, but people weren’t going around killing each other with them, at least not in the numbers we are seeing now. What has changed?
  78. Gun control is about dividing R voters from R donors/wives.

  79. Hillary Clinton was more popular than Trump in 2016, but completely punted the Great Lakes area.

    But it raises the real question on why Hillary performed so badly in those areas. Many working class whites and welfare blacks must’ve been highly uneasy with another Clinton Presidency. Sure, they were part of the “blue wall” but many feared they’d be triangulated again on the Clinton torture rack. (Free-trade deals and welfare reform.) Did she avoid campaigning there because they’d be unessential in her presidential coalition? The whole “don’t call me, I’ll call you” treatment these blue strongholds received were nerve racking for voters and regional leaderships alike. The “deplorables” statement was likely seen as a “cut down the tall trees” backstabbing move. Most within the Coalition of the Fringes (except boomer yuppies) thought they’d be on the chopping block.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    As I mentioned, there were troubles with the coalition before Mrs. Clinton ran in 2016.

    I live in Wisconsin. I have seen the job losses here due to globalization (factories moving offshore, car factories closing because GM couldn't compete with Toyota, Americans being fired from meat packing jobs and replaced by illegal aliens) and automation.

    I've walked around in what was once the most notable factory in Milwaukee, with a famous clock tower, but is now used to create tools to automate factories. There were acres of empty space in the building.

    I've seen closed GM plants in Janesville. Massive factories with grass growing through the cracks in the parking lot.

    Those were the reasons the voters turned away from the GOP and went to Obama, hoping he would help them. When he didn't, they turned to Trump. Who will they turn to now?
    , @nebulafox
    I don't understand why it is so 'effin difficult for the Democrats to privately admit they made a mistake with the nomination in 2016 and resolve to move on and just make a better choice this year. Maybe they have, but judging from how the primary is going, I don't think so.

    If they can't win this year, then there is going to be a split. The proto-socialists and the corporate wings of the party will blame each other. It shouldn't be *difficult* to beat Trump, but screaming about Ukraine 24/7 isn't going to do the trick. Bush in 2004 and Obama in 2012 were plenty beatable, too, but we know how those elections turned out as a result of the opposition refusing to do what was needed to win.

  80. Since Bloomberg is running for president, the following oldie, but goodie seems appropriate:

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/feb/8/sughed-michael-bloomberg-suggests-disarming-minori/

  81. @JohnPlywood
    The U.S. doesn't have a "big murder problem" at all. Our murder rate has steadily declined for over 2 decades and is now approaching Western European levels.

    Why are so many people seemingly unable to realize this fact, choosing to obsess over who is committing the ever-declining number of homicides (i.e., black males) or what weapons are used? The crime data supports neither a left nor right-wing/white nationalist agenda.

    Our murder rate has steadily declined for over 2 decades and is now approaching Western European levels.

    If you were paying attention you might have noticed the recent (last 6 years) increase. This is a common iSteve theme, so I am surprised you missed it. I think it is reasonable to be concerned about that trend.

    Here is an article and graphic covering 1960-2016:
    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-u-s-murder-rate-is-up-but-still-far-below-its-1980-peak/

    They used the FBI UCR data: https://www.fbi.gov/services/cjis/ucr/publications
    The following years murder and non-negligent manslaughter rates were:
    2017: 5.4
    2018: 5.0
    Those tables also show:
    2014: 4.5
    2015: 5.0
    2016: 5.4

    The 2015 and 2016 numbers are 0.1 higher than in 538’s graphic. Not sure if they somehow excluded non-negligent-manslaughter or what else might explain that difference.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    John Plywood is likely a sock puppet troll. These relatively new commenters with the style of first name/last name handles - Sam Coulton, John Arthur, etc. - are all likely the same person.
    , @JohnPlywood
    It you were paying attention you would realize this teeny weeny increase is already described in the literature (known "Ferguson effect") and ended two years ago.

    Then again it's kind of hard to pay attention when you spent the last 30 years huffing radon gas as a substitute for LSD, and your sole source of information about the world are your niche altright web blogs.

  82. @Paleo Liberal
    I remember the old days when all the fuss was on hand guns.

    The difference is, assault rifles are used more often in mass shootings, which are scarier and get more publicity.

    Just as automobiles are more dangerous than airplanes, but you never get car crashes with 100+ people dying.

    The scary publicity surrounding use of rifles, or more properly “assault rifles”, has more to do with removing weaponry from the hands of the citizenry targeted by the left for terrorization & elimination. While I am under no illusions that a citizenry, even one armed with long guns, could go toe to toe with a military/para-military being used to forward the leftist goals of terrorization & elimination in a maximal assault, it still tips the balance away from a state monopoly on deadly violence; maybe the “Good Germans” of those state forces might think twice about their possible deaths if those deaths were a real possibility when they are following the orders of their tyrannical masters against the citizenry.

    After all, lefties have been fond of saying how things might have gone differently if the Gestapo was met with deadly violence when rounding up communists & Jews. Solzhenitsyn had similar things to say about deadly violence against roundups by communist thugs during the Red Terror. And death being dealt to the leaders of persecutions from hundreds of yards away in targeted assassinations using long guns might instill a healthy dose of fear in the apparatchiks, and a fear not limited to the minds of their frontline bully boys only.

    Also, if some death squad of leftist irregulars like antifas got wasted in enfilading fire when assaulting a mobilized, and prepared community, these freelance terrorists might stop their bullshit.

    The day is coming closer, maybe closer than you think, when bastards like Northam are openly gun grabbing like he and his allies want to do so they can grind us under their heels. The Tree of Liberty must from time to time be watered with the blood of Patriots and tyrants. So said my hero Thomas Jefferson.

    Lines are being drawn. As the old union song had it, “Which side are you on?”

    • Replies: @res
    It's funny how often the cry "Nazi!" is heard for links which are relatively weak compared to the gun control comparison: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazi_gun_control_argument

    The spin control in the intro to that page (it is Wikipedia after all) is interesting.

    The Nazi gun control argument is a belief that gun regulations in the Third Reich helped to facilitate the rise of the Nazis and the Holocaust.[1][2][3] The majority of historians and fact-checkers have described the argument as "dubious,"[4] "questionable,"[5] "preposterous,"[6] "tendentious,"[3] or "problematic."[2] This argument is frequently employed by opponents of gun control in debates on U.S. gun politics. Questions about its validity, and about the motives behind its inception, have been raised by scholars. Proponents in the United States have used it as part of a "security against tyranny" argument, while opponents have referred to it as a form of Reductio ad Hitlerum.[7]
     
    P.S. We need to come up with a form of Woke Bingo for articles like this. Some suggestions for keywords: dubious, questionable, preposterous, tendentious, problematic, Nazi, racist, white supremacy, debunked, pseudoscience, problematic, etc.

    P.P.S. It might also be fun to come up with TV commercial trope bingo for the upcoming Superbowl.
    , @Joe Stalin
    "And death being dealt to the leaders of persecutions from hundreds of yards away in targeted assassinations using long guns might instill a healthy dose of fear in the apparatchiks, and a fear not limited to the minds of their frontline bully boys only."

    I think there's a familiar French song that's relevant even today.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laWIjgWDesE

    Too bad they can't be singing this in VA today.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome


    While I am under no illusions that a citizenry, even one armed with long guns, could go toe to toe with a military/para-military...

     

    Like, for instance, ANTIFA?
  83. @Peter Akuleyev
    In Austria, and a lot of other European countries I suspect, it is very easy for a citizen to get a shotgun, not terribly difficult to get a license to own a rifle, and very difficult to get a pistol. As a result, low IQ criminal types don't have guns. Muggings and home invasions, while a problem, are simply not as scary as in the US, and cops are not afraid of normal criminals shooting them. Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US.

    I remember reading an article in a UK publication about how criminals were converting Makarov “gas guns” into actual working firearms. (In Europe there is a class of self-defense weapons that have a tear gas expelling cartridge that functions a semi-automatic action.)

    ” Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US.”

    Translation: We have no Blacks (don’t look too closely) but totally attribute our low crime to lack of guns so we can accuse the USA being atavistic.

    Remember, 100 years ago the UK had the same gun rights as Americans.

  84. @Kronos

    Hillary Clinton was more popular than Trump in 2016, but completely punted the Great Lakes area.
     
    But it raises the real question on why Hillary performed so badly in those areas. Many working class whites and welfare blacks must’ve been highly uneasy with another Clinton Presidency. Sure, they were part of the “blue wall” but many feared they’d be triangulated again on the Clinton torture rack. (Free-trade deals and welfare reform.) Did she avoid campaigning there because they’d be unessential in her presidential coalition? The whole “don’t call me, I’ll call you” treatment these blue strongholds received were nerve racking for voters and regional leaderships alike. The “deplorables” statement was likely seen as a “cut down the tall trees” backstabbing move. Most within the Coalition of the Fringes (except boomer yuppies) thought they’d be on the chopping block.

    http://www.top10fun.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/13082_The-rack-torture-740x416.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/Shattered-Inside-Hillary-Clintons-Campaign/dp/0553447084

    https://youtu.be/6RW6tLBxxqg

    As I mentioned, there were troubles with the coalition before Mrs. Clinton ran in 2016.

    I live in Wisconsin. I have seen the job losses here due to globalization (factories moving offshore, car factories closing because GM couldn’t compete with Toyota, Americans being fired from meat packing jobs and replaced by illegal aliens) and automation.

    I’ve walked around in what was once the most notable factory in Milwaukee, with a famous clock tower, but is now used to create tools to automate factories. There were acres of empty space in the building.

    I’ve seen closed GM plants in Janesville. Massive factories with grass growing through the cracks in the parking lot.

    Those were the reasons the voters turned away from the GOP and went to Obama, hoping he would help them. When he didn’t, they turned to Trump. Who will they turn to now?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    Those were the reasons the voters turned away from the GOP and went to Obama, hoping he would help them. When he didn’t, they turned to Trump. Who will they turn to now?
     
    Biden may be able to use his influence to create lucrative jobs for them in the Ukraine.

    The biggest problem is the dearth of good-paying blue collar jobs with pensions and good health coverage in the current economy, and this is the case in all the advanced economies, not just the US.

    Part of the solution might be to create more government jobs to take up the slack created by manufacturing industries outsourcing production to low wage economies overseas.

    Let every government employee have an understudy. Another might be a massive government-funded construction program building a wall along the southern border using military engineers. Another might be hiring thousands of new ICE agents. And a program to send illegal aliens into space.

    The states could also hire more people.

  85. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    I like the idea. I will submit the following law to my local town board:

    “No negro or mulatto whatsoever, shall keep or carry any gun, powder, shot, club or other weapon whatsoever, offensive or defensive, but all and every gun weapon and ammunition found in the possession or custody of any negro or mulatto, may be seized by any person, and upon due proof thereof made before any justice of the peace of the district where such seizure shall be, shall by his order be forfeited to the seizor, for his own use.”

  86. @Anon
    However annoying the activists may be, you do not have an MSG allergy. It's been studied up the ass.

    If you're going to support a fake disease, you should pick something trendier. Joni Mitchell has Morgelons: Try that one. Or maybe "Chronic Lyme syndrome.," Or "whiplash."

    Except all your “phony” diseases are real diseases.

    Sorry, but you lost all credibility there. You are truly an idiot. You spout out about “phony” diseases without even looking at the scientific evidence. Moron.

    According to the Mayo clinic, there are people who are senstive to MSG:

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196

    The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.

    And so, I avoid MSG. By avoiding MSG, I have far fewer headaches, and I haven’t gone into shock in over 20 years.

    I really don’t give a flying f*** if avoiding headaches and other symptoms, up to and including shock, makes me a wayyyyy-cist or not.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I had a bad reaction to MSG in the early 1970s before I'd ever heard that it might be a problem. I don't see why people have to deny the reality of this just because it's never happened to them.
    , @Lot
    Probably the reaction is to overused and rancid frying oil plus a ton of salt. The people who say they are sensitive don’t react when given MSG in a capsule.
    , @Peterike
    Do you get headaches from Parmesan cheese?
    , @anon
    There are lots of Asians who are paranoid about and anti-MSG as well. Koreans in particular. I worked with a Korean lady who would blame MSG every time she felt bad or had a headache after having takeout at lunch. It seemed like it was indigestion or a blood sugar spike and crash from the meal, but she would insist it was MSG. Lots of Korean food packaging advertises that it's MSG-free. MSG comes from Japan, so maybe the Koreans are extra paranoid about it.

    http://mengnews.joins.com/view.aspx?aid=3055763

    MSG has long been considered something to avoid in Korea.

    MSG, which is also found in natural ingredients, has long been widely thought of as something created chemically. However, the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety earlier this year decided not to call it a chemical compound, as MSG is made out of sugar cane extracts.

    In recent years, the ministry has been also using its online blogs and other websites to explain what MSG is and how to consumer it. L-monosodium glutamate was first designated as a food additive in 1962 in Korea after it was first designated in Japan in 1948.

    One physics professor in Japan in 1908 discovered what makes umami, or gamchilmat in Korean. This comes from kelp broth, asparagus, tomatoes or other the products that contain glutamate. He added salt to it to make L-monosodium glutamate. The Food Safety Ministry in Korea explained in a blog post last year that the release of such an item was revolutionary, as ordinary people could get meaty flavor in their soups and other dishes without the need for meat.

    About 20 years ago, many companies, wanting to give off a chemical-free image and take the lead in the market started advertising their products’ MSG-free status. This spread the idea that MSG is harmful. Many testimonies about headaches, obesity or indigestion caused by MSG arose. However, the local Food Safety Ministry has said MSG is a safe food additive, and it doesn’t even post a recommended daily consumption limit.
     
    , @Anon

    By avoiding MSG, I have far fewer headaches, and I haven’t gone into shock in over 20 years.
     
    By definition people suffering from psychogenic conditions think that they have symptoms like headaches. And you've never gone into shock, or you'd be dead, unless you mean something other than anaphylactic shock.

    The "patient info" at the mayoclinic.org site is not the same as the Mayo Clinic. It's primarily a money making content site with advertising. Google uses a so-called "EAT YMYL" algorithm for ranking health and investment websites, so health sites hire underpaid, marginally credentialed writers to produce clickbait content that will rank. In the case you cited, a registered dietitian wrote the content. Her day gig is planning hospital food menus at the Mayo Clinic, i.e., she adds up Nutiriton Facts numbers in a spreadsheet to keep the calories, salt, and sugar low. She is not a medical professional familiar with the research literature.

    But even so, read what she wrote with the sort of critical eye you'd use if you were taking the LSAT:

    -- MSG is classified as GRAS, "generally recognized as safe," by the FDA (seizures? nope).

    -- It's "controversial"; so is Obama's birth certificate.

    -- There are anecdotal reports of adverse reactions, and people on the internet have compiled long lists of symptoms (that weirdly are the same symptoms for chronic fatigue syndrome and dozens of other internet diseases).

    -- No definitive evidence of a link between MSG and symptoms.

    -- Some people may "have" (i.e. "report") symptoms, which are mild and don't require treatment (i.e., no Epipen necessary).

    -- "The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG." What does this even mean? The only way to prevent a psychogenic reaction is not to do the thing you delusionally think will cause it.

    Re Morgellons: The CDC was hectored by a congressman with a loopy wife to study Morgellons, so they did, and it came up with zip.

    https://slate.com/human-interest/2012/01/morgellons-disease-the-cdc-study-that-debunks-the-skin-ailment.html

    Re: Chronic Lyme, you need to read between the lines, but this is the closest the CDC ever gets to calling something complete bullshit:

    https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/postlds/index.html

    Re Whiplash: Whiplash is a spinal injury that doesn't show up in any sort of imaging whatsoever, and is only diagnosed from patient complaingts. There is a high correlation between patients who have been in an automobile accident with an insured driver and whiplash diagnoses. But the weirdest thing is that 99 percent of whiplash cases occur in the United States, Canada, and Australia. I guess cars (and spines) are made differently in other countries ... or else it's a socially constructed disease. There's a quite entertaining literature on whiplash.
  87. @Digital Samizdat

    The difference is, assault rifles are used more often in mass shootings, which are scarier and get more publicity.
     
    That may be true, but it's nothing new. Way back in 1966, Charles Whitman, a former Marine sniper, shot and killed 17 people at the UT campus with a hunting rifle.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Whitman

    And while some of the signature assassinations of the era--such as RFK, and the attempted killing of George Wallace--were carried out with handguns, the two that kicked off the trend--JFK and MLK--were committed with rifles instead (although, if it was indeed the CIA that did it, I'm sure they had a permit for them!

    So high-profile crimes committed with rifles are hardly a recent development. But back then, they were understood for what they were: unusual, freakish, and statistically unlikely. Then as now, the vast majority of gun deaths were the result of handguns used in the commission of common crimes, such a liquor-store holdups or drug deals gone bad.

    Well, if you believe James Files, the fatal shot of JFK was with a long range pistol.

    http://www.jfkmurdersolved.com/fireball1.htm

  88. @Mr McKenna
    We'll see. My thought is that it really doesn't matter how many show up, or even what they do. What matters is what the MSM decide to show, and how. And that is relatively predictable.

    In 2003 the MSM were so on-board with Iraq War Now! that they made short shrift of a million protestors in Washington DC.

    It will matter. If few Americans protest then the politicians will eliminate the 2nd amendment via more laws and regulations. If a significant number of protesters demonstrate then some politicians and judges may think twice about banning gun ownership.

    I attended the Persian Gulf War protests in 1991 in Washington DC , which was actually much larger than the protests which took place in 2003. You are correct that the press downplayed the protests. They reported about 100,000 at the 1991 Gulf war protests and less than 50,000 in 2003 protesting the Iraq War in DC. The biggest protest in 2003 was in NYC , when over 400,00 people protested the Iraq War.

    I realized that the anti-war protesters were bunch of Frauds when they mostly supported Clintons military against Iraq. Clinton dropped more bombs on Iraq and fired more cruise missiles on Iraq than Bush did in 1991. Yet there were zero protests. The same people I protested with in 1991 fully supported Clinton and ignored his military actions. Just as they ignored the military interventions done by Obama and kept quiet when he used military actions to promote regime change in Libya and sent troops into Syria to overthrow the Syrian government.

    The anti-war people are just anti-GOP and actually fully support most of the military actions when done by a Democratic President.

  89. @Paleo Liberal

    But the Democratic Party’s “Coalition of the Fringes” isn’t doing too well (ask Hillary.)
     
    That doesn't necessarily follow. Hillary probably could have won the election if she had known how to run a decent campaign. She was at least as popular as Obama in 2008, but ran a campaign more designed to the GOP rules rather than the Democratic Party rules. (The two parties use different rules for selecting delegates. Had both parties used the Dem rules, the candidates would've been Obama and Romney. Had both parties used the GOP rules, the candidates would have been H. Clinton and McCain. Seeing as how Romney was, in fact, a better candidate than McCain, a case can be made that the Dems used the "better" rules, based on one data point).

    Hillary Clinton was more popular than Trump in 2016, but completely punted the Great Lakes area. Local Dem leaders were begging her campaign to send money for Get Out The Vote drives. As in driving voters to the polls, etc. A strong case can be made that H. Clinton would have won in 2016 if she had actually run a decent campaign.

    As for evidence for trouble in the Democratic Party, the loss of 1000 local seats during the Obama years is probably a far better indicator. To be fair to you, the loss of party structure in those years was probably a huge factor in Mrs. Clinton's electoral college loss, so your example was not a BAD example. It just was a case where there was a very glaring case that showed other causes for her loss.

    I am not denying there is trouble in the Democratic Party. My family has been Dems since the days of Andy Jackson, and I hope my party can recover. I just think the one example you used was not the BEST example.

    I failed to press the reply button (my bad) and my reply-post is down below. Please see the gentleman being tortured on the rack. He’ll point you in the right direction. Also, if Hillary did win, do you think it would’ve been Bill Clinton’s “third term” or actually Obama’s “third term?”

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    Thank you, I was able to find your post, and by now my reply should have gone through.

    I am not sure that either Bill's 3rd term or Obama's 3rd term would have been accurate.

    It appeared to me that in 2008 Mrs. Clinton tried to put Bill's coalition back together to win the election, but it didn't work. It appeared to me that in 2016 Mrs. Clinton tried to piggyback onto Obama's coalition, which almost worked.

    At some point, Mrs. Clinton was running against her husband's policy's, esp. immigration policies. Bill seemed to have a lesser role in her campaign than she had in his campaigns. BUT, I am not an insider, and I haven't talked to insiders about this in many years.

    One of the more interesting insights I got from insiders back in the day. One of Hillary Clinton's closest Arkansas friends and advisers advised Hillary NOT to move to NY and run for the Senate. The phrase "carpet bagger" came up in the discussion. This friend, who was also a friend of my family, suggested Hillary move back to her childhood home in Illinois, and run for the Senate in 2004. Hillary ignored the suggestion. This friend's advice in previous election cycles had prevented disaster for Bill Clinton, but Hillary thought she knew better.

    I suppose Hillary thought the 2004 Illinois Senate seat wouldn't be a good stepping stone to the White House.

    So who did run for the Illinois Senate seat? Some unknown guy named Barack Obama. You may have heard of him.
  90. @Paleo Liberal
    Except all your "phony" diseases are real diseases.

    Sorry, but you lost all credibility there. You are truly an idiot. You spout out about "phony" diseases without even looking at the scientific evidence. Moron.

    According to the Mayo clinic, there are people who are senstive to MSG:

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196

    The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
     
    And so, I avoid MSG. By avoiding MSG, I have far fewer headaches, and I haven't gone into shock in over 20 years.

    I really don't give a flying f*** if avoiding headaches and other symptoms, up to and including shock, makes me a wayyyyy-cist or not.

    I had a bad reaction to MSG in the early 1970s before I’d ever heard that it might be a problem. I don’t see why people have to deny the reality of this just because it’s never happened to them.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    You can see an arm or leg in a cast.
    You can’t see someone else’s headache.

    For the less logically minded, that makes the headache fake.
  91. @Achmed E. Newman
    The big gun rally is tomorrow in Richmond. I've said it before, and I'll say it again: there's power in numbers. If there are 10,000 gun-rights supporters out, they cannot be Charlottesvilled like a few dozen can.

    “Charlottesvilled”

    It’s also a good idea to ban agent provocateurs like DOJ asset and clothes horse Richard Spencer from your rally.

    • Replies: @bigdicknick
    is there evidence Richard is a fed? He seems like just an idiot.
  92. @Kronos
    I failed to press the reply button (my bad) and my reply-post is down below. Please see the gentleman being tortured on the rack. He’ll point you in the right direction. Also, if Hillary did win, do you think it would’ve been Bill Clinton’s “third term” or actually Obama’s “third term?”

    Thank you, I was able to find your post, and by now my reply should have gone through.

    I am not sure that either Bill’s 3rd term or Obama’s 3rd term would have been accurate.

    It appeared to me that in 2008 Mrs. Clinton tried to put Bill’s coalition back together to win the election, but it didn’t work. It appeared to me that in 2016 Mrs. Clinton tried to piggyback onto Obama’s coalition, which almost worked.

    At some point, Mrs. Clinton was running against her husband’s policy’s, esp. immigration policies. Bill seemed to have a lesser role in her campaign than she had in his campaigns. BUT, I am not an insider, and I haven’t talked to insiders about this in many years.

    One of the more interesting insights I got from insiders back in the day. One of Hillary Clinton’s closest Arkansas friends and advisers advised Hillary NOT to move to NY and run for the Senate. The phrase “carpet bagger” came up in the discussion. This friend, who was also a friend of my family, suggested Hillary move back to her childhood home in Illinois, and run for the Senate in 2004. Hillary ignored the suggestion. This friend’s advice in previous election cycles had prevented disaster for Bill Clinton, but Hillary thought she knew better.

    I suppose Hillary thought the 2004 Illinois Senate seat wouldn’t be a good stepping stone to the White House.

    So who did run for the Illinois Senate seat? Some unknown guy named Barack Obama. You may have heard of him.

    • Replies: @Kronos

    So who did run for the Illinois Senate seat? Some unknown guy named Barack Obama. You may have heard of him.
     
    You mean Barry “Yo Mama?” Yeah, I’ve heard a thing or two. I’m currently reading David Garrow’s biography “Rising Star” on him right now. Here he is as a state senator getting verbally roughed-up by his colleagues in the Illinois State Senate.

    The next day, Senate Judiciary approved Barack’s SB 574, authorizing administrative hearings for alleged violations of municipal ordinances, but Thursday, March 13, was Barack’s rookie debut on the Senate floor, as his SB 837, authorizing the directory of graduating Chicago city college students, came up for passage. The Senate had a long tradition of “roasting” new members when they rose to request passage of their first bill, but Barack suffered a far rougher debut than most. This was due in part to how he had knocked Alice Palmer off the 1996 primary ballot, but to a far greater degree it illustrated the stark dislike several Chicago African American senators had for their new young upstart colleague.

    “I come humbly before you on this extremely humble bill,” Barack began, explaining that it “authorizes the community colleges to develop and distribute a directory of graduating vocational and technical school students,” an idea that someone at Kennedy-King College had suggested to Barack.

    Rickey Hendon, a forty-three-year-old West Sider who had entered the Senate four years earlier after serving as 27th Ward alderman, was quick on the attack. “Senator, could you correctly pronounce your name for me? I’m having a little trouble with it,” perhaps because Hendon and his buddy Donne Trotter had under their breaths already been mouthing a variety of insulting quips like “Yo Mama,” targeting the visibly self-confident, or arrogant, new hotshot. After Barack answered, Hendon said, “Is that Irish?” “It will be when I run countywide,” Barack replied. “That was a good joke, but this bill’s still going to die. This directory, would that have those 1-800 sex line numbers in this directory?”

    Hendon queried. Walter Dudycz, often the presiding officer, called on Barack to answer Hendon’s question, and Barack replied, “I apologize. I wasn’t paying Senator Hendon any attention.” Hendon responded, “Well, clearly, as poorly as this legislation is drafted, you didn’t pay it much attention, either. My question was: Are the 1-800 sex line numbers going to be in this directory?” Barack stumbled, citing where the idea came from and declaring that those numbers would not be included. Hendon proceded. “I seem to recall a very lovely senator by the name of Palmer—much easier to pronounce than Obama—and she always had cookies and nice things to say, and you don’t have anything to give us around your desk. How do you expect to get votes? And you don’t even wear nice perfume like Senator Palmer did.”
     

    , @Jonathan Mason

    At some point, Mrs. Clinton was running against her husband’s policy’s, esp. immigration policies. Bill seemed to have a lesser role in her campaign than she had in his campaigns.
     
    She said a lot of very stupid things in her campaigns that suggested she had not paid much attention during her period of office in her husband's kitchen cabinet. She also might have taken better advice when it came to her vote in favor of invading Iraq. Had she opposed the invasion of Iraq, she would have been in a much better position to campaign on the basis of showing sound judgment and leadership, instead of having to claim that she was tricked by George Bush.

    Instead, the Democratic nomination went to a vociferous opponent of Iraq who looked more like a leader. Can't think of his name now.

    Tony Blair was another whose career foundered over Iraq, though spending time alone with Rupert Murdoch's wife probably didn't help him either.

  93. @PseudoNhymm
    And Virginia? Where a bunch of blue state elites took over and are forcing the rural counties to disarm, 95% of which disagree. Do they all just pack up and move to Texas? And when Texas turns blue in 8 years, do they move again? At what point is an inalienable right inalienable?

    Texas has the right to bear arms codified in its state constitution. The state would have to do a lot more than turn blue to get rid of RKBA.

  94. Murder victims are 22 times more likely to be killed with a handgun as with a rifle, but most of the gun control energy in recent years has been paid to rifles.

    Partly ignorance and partly rifles are a wedge issue. After semi auto rifles are banned they will come after handguns, for sure.

    Unless the US gains control over mass third world immigration, demographic change will do for the US’s relatively liberal (in the classical meaning ‘free’ sense) firearm laws underpinned by the 2nd Amendment.

  95. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    For those of us who commute into a big city that is politically controlled by the Left’s vote banks (which is approximately all of them), letting cities enact their own firearm regulations is a non-starter. We all know what happens: first thing the city council does is disarm the commuters, your state-issued CCW permit is no good here. And yes, we have a database of CCW holders and their license plates, for officer safety, don’t you know, so your fender-bender or targeted enforcement speeding citation turns into jail time if you ignore the ordinance, and having a CCW license means you get a search of your car and a patdown if you ever interact with a cop. (Of course, if you follow the city’s ordinance, you might pay the Reginald Denny tax, so choose wisely.)

    If your region has a lot of municipalities around the big Leftist city, they all adopt different asinine regulations that add up to no realistic possibility of compliance. City 1 says no magazines >10 rounds, city 2 says no mags >8 rounds, city 3 says no hollow-point bullets, city 4 says no night sights, city 5 says revolvers are fine but semiautos are bad, city 6 bans anything over .380 caliber, city 7 bans anything centerfire, and by the way you have to drive through all of them to get to and from work, or just going about your daily life.

    Then there’s enforcement on the interstate. Drive through our town, even at 65 mph with no intention of stopping, follow our rules. The patchwork-of-municipalities problem above is now nationwide.

    This is what will happen, because it’s what has happened, and why NRA-ILA spent so much time pushing statewide preemption of local firearm regulation. The incentives pushing urban pols to do this haven’t gone away.

  96. @Anon
    OT

    Tucker Carlson on the Adam Carolla Show during his book promotion in 2018:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUnqT1Hg8qo

    The first ten minutes might be of interest to Steve "I don't listen to podcasts" Sailer.

    The beginning of the interview is about Carlson's California upbringing: Both he and Carolla grew up in the Valley, Studio City for Carlson, North Hollywood for Carolla, the Valley Village part, lots of local inside baseball talk. Carlson's dad worked for Eyewitness News, channel 7. Carlson talks about how he had to flee; Carolla is still there, and he talks about the place has gone to hell ("barbed wire around freeway signs" to prevent Mexican gang graffiti).

    “barbed wire around freeway signs”

    This is something I noticed after moving to LA from NorCal in the late 1990s: the prevalence of barbed wire. Even in such sedate settings (for LA) like Studio City and Burbank, barbed wire spread like ivy around parking lots, strip malls, garbage dumpsters, and so on. There is a siege mentality at work in LA, even in the more desirable areas. I still like LA, but full time residency is not conducive to mental health.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    In Mexico you would have a wall around your property topped with broken glass. Because Mexicans.
    , @Hail

    Even in such sedate settings (for LA) like Studio City and Burbank, barbed wire spread like ivy around parking lots, strip malls, garbage dumpsters, and so on. There is a siege mentality at work in LA, even in the more desirable areas.
     
    I think this is a good observation and want to quote it. It is in line with my experiences in Southern California (by now certainly not just LA). Though I have spent only a cumulative few weeks of my life in the state, in various visits and passings-through.

    I wonder if Steve Sailer or other native/lifelong Californians feel the same. (I understand Steve lived in/around LA from birth to 1976, and 2000 to present and frequent visits during the intervening years). And when they'd peg the siege mentality as emerging.

    I cannot imagine it was true in the 1950s, but it was certainly true by the 1990s. I think a glance at this graph might give a clue...:

    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/california-population-by-race-1940-to-2020-five-year-intervals.png

    ("‘Who Lost California?’ The ‘When,’ the ‘Who,’ and the ‘Why’ of California’s Decline from Midwest-on-the-Pacific to Brazil-on-the-Pacific")
  97. @Paleo Liberal
    Thank you, I was able to find your post, and by now my reply should have gone through.

    I am not sure that either Bill's 3rd term or Obama's 3rd term would have been accurate.

    It appeared to me that in 2008 Mrs. Clinton tried to put Bill's coalition back together to win the election, but it didn't work. It appeared to me that in 2016 Mrs. Clinton tried to piggyback onto Obama's coalition, which almost worked.

    At some point, Mrs. Clinton was running against her husband's policy's, esp. immigration policies. Bill seemed to have a lesser role in her campaign than she had in his campaigns. BUT, I am not an insider, and I haven't talked to insiders about this in many years.

    One of the more interesting insights I got from insiders back in the day. One of Hillary Clinton's closest Arkansas friends and advisers advised Hillary NOT to move to NY and run for the Senate. The phrase "carpet bagger" came up in the discussion. This friend, who was also a friend of my family, suggested Hillary move back to her childhood home in Illinois, and run for the Senate in 2004. Hillary ignored the suggestion. This friend's advice in previous election cycles had prevented disaster for Bill Clinton, but Hillary thought she knew better.

    I suppose Hillary thought the 2004 Illinois Senate seat wouldn't be a good stepping stone to the White House.

    So who did run for the Illinois Senate seat? Some unknown guy named Barack Obama. You may have heard of him.

    So who did run for the Illinois Senate seat? Some unknown guy named Barack Obama. You may have heard of him.

    You mean Barry “Yo Mama?” Yeah, I’ve heard a thing or two. I’m currently reading David Garrow’s biography “Rising Star” on him right now. Here he is as a state senator getting verbally roughed-up by his colleagues in the Illinois State Senate.

    The next day, Senate Judiciary approved Barack’s SB 574, authorizing administrative hearings for alleged violations of municipal ordinances, but Thursday, March 13, was Barack’s rookie debut on the Senate floor, as his SB 837, authorizing the directory of graduating Chicago city college students, came up for passage. The Senate had a long tradition of “roasting” new members when they rose to request passage of their first bill, but Barack suffered a far rougher debut than most. This was due in part to how he had knocked Alice Palmer off the 1996 primary ballot, but to a far greater degree it illustrated the stark dislike several Chicago African American senators had for their new young upstart colleague.

    “I come humbly before you on this extremely humble bill,” Barack began, explaining that it “authorizes the community colleges to develop and distribute a directory of graduating vocational and technical school students,” an idea that someone at Kennedy-King College had suggested to Barack.

    Rickey Hendon, a forty-three-year-old West Sider who had entered the Senate four years earlier after serving as 27th Ward alderman, was quick on the attack. “Senator, could you correctly pronounce your name for me? I’m having a little trouble with it,” perhaps because Hendon and his buddy Donne Trotter had under their breaths already been mouthing a variety of insulting quips like “Yo Mama,” targeting the visibly self-confident, or arrogant, new hotshot. After Barack answered, Hendon said, “Is that Irish?” “It will be when I run countywide,” Barack replied. “That was a good joke, but this bill’s still going to die. This directory, would that have those 1-800 sex line numbers in this directory?”

    Hendon queried. Walter Dudycz, often the presiding officer, called on Barack to answer Hendon’s question, and Barack replied, “I apologize. I wasn’t paying Senator Hendon any attention.” Hendon responded, “Well, clearly, as poorly as this legislation is drafted, you didn’t pay it much attention, either. My question was: Are the 1-800 sex line numbers going to be in this directory?” Barack stumbled, citing where the idea came from and declaring that those numbers would not be included. Hendon proceded. “I seem to recall a very lovely senator by the name of Palmer—much easier to pronounce than Obama—and she always had cookies and nice things to say, and you don’t have anything to give us around your desk. How do you expect to get votes? And you don’t even wear nice perfume like Senator Palmer did.”

  98. @Peter Akuleyev
    In Austria, and a lot of other European countries I suspect, it is very easy for a citizen to get a shotgun, not terribly difficult to get a license to own a rifle, and very difficult to get a pistol. As a result, low IQ criminal types don't have guns. Muggings and home invasions, while a problem, are simply not as scary as in the US, and cops are not afraid of normal criminals shooting them. Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US.

    This is all nonsense. Many of those countries never had wide gun ownership and almost none had gun culture written into their foundational law. Home invasions and muggings are sufficiently terrifying that arguments about degree are incoherent. Europe only recently had the real issue that causes American crime, the huge and uncontrollable hostile alien population. The European criminal who wants a gun has no difficulty in obtaining one, as we have see time and again. And that difficulty will becomes less and less as police departments are filled more and more by diversity hires. European gun regulation normally means nobility can do whatever they want (gun-grabbers in the US feel the same way; one high level anti-Constitution activist holds a class III license and shoots his full auto rifles in competitions), while normal citizens are stuck, enshrining injustice into the government’s DNA. That is a reason beside public safety to hate such laws. European normies are unaware of the Soviet-level anti-gun propaganda which has been written into their entertainments and constricts their news. A European NPC thus brainwashed therefore feels that there is no such thing as the safe handling of any gun even by an instructor, just like an American NPC feels vaguely thanks to CNN that Trump is the devil.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    Pretty much your entire post is nonsense. Europeans have a long gun culture. Europe was awash in guns in the 1940s, for obvious reasons. In the 1950s and 60s it was still common to find veterans with weapons at home. Compulsory military service, until very recently, assured that the average European male actually had more hands on experience with firearms than the average American male. The beauty of military service is that it usually treats you to respect firearms but not to fetishize them.

    The European criminal who wants a gun generally fails. Hence the high number of terrorist attacks with cars, knives, etc. Normal citizens (white indigenous population) can get guns fairly easily. All that the NRA does is put hand guns in the hands of blacks and Latinos and then lecture us about "freedom". Wake the hell up.
  99. My summary of former Navy SEAL and non-insane author Matt Bracken is still in moderation but a favorable direct link to Andrew fucking Anglin went through?

  100. @MikeatMikedotMike
    Cracking down on handguns would require law enforcement to crack down on negroes. Cracking down on negroes is bad publicity. Politicians, bureaucrats, and media honchos know this.

    Easier to invent a crisis (like frat boy campus rape culture) than to honestly deal with one (college negro athletes raping white coeds on campus.)

    Could not have said it any better. The truth right there!

  101. @Harry Baldwin
    I had a bad reaction to MSG in the early 1970s before I'd ever heard that it might be a problem. I don't see why people have to deny the reality of this just because it's never happened to them.

    You can see an arm or leg in a cast.
    You can’t see someone else’s headache.

    For the less logically minded, that makes the headache fake.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    This is the future. They already told rape victims, at the height of a rape panic, that they were just racist liars. A headache is less to disempathize with than rape. In the future, if a white person is clearly suffering cardiac arrest, the standard response will be giggling.
  102. Off-topic, but this being isteve, relevant to the blog – the pale male inventor of the laser printer has passed on:

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/gary-starkweather-invented-a-laser-printer-at-xerox-11579024691

  103. As the Yugoslav Wars demonstrated, rifles are far more effective in civil conflict than handguns. Progressives know they must disarm the historic American people of rifles before they can fully dispossess them.

  104. [The overture to Richard Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde plays with added walkie-talkie static effects. Start black and fade in slowly –]
    In “Trump’s America,” lawful citizens of every race and creed peacefully exercise their right to protest the government — who will save us from this nightmare?
    https://postimg.cc/LqPfdXzn

  105. @Paleo Liberal
    You can see an arm or leg in a cast.
    You can’t see someone else’s headache.

    For the less logically minded, that makes the headache fake.

    This is the future. They already told rape victims, at the height of a rape panic, that they were just racist liars. A headache is less to disempathize with than rape. In the future, if a white person is clearly suffering cardiac arrest, the standard response will be giggling.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    From what I can find, the "MSG allergy equals racism/xenophobia" campaign is quite openly run by the Japanese company which manufactures MSG.

    Which makes them just as trustworthy as depending on cigarette makers for lung cancer information.

    So this is it. A company in Japan, perhaps the most racist and xenophobic country in the world, is calling everyone sickened by their product a racist and a xenophobe. This from the fine people who brought us Pearl Harbor and the Rape of Nanking. (*)

    (*) Some Japanese claim the Rape of Nanking never happened. I went to the Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial in Taipei, where they have tons of evidence that it happened. Or does that make me racist?
  106. @JerseyJeffersonian
    The scary publicity surrounding use of rifles, or more properly "assault rifles", has more to do with removing weaponry from the hands of the citizenry targeted by the left for terrorization & elimination. While I am under no illusions that a citizenry, even one armed with long guns, could go toe to toe with a military/para-military being used to forward the leftist goals of terrorization & elimination in a maximal assault, it still tips the balance away from a state monopoly on deadly violence; maybe the "Good Germans" of those state forces might think twice about their possible deaths if those deaths were a real possibility when they are following the orders of their tyrannical masters against the citizenry.

    After all, lefties have been fond of saying how things might have gone differently if the Gestapo was met with deadly violence when rounding up communists & Jews. Solzhenitsyn had similar things to say about deadly violence against roundups by communist thugs during the Red Terror. And death being dealt to the leaders of persecutions from hundreds of yards away in targeted assassinations using long guns might instill a healthy dose of fear in the apparatchiks, and a fear not limited to the minds of their frontline bully boys only.

    Also, if some death squad of leftist irregulars like antifas got wasted in enfilading fire when assaulting a mobilized, and prepared community, these freelance terrorists might stop their bullshit.

    The day is coming closer, maybe closer than you think, when bastards like Northam are openly gun grabbing like he and his allies want to do so they can grind us under their heels. The Tree of Liberty must from time to time be watered with the blood of Patriots and tyrants. So said my hero Thomas Jefferson.

    Lines are being drawn. As the old union song had it, "Which side are you on?"

    It’s funny how often the cry “Nazi!” is heard for links which are relatively weak compared to the gun control comparison: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazi_gun_control_argument

    The spin control in the intro to that page (it is Wikipedia after all) is interesting.

    The Nazi gun control argument is a belief that gun regulations in the Third Reich helped to facilitate the rise of the Nazis and the Holocaust.[1][2][3] The majority of historians and fact-checkers have described the argument as “dubious,”[4] “questionable,”[5] “preposterous,”[6] “tendentious,”[3] or “problematic.”[2] This argument is frequently employed by opponents of gun control in debates on U.S. gun politics. Questions about its validity, and about the motives behind its inception, have been raised by scholars. Proponents in the United States have used it as part of a “security against tyranny” argument, while opponents have referred to it as a form of Reductio ad Hitlerum.[7]

    P.S. We need to come up with a form of Woke Bingo for articles like this. Some suggestions for keywords: dubious, questionable, preposterous, tendentious, problematic, Nazi, racist, white supremacy, debunked, pseudoscience, problematic, etc.

    P.P.S. It might also be fun to come up with TV commercial trope bingo for the upcoming Superbowl.

  107. @Twodees Partain
    Obviously, you haven't been watching. The demonization of gun owners has already been pushed in the media, Antifa is coming to the rally with some of them even claiming that they have common cause with Virginia gun owners. The rally is set up to be another Charlottesville, so the rally itself has already been "Charlottesvilled".

    Coonman and the beneficiaries of vote fraud in the state legislature have arranged for violence to happen in Richmond today. Any gun rights people still planning to attend will be sorry that they did, I think.

    I was there this morning. It was very peaceful. I am not some expert on crowds, T.P., but I estimate way over 10,000 just in the immediate area (from my nice vantage point). There were plenty others on the side streets, such as 9th St. (to the West?), but I wasn’t that familiar with Richmond.

    4 helicopters flew around, along with a drone. The local GOP politicians, many of them with orange “Guns save lives” stickers on their fancy suits, shook hands with people near them. I saw plenty of people carrying rifles (maybe 1 in 10), some of them in militia type gear, but that’s only 5 % of the crowd. All the gun-toters had to stay downhill (outside the fence) from the State House.

    I will put up some pics on my site probably very late tonight (busy day from here on) or tomorrow morning.

    Cool air, great crowd, not a lick of violence. This is from 1130 EST and earlier. I could not stay long.

    What did I write yesterday – They can’t mess with 10,000 people. Maybe, there were lots more than that.

    • Thanks: Lot, HammerJack
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    "What did I write yesterday – They can’t mess with 10,000 people."

    The Virginia Army National Guard is authorized approximately 7,250 personnel and has an approximate strength of 7,175 as of August 29, 2019.

    https://vaguard.dodlive.mil/vaarng/
     
    That's more than the Va. NG. That means if they decide to go all in with Bloomberg, the state capitol will resemble something like this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGJdvVMqjO8
    , @Twodees Partain
    Yes, you were right. I fell for the wolf tickets being sold by Coonman and cronies. Apparently, they were trying to scare people away.
    , @Mr McKenna
    From the chopper footage I saw it didn't look like a large crowd. Glad it was peaceful, though. I'll check out your on-site materials later on today, thanks.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM9h971yDMw

    Aha...the comments say there were many more in the streets, not on the Capitol Grounds. At 00:10 to 00:12 you can see a very crowded street feeding into the area. I wonder if this is typical MSM obfuscation.

  108. @JerseyJeffersonian
    The scary publicity surrounding use of rifles, or more properly "assault rifles", has more to do with removing weaponry from the hands of the citizenry targeted by the left for terrorization & elimination. While I am under no illusions that a citizenry, even one armed with long guns, could go toe to toe with a military/para-military being used to forward the leftist goals of terrorization & elimination in a maximal assault, it still tips the balance away from a state monopoly on deadly violence; maybe the "Good Germans" of those state forces might think twice about their possible deaths if those deaths were a real possibility when they are following the orders of their tyrannical masters against the citizenry.

    After all, lefties have been fond of saying how things might have gone differently if the Gestapo was met with deadly violence when rounding up communists & Jews. Solzhenitsyn had similar things to say about deadly violence against roundups by communist thugs during the Red Terror. And death being dealt to the leaders of persecutions from hundreds of yards away in targeted assassinations using long guns might instill a healthy dose of fear in the apparatchiks, and a fear not limited to the minds of their frontline bully boys only.

    Also, if some death squad of leftist irregulars like antifas got wasted in enfilading fire when assaulting a mobilized, and prepared community, these freelance terrorists might stop their bullshit.

    The day is coming closer, maybe closer than you think, when bastards like Northam are openly gun grabbing like he and his allies want to do so they can grind us under their heels. The Tree of Liberty must from time to time be watered with the blood of Patriots and tyrants. So said my hero Thomas Jefferson.

    Lines are being drawn. As the old union song had it, "Which side are you on?"

    “And death being dealt to the leaders of persecutions from hundreds of yards away in targeted assassinations using long guns might instill a healthy dose of fear in the apparatchiks, and a fear not limited to the minds of their frontline bully boys only.”

    I think there’s a familiar French song that’s relevant even today.

    Too bad they can’t be singing this in VA today.

  109. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    Isn’t it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away?

    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.

    Another way to apply your theory would be to allow guns only to non felons who are married homeowners or mortgagees. Anyone selling or gifting a gun to a felon, incel, or a renter or homeless person would automatically be guilty of a felony and this would be a strict liability offense.

    All gun sales would have to be sold with third party liability insurance, just like when you rent a car.

    This could be started as a trial project in one small state, say Maryland, to see if it reduces the number of murders, and then rolled out over larger areas if effective.

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting, so they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.

    • Replies: @anon
    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.

    Of course you are familiar with US Federal law regarding interstate transport of firearms, you just decided to roll an old emotional argument out for entertainment purposes.

    But pray do tell us how you know that "nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition [in Mexico] are lobbed over the fence from the US", old boy. I'd like to see you try, because you cannot.

    Now, given that you've been caught outright in one subtle and one obvious falsehood, one must wonder what other little porkey-pies you are peddling.

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting,

    Not anymore, mister "Northern Florida resident', as you would know if you bothered to pay attention to your own state laws for the last 2 - 3 years. You do reside in North Florida, don't you?

    they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.

    What exactly are the current Federal and Florida laws regarding "felon in possession of a firearm", mister "worked in prison corrections", hmm?

    Your comments are often remarkably free of any verifiable facts. Why is that?

    , @Wilmingtonian

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting, so they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.
     
    I'm reliably informed that preventing felons from voting, something that would have been obvious common sense to everyone in the entire history of the world up until perhaps five years ago, is racist and Nazi. Fortunately, attaching higher costs and more potential criminal liability to legal firearm ownership, even though it will predictably have a similar disparate impact on non-whites, is immune from being racist and Nazi.
    , @Bill Jones
    "People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting"

    What utter bollocks.

    How many felons have been arrested for trying to vote?

    Some of them, Hillary Clinton springs to mind, do it proudly and openly.
  110. America doesn’t have a gun-crime problem. America has a black-crime problem.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational

    America has a black-crime problem.
     
    HATEFACT!  HAAAAATE FAAAAAACT!!!!
  111. Anonymous[266] • Disclaimer says:
    @ayatollah smith
    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal. A Texas student said he wouldn't want to live in a country where he couldn't 'defend' himself. Well, I wouldn't want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    The problem isn't the guns. A great many, and perhaps most, Americans are naturally violent. The US is by far the most violent nation in the world (excepting Israel's actions on Arabs in Palestine). When you aren't killing each other, you're killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . . . It never ends. Killing is what you do. You have been at war with someone for about 235 years of your 245 years as a country. What else is there to say? Killing is what you do.

    Chris Kyle, your favorite sniper, killed about 100 people. He said his favorite kill was a head shot of an infant being held in its mother's arms. He said he loved killing, and wished he could have done more of it. And, he had tattooed a large cross on his shoulder "because I wanted everyone to know I was a Christian".

    You people will never understand. Shanghai, with 25 million people, has less violent crime, and many fewer murders, in a year than does DC with only 500,000 people, or places like Chicago or Detroit.

    In a conversation with a health insurance executive some years ago, he said the best solution for his company in dealing with long-term disability patients was to "pin a $10 bill to the back of his shirt and send him to a baseball game in Detroit".

    Nobody in North America has any understanding of life in a safe country. Here are three examples, two from my personal experience, the other related by a friend.

    1. I was walking down a street in Monte Carlo, chatting with a policeman when, in front of an expensive apartment building, we saw a Rolls-Royce convertible with the top down, the keys in the ignition and the engine running, and what looked like a diamond necklace sitting on the seat. The policeman said he knew the woman who owned the car, and he offered this brief commentary:

    "She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it."


    2. China is still in some ways a cash society, having bypassed cheques and cards for mobile phone payment but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions. In any city in China we see on a daily basis people standing in line at an ATM, patiently waiting while one person is feeding huge wads of bills into the machine, 10,000 RMB at a time, the pile of cash often exceeding perhaps $US50,000. This is such a common transaction as to be completely ignored by everyone. In any city in North America this is begging for a 'snatch and grab' robbery, but I have never heard of such a thing occurring in China.


    3. An acquaintance of mine in Tokyo was waiting for a friend at a train station about 100 meters from her office when she remembered some important papers she needed. Her office would be closed within a few minutes, but the train was also arriving within a few minutes. What to do? On a bench just outside the train station exit, she left her bag, knowing her friend would recognise it, and returned to her office to collect her papers. This was her purse - with her wallet, passport, money, credit cards. When she returned to the station, her friend was sitting on the bench beside her bag, waiting for her. Theft is unknown in Japan, and no parents worry about their children being out late at night in even the largest cities.


    As I said, the problem is not guns. The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    Say what you will of the late Chris Kyle, afaik 100% of his kills were “legal” under the civil law and the UCMJ of the country whose uniform he wore. Your beef is with those, not Kyle. He was no renegade or non state actor. He wasn’t whacking people for the mob or being a freelance serial killer.

    In other words he was a Mark 1 Mod 1 White Man. For good or for ill.

  112. @Paleo Liberal
    As I mentioned, there were troubles with the coalition before Mrs. Clinton ran in 2016.

    I live in Wisconsin. I have seen the job losses here due to globalization (factories moving offshore, car factories closing because GM couldn't compete with Toyota, Americans being fired from meat packing jobs and replaced by illegal aliens) and automation.

    I've walked around in what was once the most notable factory in Milwaukee, with a famous clock tower, but is now used to create tools to automate factories. There were acres of empty space in the building.

    I've seen closed GM plants in Janesville. Massive factories with grass growing through the cracks in the parking lot.

    Those were the reasons the voters turned away from the GOP and went to Obama, hoping he would help them. When he didn't, they turned to Trump. Who will they turn to now?

    Those were the reasons the voters turned away from the GOP and went to Obama, hoping he would help them. When he didn’t, they turned to Trump. Who will they turn to now?

    Biden may be able to use his influence to create lucrative jobs for them in the Ukraine.

    The biggest problem is the dearth of good-paying blue collar jobs with pensions and good health coverage in the current economy, and this is the case in all the advanced economies, not just the US.

    Part of the solution might be to create more government jobs to take up the slack created by manufacturing industries outsourcing production to low wage economies overseas.

    Let every government employee have an understudy. Another might be a massive government-funded construction program building a wall along the southern border using military engineers. Another might be hiring thousands of new ICE agents. And a program to send illegal aliens into space.

    The states could also hire more people.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational

    Part of the solution might be to create more government jobs to take up the slack created by manufacturing industries outsourcing production to low wage economies overseas.
     
    In order to give people money to buy those foreign goods, but paying for them how?  Foreign countries aren't going to take un-repayable bonds forever.

    The no-jobs problem is coming home, as robots become cheaper and better than even cheap foreign peons.  Bill Gates proposes to charge employment taxes on robots, which is likely a good chunk of any solution but won't be enough by itself.  Ultimately we have to stop producing unemployable people, and repatriate the foreign ones we have.
  113. @Paleo Liberal
    Thank you, I was able to find your post, and by now my reply should have gone through.

    I am not sure that either Bill's 3rd term or Obama's 3rd term would have been accurate.

    It appeared to me that in 2008 Mrs. Clinton tried to put Bill's coalition back together to win the election, but it didn't work. It appeared to me that in 2016 Mrs. Clinton tried to piggyback onto Obama's coalition, which almost worked.

    At some point, Mrs. Clinton was running against her husband's policy's, esp. immigration policies. Bill seemed to have a lesser role in her campaign than she had in his campaigns. BUT, I am not an insider, and I haven't talked to insiders about this in many years.

    One of the more interesting insights I got from insiders back in the day. One of Hillary Clinton's closest Arkansas friends and advisers advised Hillary NOT to move to NY and run for the Senate. The phrase "carpet bagger" came up in the discussion. This friend, who was also a friend of my family, suggested Hillary move back to her childhood home in Illinois, and run for the Senate in 2004. Hillary ignored the suggestion. This friend's advice in previous election cycles had prevented disaster for Bill Clinton, but Hillary thought she knew better.

    I suppose Hillary thought the 2004 Illinois Senate seat wouldn't be a good stepping stone to the White House.

    So who did run for the Illinois Senate seat? Some unknown guy named Barack Obama. You may have heard of him.

    At some point, Mrs. Clinton was running against her husband’s policy’s, esp. immigration policies. Bill seemed to have a lesser role in her campaign than she had in his campaigns.

    She said a lot of very stupid things in her campaigns that suggested she had not paid much attention during her period of office in her husband’s kitchen cabinet. She also might have taken better advice when it came to her vote in favor of invading Iraq. Had she opposed the invasion of Iraq, she would have been in a much better position to campaign on the basis of showing sound judgment and leadership, instead of having to claim that she was tricked by George Bush.

    Instead, the Democratic nomination went to a vociferous opponent of Iraq who looked more like a leader. Can’t think of his name now.

    Tony Blair was another whose career foundered over Iraq, though spending time alone with Rupert Murdoch’s wife probably didn’t help him either.

  114. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    Oh, I see. You want to let states have rights.

    So you want to bring back slavery, too?

    What are you, a racist?

  115. anon[234] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Isn’t it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away?
     
    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.

    Another way to apply your theory would be to allow guns only to non felons who are married homeowners or mortgagees. Anyone selling or gifting a gun to a felon, incel, or a renter or homeless person would automatically be guilty of a felony and this would be a strict liability offense.

    All gun sales would have to be sold with third party liability insurance, just like when you rent a car.

    This could be started as a trial project in one small state, say Maryland, to see if it reduces the number of murders, and then rolled out over larger areas if effective.

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting, so they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.

    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.

    Of course you are familiar with US Federal law regarding interstate transport of firearms, you just decided to roll an old emotional argument out for entertainment purposes.

    But pray do tell us how you know that “nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition [in Mexico] are lobbed over the fence from the US”, old boy. I’d like to see you try, because you cannot.

    Now, given that you’ve been caught outright in one subtle and one obvious falsehood, one must wonder what other little porkey-pies you are peddling.

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting,

    Not anymore, mister “Northern Florida resident’, as you would know if you bothered to pay attention to your own state laws for the last 2 – 3 years. You do reside in North Florida, don’t you?

    they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.

    What exactly are the current Federal and Florida laws regarding “felon in possession of a firearm”, mister “worked in prison corrections”, hmm?

    Your comments are often remarkably free of any verifiable facts. Why is that?

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting,

    Not anymore, mister “Northern Florida resident’, as you would know if you bothered to pay attention to your own state laws for the last 2 – 3 years. You do reside in North Florida, don’t you?

     

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/florida-supreme-court-rules-convicted-felons-must-pay-off-fines-before-voting-today-2020-01-16/

    The rules are inconsistent between states, but the important thing is that there are organized partisan attempts to influence legislatures or courts that go to extraordinary lengths to exclude people from voter rolls, this is not purely a historical phenomenon, although it does appear that the former slave-holding states are more likely to restrict former felons from voting.

    For example, former felons who have migrated south from New York, where they have voted, may be barred from voting on arrival in Florida for a variety of reasons.
  116. @res

    Our murder rate has steadily declined for over 2 decades and is now approaching Western European levels.
     
    If you were paying attention you might have noticed the recent (last 6 years) increase. This is a common iSteve theme, so I am surprised you missed it. I think it is reasonable to be concerned about that trend.

    Here is an article and graphic covering 1960-2016:
    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-u-s-murder-rate-is-up-but-still-far-below-its-1980-peak/

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/asher-ucr-2016-0922-1-corrected.png

    They used the FBI UCR data: https://www.fbi.gov/services/cjis/ucr/publications
    The following years murder and non-negligent manslaughter rates were:
    2017: 5.4
    2018: 5.0
    Those tables also show:
    2014: 4.5
    2015: 5.0
    2016: 5.4

    The 2015 and 2016 numbers are 0.1 higher than in 538's graphic. Not sure if they somehow excluded non-negligent-manslaughter or what else might explain that difference.

    John Plywood is likely a sock puppet troll. These relatively new commenters with the style of first name/last name handles – Sam Coulton, John Arthur, etc. – are all likely the same person.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    I am no such thing!
  117. @Jonathan Mason

    Isn’t it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away?
     
    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.

    Another way to apply your theory would be to allow guns only to non felons who are married homeowners or mortgagees. Anyone selling or gifting a gun to a felon, incel, or a renter or homeless person would automatically be guilty of a felony and this would be a strict liability offense.

    All gun sales would have to be sold with third party liability insurance, just like when you rent a car.

    This could be started as a trial project in one small state, say Maryland, to see if it reduces the number of murders, and then rolled out over larger areas if effective.

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting, so they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting, so they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.

    I’m reliably informed that preventing felons from voting, something that would have been obvious common sense to everyone in the entire history of the world up until perhaps five years ago, is racist and Nazi. Fortunately, attaching higher costs and more potential criminal liability to legal firearm ownership, even though it will predictably have a similar disparate impact on non-whites, is immune from being racist and Nazi.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I’m reliably informed that preventing felons from voting, something that would have been obvious common sense to everyone in the entire history of the world up until perhaps five years ago,
     
    This is not so. In many European countries felons are allowed, even encouraged, to vote while they are in prison, prisoners can vote in Canada, and in Australia too, with certain restrictions. In Ireland prisoners remain registered to vote at their prior home addresses and may vote by mail effective 2006.

    In Israel neither the courts nor the prison authorities have any power to prevent someone from voting.

    In most countries disenfranchisement is not automatic, but is a separate part of a sentence, and may be imposed for offenses such as election fraud, treason, and so on. In some countries felons are forbidden to run for elected office for a period of years, for example 5 years in Germany, 3 years in New Zealand.

    All of these laws predate five years ago, sometimes by eons.

    In the United States only 2 out of 40 states allow inmates to vote while in prison. Not surprisingly neither of them is a former slave state. If you look at the various types of restrictions on former felon voting in the US and divide them up into states that automatically restore the vote to felons when their sentence is completed, and those that do not, or place further onerous restrictions, it will be seen that certain states make it their business to restrict voting.

    What is more, if you look at the history of felon and minority disenfranchisement in the US, it cannot truly be separated from the history of reconstruction attempts to disenfranchise blacks, and has little to do with justice or preserving electoral integrity.
  118. @Peter Akuleyev
    In Austria, and a lot of other European countries I suspect, it is very easy for a citizen to get a shotgun, not terribly difficult to get a license to own a rifle, and very difficult to get a pistol. As a result, low IQ criminal types don't have guns. Muggings and home invasions, while a problem, are simply not as scary as in the US, and cops are not afraid of normal criminals shooting them. Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US.

    “Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US.”

    Wrong. You don’t have negroes. Look at the data on murder rates controlled by race, available within this very comments of the post.

    You Euros make yourselves look really silly when you present your opinions of the US based on sitcom reruns.

    • Agree: By-tor
    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
    You don’t have negroes.

    That's the point. The Second Amendment provides negroes the freedom to own guns. In most European countries they work (still) to keep guns away from immigrants and in the hands of the founding population. I don't know long that will hold, but it makes more sense than the American decision to arm everyone.
  119. @Jonathan Mason

    Isn’t it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away?
     
    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.

    Another way to apply your theory would be to allow guns only to non felons who are married homeowners or mortgagees. Anyone selling or gifting a gun to a felon, incel, or a renter or homeless person would automatically be guilty of a felony and this would be a strict liability offense.

    All gun sales would have to be sold with third party liability insurance, just like when you rent a car.

    This could be started as a trial project in one small state, say Maryland, to see if it reduces the number of murders, and then rolled out over larger areas if effective.

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting, so they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.

    “People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting”

    What utter bollocks.

    How many felons have been arrested for trying to vote?

    Some of them, Hillary Clinton springs to mind, do it proudly and openly.

  120. The underperformance of strangulation here is basically another system of declining testosterone levels and a feminized society. It’s a very good way to kill people but modern American men just don’t have the grip strength anymore. Too much soy.

    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Kronos
    I guess it’s one of those things that must be either automated, off-shored, or delegated to immigrants with big strong hands...

    https://youtu.be/8MXiwObTU34
    , @Paleo Liberal
    Ask Epstein if strangulation is no longer effective. :-;
    , @kaganovitch
    If we still had shop class in high school , we would be making garrotes and grip strength wouldn't be an issue. Why isit that we can't have nice things like garrotes anymore?
  121. @MikeatMikedotMike
    John Plywood is likely a sock puppet troll. These relatively new commenters with the style of first name/last name handles - Sam Coulton, John Arthur, etc. - are all likely the same person.

    I am no such thing!

    • Agree: MikeatMikedotMike
    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    Touche - comparing commenting history with the name style is important. Those other commenters have very few comments and all started appearing right about the same time.
  122. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there

    But they do. Chicago as an example has very restrictive gun laws. (After Heller they were forced to allow individuals to own handguns, but they required anyone applying for a permit to take a gun safety course at a gun range within city jurisdiction. And then no permits for opening a gun range was given.) The Alders claim handguns brought in illegally from adjoining districts is the cause of the mayhem, but that fails to explain why there is no such turmoil in those adjoining districts.

    Stop-and-frisk is the only way to curb killings in some neighborhoods.

    • Replies: @Flip

    But they do. Chicago as an example has very restrictive gun laws. (After Heller they were forced to allow individuals to own handguns, but they required anyone applying for a permit to take a gun safety course at a gun range within city jurisdiction. And then no permits for opening a gun range was given.) The Alders claim handguns brought in illegally from adjoining districts is the cause of the mayhem, but that fails to explain why there is no such turmoil in those adjoining districts.
     
    No, the safety course is only to get a concealed carry permit and that's statewide. Chicago's restrictive laws were overruled by the state. The only limit on handguns is that you have to have a state Firearms Owners ID (FOID) Card. Chicago does have some laws on so-called assault rifles.
  123. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:
    @ayatollah smith
    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal. A Texas student said he wouldn't want to live in a country where he couldn't 'defend' himself. Well, I wouldn't want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    The problem isn't the guns. A great many, and perhaps most, Americans are naturally violent. The US is by far the most violent nation in the world (excepting Israel's actions on Arabs in Palestine). When you aren't killing each other, you're killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . . . It never ends. Killing is what you do. You have been at war with someone for about 235 years of your 245 years as a country. What else is there to say? Killing is what you do.

    Chris Kyle, your favorite sniper, killed about 100 people. He said his favorite kill was a head shot of an infant being held in its mother's arms. He said he loved killing, and wished he could have done more of it. And, he had tattooed a large cross on his shoulder "because I wanted everyone to know I was a Christian".

    You people will never understand. Shanghai, with 25 million people, has less violent crime, and many fewer murders, in a year than does DC with only 500,000 people, or places like Chicago or Detroit.

    In a conversation with a health insurance executive some years ago, he said the best solution for his company in dealing with long-term disability patients was to "pin a $10 bill to the back of his shirt and send him to a baseball game in Detroit".

    Nobody in North America has any understanding of life in a safe country. Here are three examples, two from my personal experience, the other related by a friend.

    1. I was walking down a street in Monte Carlo, chatting with a policeman when, in front of an expensive apartment building, we saw a Rolls-Royce convertible with the top down, the keys in the ignition and the engine running, and what looked like a diamond necklace sitting on the seat. The policeman said he knew the woman who owned the car, and he offered this brief commentary:

    "She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it."


    2. China is still in some ways a cash society, having bypassed cheques and cards for mobile phone payment but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions. In any city in China we see on a daily basis people standing in line at an ATM, patiently waiting while one person is feeding huge wads of bills into the machine, 10,000 RMB at a time, the pile of cash often exceeding perhaps $US50,000. This is such a common transaction as to be completely ignored by everyone. In any city in North America this is begging for a 'snatch and grab' robbery, but I have never heard of such a thing occurring in China.


    3. An acquaintance of mine in Tokyo was waiting for a friend at a train station about 100 meters from her office when she remembered some important papers she needed. Her office would be closed within a few minutes, but the train was also arriving within a few minutes. What to do? On a bench just outside the train station exit, she left her bag, knowing her friend would recognise it, and returned to her office to collect her papers. This was her purse - with her wallet, passport, money, credit cards. When she returned to the station, her friend was sitting on the bench beside her bag, waiting for her. Theft is unknown in Japan, and no parents worry about their children being out late at night in even the largest cities.


    As I said, the problem is not guns. The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal.

    Lol! What is the “free carry law”? Please point to the relevant part of Texas law code that defines the term. Be sure to note subsection 30.06, ok?

    This isn’t even up to Corvinus-level trolling. “Media Matters” clearly isn’t sending its very best.

  124. @Corn
    Ramzpaul linked to a graph on twitter once (I can’t display it here, on my phone and not tech savvy anyway). If that graph was accurate the firearm homicide rate of white Americans was lower than that of Canada, France, Austria and Finland!

    Firearm homicides per 100,000 people:

    US White: 1.7

    Czech Republic: 1.7

    Canada: 1.8

    France: 2.6

    Austria: 2.8

    Finland: 3.3

    However.......

    US Hispanic: 6.4

    US Black: 19.8

    Sadly, Canada and Western Europe now have a (completely unnecessary and gratuitously imported) race problem too, so the numbers from Canada, France and Austria also need to be scrubbed to make them comparable to US white numbers. One suspects the universal NW European white rate might be about 1.7.

  125. @ayatollah smith
    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal. A Texas student said he wouldn't want to live in a country where he couldn't 'defend' himself. Well, I wouldn't want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    The problem isn't the guns. A great many, and perhaps most, Americans are naturally violent. The US is by far the most violent nation in the world (excepting Israel's actions on Arabs in Palestine). When you aren't killing each other, you're killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . . . It never ends. Killing is what you do. You have been at war with someone for about 235 years of your 245 years as a country. What else is there to say? Killing is what you do.

    Chris Kyle, your favorite sniper, killed about 100 people. He said his favorite kill was a head shot of an infant being held in its mother's arms. He said he loved killing, and wished he could have done more of it. And, he had tattooed a large cross on his shoulder "because I wanted everyone to know I was a Christian".

    You people will never understand. Shanghai, with 25 million people, has less violent crime, and many fewer murders, in a year than does DC with only 500,000 people, or places like Chicago or Detroit.

    In a conversation with a health insurance executive some years ago, he said the best solution for his company in dealing with long-term disability patients was to "pin a $10 bill to the back of his shirt and send him to a baseball game in Detroit".

    Nobody in North America has any understanding of life in a safe country. Here are three examples, two from my personal experience, the other related by a friend.

    1. I was walking down a street in Monte Carlo, chatting with a policeman when, in front of an expensive apartment building, we saw a Rolls-Royce convertible with the top down, the keys in the ignition and the engine running, and what looked like a diamond necklace sitting on the seat. The policeman said he knew the woman who owned the car, and he offered this brief commentary:

    "She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it."


    2. China is still in some ways a cash society, having bypassed cheques and cards for mobile phone payment but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions. In any city in China we see on a daily basis people standing in line at an ATM, patiently waiting while one person is feeding huge wads of bills into the machine, 10,000 RMB at a time, the pile of cash often exceeding perhaps $US50,000. This is such a common transaction as to be completely ignored by everyone. In any city in North America this is begging for a 'snatch and grab' robbery, but I have never heard of such a thing occurring in China.


    3. An acquaintance of mine in Tokyo was waiting for a friend at a train station about 100 meters from her office when she remembered some important papers she needed. Her office would be closed within a few minutes, but the train was also arriving within a few minutes. What to do? On a bench just outside the train station exit, she left her bag, knowing her friend would recognise it, and returned to her office to collect her papers. This was her purse - with her wallet, passport, money, credit cards. When she returned to the station, her friend was sitting on the bench beside her bag, waiting for her. Theft is unknown in Japan, and no parents worry about their children being out late at night in even the largest cities.


    As I said, the problem is not guns. The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    Well, I wouldn’t want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    We don’t want you to either. Get out or stay out, and stop bothering us with your pathetic anecdotes.

  126. @J.Ross
    This is the future. They already told rape victims, at the height of a rape panic, that they were just racist liars. A headache is less to disempathize with than rape. In the future, if a white person is clearly suffering cardiac arrest, the standard response will be giggling.

    From what I can find, the “MSG allergy equals racism/xenophobia” campaign is quite openly run by the Japanese company which manufactures MSG.

    Which makes them just as trustworthy as depending on cigarette makers for lung cancer information.

    So this is it. A company in Japan, perhaps the most racist and xenophobic country in the world, is calling everyone sickened by their product a racist and a xenophobe. This from the fine people who brought us Pearl Harbor and the Rape of Nanking. (*)

    (*) Some Japanese claim the Rape of Nanking never happened. I went to the Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial in Taipei, where they have tons of evidence that it happened. Or does that make me racist?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Yes, this is pretty normal East Asian We Alien (1979) Now "The Company Says So" morality. But don't get your flavor enhanced -- the Japs are pretty much the least awful by far at this. When they admit fault (which Japanese formally do in a much wider range of situations than their US counterparts) they resign; when they admit fault to the public on something big like faulty safety equipment or that one really big carcinogen situation in the 70s they physically get down on the floor.
    You know which East Aaian nationality doesn't do that, and wouldn't anyway to American complainants? The ones who outnumber Japanese by over a billion, and who Trump wants in here in bigger numbers than ever.
    ----------
    Rape of Nanking - that's a whole other thing but, as dumb and gratuitously violent as the interwar militarist Japanese were, RoN is a premier example of a purely tribalist grievance. The absolute worst stories pale next to normal treatment of Chinese people in that period by not even the worst Chinese people. Every Chinese who could, got out from under a Chinese government and into a town or territory governed by foreigners, because everything was objectively better there. All the factions of the Chinese civil war routinely took, abused, raped, and killed slaves, and the people they were enslaving were of course Chinese. The Japanese shouldn't have been there and shouldn't have done what they did, but no way in frozen hell is whining about the least atrocious atrocity of the civil war era meaningful coming from the state that Mao built out of acres of human gore.
    While this is about East Asians and disputed in degree but fundamentally undoubted historical events, and not about Africans or Semites and mythohistorical events, it does illustrate my second named law: in tribalism, reality itself is negotiable, and Tribe A talks up The Terrible Historical Tragedy not because it happened but as a negotiation ploy against equally cynical Tribe B. A non-tribalist community wandering into the middle of that might be inclined to start believing in this Great Historical tragedy business, but that's a mistake. Even if the event has provable elements the negotiation aspect cannot be forgotten, and policy should never be based on such a story.
  127. @Mr. Anon
    America doesn't have a gun-crime problem. America has a black-crime problem.

    America has a black-crime problem.

    HATEFACT!  HAAAAATE FAAAAAACT!!!!

  128. @Jonathan Mason

    Those were the reasons the voters turned away from the GOP and went to Obama, hoping he would help them. When he didn’t, they turned to Trump. Who will they turn to now?
     
    Biden may be able to use his influence to create lucrative jobs for them in the Ukraine.

    The biggest problem is the dearth of good-paying blue collar jobs with pensions and good health coverage in the current economy, and this is the case in all the advanced economies, not just the US.

    Part of the solution might be to create more government jobs to take up the slack created by manufacturing industries outsourcing production to low wage economies overseas.

    Let every government employee have an understudy. Another might be a massive government-funded construction program building a wall along the southern border using military engineers. Another might be hiring thousands of new ICE agents. And a program to send illegal aliens into space.

    The states could also hire more people.

    Part of the solution might be to create more government jobs to take up the slack created by manufacturing industries outsourcing production to low wage economies overseas.

    In order to give people money to buy those foreign goods, but paying for them how?  Foreign countries aren’t going to take un-repayable bonds forever.

    The no-jobs problem is coming home, as robots become cheaper and better than even cheap foreign peons.  Bill Gates proposes to charge employment taxes on robots, which is likely a good chunk of any solution but won’t be enough by itself.  Ultimately we have to stop producing unemployable people, and repatriate the foreign ones we have.

  129. I will put what I have been able to find on the internet, looking at reputable sources, etc., about MSG.

    WARNING!

    Reading this may turn you into a racist xenophobe.

    1. There is no proof that the “average” adult is affected by MSG.

    2. MSG occurs in nature, and it is estimated that in the US and UK, the average person gets a little over 0.5 g/day in their diet.

    3. There is a positive correlation in some Chinese studies between MSG use and obesity in children. This has not been shown in all studies, nor has any link been proven.

    4. No studies have shown any short term effect due to a 1-time small dose of MSG.

    5. Some studies have shown that SOME people, especially asthmatics, have bad effects from MSG in “high doses”, meaning 1.5 -2.5 g of MSG. Over 3. g of MSG is considered possibly harmful for asthmatics, aka white racist xenophobes.

    6. The FDA considers MSG to be safe, because the “normal” amount to put in the food in a good Chinese restaurant is <= 0.5 g. So the "high doses" won't be seen.

    7. Some studies have shown amounts of 5+ g of MSG in dishes in SOME Chinese restaurants. Oops. That may explain why some of us will have no symptoms after eating SOME Chinese dishes, mild symptoms after eating other dishes, and severe symptoms in a few cases. Because some Chinese chefs put in a tiny amount for flavoring, while others pour in half the bottle.

    8. Muslim clerics in Turkey have declared MSG to be non-Halal. They consider it to be a dangerous food additive, and anything dangerous in non-Halal. Some clerics in Pakistan have done the same in some areas of Pakistan. Some Pakistani states have banned MSG. Which proves Pakistanis are white supremacists and literally Hitler.

    9. The manufacturers of MSG in Japan run the campaign to label critics of MSG as racist and xenophobes. Because nobody knows racism and xenophobia like the Japanese, I suppose.

    OK, that is all for my MSG kick.

    I think of MSG sensitivity as akin to gluten intolerance. Most people who go gluten free don't need to, and probably get no benefit from it. But for SOME people, availability of gluten-free alternatives is crucial.

    Similarly, most people who avoid MSG probably (though not proven) need to do so. But for SOME of us, availability of MSG-free alternatives is crucial.

    • Thanks: Hail
  130. @Paleo Liberal
    From what I can find, the "MSG allergy equals racism/xenophobia" campaign is quite openly run by the Japanese company which manufactures MSG.

    Which makes them just as trustworthy as depending on cigarette makers for lung cancer information.

    So this is it. A company in Japan, perhaps the most racist and xenophobic country in the world, is calling everyone sickened by their product a racist and a xenophobe. This from the fine people who brought us Pearl Harbor and the Rape of Nanking. (*)

    (*) Some Japanese claim the Rape of Nanking never happened. I went to the Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial in Taipei, where they have tons of evidence that it happened. Or does that make me racist?

    Yes, this is pretty normal East Asian We Alien (1979) Now “The Company Says So” morality. But don’t get your flavor enhanced — the Japs are pretty much the least awful by far at this. When they admit fault (which Japanese formally do in a much wider range of situations than their US counterparts) they resign; when they admit fault to the public on something big like faulty safety equipment or that one really big carcinogen situation in the 70s they physically get down on the floor.
    You know which East Aaian nationality doesn’t do that, and wouldn’t anyway to American complainants? The ones who outnumber Japanese by over a billion, and who Trump wants in here in bigger numbers than ever.
    ———-
    Rape of Nanking – that’s a whole other thing but, as dumb and gratuitously violent as the interwar militarist Japanese were, RoN is a premier example of a purely tribalist grievance. The absolute worst stories pale next to normal treatment of Chinese people in that period by not even the worst Chinese people. Every Chinese who could, got out from under a Chinese government and into a town or territory governed by foreigners, because everything was objectively better there. All the factions of the Chinese civil war routinely took, abused, raped, and killed slaves, and the people they were enslaving were of course Chinese. The Japanese shouldn’t have been there and shouldn’t have done what they did, but no way in frozen hell is whining about the least atrocious atrocity of the civil war era meaningful coming from the state that Mao built out of acres of human gore.
    While this is about East Asians and disputed in degree but fundamentally undoubted historical events, and not about Africans or Semites and mythohistorical events, it does illustrate my second named law: in tribalism, reality itself is negotiable, and Tribe A talks up The Terrible Historical Tragedy not because it happened but as a negotiation ploy against equally cynical Tribe B. A non-tribalist community wandering into the middle of that might be inclined to start believing in this Great Historical tragedy business, but that’s a mistake. Even if the event has provable elements the negotiation aspect cannot be forgotten, and policy should never be based on such a story.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    ...no way in frozen hell is whining about the least atrocious atrocity of the civil war era meaningful coming from the state that Mao built out of acres of human gore.
     
    https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/QMxU2ZAaNG4YKErlGASmXIRlI-w=/0x0:638x480/1200x800/filters:focal(268x189:370x291)/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/63698749/pogo-met-the-enemy.0.1505425927.0.jpg
    , @Hail

    While this is about East Asians and disputed in degree but fundamentally undoubted historical events, and not about Africans or Semites and mythohistorical events, it does illustrate my second named law: in tribalism, reality itself is negotiable, and Tribe A talks up The Terrible Historical Tragedy not because it happened but as a negotiation ploy against equally cynical Tribe B. A non-tribalist community wandering into the middle of that might be inclined to start believing in this Great Historical tragedy business, but that’s a mistake. Even if the event has provable elements the negotiation aspect cannot be forgotten, and policy should never be based on such a story.
     
    Excellent insight in this and preceding paragraph. Thanks for taking the time to write it.
    , @Anonymous
    A Jewish poster here recently called Arabs liars who routinely inflate their civilian war casualties for cynical reasons. An eyebrow went up when I saw that.
  131. @anon
    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.

    Of course you are familiar with US Federal law regarding interstate transport of firearms, you just decided to roll an old emotional argument out for entertainment purposes.

    But pray do tell us how you know that "nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition [in Mexico] are lobbed over the fence from the US", old boy. I'd like to see you try, because you cannot.

    Now, given that you've been caught outright in one subtle and one obvious falsehood, one must wonder what other little porkey-pies you are peddling.

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting,

    Not anymore, mister "Northern Florida resident', as you would know if you bothered to pay attention to your own state laws for the last 2 - 3 years. You do reside in North Florida, don't you?

    they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.

    What exactly are the current Federal and Florida laws regarding "felon in possession of a firearm", mister "worked in prison corrections", hmm?

    Your comments are often remarkably free of any verifiable facts. Why is that?

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting,

    Not anymore, mister “Northern Florida resident’, as you would know if you bothered to pay attention to your own state laws for the last 2 – 3 years. You do reside in North Florida, don’t you?

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/florida-supreme-court-rules-convicted-felons-must-pay-off-fines-before-voting-today-2020-01-16/

    The rules are inconsistent between states, but the important thing is that there are organized partisan attempts to influence legislatures or courts that go to extraordinary lengths to exclude people from voter rolls, this is not purely a historical phenomenon, although it does appear that the former slave-holding states are more likely to restrict former felons from voting.

    For example, former felons who have migrated south from New York, where they have voted, may be barred from voting on arrival in Florida for a variety of reasons.

    • Replies: @anon
    The rules are inconsistent between states, but the important thing is that there are organized partisan attempts to influence legislatures or courts that go to extraordinary lengths to exclude people from voter rolls, this is not purely a historical phenomenon, although it does appear that the former slave-holding states are more likely to restrict former felons from voting.

    Would you consider enacting an amendment to the Florida state constitution to be an "extraordinary length"? Or is that just no big deal to you? Or did you fail to pay any attention to the 2018 election?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_Florida_Amendment_4

    Some people went to extraordinary lengths to make it possible for most convicted felons to vote, excluding those convicted of murder and sexual offenses. Therefore your claim is rather false.

    Now about that other issue you raised:

    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.
     
    Of course you are familiar with US Federal law regarding interstate transport of firearms, you just decided to roll an old emotional argument out for entertainment purposes.

    But pray do tell us how you know that “nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition [in Mexico] are lobbed over the fence from the US”, old boy. I’d like to see you try, because you cannot.

    Now, given that you’ve been caught outright in one subtle and one obvious falsehood, one must wonder what other little porkey-pies you are peddling.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    ...although it does appear that the former slave-holding states are more likely to restrict former felons from voting.
     
    And from possessing firearms. Funny, that... which they share with states which are relatively easy on released felons:

    All states except Vermont broadly restrict access to firearms by felons...

    New Jersey, for example, prohibits firearm purchases by persons who have been convicted of a “crime,” defined as an offense punishable by imprisonment in excess of six months. New York includes specified felonies and “serious offenses” including child endangerment, certain kinds of disorderly conduct, and certain kinds of stalking.

    California and Connecticut each have a long list of felonies and violence-related or firearm-related misdemeanors that disqualify people from owning firearms. In 2017, California passed a bill prohibiting hate crime misdemeanants from possessing guns for 10 years.

    In Illinois, felony or misdemeanor convictions within the previous five years for battery, assault, aggravated assault, or violation of an order of protection, in which a firearm was used or possessed, are disqualifying offenses.

    https://lawcenter.giffords.org/gun-laws/policy-areas/who-can-have-a-gun/categories-of-prohibited-people/#federal

     


    For example, former felons who have migrated south from New York, where they have voted, may be barred from voting on arrival in Florida for a variety of reasons.
     
    If they can't carry in New York, why should they vote in Florida? Or vice versa?
  132. Interesting…a .221 or .222 handgun that shot 6.5 x 52 rifle bullets.
    Not the silliest theory I have heard, but definitely Mark Lane territory.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    Interesting…a .221 or .222 handgun that shot 6.5 x 52 rifle bullets.
    Not the silliest theory I have heard, but definitely Mark Lane territory.



    I'm not following, how can a .22 fire 6.5 rifle bullets that exceed its bore diameter?
  133. anon[307] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting,

    Not anymore, mister “Northern Florida resident’, as you would know if you bothered to pay attention to your own state laws for the last 2 – 3 years. You do reside in North Florida, don’t you?

     

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/florida-supreme-court-rules-convicted-felons-must-pay-off-fines-before-voting-today-2020-01-16/

    The rules are inconsistent between states, but the important thing is that there are organized partisan attempts to influence legislatures or courts that go to extraordinary lengths to exclude people from voter rolls, this is not purely a historical phenomenon, although it does appear that the former slave-holding states are more likely to restrict former felons from voting.

    For example, former felons who have migrated south from New York, where they have voted, may be barred from voting on arrival in Florida for a variety of reasons.

    The rules are inconsistent between states, but the important thing is that there are organized partisan attempts to influence legislatures or courts that go to extraordinary lengths to exclude people from voter rolls, this is not purely a historical phenomenon, although it does appear that the former slave-holding states are more likely to restrict former felons from voting.

    Would you consider enacting an amendment to the Florida state constitution to be an “extraordinary length”? Or is that just no big deal to you? Or did you fail to pay any attention to the 2018 election?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_Florida_Amendment_4

    Some people went to extraordinary lengths to make it possible for most convicted felons to vote, excluding those convicted of murder and sexual offenses. Therefore your claim is rather false.

    Now about that other issue you raised:

    That is certainly a consideration, but how do you stop unscrupulous people buying guns in rural Texas and retailing them to buyers in downtown Manhattan or Mexico, where nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition are lobbed over the fence from the US.

    Of course you are familiar with US Federal law regarding interstate transport of firearms, you just decided to roll an old emotional argument out for entertainment purposes.

    But pray do tell us how you know that “nearly all the illegal guns and ammunition [in Mexico] are lobbed over the fence from the US”, old boy. I’d like to see you try, because you cannot.

    Now, given that you’ve been caught outright in one subtle and one obvious falsehood, one must wonder what other little porkey-pies you are peddling.

  134. Image from today’s thankfully bloodless rally. Posted below the fold because some folks might be eating.

  135. @ayatollah smith
    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal. A Texas student said he wouldn't want to live in a country where he couldn't 'defend' himself. Well, I wouldn't want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    The problem isn't the guns. A great many, and perhaps most, Americans are naturally violent. The US is by far the most violent nation in the world (excepting Israel's actions on Arabs in Palestine). When you aren't killing each other, you're killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . . . It never ends. Killing is what you do. You have been at war with someone for about 235 years of your 245 years as a country. What else is there to say? Killing is what you do.

    Chris Kyle, your favorite sniper, killed about 100 people. He said his favorite kill was a head shot of an infant being held in its mother's arms. He said he loved killing, and wished he could have done more of it. And, he had tattooed a large cross on his shoulder "because I wanted everyone to know I was a Christian".

    You people will never understand. Shanghai, with 25 million people, has less violent crime, and many fewer murders, in a year than does DC with only 500,000 people, or places like Chicago or Detroit.

    In a conversation with a health insurance executive some years ago, he said the best solution for his company in dealing with long-term disability patients was to "pin a $10 bill to the back of his shirt and send him to a baseball game in Detroit".

    Nobody in North America has any understanding of life in a safe country. Here are three examples, two from my personal experience, the other related by a friend.

    1. I was walking down a street in Monte Carlo, chatting with a policeman when, in front of an expensive apartment building, we saw a Rolls-Royce convertible with the top down, the keys in the ignition and the engine running, and what looked like a diamond necklace sitting on the seat. The policeman said he knew the woman who owned the car, and he offered this brief commentary:

    "She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it."


    2. China is still in some ways a cash society, having bypassed cheques and cards for mobile phone payment but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions. In any city in China we see on a daily basis people standing in line at an ATM, patiently waiting while one person is feeding huge wads of bills into the machine, 10,000 RMB at a time, the pile of cash often exceeding perhaps $US50,000. This is such a common transaction as to be completely ignored by everyone. In any city in North America this is begging for a 'snatch and grab' robbery, but I have never heard of such a thing occurring in China.


    3. An acquaintance of mine in Tokyo was waiting for a friend at a train station about 100 meters from her office when she remembered some important papers she needed. Her office would be closed within a few minutes, but the train was also arriving within a few minutes. What to do? On a bench just outside the train station exit, she left her bag, knowing her friend would recognise it, and returned to her office to collect her papers. This was her purse - with her wallet, passport, money, credit cards. When she returned to the station, her friend was sitting on the bench beside her bag, waiting for her. Theft is unknown in Japan, and no parents worry about their children being out late at night in even the largest cities.


    As I said, the problem is not guns. The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    Outside of heavily policed inner cities, China is definitely more violent than the US. This idea that it’s a peaceful society just isn’t true.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    I'm sorry, but that's just not true. The PRC has a lot of problems that Xinhua and the China-apologists will never own up to, like the spree knife attacks, but there is simply no equivalent to the war zones on display in places like Baltimore or Detroit anywhere in China, rural or urban. Or in the region in general.

    But if the majority of the PRC isn't Lujiazui, then the majority of the US is not Baltimore or Detroit, either. The USA is way safer than it was in the 1980s, or at least it was until recently in some metro areas. (Was there a poop problem in the Bay Area back then?) As usual, the media wants bad things to happen, because if they don't, they don't get money and attention.
  136. A “handgun” is a pistol which has just left the room.

  137. @Wilmingtonian

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting, so they should be willing to go to even greater lengths to stop them obtaining firearms.
     
    I'm reliably informed that preventing felons from voting, something that would have been obvious common sense to everyone in the entire history of the world up until perhaps five years ago, is racist and Nazi. Fortunately, attaching higher costs and more potential criminal liability to legal firearm ownership, even though it will predictably have a similar disparate impact on non-whites, is immune from being racist and Nazi.

    I’m reliably informed that preventing felons from voting, something that would have been obvious common sense to everyone in the entire history of the world up until perhaps five years ago,

    This is not so. In many European countries felons are allowed, even encouraged, to vote while they are in prison, prisoners can vote in Canada, and in Australia too, with certain restrictions. In Ireland prisoners remain registered to vote at their prior home addresses and may vote by mail effective 2006.

    In Israel neither the courts nor the prison authorities have any power to prevent someone from voting.

    In most countries disenfranchisement is not automatic, but is a separate part of a sentence, and may be imposed for offenses such as election fraud, treason, and so on. In some countries felons are forbidden to run for elected office for a period of years, for example 5 years in Germany, 3 years in New Zealand.

    All of these laws predate five years ago, sometimes by eons.

    In the United States only 2 out of 40 states allow inmates to vote while in prison. Not surprisingly neither of them is a former slave state. If you look at the various types of restrictions on former felon voting in the US and divide them up into states that automatically restore the vote to felons when their sentence is completed, and those that do not, or place further onerous restrictions, it will be seen that certain states make it their business to restrict voting.

    What is more, if you look at the history of felon and minority disenfranchisement in the US, it cannot truly be separated from the history of reconstruction attempts to disenfranchise blacks, and has little to do with justice or preserving electoral integrity.

    • Replies: @By-tor
    The US System was designed by white man for a religious, high-trust, educated, land-owning, white population. Landless, ignorant blacks should not have been granted the right to vote at all as we now see the historical catastrophe that has resulted by granting a low-intelligence, tribal sub-population rights to commandeer a system that the overwhelming majority of its members have basically no respect for in the first place. The US System ceased to function as designed long ago, as its anti-white, santanic, pedophile-enabling, resource-stealing and greedy Establishment has been stoking armed conflicts both inside and outside US borders for 150 years.

    What you describe is an excuse for equal outcome. Why should an illiterate, unmarried black breed sow with 5 children, who holds a 20 hours-per-week job at Wal-Mart while living in government subsidized housing, and whose groceries and medical care are overed by EBT, Medicaid and WIC, have the right to vote alongside someone who went to college or trade school and earns $60,000/ year to support a wife and one child, one whose family collects no unearned government largess?

    People in prison forfeit their rights until they have served their sentences. Murderers, thieves, rapists, child molesters, arsonists, corporate fraudsters, repeat offenders, etc. for any all offenses do not deserve to vote- period. Deconstruction of civil norms leads to anarchy and then to tyranny.

  138. @PseudoNhymm
    And Virginia? Where a bunch of blue state elites took over and are forcing the rural counties to disarm, 95% of which disagree. Do they all just pack up and move to Texas? And when Texas turns blue in 8 years, do they move again? At what point is an inalienable right inalienable?

    At what point is an inalienable right inalienable?

    It becomes quite alienable when you apply it to peoples for whom it was never meant, and those people grow to be a majority.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    when you apply it to peoples for whom it was never meant
     
    With guns, it doesn’t matter: If the Second Amendment is truly treated as inalienable in all US jurisdictions, “those people” (I assume you mean blacks, as per past posts) will still mostly shoot and kill each other, and of those crossover strays who get violently uppity—well, we can legally use our guns on them.

    It’s a big self-cleaning oven serving attrition nutrition. :)
  139. Yes. The gun control arguments used to always make a point of saying that they have no objection to rifles, as they are used for hunting. They just wanted to ban the handgun, because it is the murder/suicide weapon of choice.

  140. @Paleo Liberal
    I remember the old days when all the fuss was on hand guns.

    The difference is, assault rifles are used more often in mass shootings, which are scarier and get more publicity.

    Just as automobiles are more dangerous than airplanes, but you never get car crashes with 100+ people dying.

    Car crashes on highways that cause pile ups can exceed 100 dead. Germany’s autobahn is one example of this happening. The faster a car, the less time to react to having to suddenly hit the break in time, swerve in time, etc.

  141. @Paleo Liberal
    Except all your "phony" diseases are real diseases.

    Sorry, but you lost all credibility there. You are truly an idiot. You spout out about "phony" diseases without even looking at the scientific evidence. Moron.

    According to the Mayo clinic, there are people who are senstive to MSG:

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196

    The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
     
    And so, I avoid MSG. By avoiding MSG, I have far fewer headaches, and I haven't gone into shock in over 20 years.

    I really don't give a flying f*** if avoiding headaches and other symptoms, up to and including shock, makes me a wayyyyy-cist or not.

    Probably the reaction is to overused and rancid frying oil plus a ton of salt. The people who say they are sensitive don’t react when given MSG in a capsule.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    People don’t react to small, one-time doses of MSG.
    We get about 0.5 g every day naturally.

    Chronic use of MSG may cause some health issues. There are positive correlations in some studies with childhood obesity, but no known link.

    Large doses of 1.5 - 2.5 g cause reactions in some people.

    Some Chinese restaurants use 5 g or even higher. In other words 2-3x or more of the dose known to cause reactions in some people.
  142. @SunBakedSuburb
    "barbed wire around freeway signs"

    This is something I noticed after moving to LA from NorCal in the late 1990s: the prevalence of barbed wire. Even in such sedate settings (for LA) like Studio City and Burbank, barbed wire spread like ivy around parking lots, strip malls, garbage dumpsters, and so on. There is a siege mentality at work in LA, even in the more desirable areas. I still like LA, but full time residency is not conducive to mental health.

    In Mexico you would have a wall around your property topped with broken glass. Because Mexicans.

    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    When I was 12 way back in 1964, I took a trip with my mother & father to points south. I saw walls just like that in Bolivia. A little less "institutional" looking than barbed wire, but clearly with the same intent.

    Seeing the 3rd world was a real eye-opener for my young mind. Lots of questions...
  143. MEGAWEAPON
    https://postimg.cc/xNKvYnt7

    [MORE]

    (If you can’t read it, on the lower bumper, angled so that Italian Don Johnson can read it as he slides underneath Megaweapon, is printed:
    FREE SPEECH UNIT. The back is presumably stocked with megaphones and printing presses.)

  144. @ayatollah smith
    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal. A Texas student said he wouldn't want to live in a country where he couldn't 'defend' himself. Well, I wouldn't want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    The problem isn't the guns. A great many, and perhaps most, Americans are naturally violent. The US is by far the most violent nation in the world (excepting Israel's actions on Arabs in Palestine). When you aren't killing each other, you're killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . . . It never ends. Killing is what you do. You have been at war with someone for about 235 years of your 245 years as a country. What else is there to say? Killing is what you do.

    Chris Kyle, your favorite sniper, killed about 100 people. He said his favorite kill was a head shot of an infant being held in its mother's arms. He said he loved killing, and wished he could have done more of it. And, he had tattooed a large cross on his shoulder "because I wanted everyone to know I was a Christian".

    You people will never understand. Shanghai, with 25 million people, has less violent crime, and many fewer murders, in a year than does DC with only 500,000 people, or places like Chicago or Detroit.

    In a conversation with a health insurance executive some years ago, he said the best solution for his company in dealing with long-term disability patients was to "pin a $10 bill to the back of his shirt and send him to a baseball game in Detroit".

    Nobody in North America has any understanding of life in a safe country. Here are three examples, two from my personal experience, the other related by a friend.

    1. I was walking down a street in Monte Carlo, chatting with a policeman when, in front of an expensive apartment building, we saw a Rolls-Royce convertible with the top down, the keys in the ignition and the engine running, and what looked like a diamond necklace sitting on the seat. The policeman said he knew the woman who owned the car, and he offered this brief commentary:

    "She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it."


    2. China is still in some ways a cash society, having bypassed cheques and cards for mobile phone payment but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions. In any city in China we see on a daily basis people standing in line at an ATM, patiently waiting while one person is feeding huge wads of bills into the machine, 10,000 RMB at a time, the pile of cash often exceeding perhaps $US50,000. This is such a common transaction as to be completely ignored by everyone. In any city in North America this is begging for a 'snatch and grab' robbery, but I have never heard of such a thing occurring in China.


    3. An acquaintance of mine in Tokyo was waiting for a friend at a train station about 100 meters from her office when she remembered some important papers she needed. Her office would be closed within a few minutes, but the train was also arriving within a few minutes. What to do? On a bench just outside the train station exit, she left her bag, knowing her friend would recognise it, and returned to her office to collect her papers. This was her purse - with her wallet, passport, money, credit cards. When she returned to the station, her friend was sitting on the bench beside her bag, waiting for her. Theft is unknown in Japan, and no parents worry about their children being out late at night in even the largest cities.


    As I said, the problem is not guns. The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    When you aren’t killing each other, you’re killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . .

    Strangely, you left out the primary examples of Japan and Germany. We could have ignored the latter, and simply retaliated for Pearl Harbor and let the Japanese have their way with the rest of the Pacific. But no, we had to get involved.

    No excuse for that, you agree? Japan would have been a much nicer hegemon in the Pacific.

    “She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it.”

    What good is stealing something you can’t possibly use or sell? That’s why classic paintings are almost never taken, except by mental cases for emotional reasons.

    At any rate, in many small towns in the US, just about everybody would have knocked on the owner’s door to see if anything was wrong. The late Icelandic-American poet Bill Holm not only left the doors to his home in Minneota (sic) unlocked, but those to his car as well– with the keys in the ignition.

    …but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions.

    Do they still use bills for the tiniest transaction? In 1985, I saw no coins in Canton. There were bills worth pennies.

    Counting our change, we were impressed by how honest everyone was. More experienced hands explained that the Chinese cheated each other left and right, but the penalties for doing this to a foreign visitor were so severe that nobody dared. Not for so little return.

    You need to visit other parts of North America than Detroit, Chicago, and the District of Columbia. Which, for your information, look more like the rest of the world than the rest of America.

  145. @ayatollah smith
    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal. A Texas student said he wouldn't want to live in a country where he couldn't 'defend' himself. Well, I wouldn't want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    The problem isn't the guns. A great many, and perhaps most, Americans are naturally violent. The US is by far the most violent nation in the world (excepting Israel's actions on Arabs in Palestine). When you aren't killing each other, you're killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . . . It never ends. Killing is what you do. You have been at war with someone for about 235 years of your 245 years as a country. What else is there to say? Killing is what you do.

    Chris Kyle, your favorite sniper, killed about 100 people. He said his favorite kill was a head shot of an infant being held in its mother's arms. He said he loved killing, and wished he could have done more of it. And, he had tattooed a large cross on his shoulder "because I wanted everyone to know I was a Christian".

    You people will never understand. Shanghai, with 25 million people, has less violent crime, and many fewer murders, in a year than does DC with only 500,000 people, or places like Chicago or Detroit.

    In a conversation with a health insurance executive some years ago, he said the best solution for his company in dealing with long-term disability patients was to "pin a $10 bill to the back of his shirt and send him to a baseball game in Detroit".

    Nobody in North America has any understanding of life in a safe country. Here are three examples, two from my personal experience, the other related by a friend.

    1. I was walking down a street in Monte Carlo, chatting with a policeman when, in front of an expensive apartment building, we saw a Rolls-Royce convertible with the top down, the keys in the ignition and the engine running, and what looked like a diamond necklace sitting on the seat. The policeman said he knew the woman who owned the car, and he offered this brief commentary:

    "She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it."


    2. China is still in some ways a cash society, having bypassed cheques and cards for mobile phone payment but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions. In any city in China we see on a daily basis people standing in line at an ATM, patiently waiting while one person is feeding huge wads of bills into the machine, 10,000 RMB at a time, the pile of cash often exceeding perhaps $US50,000. This is such a common transaction as to be completely ignored by everyone. In any city in North America this is begging for a 'snatch and grab' robbery, but I have never heard of such a thing occurring in China.


    3. An acquaintance of mine in Tokyo was waiting for a friend at a train station about 100 meters from her office when she remembered some important papers she needed. Her office would be closed within a few minutes, but the train was also arriving within a few minutes. What to do? On a bench just outside the train station exit, she left her bag, knowing her friend would recognise it, and returned to her office to collect her papers. This was her purse - with her wallet, passport, money, credit cards. When she returned to the station, her friend was sitting on the bench beside her bag, waiting for her. Theft is unknown in Japan, and no parents worry about their children being out late at night in even the largest cities.


    As I said, the problem is not guns. The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    >There’s no car theft in Europe

    Psiakrew, bzdura, kurwa!

  146. @Achmed E. Newman
    I was there this morning. It was very peaceful. I am not some expert on crowds, T.P., but I estimate way over 10,000 just in the immediate area (from my nice vantage point). There were plenty others on the side streets, such as 9th St. (to the West?), but I wasn't that familiar with Richmond.

    4 helicopters flew around, along with a drone. The local GOP politicians, many of them with orange "Guns save lives" stickers on their fancy suits, shook hands with people near them. I saw plenty of people carrying rifles (maybe 1 in 10), some of them in militia type gear, but that's only 5 % of the crowd. All the gun-toters had to stay downhill (outside the fence) from the State House.

    I will put up some pics on my site probably very late tonight (busy day from here on) or tomorrow morning.

    Cool air, great crowd, not a lick of violence. This is from 1130 EST and earlier. I could not stay long.

    What did I write yesterday - They can't mess with 10,000 people. Maybe, there were lots more than that.

    “What did I write yesterday – They can’t mess with 10,000 people.”

    The Virginia Army National Guard is authorized approximately 7,250 personnel and has an approximate strength of 7,175 as of August 29, 2019.

    https://vaguard.dodlive.mil/vaarng/

    That’s more than the Va. NG. That means if they decide to go all in with Bloomberg, the state capitol will resemble something like this:

  147. OT: Steve Bannon interview for PBS (March 17, 2019) 2h 26 min

  148. Like the man said who are you going to shoot.
    Alexander Hamilton had rifles in mind, not handguns. Which is ironic.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    Seems to me that "How Alexander Hamilton solved America's gun problem — 228 years ago" ( https://theweek.com/articles/629815/how-alexander-hamilton-solved-americas-gun-problem--228-years-ago ) was written simply to ensure US gun rights are to be limited by non-stop harassment by the cosmopolitans. The author clearly hopes that the US Judiciary will once again be overrun by gun controllers like they are NOW.

    Check out some of the gun quotes by the Founding Fathers here:

    https://www.concealedcarry.com/gun-quotes-from-our-founding-fathers-2nd-amendment/

    And let's not forget why the 14Th Amendment was created to defend gun rights:

    https://www.azcdl.org/Halbrook_TheJurisprudenceoTheSecondandFourteenthAmdts.pdf
  149. Maybe they want more people dead. Overpopulation and all that.

  150. There was one arrest at the Virginia rally: it was of a female antifa, of possible all-the-wars-starting ancestry and large caliber problem eyeglasses, who refused to remove her anarchist bandanna after repeated warnings.
    https://postimg.cc/5HSGnWBx

    • Replies: @Lot
    “ of possible all-the-wars-starting ancestry”

    Her surname appears to be non-Jewish and German. That’s what you meant, right?
    , @anon
    There was one arrest at the Virginia rally: it was of a female antifa, ... who refused to remove her anarchist bandanna after repeated warnings.

    Good. Those laws were enacted specifically to prevent masked persons engaging in intimidation. Intimidation of the sort Antifa has routinely engages in.
  151. OK, but… let’s see the frequency distribution of victim-fatalities per shooting-incident for rifles compared to that for handguns. One might expect that the former is less skewed toward 1/1 than is the latter, but what’s the truth?

  152. @Peter Akuleyev
    In Austria, and a lot of other European countries I suspect, it is very easy for a citizen to get a shotgun, not terribly difficult to get a license to own a rifle, and very difficult to get a pistol. As a result, low IQ criminal types don't have guns. Muggings and home invasions, while a problem, are simply not as scary as in the US, and cops are not afraid of normal criminals shooting them. Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US.

    You can get arrested for thought crimes in Europe. Any freedom you feel is just an illusion.

  153. @Lars Porsena
    The underperformance of strangulation here is basically another system of declining testosterone levels and a feminized society. It's a very good way to kill people but modern American men just don't have the grip strength anymore. Too much soy.

    I guess it’s one of those things that must be either automated, off-shored, or delegated to immigrants with big strong hands…

  154. @Mr McKenna

    Do they all just pack up and move to Texas?
     
    No, they just join with their compatriots in the mountains.
    Did you not see this?

    West Virginia Lawmakers Invite Virginia Counties Fed Up With Gun Control to Secede

    The offer to the counties of western Virginia ought to be fulfilled without any issue beyond a plebiscite. If freedom means anything at all, it means freedom of association–for both people and polities.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/white-virginia-is-rising-west-virginia-one-of-americas-whitest-states-offers-overwhelmingly-white-virginia-counties-declaring-themselves-2nd-amendment-sanctuaries-the-opportunity-for-secession-fr/

    Two quirks with the Commonwealth:

    1. Virginia’s counties are unencumbered by cities, by law. They are inherently more suburban or rural than similar counties elsewhere.

    Of the 41 independent U.S. cities, 38 are in Virginia, whose state constitution makes them a special case. The three independent cities outside Virginia are Baltimore, Maryland; St. Louis, Missouri; and Carson City, Nevada.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independent_city_(United_States)

    (NB: New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and others are not outside county government, but constitute counties or groups of counties themselves. Miami, Jacksonville, and Indianapolis are city-county mergers.)

    Secession and absorption by West Virginia would leave cities like Roanoke, Charlottesville, and even Richmond as urban exclaves of Virginia.

    2. There is that sticky Article IV, Section 3 of the Constitution:

    New states may be admitted by the Congress into this union; but no new states shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of the states concerned as well as of the Congress.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/articleiv

    That’s a bit ambiguous, as it refers to “new states”. Does the addition of territory to an old state constitute a new state, or merely the new form of an old state?

    But West Virginia was herself a new state, which has apparently never been authorized by Mother Commonwealth, the way Maine was by hers.

    This is the Ellis Island landfill case raised to a Contitutional level. Stock up on popcorn, baked ham, and ramps.

    New Jersey v. New York, 523 U.S. 767 (1998)

    • Thanks: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    The City of Miami is a separate entity from the County of Miami-Dade. The county provides many services to the city, but they are not one and the same.

    (The 1997 name change from Dade to Miami-Dade was purely cosmetic.)
  155. @J.Ross
    There was one arrest at the Virginia rally: it was of a female antifa, of possible all-the-wars-starting ancestry and large caliber problem eyeglasses, who refused to remove her anarchist bandanna after repeated warnings.
    https://postimg.cc/5HSGnWBx

    “ of possible all-the-wars-starting ancestry”

    Her surname appears to be non-Jewish and German. That’s what you meant, right?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I am seeing plenty of Jewish Beschlers, although I have no idea if she's one. The point was that this was not what people, especially certain people, were expecting. Youtube has videos of her dancing and one at a baptism. Apparently she had an assault charge in the past (not verified) and a fashion blog -- is this a case of Don't Let Your Daughter Be Universitied?
    , @Reg Cæsar
    He might be referring to her apparent Polynesian side.


    Was she frisked?

    http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/magellan.htm



    https://live.staticflickr.com/2004/2194134864_8b06a39c10_b.jpg
  156. @Yngvar

    If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there
     
    But they do. Chicago as an example has very restrictive gun laws. (After Heller they were forced to allow individuals to own handguns, but they required anyone applying for a permit to take a gun safety course at a gun range within city jurisdiction. And then no permits for opening a gun range was given.) The Alders claim handguns brought in illegally from adjoining districts is the cause of the mayhem, but that fails to explain why there is no such turmoil in those adjoining districts.

    Stop-and-frisk is the only way to curb killings in some neighborhoods.

    But they do. Chicago as an example has very restrictive gun laws. (After Heller they were forced to allow individuals to own handguns, but they required anyone applying for a permit to take a gun safety course at a gun range within city jurisdiction. And then no permits for opening a gun range was given.) The Alders claim handguns brought in illegally from adjoining districts is the cause of the mayhem, but that fails to explain why there is no such turmoil in those adjoining districts.

    No, the safety course is only to get a concealed carry permit and that’s statewide. Chicago’s restrictive laws were overruled by the state. The only limit on handguns is that you have to have a state Firearms Owners ID (FOID) Card. Chicago does have some laws on so-called assault rifles.

  157. @Bill Jones
    I am no such thing!

    Touche – comparing commenting history with the name style is important. Those other commenters have very few comments and all started appearing right about the same time.

  158. @ayatollah smith
    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal. A Texas student said he wouldn't want to live in a country where he couldn't 'defend' himself. Well, I wouldn't want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    The problem isn't the guns. A great many, and perhaps most, Americans are naturally violent. The US is by far the most violent nation in the world (excepting Israel's actions on Arabs in Palestine). When you aren't killing each other, you're killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . . . It never ends. Killing is what you do. You have been at war with someone for about 235 years of your 245 years as a country. What else is there to say? Killing is what you do.

    Chris Kyle, your favorite sniper, killed about 100 people. He said his favorite kill was a head shot of an infant being held in its mother's arms. He said he loved killing, and wished he could have done more of it. And, he had tattooed a large cross on his shoulder "because I wanted everyone to know I was a Christian".

    You people will never understand. Shanghai, with 25 million people, has less violent crime, and many fewer murders, in a year than does DC with only 500,000 people, or places like Chicago or Detroit.

    In a conversation with a health insurance executive some years ago, he said the best solution for his company in dealing with long-term disability patients was to "pin a $10 bill to the back of his shirt and send him to a baseball game in Detroit".

    Nobody in North America has any understanding of life in a safe country. Here are three examples, two from my personal experience, the other related by a friend.

    1. I was walking down a street in Monte Carlo, chatting with a policeman when, in front of an expensive apartment building, we saw a Rolls-Royce convertible with the top down, the keys in the ignition and the engine running, and what looked like a diamond necklace sitting on the seat. The policeman said he knew the woman who owned the car, and he offered this brief commentary:

    "She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it."


    2. China is still in some ways a cash society, having bypassed cheques and cards for mobile phone payment but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions. In any city in China we see on a daily basis people standing in line at an ATM, patiently waiting while one person is feeding huge wads of bills into the machine, 10,000 RMB at a time, the pile of cash often exceeding perhaps $US50,000. This is such a common transaction as to be completely ignored by everyone. In any city in North America this is begging for a 'snatch and grab' robbery, but I have never heard of such a thing occurring in China.


    3. An acquaintance of mine in Tokyo was waiting for a friend at a train station about 100 meters from her office when she remembered some important papers she needed. Her office would be closed within a few minutes, but the train was also arriving within a few minutes. What to do? On a bench just outside the train station exit, she left her bag, knowing her friend would recognise it, and returned to her office to collect her papers. This was her purse - with her wallet, passport, money, credit cards. When she returned to the station, her friend was sitting on the bench beside her bag, waiting for her. Theft is unknown in Japan, and no parents worry about their children being out late at night in even the largest cities.


    As I said, the problem is not guns. The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    Well, I wouldn’t want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    What would you rather carry to defend yourself? A rape whistle is an option, if you think that would suffice.

    The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    Not most Americans. The problem is concentrated in 12.7 percent of the populace.

    • Agree: Kronos
  159. @Lot
    “ of possible all-the-wars-starting ancestry”

    Her surname appears to be non-Jewish and German. That’s what you meant, right?

    I am seeing plenty of Jewish Beschlers, although I have no idea if she’s one. The point was that this was not what people, especially certain people, were expecting. Youtube has videos of her dancing and one at a baptism. Apparently she had an assault charge in the past (not verified) and a fashion blog — is this a case of Don’t Let Your Daughter Be Universitied?

  160. @ayatollah smith
    When Texas expanded the free carry law to university students and campuses, the US was compared to Japan or China where firearms are illegal. A Texas student said he wouldn't want to live in a country where he couldn't 'defend' himself. Well, I wouldn't want to live in a country where I had to defend myself by carrying a gun.

    The problem isn't the guns. A great many, and perhaps most, Americans are naturally violent. The US is by far the most violent nation in the world (excepting Israel's actions on Arabs in Palestine). When you aren't killing each other, you're killing families in Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Bolivia, Haiti, Nicaragua, Indonesia, the Philippines, Jugoslavia, Serbia, Pakistan, China (Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong), Russia (Sochi), the Ukraine . . . . It never ends. Killing is what you do. You have been at war with someone for about 235 years of your 245 years as a country. What else is there to say? Killing is what you do.

    Chris Kyle, your favorite sniper, killed about 100 people. He said his favorite kill was a head shot of an infant being held in its mother's arms. He said he loved killing, and wished he could have done more of it. And, he had tattooed a large cross on his shoulder "because I wanted everyone to know I was a Christian".

    You people will never understand. Shanghai, with 25 million people, has less violent crime, and many fewer murders, in a year than does DC with only 500,000 people, or places like Chicago or Detroit.

    In a conversation with a health insurance executive some years ago, he said the best solution for his company in dealing with long-term disability patients was to "pin a $10 bill to the back of his shirt and send him to a baseball game in Detroit".

    Nobody in North America has any understanding of life in a safe country. Here are three examples, two from my personal experience, the other related by a friend.

    1. I was walking down a street in Monte Carlo, chatting with a policeman when, in front of an expensive apartment building, we saw a Rolls-Royce convertible with the top down, the keys in the ignition and the engine running, and what looked like a diamond necklace sitting on the seat. The policeman said he knew the woman who owned the car, and he offered this brief commentary:

    "She has probably gone upstairs to her apartment, forgotten about her car, and gone to sleep. But when she comes out in the morning, her car will still be here, the engine still running, and her diamond necklace will still be on the seat where she left it."


    2. China is still in some ways a cash society, having bypassed cheques and cards for mobile phone payment but surprisingly still using bills for many large transactions. In any city in China we see on a daily basis people standing in line at an ATM, patiently waiting while one person is feeding huge wads of bills into the machine, 10,000 RMB at a time, the pile of cash often exceeding perhaps $US50,000. This is such a common transaction as to be completely ignored by everyone. In any city in North America this is begging for a 'snatch and grab' robbery, but I have never heard of such a thing occurring in China.


    3. An acquaintance of mine in Tokyo was waiting for a friend at a train station about 100 meters from her office when she remembered some important papers she needed. Her office would be closed within a few minutes, but the train was also arriving within a few minutes. What to do? On a bench just outside the train station exit, she left her bag, knowing her friend would recognise it, and returned to her office to collect her papers. This was her purse - with her wallet, passport, money, credit cards. When she returned to the station, her friend was sitting on the bench beside her bag, waiting for her. Theft is unknown in Japan, and no parents worry about their children being out late at night in even the largest cities.


    As I said, the problem is not guns. The problem is that most Americans are totally f***ing crazy.

    4 comment history.

  161. @Paleo Liberal
    Except all your "phony" diseases are real diseases.

    Sorry, but you lost all credibility there. You are truly an idiot. You spout out about "phony" diseases without even looking at the scientific evidence. Moron.

    According to the Mayo clinic, there are people who are senstive to MSG:

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196

    The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
     
    And so, I avoid MSG. By avoiding MSG, I have far fewer headaches, and I haven't gone into shock in over 20 years.

    I really don't give a flying f*** if avoiding headaches and other symptoms, up to and including shock, makes me a wayyyyy-cist or not.

    Do you get headaches from Parmesan cheese?

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    There is a difference between a small amount of naturally occurring glutamic acid and someone pouring several grams of refined synthetic MSG on the food.

    Studies have shown reactions to pure MSG at lower doses than what is found in many restaurants. The tiny amount of naturally occurring glutamates in cheese are minimal.
    , @JMcG
    Only domestic. The real deal from Parma is fine, I’m sure.
  162. @Jonathan Mason

    I’m reliably informed that preventing felons from voting, something that would have been obvious common sense to everyone in the entire history of the world up until perhaps five years ago,
     
    This is not so. In many European countries felons are allowed, even encouraged, to vote while they are in prison, prisoners can vote in Canada, and in Australia too, with certain restrictions. In Ireland prisoners remain registered to vote at their prior home addresses and may vote by mail effective 2006.

    In Israel neither the courts nor the prison authorities have any power to prevent someone from voting.

    In most countries disenfranchisement is not automatic, but is a separate part of a sentence, and may be imposed for offenses such as election fraud, treason, and so on. In some countries felons are forbidden to run for elected office for a period of years, for example 5 years in Germany, 3 years in New Zealand.

    All of these laws predate five years ago, sometimes by eons.

    In the United States only 2 out of 40 states allow inmates to vote while in prison. Not surprisingly neither of them is a former slave state. If you look at the various types of restrictions on former felon voting in the US and divide them up into states that automatically restore the vote to felons when their sentence is completed, and those that do not, or place further onerous restrictions, it will be seen that certain states make it their business to restrict voting.

    What is more, if you look at the history of felon and minority disenfranchisement in the US, it cannot truly be separated from the history of reconstruction attempts to disenfranchise blacks, and has little to do with justice or preserving electoral integrity.

    The US System was designed by white man for a religious, high-trust, educated, land-owning, white population. Landless, ignorant blacks should not have been granted the right to vote at all as we now see the historical catastrophe that has resulted by granting a low-intelligence, tribal sub-population rights to commandeer a system that the overwhelming majority of its members have basically no respect for in the first place. The US System ceased to function as designed long ago, as its anti-white, santanic, pedophile-enabling, resource-stealing and greedy Establishment has been stoking armed conflicts both inside and outside US borders for 150 years.

    What you describe is an excuse for equal outcome. Why should an illiterate, unmarried black breed sow with 5 children, who holds a 20 hours-per-week job at Wal-Mart while living in government subsidized housing, and whose groceries and medical care are overed by EBT, Medicaid and WIC, have the right to vote alongside someone who went to college or trade school and earns $60,000/ year to support a wife and one child, one whose family collects no unearned government largess?

    People in prison forfeit their rights until they have served their sentences. Murderers, thieves, rapists, child molesters, arsonists, corporate fraudsters, repeat offenders, etc. for any all offenses do not deserve to vote- period. Deconstruction of civil norms leads to anarchy and then to tyranny.

  163. @Corn
    Ramzpaul linked to a graph on twitter once (I can’t display it here, on my phone and not tech savvy anyway). If that graph was accurate the firearm homicide rate of white Americans was lower than that of Canada, France, Austria and Finland!

    Firearm homicides per 100,000 people:

    US White: 1.7

    Czech Republic: 1.7

    Canada: 1.8

    France: 2.6

    Austria: 2.8

    Finland: 3.3

    However.......

    US Hispanic: 6.4

    US Black: 19.8

    Those numbers are way off other than Canada. Euro countries are mostly 1 or less, other than Russia which is twice the US rate. US white homicide rate is something like 2.5. Ann Coulter got some controversy once for pointing out that was the same as Belgium’s. Turned out she picked an unusually violent year in one of the most violent West European countries.

  164. One favored method for mass disarmament of a citizenry is to make high-profile arrests of those who are vocal about their firearms “rights”.

    Another way is to enlist the “help” of the communist “mainstream media” to demonize anyone who has an interest in firearms, allowing the media to be present at “raids” and in general use “loaded” terms such as “arsenals”, “weapons of mass-destruction”, “weapons of war”, “machine guns” and other sensational terms, to inflame the non-knowledgeable public, introducing them to their “unstable” neighbors who are being (illegally and unconstitutionally) raided.

    It’s all about perception, which the left uses to good effect, utilizing tactics from jew communist Saul Alinsky’s “Rules for Radicals. The “mainstream media has always been dishonest and against firearms rights.

    High-profile raids will push the firearms owning public underground. Those who choose to “fight back” will be regarded as “terrorists” and “enemies of the state and good order” by the mainstream media, who will fan the flames of hysteria, attempting to get the general public on their side—supporting mass disarmament. If and when they are murdered by “law enforcement” very little, if anything, will be mentioned about the illegality of these “raids”.

    All one has to do is look at how firearms owners are treated presently by the mainstream media-looked upon as “pariahs” and other unstable types.

    The “key” to resistance may be to “cache” your firearms, leaving a few firearms accessible both for protection and as “bait” to “feed” the gun-grabbers if and when the raids come.

    The left is expert at using “incrementalism”, chipping away at rights a little-bit at a time. From arbitrary classification of firearms, declaring certain “features” illegal, to specifying barrel lengths, magazine capacity, to outright banning the production and ownership of newly-manufactured machine guns, the left has been busy.

    There are no easy answers to the situation we are presently in, but surrendering one’s rights is never the answer.

    A good read, “Unintended Consequences” by John Ross, about our present situation and possible “solutions” was written in 1995 and is still available in print and as a free pdf. This book is a good reference, history lesson, and comes up with possible solutions to the assault on our freedom.

    This book was considered so volatile when it first came out that sellers were routinely harassed by FBI, ATF, and DEA types for displaying and selling it.

    To quote Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn:

    And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say goodbye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling in terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand. The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin’s thirst; the cursed machine would have ground to a halt . . .
    — Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, The Gulag Archipelago

  165. @Harry Baldwin
    In Mexico you would have a wall around your property topped with broken glass. Because Mexicans.

    When I was 12 way back in 1964, I took a trip with my mother & father to points south. I saw walls just like that in Bolivia. A little less “institutional” looking than barbed wire, but clearly with the same intent.

    Seeing the 3rd world was a real eye-opener for my young mind. Lots of questions…

  166. Quite often, firearms owners are their own worst enemies.

    The duck hunters don’t like the AR-15 “black rifles” so they see no problem if attempts are made to ban them.

    The traditional rifle owners don’t like machine guns, so they have no problem with them being legislated out of existence.

    Some pistol owners see nothing wrong with certain long guns being outlawed just as some rifle owners would have no problem seeing pistols banned.

    You see, anti-gunners want them all. They will chip away a little at a time until their goal of civilian disarmament is complete. They have an excuse for banning every firearm.

    Scoped bolt-action rifles are defined by anti-gunners as “sniper rifles” because they are “too accurate”.

    Magazine-fed weapons are suspect because of high (actually normal) magazine capacity.

    Handguns are suspect because they are “easily concealable”.

    The gun grabbers want them all and have made (flimsy and suspect) excuses for banning every type of firearm. They don’t care how long it takes. and will use incrementalism to their advantage.

    Friends, ALL firearms advocates must “hang together” and realize that an assault on ANY means of firearms ownership and self-defense is an assault on ALL forms of firearms ownership and self-defense.

    There is absolutely NO ROOM for complacency among ANY Second Amendment supporters. An attack on one is an attack on ALL…

    ALL firearms laws are unconstitutional on their face. Imagine the hue and cry if “reasonable” restrictions were placed on First Amendment activities, especially with the “mainstream media”.

    The Second Amendment is clear–what part of “shall not be infringed” do politicians and the media not understand…of course, they understand full well…it’s part of their communist agenda…

    Even the NRA bears responsibility for capitulation on matters concerning firearms.

    The NRA failed when it allowed the National Firearms Act of 1934 to stand without offering opposition, the 1968 Gun Control Act, the NICS “instant check” system, the “no new machine gun for civilians” ban in 1986, the so-called “assault weapons” ban in 1994, and other infringements of the Second Amendment.

    Let’s face it. What better way to increase membership than to “allow” infringements to be enacted and then push for a new membership drive.

    Yes, the NRA has done good, but its spirit of “compromise” will only lead to one thing…confiscation.

  167. Anonymous[205] • Disclaimer says:

    Nixon wanted to ban handguns:

    https://www.politico.com/story/2013/03/gun-control-richard-nixon-wished-for-total-handgun-ban-088686

    “I don’t know why any individual should have a right to have a revolver in his house,” Nixon said in a taped conversation with aides. “The kids usually kill themselves with it and so forth.” He asked why “can’t we go after handguns, period?”

    Nixon went on: “I know the rifle association will be against it, the gun makers will be against it.” But “people should not have handguns.”

    “Let me ask you,” Nixon said to Attorney General John Mitchell in June 1971, “there is only one thing you are checking on, that’s the manufacture of those $20 guns? We should probably stop that.” Saturday night specials sold for $10 to $30 at the time. Mitchell responded that banning those guns would be “pretty difficult, actually,” because of the gun lobby.

    “No hunters are going to use $20 guns,” Nixon countered.

    “No, but the gun lobby’s against any incursion into the elimination of firearms,” said Mitchell.

    Reagan was relatively pro gun control as well, both during his governorship of California and presidency, although he generally had the support of the NRA.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    No surprise there. In Illinois both ex-Govs. James Thompson and Jim Edgar expressed support for AR bans, but only stated this AFTER their terms in office.
    , @Joe Stalin
    Elvis presented this M1911 to Nixon:

    https://static.flickr.com/46/178121557_d26a2cb710_m.jpg

    Camille Metzger examines a World War II commemorative Colt .45 pistol, that Elvis Presley gave to Richard Nixon during their Dec. 21, 1971 meeting, as she visits the Nixon Presidential Library and Birthplace on what would have been Elvis 72nd birthday Monday, Jan. 8, 2007, in Yorba Linda, Calif. The library celebrated the historic meeting with a museum-style display of the outfits both men wore and a talk by the presidential aide who set the meeting up.(AP Photo/Ric Francis)

    https://www.xdtalk.com/threads/the-colt-45-elvis-gave-nixon.30291/
     
    I also recall Nixon was given a presentation grade full-auto AK-47 while traveling abroad, but some fool in the USG had it destroyed.
  168. @Lot
    “ of possible all-the-wars-starting ancestry”

    Her surname appears to be non-Jewish and German. That’s what you meant, right?

    He might be referring to her apparent Polynesian side.

    Was she frisked?

    http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/magellan.htm

  169. The problem is, we have allowed the anti Second Amendment crowd to define the terms.

    A firearm is a tool which possesses no evil intent on its own. Assigning intent to an inanimate object is the epitome of insanity. Demonizing a weapon on looks alone also marks the accuser as an unstable individual who is also insane. Call them out on their illogic and insanity.

    Another dirty tactic the anti-Second Amendment crowd uses exposes children to potential and actual harm by putting them in gun-free zones. These people care not one wit about children, but uses them for their own nefarious purposes.

    We need to TAKE BACK the argument

    When the antis blame the firearm for the actions of a criminal, state that: a firearm is an inanimate object, subject only to the intent of the user. Firearms ARE used to preserve life and make a 90 lb. woman equal to a 200 lb. criminal”.

    When the antis attempt to justify their gun free zones counter their misguided argument with you mean, criminal safety zones or victim disarmament zones.
    State that we protect our money, banks, politicians and celebrities, buildings and facilities with PEOPLE WITH GUNS, but protect our children with gun-free zone signs.

    When the antis criticize AR-15s in general, counter with: you mean the most popular rifle of the day, use able by even the smallest, weakest person as a means of self-defense. Besides, AR-15s are FUN to shoot. Offer to take them to the range and supply them with an AR-15, ammunition and range time. I have made many converts this way.

    When the antis state that: You dont need an AR-15 to hunt with, counter with AR-15s ARE used for hunting, but in many states, are prohibited from being used to take large game because they are underpowered.

    When the antis state that: AR-15s are high powered rifles, correct them by stating that AR-15s with the .223 or 5.56mm cartridge are considered medium-powered weapons-NOT high-powered by any means.

    When the antis state that: you don’t need and AR-15, counter with, Who are YOU to consider what I need?

    When the antis state that: the Constitution was written during the time of muskets, and that the Second Amendment should only apply to weapons of that time period, state that: by your logic, the First Amendment should not apply to modern-day telecommunications, internet, television, radio, public-address systems, books and newspapers produced on high-speed offset printing presses. By their “logic” only town-criers and Benjamin Franklin type printing presses would be covered under the First Amendment.

    When the antis state that only law enforcement and government should possess firearms, remind them of the latest school shooting, as well as Columbine, where law enforcement SAT ON THEIR HANDS and cowered in fear while children were being murdered, citing “officer safety”, afraid to challenge the shooter, despite being armed to the hilt and possessing “immunity”.

    The government-run murderous sieges at Ruby Ridge and Waco are also good examples of government (mis)use of firearms.

    This tome can be used to counter any argument against any infringement of our Second Amendment.

  170. @J.Ross
    Yes, this is pretty normal East Asian We Alien (1979) Now "The Company Says So" morality. But don't get your flavor enhanced -- the Japs are pretty much the least awful by far at this. When they admit fault (which Japanese formally do in a much wider range of situations than their US counterparts) they resign; when they admit fault to the public on something big like faulty safety equipment or that one really big carcinogen situation in the 70s they physically get down on the floor.
    You know which East Aaian nationality doesn't do that, and wouldn't anyway to American complainants? The ones who outnumber Japanese by over a billion, and who Trump wants in here in bigger numbers than ever.
    ----------
    Rape of Nanking - that's a whole other thing but, as dumb and gratuitously violent as the interwar militarist Japanese were, RoN is a premier example of a purely tribalist grievance. The absolute worst stories pale next to normal treatment of Chinese people in that period by not even the worst Chinese people. Every Chinese who could, got out from under a Chinese government and into a town or territory governed by foreigners, because everything was objectively better there. All the factions of the Chinese civil war routinely took, abused, raped, and killed slaves, and the people they were enslaving were of course Chinese. The Japanese shouldn't have been there and shouldn't have done what they did, but no way in frozen hell is whining about the least atrocious atrocity of the civil war era meaningful coming from the state that Mao built out of acres of human gore.
    While this is about East Asians and disputed in degree but fundamentally undoubted historical events, and not about Africans or Semites and mythohistorical events, it does illustrate my second named law: in tribalism, reality itself is negotiable, and Tribe A talks up The Terrible Historical Tragedy not because it happened but as a negotiation ploy against equally cynical Tribe B. A non-tribalist community wandering into the middle of that might be inclined to start believing in this Great Historical tragedy business, but that's a mistake. Even if the event has provable elements the negotiation aspect cannot be forgotten, and policy should never be based on such a story.

    …no way in frozen hell is whining about the least atrocious atrocity of the civil war era meaningful coming from the state that Mao built out of acres of human gore.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Per one of the great iSteve themes, pointing your finger at Those Awful Oppressors can be a way to not notice when the enemy is the giant spider of you.
  171. @Sean
    https://youtu.be/kl5279dWqGs?t=3025

    Like the man said who are you going to shoot.
    Alexander Hamilton had rifles in mind, not handguns. Which is ironic.

    https://youtu.be/VjsqZHb32Gk?t=106

    Seems to me that “How Alexander Hamilton solved America’s gun problem — 228 years ago” ( https://theweek.com/articles/629815/how-alexander-hamilton-solved-americas-gun-problem–228-years-ago ) was written simply to ensure US gun rights are to be limited by non-stop harassment by the cosmopolitans. The author clearly hopes that the US Judiciary will once again be overrun by gun controllers like they are NOW.

    Check out some of the gun quotes by the Founding Fathers here:

    https://www.concealedcarry.com/gun-quotes-from-our-founding-fathers-2nd-amendment/

    And let’s not forget why the 14Th Amendment was created to defend gun rights:

    https://www.azcdl.org/Halbrook_TheJurisprudenceoTheSecondandFourteenthAmdts.pdf

  172. @Corn
    Ramzpaul linked to a graph on twitter once (I can’t display it here, on my phone and not tech savvy anyway). If that graph was accurate the firearm homicide rate of white Americans was lower than that of Canada, France, Austria and Finland!

    Firearm homicides per 100,000 people:

    US White: 1.7

    Czech Republic: 1.7

    Canada: 1.8

    France: 2.6

    Austria: 2.8

    Finland: 3.3

    However.......

    US Hispanic: 6.4

    US Black: 19.8

    Your numbers are wrong. Canada’s TOTAL murder rate in 2018 was 1.8 per 100,000, not the firearms homicide rate specifically. France’s total rate was 1.2, so I have no idea where a firearms-only rate of 2.6 would even come from. Austria’s murder rate (total, not just firearms) is typically around 0.5 per 100,000. 2.8 would be many multiples of the usual total and would probably result in the Austrian military being deployed. Please use more reliable sources in the future.

  173. @Lot
    Probably the reaction is to overused and rancid frying oil plus a ton of salt. The people who say they are sensitive don’t react when given MSG in a capsule.

    People don’t react to small, one-time doses of MSG.
    We get about 0.5 g every day naturally.

    Chronic use of MSG may cause some health issues. There are positive correlations in some studies with childhood obesity, but no known link.

    Large doses of 1.5 – 2.5 g cause reactions in some people.

    Some Chinese restaurants use 5 g or even higher. In other words 2-3x or more of the dose known to cause reactions in some people.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  174. looks like the 2a march was a grand success! We need to learn from the nra and other groups that are actually successful in doing IRL activism.

  175. @Peterike
    Do you get headaches from Parmesan cheese?

    There is a difference between a small amount of naturally occurring glutamic acid and someone pouring several grams of refined synthetic MSG on the food.

    Studies have shown reactions to pure MSG at lower doses than what is found in many restaurants. The tiny amount of naturally occurring glutamates in cheese are minimal.

  176. anon[323] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paleo Liberal
    Except all your "phony" diseases are real diseases.

    Sorry, but you lost all credibility there. You are truly an idiot. You spout out about "phony" diseases without even looking at the scientific evidence. Moron.

    According to the Mayo clinic, there are people who are senstive to MSG:

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196

    The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
     
    And so, I avoid MSG. By avoiding MSG, I have far fewer headaches, and I haven't gone into shock in over 20 years.

    I really don't give a flying f*** if avoiding headaches and other symptoms, up to and including shock, makes me a wayyyyy-cist or not.

    There are lots of Asians who are paranoid about and anti-MSG as well. Koreans in particular. I worked with a Korean lady who would blame MSG every time she felt bad or had a headache after having takeout at lunch. It seemed like it was indigestion or a blood sugar spike and crash from the meal, but she would insist it was MSG. Lots of Korean food packaging advertises that it’s MSG-free. MSG comes from Japan, so maybe the Koreans are extra paranoid about it.

    http://mengnews.joins.com/view.aspx?aid=3055763

    MSG has long been considered something to avoid in Korea.

    MSG, which is also found in natural ingredients, has long been widely thought of as something created chemically. However, the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety earlier this year decided not to call it a chemical compound, as MSG is made out of sugar cane extracts.

    In recent years, the ministry has been also using its online blogs and other websites to explain what MSG is and how to consumer it. L-monosodium glutamate was first designated as a food additive in 1962 in Korea after it was first designated in Japan in 1948.

    One physics professor in Japan in 1908 discovered what makes umami, or gamchilmat in Korean. This comes from kelp broth, asparagus, tomatoes or other the products that contain glutamate. He added salt to it to make L-monosodium glutamate. The Food Safety Ministry in Korea explained in a blog post last year that the release of such an item was revolutionary, as ordinary people could get meaty flavor in their soups and other dishes without the need for meat.

    About 20 years ago, many companies, wanting to give off a chemical-free image and take the lead in the market started advertising their products’ MSG-free status. This spread the idea that MSG is harmful. Many testimonies about headaches, obesity or indigestion caused by MSG arose. However, the local Food Safety Ministry has said MSG is a safe food additive, and it doesn’t even post a recommended daily consumption limit.

  177. @Lars Porsena
    The underperformance of strangulation here is basically another system of declining testosterone levels and a feminized society. It's a very good way to kill people but modern American men just don't have the grip strength anymore. Too much soy.

    Ask Epstein if strangulation is no longer effective. :-;

    • Replies: @Hail

    Ask Epstein
     
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EOvWCptXkAYdkFW.jpg

    [Pickup truck showing "Epstein DID NOT Kill Himself"]

    One issue both the left and right can come together on at the Richmond gun rally
     
    via Elijah Schaffer.
  178. OT:

    Three years ago today (January 20), DJT became POTUS. One year hence, he or his successor will begin a new term.

  179. @Reg Cæsar
    Two quirks with the Commonwealth:

    1. Virginia's counties are unencumbered by cities, by law. They are inherently more suburban or rural than similar counties elsewhere.


    Of the 41 independent U.S. cities, 38 are in Virginia, whose state constitution makes them a special case. The three independent cities outside Virginia are Baltimore, Maryland; St. Louis, Missouri; and Carson City, Nevada.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independent_city_(United_States)
     

    (NB: New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and others are not outside county government, but constitute counties or groups of counties themselves. Miami, Jacksonville, and Indianapolis are city-county mergers.)

    Secession and absorption by West Virginia would leave cities like Roanoke, Charlottesville, and even Richmond as urban exclaves of Virginia.


    http://www.virginiaplaces.org/vacities/graphics/citiesminustwo.png


    2. There is that sticky Article IV, Section 3 of the Constitution:

    New states may be admitted by the Congress into this union; but no new states shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of the states concerned as well as of the Congress.

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/articleiv
     

    That's a bit ambiguous, as it refers to "new states". Does the addition of territory to an old state constitute a new state, or merely the new form of an old state?

    But West Virginia was herself a new state, which has apparently never been authorized by Mother Commonwealth, the way Maine was by hers.

    This is the Ellis Island landfill case raised to a Contitutional level. Stock up on popcorn, baked ham, and ramps.


    New Jersey v. New York, 523 U.S. 767 (1998)


    http://www.coinnews.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/2017-S-Proof-Ellis-Island-Quarter-Clad-Reverse-2.jpg

    The City of Miami is a separate entity from the County of Miami-Dade. The county provides many services to the city, but they are not one and the same.

    (The 1997 name change from Dade to Miami-Dade was purely cosmetic.)

  180. @Jonathan Mason

    People go to enormous lengths to stop felons from voting,

    Not anymore, mister “Northern Florida resident’, as you would know if you bothered to pay attention to your own state laws for the last 2 – 3 years. You do reside in North Florida, don’t you?

     

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/florida-supreme-court-rules-convicted-felons-must-pay-off-fines-before-voting-today-2020-01-16/

    The rules are inconsistent between states, but the important thing is that there are organized partisan attempts to influence legislatures or courts that go to extraordinary lengths to exclude people from voter rolls, this is not purely a historical phenomenon, although it does appear that the former slave-holding states are more likely to restrict former felons from voting.

    For example, former felons who have migrated south from New York, where they have voted, may be barred from voting on arrival in Florida for a variety of reasons.

    …although it does appear that the former slave-holding states are more likely to restrict former felons from voting.

    And from possessing firearms. Funny, that… which they share with states which are relatively easy on released felons:

    All states except Vermont broadly restrict access to firearms by felons…

    New Jersey, for example, prohibits firearm purchases by persons who have been convicted of a “crime,” defined as an offense punishable by imprisonment in excess of six months. New York includes specified felonies and “serious offenses” including child endangerment, certain kinds of disorderly conduct, and certain kinds of stalking.

    California and Connecticut each have a long list of felonies and violence-related or firearm-related misdemeanors that disqualify people from owning firearms. In 2017, California passed a bill prohibiting hate crime misdemeanants from possessing guns for 10 years.

    In Illinois, felony or misdemeanor convictions within the previous five years for battery, assault, aggravated assault, or violation of an order of protection, in which a firearm was used or possessed, are disqualifying offenses.

    https://lawcenter.giffords.org/gun-laws/policy-areas/who-can-have-a-gun/categories-of-prohibited-people/#federal

    For example, former felons who have migrated south from New York, where they have voted, may be barred from voting on arrival in Florida for a variety of reasons.

    If they can’t carry in New York, why should they vote in Florida? Or vice versa?

  181. Tranquility in Virginia, violence in Hawaii, a street-sweeping in Missouri, and a rage shooting in San Antonio, Texas (the newsmedia won’t say this, per Coulter’s Law, but the shooter is racially Atlantean):
    https://www.kens5.com/mobile/article/news/crime/san-antonio-shooting-suspect-in-custody-ventura-river-walk/273-5890beb7-15f5-4b7c-aed7-500a43510738
    As with the St Louis event, this was some kind of argument at a music venue which turned into rage shooting with two dead and more injured, implying a handgun and not much aiming.

  182. @SunBakedSuburb
    "Charlottesvilled"

    It's also a good idea to ban agent provocateurs like DOJ asset and clothes horse Richard Spencer from your rally.

    is there evidence Richard is a fed? He seems like just an idiot.

    • Agree: Lot
  183. @Reg Cæsar

    ...no way in frozen hell is whining about the least atrocious atrocity of the civil war era meaningful coming from the state that Mao built out of acres of human gore.
     
    https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/QMxU2ZAaNG4YKErlGASmXIRlI-w=/0x0:638x480/1200x800/filters:focal(268x189:370x291)/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/63698749/pogo-met-the-enemy.0.1505425927.0.jpg

    Per one of the great iSteve themes, pointing your finger at Those Awful Oppressors can be a way to not notice when the enemy is the giant spider of you.

  184. @J.Ross
    There was one arrest at the Virginia rally: it was of a female antifa, of possible all-the-wars-starting ancestry and large caliber problem eyeglasses, who refused to remove her anarchist bandanna after repeated warnings.
    https://postimg.cc/5HSGnWBx

    There was one arrest at the Virginia rally: it was of a female antifa, … who refused to remove her anarchist bandanna after repeated warnings.

    Good. Those laws were enacted specifically to prevent masked persons engaging in intimidation. Intimidation of the sort Antifa has routinely engages in.

  185. @Anonymous
    Nixon wanted to ban handguns:

    https://www.politico.com/story/2013/03/gun-control-richard-nixon-wished-for-total-handgun-ban-088686

    "I don't know why any individual should have a right to have a revolver in his house," Nixon said in a taped conversation with aides. "The kids usually kill themselves with it and so forth." He asked why "can't we go after handguns, period?"

    Nixon went on: "I know the rifle association will be against it, the gun makers will be against it." But "people should not have handguns."

    ...

    "Let me ask you," Nixon said to Attorney General John Mitchell in June 1971, "there is only one thing you are checking on, that's the manufacture of those $20 guns? We should probably stop that." Saturday night specials sold for $10 to $30 at the time. Mitchell responded that banning those guns would be "pretty difficult, actually," because of the gun lobby.

    "No hunters are going to use $20 guns," Nixon countered.

    "No, but the gun lobby's against any incursion into the elimination of firearms," said Mitchell.
     
    Reagan was relatively pro gun control as well, both during his governorship of California and presidency, although he generally had the support of the NRA.

    No surprise there. In Illinois both ex-Govs. James Thompson and Jim Edgar expressed support for AR bans, but only stated this AFTER their terms in office.

  186. @Anonymous
    Nixon wanted to ban handguns:

    https://www.politico.com/story/2013/03/gun-control-richard-nixon-wished-for-total-handgun-ban-088686

    "I don't know why any individual should have a right to have a revolver in his house," Nixon said in a taped conversation with aides. "The kids usually kill themselves with it and so forth." He asked why "can't we go after handguns, period?"

    Nixon went on: "I know the rifle association will be against it, the gun makers will be against it." But "people should not have handguns."

    ...

    "Let me ask you," Nixon said to Attorney General John Mitchell in June 1971, "there is only one thing you are checking on, that's the manufacture of those $20 guns? We should probably stop that." Saturday night specials sold for $10 to $30 at the time. Mitchell responded that banning those guns would be "pretty difficult, actually," because of the gun lobby.

    "No hunters are going to use $20 guns," Nixon countered.

    "No, but the gun lobby's against any incursion into the elimination of firearms," said Mitchell.
     
    Reagan was relatively pro gun control as well, both during his governorship of California and presidency, although he generally had the support of the NRA.

    Elvis presented this M1911 to Nixon:

    Camille Metzger examines a World War II commemorative Colt .45 pistol, that Elvis Presley gave to Richard Nixon during their Dec. 21, 1971 meeting, as she visits the Nixon Presidential Library and Birthplace on what would have been Elvis 72nd birthday Monday, Jan. 8, 2007, in Yorba Linda, Calif. The library celebrated the historic meeting with a museum-style display of the outfits both men wore and a talk by the presidential aide who set the meeting up.(AP Photo/Ric Francis)

    https://www.xdtalk.com/threads/the-colt-45-elvis-gave-nixon.30291/

    I also recall Nixon was given a presentation grade full-auto AK-47 while traveling abroad, but some fool in the USG had it destroyed.

  187. @anonymous
    Interesting...a .221 or .222 handgun that shot 6.5 x 52 rifle bullets.
    Not the silliest theory I have heard, but definitely Mark Lane territory.

    Interesting…a .221 or .222 handgun that shot 6.5 x 52 rifle bullets.
    Not the silliest theory I have heard, but definitely Mark Lane territory.

    I’m not following, how can a .22 fire 6.5 rifle bullets that exceed its bore diameter?

    • Replies: @anon
    I’m not following,

    Look deeper into the comment...deeper....

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Lane_(author)
  188. @Lars Porsena
    The underperformance of strangulation here is basically another system of declining testosterone levels and a feminized society. It's a very good way to kill people but modern American men just don't have the grip strength anymore. Too much soy.

    If we still had shop class in high school , we would be making garrotes and grip strength wouldn’t be an issue. Why isit that we can’t have nice things like garrotes anymore?

  189. @Reg Cæsar

    At what point is an inalienable right inalienable?
     
    It becomes quite alienable when you apply it to peoples for whom it was never meant, and those people grow to be a majority.

    when you apply it to peoples for whom it was never meant

    With guns, it doesn’t matter: If the Second Amendment is truly treated as inalienable in all US jurisdictions, “those people” (I assume you mean blacks, as per past posts) will still mostly shoot and kill each other, and of those crossover strays who get violently uppity—well, we can legally use our guns on them.

    It’s a big self-cleaning oven serving attrition nutrition. 🙂

  190. Comment #163 was skipped over, and I am not sure what in my reply needs to be kept hidden from the thread.

  191. @Paleo Liberal
    One interesting thing -- the Asian gals who complain the most about white racism tend to have white boyfriends. They are worried about being criticized as "sellouts" by other Asians, so they go overboard in their anti-white racism. One notorious example was Sarah Jeong, who wrote her most hateful anti-white screeds while in a relationship with a white guy who was active in the alt-right movement.

    I don't know if this Jessie chick is one of them. But having gone to Exeter and NYU, there is certainly that possibility.

    Anyway, I despise people like her. I have a weird MSG allergy, which appears to be cumulative. Most of the time I avoid MSG like the plague, so if I get a little MSG it doesn't hurt me. If I get a lot of MSG over a period of time, it builds up in my system. I get headaches, and I have even gone into shock a few times. The worst was after I lived in Asia for a year. I thing the MSG built up in my system a lot, so even a small amount would trigger me.

    But I think about the times I went into shock from MSG. I would love to have this b*tch, and the other pro-MSG activists, go into shock themselves, and tell them it is all because of their racism.

    These @$$holes are truly dangerous. For a few years, I was in a relationship with a Chinese lady who had actually seen me go into shock, but who later decided it was all way-cism. The b*tch would actually put MSG in my food just to prove I was way-cist, and the times it didn't put me into shock were her "proof". I am so glad to be rid of her.

    Can we get an “eye-roll” icon?

  192. @Peter Akuleyev
    In Austria, and a lot of other European countries I suspect, it is very easy for a citizen to get a shotgun, not terribly difficult to get a license to own a rifle, and very difficult to get a pistol. As a result, low IQ criminal types don't have guns. Muggings and home invasions, while a problem, are simply not as scary as in the US, and cops are not afraid of normal criminals shooting them. Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US.

    The situation you describe is identical to that in Ireland, except it is very difficult to get a non-rimfire rifle. The drug gangs have no difficulty whatsoever in obtaining and using handguns in Dublin. Casual murderers have followed the lead of the Brits and have taken to knives.
    Now, knives have been freely available in both countries since time immemorial, but people weren’t going around killing each other with them, at least not in the numbers we are seeing now. What has changed?

  193. @nebulafox
    Of course they are, Steve. That's the Narrative. Didn't you know that flash mobs are a predominantly redneck phenomenon?

    Joking aside, there's a simple solution to the whole gun control issue: let individual localities decide for themselves what the laws will be. Let people be free to choose what their laws will be. America is a big place. Isn't it silly to apply the same rules in downtown Manhattan where millions of people are crowded together to rural Texas where help is often dozens of miles away? If most of the day-to-day murders in the United States take place in the inner cities, why not let them apply strict handgun control there and let the rest of the country do as they please?

    I might not like leaving my gun behind if I visit the Bay Area, but I will do so because I will obey the law. Their house, their rules. But the converse should also apply. Everybody out here who owns guns are responsible, sane adults. Our house, our rules.

    Nebulafox is more correct than many of you who responded to him. The recognition of regional culture is one of the more important, yet less explicit, elements in our form of government as well as in the founding of our country. The importance of regional culture even reveals itself in the name of our country (to one degree or another): “The United States.” Why use the concept of states as a foundation for a national identity? It’s more than just being an evolutionary step from the Articles of Confederation, which were more in the vein of a treaty between states than a form of governance.

    One of the main problems that colonists had with the Crown and Parliament was representation; not just the absence of representation, but the nature of representation, when it existed. Many representatives of the colonies in Parliament had never even visited the colonies, let alone lived there. Three thousand miles of ocean and 170 years of salutary neglect (in one form or another, to one degree or another) had resulted in a colonial culture that was different from the culture of England, and that was a source of contention with the colonists. The founders wanted to address this “rule from afar” problem when forming their new secessionist polity…hence, maintaining colonial identities (which colonists had long been loyal to) as states.

    The thing is – as many of you rightly point out – there’s also a national legal culture and tradition in the US that recognizes (for the time being) essential rights of individual citizens at the federal level, and protects them with constitutional authority. The supremacy clause correctly puts those rights ahead of state laws, but you have to ask yourself these questions: Why does the US Constitution allow states to have their own constitution? Why does the US Constitution allow those state constitutions to have their own wording and interpretation of the Second Amendment? (By my count, more than half the states have their own interpretation of the Second Amendment, some of which seem to be more restrictive than the wording in the Bill of Rights.)

    The answer to those questions is, in a word, culture. Should North Dakota or South Carolina be required to have the same obscenity laws (First Amendment) or alcohol laws as California? I don’t think so. Even if those laws might become more uniform as time goes on, it should be the state’s prerogative. Culture is too important, but there has to be a delicate dance between the rights of individuals and the rights of regional cultures to exist. Not an easy path to follow. Dodge City, KS in the 19th century could tell people to turn over their firearms when entering the city limits, and that was probably an appropriate thing to do because it probably wasn’t part of coordinated national or statewide effort to nullify the Second Amendment. I’m guessing the new Virginia policy probably is.

    The NRA (which I’m a supporting member of) has been effective in getting concealed carry laws passed in most states. I support that effort and have a permit myself, but I also have to recognize that localities have the right to be different from the nation at large in terms of values and priorities, even when those values and priorities lean to the left. There’s a necessary balancing act, and just because the left has dedicated itself to cultural destruction and a profound lack of balance through radicalism doesn’t mean the right should also forsake the concept of culture in retaliation. It’s for this reason I didn’t support the national reciprocity law endorsed by the NRA a while back.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Why use the concept of states as a foundation for a national identity?
     
    The states already existed as separate colonies. It isn’t as if one single territory was suddenly divided into multiple states. Of course, differing “regional cultures” among those states led to the Civil War, whereupon massive violence was required to maintain “United” status.

    Why does the US Constitution allow those state constitutions to have their own wording and interpretation of the Second Amendment? (By my count, more than half the states have their own interpretation of the Second Amendment, some of which seem to be more restrictive than the wording in the Bill of Rights.)
     
    The more restrictive state constitutions are obsolete. See incorporation and Privileges or Immunities as linked in my earlier comment to NF.

    The answer to those questions is, in a word, culture.
     
    Nah. “Separate but Equal” was de jure Southern culture, and we all know how that ended up. “States’ rights” is dead. There may be some quaint state differences on issues that aren’t controversial, but on the big ones like 2A, “states’ rights” cries will again be smacked down by the Supremes or there will be real national trouble.

    Culture is too important, but there has to be a delicate dance between the rights of individuals and the rights of regional cultures to exist. Not an easy path to follow.
     
    It’s pretty easy from a legal standpoint, tiny dancer. Uphold the Bill of Rights.

    Dodge City, KS in the 19th century could tell people to turn over their firearms when entering the city limits, and that was probably an appropriate thing to do
     
    Nope. Look, if you’re scared of a present-day ‘Dodge City,’ don’t live there or travel there. OTOH, if you’re just a little wary, but heard they got the best steak and whores, go there strapped and be willing to accept a little potential chaos.

    There’s a necessary balancing act
     
    There’s no “balancing act” when it comes to slavery.

    It’s for this reason I didn’t support the national reciprocity law endorsed by the NRA a while back.
     
    National carry reciprocity is just a bridge move to national Constitutional Carry. I.e., if one has a gun possession permit, one shouldn’t need a carry permit—those should be one and the same: local state “culture” problem solved, like with standard driver’s licenses. Drive a Tesla or Explorer or Hellcat from state to state, it’s all good.
    , @Wilmingtonian

    There’s a necessary balancing act, and just because the left has dedicated itself to cultural destruction and a profound lack of balance through radicalism doesn’t mean the right should also forsake the concept of culture in retaliation.
     
    When the equilibrium is one side defecting while the other continues to cooperate, who wins? People who survive have a culture. People who get wiped out don't.
  194. @Peterike
    Do you get headaches from Parmesan cheese?

    Only domestic. The real deal from Parma is fine, I’m sure.

  195. @Paleo Liberal
    One interesting thing -- the Asian gals who complain the most about white racism tend to have white boyfriends. They are worried about being criticized as "sellouts" by other Asians, so they go overboard in their anti-white racism. One notorious example was Sarah Jeong, who wrote her most hateful anti-white screeds while in a relationship with a white guy who was active in the alt-right movement.

    I don't know if this Jessie chick is one of them. But having gone to Exeter and NYU, there is certainly that possibility.

    Anyway, I despise people like her. I have a weird MSG allergy, which appears to be cumulative. Most of the time I avoid MSG like the plague, so if I get a little MSG it doesn't hurt me. If I get a lot of MSG over a period of time, it builds up in my system. I get headaches, and I have even gone into shock a few times. The worst was after I lived in Asia for a year. I thing the MSG built up in my system a lot, so even a small amount would trigger me.

    But I think about the times I went into shock from MSG. I would love to have this b*tch, and the other pro-MSG activists, go into shock themselves, and tell them it is all because of their racism.

    These @$$holes are truly dangerous. For a few years, I was in a relationship with a Chinese lady who had actually seen me go into shock, but who later decided it was all way-cism. The b*tch would actually put MSG in my food just to prove I was way-cist, and the times it didn't put me into shock were her "proof". I am so glad to be rid of her.

    One interesting thing — the Asian gals who complain the most about white racism tend to have white boyfriends. They are worried about being criticized as “sellouts” by other Asians, so they go overboard in their anti-white racism. One notorious example was Sarah Jeong, who wrote her most hateful anti-white screeds while in a relationship with a white guy who was active in the alt-right movement.

    I don’t know if this Jessie chick is one of them. But having gone to Exeter and NYU, there is certainly that possibility.

    Anyway, I despise people like her.

    Your comment seems correct, and reminds me of this from Richmond, Virginia, today:

    An East Asian woman next to a N.European man. The East Asian woman’s sign says:

    Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?

    The conservative activist who posted that on Twitter put it up along with the “Armed Minorities are Harder to Oppress” sign guy, who was standing next to a Black guy with a puzzling “Incel” sign. There were a few others like this from the rally, including the Trans Americans For Gun Rights grouplet and the “I want Gay married couples to be able to protect their marijuana plants with guns” woman.

    If you look at his feed over the past day, this Caleb J. Hull, whoever he is, was obviously scouring the event for “Based Black Guys” and posting pictures of all he found with celebratory accompanying tweet, which constitute a majority of his substantive tweets during the rally. To me he is a clown, but a sincere one, i.e. not a troll/parody; he is almost indistinguishable from the DemsRRealRacist parody (if anyone remembers him; a genius parody account, banned ca. late 2016 or early 2017).

    Anyway, I see the East Asian woman’s “Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?” as comparable to your scenario for explaining Sarah Jeong’s anti-white invective, as follows:

    In the Sarah Jeong case, and possibly Jessie Yeung case, (you are proposing) the fear of being criticized by their fellows for being too close to another race (romantically) inclines them to politically attack whites as a race, “See, I’m close to my own race after all;” meanwhile, in the Richmond pic, the White man is afraid of being criticized by his fellows for being too close to his own race, so he brings along, or finds along the way somewhere, a nonwhite person, and points to him/her, “See, I’m not so close to my own race after all.”

    Similar racial-political dynamics for opposite ends.

    The difference is, Asians are expected/encouraged to be loyal to the race, and, to gain social approval, they can overtly do “racially loyal” things; meanwhile, Whites are expected/encouraged to be disloyal to the race, and, to gain social approval, can perform mini-acts or make statements showing how non-loyal they are.

    (Btw, the people on Reddit r/hapas would definitely disagree with her sign; they would say she is a “white supremacist,” as they believe many East Asian women are. It is a fact they lament bitterly as a central cause of psychological problems in the children produced thereby, i.e., themselves; r/hapas is a fascinating but dark place to spend any amount of time.)

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    An East Asian woman next to a N.European man. The East Asian woman’s sign says:

    Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?
     
    We can see that. It would be of more help to tell us what the man's sign says.
    , @Reg Cæsar
    I saved you the trouble. From WaPo's 12:30 pm diversity update:

    After the speeches wrapped up, rallygoers began marching along the streets of downtown Richmond — including Joe Evans, who hoisted a sign bearing black and red Chinese characters. Evans’s poster stood out amid a flood of Trump paraphernalia and “Don’t Tread on Me” signs.

    Also standing out in the crowd was his wife, a Chinese immigrant who recently obtained her U.S. citizenship. She held a sign that read: “Do I look like a white supremacist?”

    The couple had met in Beijing while Evans, who is white, was studying abroad, and have been married for seven years. They drove down from Arlington, Va., with their signs to prove that not everyone attending the rally — or every gun owner — is a white supremacist, or even white.

    “I’m an immigrant who’s a new U.S. citizen and I feel like the right to protect ourselves is important,” said Evans’s wife, who declined to give her name.

    Evans, an immigration attorney, held a sign with a Chinese proverb that translated as “water can support a ship and water can overturn it.”

    “It means that people put you in power, and people can remove you from power,” he said.

    Evans described the couple as “gay friendly and immigration friendly” but also passionately pro-gun rights.

    “There are more of us than you think in deep blue Arlington,” he said, adding that membership at their local gun range was diverse and included Asians, African Americans, Hispanics and members of the LGBTQ community.
    “We believe in equality for everyone,” said Evans, who is an independent. “That’s only possible if we have guns — or responsible people at least.”

    As they marched, they were approached by an African American man waving a giant Trump 2020 flag on a 20-foot pole.

    “Good afternoon young lady,” said Derrick Gibson. “We are the white supremacists, if you believe the news.”

    Gibson, 58, had driven down from Queens, N.Y. He, too, was at pains to point out that there was some diversity among the gun rights advocates in the primarily white crowd.

    “How are you doing? I’m Governor Northam in blackface,” he told passersby, drawing laughs.

    Northam was the target of much derision. Some signs showed him with a Hitler mustache and Nazi armband. Others showed a now-infamous photo from his medical school yearbook page which depicted one person in blackface and another under a Klan hood. “The man behind the sheet wants your guns,” one such sign said.

    “Governor Northam, I think I found the white supremacist,” said one such sign. “Unfortunately it’s you!”

    “This is not about race,” said Jonathan Austin, 46, from Chesterfield, Va. Austin, who is black, said he supports universal background checks but thought many of the other proposed gun-control bills went too far. “The government shouldn’t have the right to tell us what kind of guns we can have,” he said.

    “Gun Rights Are Also Gay Rights” read a sign held by Brandon Brod, 44.

    “My husband and I have collected guns for more than 20 years,” said Brod, who lives in Richmond and said he had attended Lobby Day since 2003. He was raised Quaker and still believes in pacifism, except when it comes to self-defense, he said. The country was a safer place now to be gay than in the mid-1990s, when he came out, he said.

    “Northam is making it out like we’re all white supremacists,” Brod said. “But I’m a gay man and a Quaker.”

    Brod, who said he’s a Libertarian, added that the response to his sign had been positive.

    “I’ve been feeling the love,” he said. “At least 100 people have asked me for a photo, including the militia guys.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-md-va/2020/01/20/virginia-gun-rally-updates/
     
  196. @Kronos

    Eventually you’ll also drop your similar shtick about Jewish fears about Ashkenazi high IQ being ‘revealed’ to the general public. 🙂 …

     

    I think the far more touchier subject is exactly how they got it so high. Many won’t like it getting out that many Eastern European Rabbis (from the Pale of Settlement) played a fast and loose de facto eugenics program. One that while creating some highly intelligent families, led to an absolutely horrific amount of mental disorders and physical abnormalities. I wouldn’t be too surprised that if Schizophrenia were to be successfully genetically decoded into various strains, that the primary ones originated from the Pale of Settlement. If you have friends/family in the medical professions, you’ll often see these Jewish families that can never catch a break.

    https://youtu.be/FgjCS5t3m40

    It’s likely one of the reasons why liberal Ashkenazi Jews have such a love for environmental explanations for human behavior so to blot out this history. Doesn’t help that many German eugenicists copy-and-pasted these ideas into their own future plans and subsequently larger and healthier breeding pools.

    https://www.amazon.com/Jewish-Eugenics-John-Glad/dp/0897030052

    Mockery of inbred gentiles is a staple of Jewish comedy. It’s an odd subject for humor.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Mockery of inbred gentiles is a staple of Jewish comedy. It’s an odd subject for humor.

     

    Not to mention ironic:

    https://www.jta.org/jewniverse/2017/in-rhode-island-jews-can-marry-their-relatives


    https://law.justia.com/codes/rhode-island/2012/title-15/chapter-15-1/chapter-15-1-4
  197. @J.Ross
    Yes, this is pretty normal East Asian We Alien (1979) Now "The Company Says So" morality. But don't get your flavor enhanced -- the Japs are pretty much the least awful by far at this. When they admit fault (which Japanese formally do in a much wider range of situations than their US counterparts) they resign; when they admit fault to the public on something big like faulty safety equipment or that one really big carcinogen situation in the 70s they physically get down on the floor.
    You know which East Aaian nationality doesn't do that, and wouldn't anyway to American complainants? The ones who outnumber Japanese by over a billion, and who Trump wants in here in bigger numbers than ever.
    ----------
    Rape of Nanking - that's a whole other thing but, as dumb and gratuitously violent as the interwar militarist Japanese were, RoN is a premier example of a purely tribalist grievance. The absolute worst stories pale next to normal treatment of Chinese people in that period by not even the worst Chinese people. Every Chinese who could, got out from under a Chinese government and into a town or territory governed by foreigners, because everything was objectively better there. All the factions of the Chinese civil war routinely took, abused, raped, and killed slaves, and the people they were enslaving were of course Chinese. The Japanese shouldn't have been there and shouldn't have done what they did, but no way in frozen hell is whining about the least atrocious atrocity of the civil war era meaningful coming from the state that Mao built out of acres of human gore.
    While this is about East Asians and disputed in degree but fundamentally undoubted historical events, and not about Africans or Semites and mythohistorical events, it does illustrate my second named law: in tribalism, reality itself is negotiable, and Tribe A talks up The Terrible Historical Tragedy not because it happened but as a negotiation ploy against equally cynical Tribe B. A non-tribalist community wandering into the middle of that might be inclined to start believing in this Great Historical tragedy business, but that's a mistake. Even if the event has provable elements the negotiation aspect cannot be forgotten, and policy should never be based on such a story.

    While this is about East Asians and disputed in degree but fundamentally undoubted historical events, and not about Africans or Semites and mythohistorical events, it does illustrate my second named law: in tribalism, reality itself is negotiable, and Tribe A talks up The Terrible Historical Tragedy not because it happened but as a negotiation ploy against equally cynical Tribe B. A non-tribalist community wandering into the middle of that might be inclined to start believing in this Great Historical tragedy business, but that’s a mistake. Even if the event has provable elements the negotiation aspect cannot be forgotten, and policy should never be based on such a story.

    Excellent insight in this and preceding paragraph. Thanks for taking the time to write it.

  198. @Paleo Liberal
    Ask Epstein if strangulation is no longer effective. :-;

    Ask Epstein

    [Pickup truck showing “Epstein DID NOT Kill Himself”]

    One issue both the left and right can come together on at the Richmond gun rally

    via Elijah Schaffer.

  199. @kaganovitch
    Interesting…a .221 or .222 handgun that shot 6.5 x 52 rifle bullets.
    Not the silliest theory I have heard, but definitely Mark Lane territory.



    I'm not following, how can a .22 fire 6.5 rifle bullets that exceed its bore diameter?

    I’m not following,

    Look deeper into the comment…deeper….

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Lane_(author)

  200. @Hail

    One interesting thing — the Asian gals who complain the most about white racism tend to have white boyfriends. They are worried about being criticized as “sellouts” by other Asians, so they go overboard in their anti-white racism. One notorious example was Sarah Jeong, who wrote her most hateful anti-white screeds while in a relationship with a white guy who was active in the alt-right movement.

    I don’t know if this Jessie chick is one of them. But having gone to Exeter and NYU, there is certainly that possibility.

    Anyway, I despise people like her.
     
    Your comment seems correct, and reminds me of this from Richmond, Virginia, today:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EOvTvLtWoAAiTPG.jpg

    An East Asian woman next to a N.European man. The East Asian woman's sign says:

    Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?
     
    The conservative activist who posted that on Twitter put it up along with the "Armed Minorities are Harder to Oppress" sign guy, who was standing next to a Black guy with a puzzling "Incel" sign. There were a few others like this from the rally, including the Trans Americans For Gun Rights grouplet and the "I want Gay married couples to be able to protect their marijuana plants with guns" woman.

    If you look at his feed over the past day, this Caleb J. Hull, whoever he is, was obviously scouring the event for "Based Black Guys" and posting pictures of all he found with celebratory accompanying tweet, which constitute a majority of his substantive tweets during the rally. To me he is a clown, but a sincere one, i.e. not a troll/parody; he is almost indistinguishable from the DemsRRealRacist parody (if anyone remembers him; a genius parody account, banned ca. late 2016 or early 2017).

    Anyway, I see the East Asian woman's "Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?" as comparable to your scenario for explaining Sarah Jeong's anti-white invective, as follows:

    In the Sarah Jeong case, and possibly Jessie Yeung case, (you are proposing) the fear of being criticized by their fellows for being too close to another race (romantically) inclines them to politically attack whites as a race, "See, I'm close to my own race after all;" meanwhile, in the Richmond pic, the White man is afraid of being criticized by his fellows for being too close to his own race, so he brings along, or finds along the way somewhere, a nonwhite person, and points to him/her, "See, I'm not so close to my own race after all."

    Similar racial-political dynamics for opposite ends.

    The difference is, Asians are expected/encouraged to be loyal to the race, and, to gain social approval, they can overtly do "racially loyal" things; meanwhile, Whites are expected/encouraged to be disloyal to the race, and, to gain social approval, can perform mini-acts or make statements showing how non-loyal they are.

    (Btw, the people on Reddit r/hapas would definitely disagree with her sign; they would say she is a "white supremacist," as they believe many East Asian women are. It is a fact they lament bitterly as a central cause of psychological problems in the children produced thereby, i.e., themselves; r/hapas is a fascinating but dark place to spend any amount of time.)

    An East Asian woman next to a N.European man. The East Asian woman’s sign says:

    Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?

    We can see that. It would be of more help to tell us what the man’s sign says.

    • Replies: @Hail
    I would guess the Chinese sign is a reference to a Hong Kong protest slogan. Elsewhere at the rally a few Hong Kong flags showed up.

    The Chinese says:


    Water can carry boats,
    It can also capsize boats
     
    The sloganeer must mean

    The people = water;
    the government or regime = the boat.

    Another water-related slogan in use in Hong Kong is attributed to Bruce Lee: “Be water.”

  201. @Hail

    One interesting thing — the Asian gals who complain the most about white racism tend to have white boyfriends. They are worried about being criticized as “sellouts” by other Asians, so they go overboard in their anti-white racism. One notorious example was Sarah Jeong, who wrote her most hateful anti-white screeds while in a relationship with a white guy who was active in the alt-right movement.

    I don’t know if this Jessie chick is one of them. But having gone to Exeter and NYU, there is certainly that possibility.

    Anyway, I despise people like her.
     
    Your comment seems correct, and reminds me of this from Richmond, Virginia, today:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EOvTvLtWoAAiTPG.jpg

    An East Asian woman next to a N.European man. The East Asian woman's sign says:

    Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?
     
    The conservative activist who posted that on Twitter put it up along with the "Armed Minorities are Harder to Oppress" sign guy, who was standing next to a Black guy with a puzzling "Incel" sign. There were a few others like this from the rally, including the Trans Americans For Gun Rights grouplet and the "I want Gay married couples to be able to protect their marijuana plants with guns" woman.

    If you look at his feed over the past day, this Caleb J. Hull, whoever he is, was obviously scouring the event for "Based Black Guys" and posting pictures of all he found with celebratory accompanying tweet, which constitute a majority of his substantive tweets during the rally. To me he is a clown, but a sincere one, i.e. not a troll/parody; he is almost indistinguishable from the DemsRRealRacist parody (if anyone remembers him; a genius parody account, banned ca. late 2016 or early 2017).

    Anyway, I see the East Asian woman's "Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?" as comparable to your scenario for explaining Sarah Jeong's anti-white invective, as follows:

    In the Sarah Jeong case, and possibly Jessie Yeung case, (you are proposing) the fear of being criticized by their fellows for being too close to another race (romantically) inclines them to politically attack whites as a race, "See, I'm close to my own race after all;" meanwhile, in the Richmond pic, the White man is afraid of being criticized by his fellows for being too close to his own race, so he brings along, or finds along the way somewhere, a nonwhite person, and points to him/her, "See, I'm not so close to my own race after all."

    Similar racial-political dynamics for opposite ends.

    The difference is, Asians are expected/encouraged to be loyal to the race, and, to gain social approval, they can overtly do "racially loyal" things; meanwhile, Whites are expected/encouraged to be disloyal to the race, and, to gain social approval, can perform mini-acts or make statements showing how non-loyal they are.

    (Btw, the people on Reddit r/hapas would definitely disagree with her sign; they would say she is a "white supremacist," as they believe many East Asian women are. It is a fact they lament bitterly as a central cause of psychological problems in the children produced thereby, i.e., themselves; r/hapas is a fascinating but dark place to spend any amount of time.)

    I saved you the trouble. From WaPo’s 12:30 pm diversity update:

    After the speeches wrapped up, rallygoers began marching along the streets of downtown Richmond — including Joe Evans, who hoisted a sign bearing black and red Chinese characters. Evans’s poster stood out amid a flood of Trump paraphernalia and “Don’t Tread on Me” signs.

    Also standing out in the crowd was his wife, a Chinese immigrant who recently obtained her U.S. citizenship. She held a sign that read: “Do I look like a white supremacist?”

    The couple had met in Beijing while Evans, who is white, was studying abroad, and have been married for seven years. They drove down from Arlington, Va., with their signs to prove that not everyone attending the rally — or every gun owner — is a white supremacist, or even white.

    “I’m an immigrant who’s a new U.S. citizen and I feel like the right to protect ourselves is important,” said Evans’s wife, who declined to give her name.

    Evans, an immigration attorney, held a sign with a Chinese proverb that translated as “water can support a ship and water can overturn it.”

    “It means that people put you in power, and people can remove you from power,” he said.

    Evans described the couple as “gay friendly and immigration friendly” but also passionately pro-gun rights.

    “There are more of us than you think in deep blue Arlington,” he said, adding that membership at their local gun range was diverse and included Asians, African Americans, Hispanics and members of the LGBTQ community.
    “We believe in equality for everyone,” said Evans, who is an independent. “That’s only possible if we have guns — or responsible people at least.”

    As they marched, they were approached by an African American man waving a giant Trump 2020 flag on a 20-foot pole.

    “Good afternoon young lady,” said Derrick Gibson. “We are the white supremacists, if you believe the news.”

    Gibson, 58, had driven down from Queens, N.Y. He, too, was at pains to point out that there was some diversity among the gun rights advocates in the primarily white crowd.

    “How are you doing? I’m Governor Northam in blackface,” he told passersby, drawing laughs.

    Northam was the target of much derision. Some signs showed him with a Hitler mustache and Nazi armband. Others showed a now-infamous photo from his medical school yearbook page which depicted one person in blackface and another under a Klan hood. “The man behind the sheet wants your guns,” one such sign said.

    “Governor Northam, I think I found the white supremacist,” said one such sign. “Unfortunately it’s you!”

    “This is not about race,” said Jonathan Austin, 46, from Chesterfield, Va. Austin, who is black, said he supports universal background checks but thought many of the other proposed gun-control bills went too far. “The government shouldn’t have the right to tell us what kind of guns we can have,” he said.

    “Gun Rights Are Also Gay Rights” read a sign held by Brandon Brod, 44.

    “My husband and I have collected guns for more than 20 years,” said Brod, who lives in Richmond and said he had attended Lobby Day since 2003. He was raised Quaker and still believes in pacifism, except when it comes to self-defense, he said. The country was a safer place now to be gay than in the mid-1990s, when he came out, he said.

    “Northam is making it out like we’re all white supremacists,” Brod said. “But I’m a gay man and a Quaker.”

    Brod, who said he’s a Libertarian, added that the response to his sign had been positive.

    “I’ve been feeling the love,” he said. “At least 100 people have asked me for a photo, including the militia guys.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-md-va/2020/01/20/virginia-gun-rally-updates/

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    That's all great stuff, Hail, especially for helping eviscerate the narrative built up by the Lyin' Press over the days before this rally. The Chinese OUGHT TO have learned something about how to resist tyranny after 40 years of Mao hard-core Communism, but the average Chinaman or Chinawoman has learned NOTHING. Other than the serious Christians, all I see is that they are out for their families and the money and nothing more.

    Yes, I saw a rainbow flag/gun rights combination flag and one pretty girl exiting the porta-potty who was possibly right up Twinkie's alley (mine too!) - maybe 1/2 Korean, as I am pretty good at telling. I saw about 5 black guys while walking back.

    However, the picture below is completely representative of the crowd. Let me just tell you all, THESE are the people that will defend our rights - NOBODY ELSE will.

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_C.jpg

    Yes, I took that. I'll put some more up in another comment.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Sorry, I knew it was a reply to you, Reg, but it's to both of you anyway.
  202. @Anonymous
    Mockery of inbred gentiles is a staple of Jewish comedy. It's an odd subject for humor.

    Mockery of inbred gentiles is a staple of Jewish comedy. It’s an odd subject for humor.

    Not to mention ironic:

    https://www.jta.org/jewniverse/2017/in-rhode-island-jews-can-marry-their-relatives

    https://law.justia.com/codes/rhode-island/2012/title-15/chapter-15-1/chapter-15-1-4

  203. @Reg Cæsar

    An East Asian woman next to a N.European man. The East Asian woman’s sign says:

    Do I look like a WHITE SUPREMACIST to you?
     
    We can see that. It would be of more help to tell us what the man's sign says.

    I would guess the Chinese sign is a reference to a Hong Kong protest slogan. Elsewhere at the rally a few Hong Kong flags showed up.

    The Chinese says:

    Water can carry boats,
    It can also capsize boats

    The sloganeer must mean

    The people = water;
    the government or regime = the boat.

    Another water-related slogan in use in Hong Kong is attributed to Bruce Lee: “Be water.”

  204. @J1234
    Nebulafox is more correct than many of you who responded to him. The recognition of regional culture is one of the more important, yet less explicit, elements in our form of government as well as in the founding of our country. The importance of regional culture even reveals itself in the name of our country (to one degree or another): "The United States." Why use the concept of states as a foundation for a national identity? It's more than just being an evolutionary step from the Articles of Confederation, which were more in the vein of a treaty between states than a form of governance.

    One of the main problems that colonists had with the Crown and Parliament was representation; not just the absence of representation, but the nature of representation, when it existed. Many representatives of the colonies in Parliament had never even visited the colonies, let alone lived there. Three thousand miles of ocean and 170 years of salutary neglect (in one form or another, to one degree or another) had resulted in a colonial culture that was different from the culture of England, and that was a source of contention with the colonists. The founders wanted to address this "rule from afar" problem when forming their new secessionist polity...hence, maintaining colonial identities (which colonists had long been loyal to) as states.

    The thing is - as many of you rightly point out - there's also a national legal culture and tradition in the US that recognizes (for the time being) essential rights of individual citizens at the federal level, and protects them with constitutional authority. The supremacy clause correctly puts those rights ahead of state laws, but you have to ask yourself these questions: Why does the US Constitution allow states to have their own constitution? Why does the US Constitution allow those state constitutions to have their own wording and interpretation of the Second Amendment? (By my count, more than half the states have their own interpretation of the Second Amendment, some of which seem to be more restrictive than the wording in the Bill of Rights.)

    The answer to those questions is, in a word, culture. Should North Dakota or South Carolina be required to have the same obscenity laws (First Amendment) or alcohol laws as California? I don't think so. Even if those laws might become more uniform as time goes on, it should be the state's prerogative. Culture is too important, but there has to be a delicate dance between the rights of individuals and the rights of regional cultures to exist. Not an easy path to follow. Dodge City, KS in the 19th century could tell people to turn over their firearms when entering the city limits, and that was probably an appropriate thing to do because it probably wasn't part of coordinated national or statewide effort to nullify the Second Amendment. I'm guessing the new Virginia policy probably is.

    The NRA (which I'm a supporting member of) has been effective in getting concealed carry laws passed in most states. I support that effort and have a permit myself, but I also have to recognize that localities have the right to be different from the nation at large in terms of values and priorities, even when those values and priorities lean to the left. There's a necessary balancing act, and just because the left has dedicated itself to cultural destruction and a profound lack of balance through radicalism doesn't mean the right should also forsake the concept of culture in retaliation. It's for this reason I didn't support the national reciprocity law endorsed by the NRA a while back.

    Why use the concept of states as a foundation for a national identity?

    The states already existed as separate colonies. It isn’t as if one single territory was suddenly divided into multiple states. Of course, differing “regional cultures” among those states led to the Civil War, whereupon massive violence was required to maintain “United” status.

    Why does the US Constitution allow those state constitutions to have their own wording and interpretation of the Second Amendment? (By my count, more than half the states have their own interpretation of the Second Amendment, some of which seem to be more restrictive than the wording in the Bill of Rights.)

    The more restrictive state constitutions are obsolete. See incorporation and Privileges or Immunities as linked in my earlier comment to NF.

    The answer to those questions is, in a word, culture.

    Nah. “Separate but Equal” was de jure Southern culture, and we all know how that ended up. “States’ rights” is dead. There may be some quaint state differences on issues that aren’t controversial, but on the big ones like 2A, “states’ rights” cries will again be smacked down by the Supremes or there will be real national trouble.

    Culture is too important, but there has to be a delicate dance between the rights of individuals and the rights of regional cultures to exist. Not an easy path to follow.

    It’s pretty easy from a legal standpoint, tiny dancer. Uphold the Bill of Rights.

    Dodge City, KS in the 19th century could tell people to turn over their firearms when entering the city limits, and that was probably an appropriate thing to do

    Nope. Look, if you’re scared of a present-day ‘Dodge City,’ don’t live there or travel there. OTOH, if you’re just a little wary, but heard they got the best steak and whores, go there strapped and be willing to accept a little potential chaos.

    There’s a necessary balancing act

    There’s no “balancing act” when it comes to slavery.

    It’s for this reason I didn’t support the national reciprocity law endorsed by the NRA a while back.

    National carry reciprocity is just a bridge move to national Constitutional Carry. I.e., if one has a gun possession permit, one shouldn’t need a carry permit—those should be one and the same: local state “culture” problem solved, like with standard driver’s licenses. Drive a Tesla or Explorer or Hellcat from state to state, it’s all good.

    • Replies: @J1234
    Oh Lord...


    The states already existed as separate colonies.
     
    Which is why I said that...

    It isn’t as if one single territory was suddenly divided into multiple states.
     
    ...and didn't say (or imply) that.

    Of course, differing “regional cultures” among those states led to the Civil War, whereupon massive violence was required to maintain “United” status.
     
    For the millionth time, there was no single cause of the Civil War. Causes range from the Industrial Revolution to slavery to the Democrat's screwed up convention in Charleston to the ceding of debates on national issues to radical elements in both the North and the South.

    The more restrictive state constitutions are obsolete.
     
    They are not obsolete. Travel through Illinois with your gun and see just how obsolete they are. Try to sell a gun that isn't on California's approved list in California and see how obsolete they are. There aren't uniform gun laws from state to state just like there aren't uniform knife laws. (Both guns and knives are "arms" that should be covered by the second amend.)



    Nah. “Separate but Equal” was de jure Southern culture, and we all know how that ended up. “States’ rights” is dead.
     
    That was judicial overreach, IMHO, but it's within the purview of the federal judiciary to determine the balance between the state's legal rights as a collective vs. the individual's legal rights as a citizen.

    If you believe state's rights are dead as a principle, then you shouldn't have a problem with the people who want to do away with the electoral college system during presidential elections...or decrease the number of senators from Wyoming to one while increasing the number of senators from New York to twenty five.

    There may be some quaint state differences on issues that aren’t controversial,
     
    So the differences in grand juries (as provided for in the Fifth Amendment) are quaint? Probably so, I guess...to everyone who isn't in the midst of a grand jury proceeding.

    https://www.ncsc.org/Topics/Jury/Grand-Juries/Resource-Guide.aspx


    but on the big ones like 2A
     
    This is where all of this is going for far too many gun rights people...The Second Amendment is the only important amendment. (Where does it say THAT in the Constitution?) BTW, in case anyone's wondering, the Bill of Rights doesn't necessarily present it's amendments in order of importance, as some people like to mythologize. The original draft First Amendment that Madison included was some rather procedural sounding item that I can't even recall anymore. It was deleted for some reason.

    Regardless, all of the energy in the gun rights movement has led to great successes, which I value, but how many conservatives in the gun rights movement stay silent on First Amendment issues? Too many.

    Too many conservatives are willing to embrace a federal legal mono-culture on gun rights, while at the same time complain about an oppressive federal government. That's typically a leftist tactic...latching on to whatever principle presents itself to your specific cause, even when the principle contradicts larger issues. Why are conservatives doing that?

    Because things are currently going their way (more or less) in the gun rights movement. They can't envision a time when the federal legal mono-culture turns against them. I can envision that time. The number of non-gun owning households in the US is now significantly greater than gun owning households. Hunting is in great decline nationally, despite a need for hunting to properly cull wildlife. Those demographic trends don't hold true in my state.

    The NRA is correct in promoting gun rights in all states like they do, and I support them in that, but further movement towards a national mono-culture should be resisted as much a possible, and that includes the issue of gun rights.
  205. “Guns, torches, and bats are banned from Monday’s pro-gun rally in Richmond, Va.” —N.Y. Times

    No, not bats! They’re legal tender!

  206. @J.Ross
    This is all nonsense. Many of those countries never had wide gun ownership and almost none had gun culture written into their foundational law. Home invasions and muggings are sufficiently terrifying that arguments about degree are incoherent. Europe only recently had the real issue that causes American crime, the huge and uncontrollable hostile alien population. The European criminal who wants a gun has no difficulty in obtaining one, as we have see time and again. And that difficulty will becomes less and less as police departments are filled more and more by diversity hires. European gun regulation normally means nobility can do whatever they want (gun-grabbers in the US feel the same way; one high level anti-Constitution activist holds a class III license and shoots his full auto rifles in competitions), while normal citizens are stuck, enshrining injustice into the government's DNA. That is a reason beside public safety to hate such laws. European normies are unaware of the Soviet-level anti-gun propaganda which has been written into their entertainments and constricts their news. A European NPC thus brainwashed therefore feels that there is no such thing as the safe handling of any gun even by an instructor, just like an American NPC feels vaguely thanks to CNN that Trump is the devil.

    Pretty much your entire post is nonsense. Europeans have a long gun culture. Europe was awash in guns in the 1940s, for obvious reasons. In the 1950s and 60s it was still common to find veterans with weapons at home. Compulsory military service, until very recently, assured that the average European male actually had more hands on experience with firearms than the average American male. The beauty of military service is that it usually treats you to respect firearms but not to fetishize them.

    The European criminal who wants a gun generally fails. Hence the high number of terrorist attacks with cars, knives, etc. Normal citizens (white indigenous population) can get guns fairly easily. All that the NRA does is put hand guns in the hands of blacks and Latinos and then lecture us about “freedom”. Wake the hell up.

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    "The European criminal who wants a gun generally fails. "

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIhGCRIQnCA
    , @J.Ross
    Europeans had guns for a long time.
    Yes.
    Europeans have a continuous spiritual-moral understanding of firearms informing how society and government work.
    Drink some coffee and then try again, champ.
    The historical Dutch fought house to house to rid themselves of Spanish oppressors.
    Yes.
    The modern Dutch are the same people.
    No.
    A major key here is that your guns have to be capable of defeating an army, not just going bang, and you have to know how to use them through lots of practice (this is what well-regulated means). Being able to have them at your place is a totally practical result of expecting them to be practiced with frequently. Resenting regulation, imposed hierarchy, and the use of the term "common sense" is a living memory of a specific gun grabbing attempt just before England's revolution, not just an emotional reaction. TV news cannot prepare you for this issue, least of all European state propaganda.
  207. Anon[174] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paleo Liberal
    Except all your "phony" diseases are real diseases.

    Sorry, but you lost all credibility there. You are truly an idiot. You spout out about "phony" diseases without even looking at the scientific evidence. Moron.

    According to the Mayo clinic, there are people who are senstive to MSG:

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/monosodium-glutamate/faq-20058196

    The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.
     
    And so, I avoid MSG. By avoiding MSG, I have far fewer headaches, and I haven't gone into shock in over 20 years.

    I really don't give a flying f*** if avoiding headaches and other symptoms, up to and including shock, makes me a wayyyyy-cist or not.

    By avoiding MSG, I have far fewer headaches, and I haven’t gone into shock in over 20 years.

    By definition people suffering from psychogenic conditions think that they have symptoms like headaches. And you’ve never gone into shock, or you’d be dead, unless you mean something other than anaphylactic shock.

    The “patient info” at the mayoclinic.org site is not the same as the Mayo Clinic. It’s primarily a money making content site with advertising. Google uses a so-called “EAT YMYL” algorithm for ranking health and investment websites, so health sites hire underpaid, marginally credentialed writers to produce clickbait content that will rank. In the case you cited, a registered dietitian wrote the content. Her day gig is planning hospital food menus at the Mayo Clinic, i.e., she adds up Nutiriton Facts numbers in a spreadsheet to keep the calories, salt, and sugar low. She is not a medical professional familiar with the research literature.

    But even so, read what she wrote with the sort of critical eye you’d use if you were taking the LSAT:

    — MSG is classified as GRAS, “generally recognized as safe,” by the FDA (seizures? nope).

    — It’s “controversial”; so is Obama’s birth certificate.

    — There are anecdotal reports of adverse reactions, and people on the internet have compiled long lists of symptoms (that weirdly are the same symptoms for chronic fatigue syndrome and dozens of other internet diseases).

    — No definitive evidence of a link between MSG and symptoms.

    — Some people may “have” (i.e. “report”) symptoms, which are mild and don’t require treatment (i.e., no Epipen necessary).

    — “The only way to prevent a reaction is to avoid foods containing MSG.” What does this even mean? The only way to prevent a psychogenic reaction is not to do the thing you delusionally think will cause it.

    Re Morgellons: The CDC was hectored by a congressman with a loopy wife to study Morgellons, so they did, and it came up with zip.

    https://slate.com/human-interest/2012/01/morgellons-disease-the-cdc-study-that-debunks-the-skin-ailment.html

    Re: Chronic Lyme, you need to read between the lines, but this is the closest the CDC ever gets to calling something complete bullshit:

    https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/postlds/index.html

    Re Whiplash: Whiplash is a spinal injury that doesn’t show up in any sort of imaging whatsoever, and is only diagnosed from patient complaingts. There is a high correlation between patients who have been in an automobile accident with an insured driver and whiplash diagnoses. But the weirdest thing is that 99 percent of whiplash cases occur in the United States, Canada, and Australia. I guess cars (and spines) are made differently in other countries … or else it’s a socially constructed disease. There’s a quite entertaining literature on whiplash.

  208. @MikeatMikedotMike
    "Regulated gun ownership is probably the number one reason people actually feel more free in their daily lives in Europe than they do in the US."

    Wrong. You don't have negroes. Look at the data on murder rates controlled by race, available within this very comments of the post.

    You Euros make yourselves look really silly when you present your opinions of the US based on sitcom reruns.

    You don’t have negroes.

    That’s the point. The Second Amendment provides negroes the freedom to own guns. In most European countries they work (still) to keep guns away from immigrants and in the hands of the founding population. I don’t know long that will hold, but it makes more sense than the American decision to arm everyone.

  209. @res

    Our murder rate has steadily declined for over 2 decades and is now approaching Western European levels.
     
    If you were paying attention you might have noticed the recent (last 6 years) increase. This is a common iSteve theme, so I am surprised you missed it. I think it is reasonable to be concerned about that trend.

    Here is an article and graphic covering 1960-2016:
    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-u-s-murder-rate-is-up-but-still-far-below-its-1980-peak/

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/asher-ucr-2016-0922-1-corrected.png

    They used the FBI UCR data: https://www.fbi.gov/services/cjis/ucr/publications
    The following years murder and non-negligent manslaughter rates were:
    2017: 5.4
    2018: 5.0
    Those tables also show:
    2014: 4.5
    2015: 5.0
    2016: 5.4

    The 2015 and 2016 numbers are 0.1 higher than in 538's graphic. Not sure if they somehow excluded non-negligent-manslaughter or what else might explain that difference.

    It you were paying attention you would realize this teeny weeny increase is already described in the literature (known “Ferguson effect”) and ended two years ago.

    Then again it’s kind of hard to pay attention when you spent the last 30 years huffing radon gas as a substitute for LSD, and your sole source of information about the world are your niche altright web blogs.

    • Replies: @Rob
    A PSA:

    Radon is expensive, has a short half-life, and is a noble gas. It is a very poor substitute for LSD.

    The more you know.
    , @res

    It you were paying attention you would realize this teeny weeny increase is already described in the literature (known “Ferguson effect”) and ended two years ago.
     
    Teeny weeny 10% increase in homicide rates from 2014 to 2015. Got it. You'll notice that I actually included the numbers showing what you said. Unlike you.

    And if this was so well known, why did you say "steadily declining"?

    Then again it’s kind of hard to pay attention when you spent the last 30 years huffing radon gas as a substitute for LSD, and your sole source of information about the world are your niche altright web blogs.
     
    At least that was kind of funny. Totally wrong, but at least a little amusing. And that is an improvement over your usual just wrong.
  210. @Redneck farmer
    1. Some people believe we have a murder problem. So areas do in fact have a murder/attempted murder problem.
    2. These are areas the Left controls, and are committed by groups the Left says it represents.

    Is tbis that Western reason we are supposed to be enthusiastic about preserving?

  211. @Achmed E. Newman
    I was there this morning. It was very peaceful. I am not some expert on crowds, T.P., but I estimate way over 10,000 just in the immediate area (from my nice vantage point). There were plenty others on the side streets, such as 9th St. (to the West?), but I wasn't that familiar with Richmond.

    4 helicopters flew around, along with a drone. The local GOP politicians, many of them with orange "Guns save lives" stickers on their fancy suits, shook hands with people near them. I saw plenty of people carrying rifles (maybe 1 in 10), some of them in militia type gear, but that's only 5 % of the crowd. All the gun-toters had to stay downhill (outside the fence) from the State House.

    I will put up some pics on my site probably very late tonight (busy day from here on) or tomorrow morning.

    Cool air, great crowd, not a lick of violence. This is from 1130 EST and earlier. I could not stay long.

    What did I write yesterday - They can't mess with 10,000 people. Maybe, there were lots more than that.

    Yes, you were right. I fell for the wolf tickets being sold by Coonman and cronies. Apparently, they were trying to scare people away.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  212. @Achmed E. Newman
    I was there this morning. It was very peaceful. I am not some expert on crowds, T.P., but I estimate way over 10,000 just in the immediate area (from my nice vantage point). There were plenty others on the side streets, such as 9th St. (to the West?), but I wasn't that familiar with Richmond.

    4 helicopters flew around, along with a drone. The local GOP politicians, many of them with orange "Guns save lives" stickers on their fancy suits, shook hands with people near them. I saw plenty of people carrying rifles (maybe 1 in 10), some of them in militia type gear, but that's only 5 % of the crowd. All the gun-toters had to stay downhill (outside the fence) from the State House.

    I will put up some pics on my site probably very late tonight (busy day from here on) or tomorrow morning.

    Cool air, great crowd, not a lick of violence. This is from 1130 EST and earlier. I could not stay long.

    What did I write yesterday - They can't mess with 10,000 people. Maybe, there were lots more than that.

    From the chopper footage I saw it didn’t look like a large crowd. Glad it was peaceful, though. I’ll check out your on-site materials later on today, thanks.

    Aha…the comments say there were many more in the streets, not on the Capitol Grounds. At 00:10 to 00:12 you can see a very crowded street feeding into the area. I wonder if this is typical MSM obfuscation.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    The Capitol grounds crowd was smaller because people were being screened (last minute idea by The State, as I recall). That would eliminate people who brought weapons but also people like me, who didn't have the time for that and/or didn't want to go through that BS.

    Please note that I decreased the size in pixels from the much higher resolution originals. You can't blow them up too much - I didn't know for sure if Mr. Unz's software would deal OK with larger ones. It would not matter once it was shrunk to fit the page anyway.

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_A.jpg


    Due to my reducing of the resolution, I'll tell you this one says "The Constitution is my gun permit."

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_B.jpg


    I honestly didn't know who any of these well-dressed State big-wigs were. However, the ones with the orange stickers ("Guns save lives") were obviously the good guys. They came from the left (NW) there and shook hands with members of the crowd that were nearest before they headed toward the State House.

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_D.jpg


    This is looking SE, but on the street behind me, on the other side of the big block containing the State House, there was another road full of people, along with pretty big crowds on the next street downhill, Cary Street (goes NW-SE)

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_E.jpg
  213. @bill P

    “Outside of heavily policed inner cities, China is definitely more violent than the US. This idea that it’s a peaceful society just isn’t true.”

    China’s inner cities are in no way “heavily policed”. Except sometimes at intersections directing traffic, you seldom see a police officer anywhere. Your comment that China is more violent than the US is just foolish nonsense, ideology and bigotry masquerading as apparently self-evident facts.

    I have traveled every part of China, from the largest cities to the smallest towns and rural areas, with friends and alone, during the day and in the darkest of night, and I can honestly say I have never once had the slightest fear for my physical safety. The very thought has never crossed my mind. By contrast, even in the safest of cities in the US or Canada, there are areas where I would never go after dark even in a large group.

    The fact is that the US is nation teeming with violence whereas China is safer and less violent by orders of magnitude. That’s the truth and you don’t have to like it.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    China has more headlines of the variety: "800 Peasants Battle 200 Club-Wielding Bandits Over Golf Course Expropriation."
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I apologize to you for calling you a name in that reply to Steve. That was probably unwarranted, but I definitely don't agree with your first comment - lots of your opinions there are completely wrong. Just as a starter, BLACK Americans, and much-less, but still significantly, Hispanic Americans, are a violent people. Americans are not at all particularly violent people.

    Yeah, you saw someone take out those bills from the machine in China with no worries. You may have been all over China, but I don't think you learn the real story. You don't think there was a bodyguard or two? Are you conversant in Mandarin? Small crime is pretty widespread. In Canton, motorcycles were completely banned from big parts of the city because there were guys snatching purses off women from their bikes (yes, often times arms were broken in the process). I could tell you lots of stories. Read Peak Stupidity on "Cat burglars and entrepreneurship in China". Welding burglar bars out on the sidewalk (because the shop is full-up) is a big thing. Why do you think that is, Mr. Smith?

    Your ability to walk around and feel safe there from violent crime is something I concur with. Some certain thugs seem to be missing from the scene... hmmmmm ... However, for non-violent crime, I don't agree with you. Secondly, because you are a foreigner, there will be much hesitation from a Chinaman up to no good in terms of petty crime. As far as he knows, you may be a big shot. If things ever get heated up between the US and China (and I sure hope NOT), you may get your ass kicked just for showing your face.
  214. @ayatollah smith
    @bill P

    "Outside of heavily policed inner cities, China is definitely more violent than the US. This idea that it’s a peaceful society just isn’t true."

    China's inner cities are in no way "heavily policed". Except sometimes at intersections directing traffic, you seldom see a police officer anywhere. Your comment that China is more violent than the US is just foolish nonsense, ideology and bigotry masquerading as apparently self-evident facts.

    I have traveled every part of China, from the largest cities to the smallest towns and rural areas, with friends and alone, during the day and in the darkest of night, and I can honestly say I have never once had the slightest fear for my physical safety. The very thought has never crossed my mind. By contrast, even in the safest of cities in the US or Canada, there are areas where I would never go after dark even in a large group.

    The fact is that the US is nation teeming with violence whereas China is safer and less violent by orders of magnitude. That's the truth and you don't have to like it.

    China has more headlines of the variety: “800 Peasants Battle 200 Club-Wielding Bandits Over Golf Course Expropriation.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I thought your reply (before I noticed you were replying to the idiot Mullah Smith there) was gonna be in response to Hail and Reg about that Chinese sign.

    I'll say this for them : On resistance to the abuses of eminent domain, we have nothing on some of the Chinamen armed with nothing but fireworks - In Fireworks from China, Peak Stupidity loosely translates one such rebel as saying "I've got your eminent domain right here, bitches!

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_906A.jpg

    (No, I didn't take this one.)
    , @Neoconned
    China has much less generalized violence but I read about the occasional psycho mass stabbing an elementary school or taking gasoline and burning up a moving city bus with them & a load of ppl on it....

    But those seem to be isolated incidents.
  215. @Reg Cæsar
    I saved you the trouble. From WaPo's 12:30 pm diversity update:

    After the speeches wrapped up, rallygoers began marching along the streets of downtown Richmond — including Joe Evans, who hoisted a sign bearing black and red Chinese characters. Evans’s poster stood out amid a flood of Trump paraphernalia and “Don’t Tread on Me” signs.

    Also standing out in the crowd was his wife, a Chinese immigrant who recently obtained her U.S. citizenship. She held a sign that read: “Do I look like a white supremacist?”

    The couple had met in Beijing while Evans, who is white, was studying abroad, and have been married for seven years. They drove down from Arlington, Va., with their signs to prove that not everyone attending the rally — or every gun owner — is a white supremacist, or even white.

    “I’m an immigrant who’s a new U.S. citizen and I feel like the right to protect ourselves is important,” said Evans’s wife, who declined to give her name.

    Evans, an immigration attorney, held a sign with a Chinese proverb that translated as “water can support a ship and water can overturn it.”

    “It means that people put you in power, and people can remove you from power,” he said.

    Evans described the couple as “gay friendly and immigration friendly” but also passionately pro-gun rights.

    “There are more of us than you think in deep blue Arlington,” he said, adding that membership at their local gun range was diverse and included Asians, African Americans, Hispanics and members of the LGBTQ community.
    “We believe in equality for everyone,” said Evans, who is an independent. “That’s only possible if we have guns — or responsible people at least.”

    As they marched, they were approached by an African American man waving a giant Trump 2020 flag on a 20-foot pole.

    “Good afternoon young lady,” said Derrick Gibson. “We are the white supremacists, if you believe the news.”

    Gibson, 58, had driven down from Queens, N.Y. He, too, was at pains to point out that there was some diversity among the gun rights advocates in the primarily white crowd.

    “How are you doing? I’m Governor Northam in blackface,” he told passersby, drawing laughs.

    Northam was the target of much derision. Some signs showed him with a Hitler mustache and Nazi armband. Others showed a now-infamous photo from his medical school yearbook page which depicted one person in blackface and another under a Klan hood. “The man behind the sheet wants your guns,” one such sign said.

    “Governor Northam, I think I found the white supremacist,” said one such sign. “Unfortunately it’s you!”

    “This is not about race,” said Jonathan Austin, 46, from Chesterfield, Va. Austin, who is black, said he supports universal background checks but thought many of the other proposed gun-control bills went too far. “The government shouldn’t have the right to tell us what kind of guns we can have,” he said.

    “Gun Rights Are Also Gay Rights” read a sign held by Brandon Brod, 44.

    “My husband and I have collected guns for more than 20 years,” said Brod, who lives in Richmond and said he had attended Lobby Day since 2003. He was raised Quaker and still believes in pacifism, except when it comes to self-defense, he said. The country was a safer place now to be gay than in the mid-1990s, when he came out, he said.

    “Northam is making it out like we’re all white supremacists,” Brod said. “But I’m a gay man and a Quaker.”

    Brod, who said he’s a Libertarian, added that the response to his sign had been positive.

    “I’ve been feeling the love,” he said. “At least 100 people have asked me for a photo, including the militia guys.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-md-va/2020/01/20/virginia-gun-rally-updates/
     

    That’s all great stuff, Hail, especially for helping eviscerate the narrative built up by the Lyin’ Press over the days before this rally. The Chinese OUGHT TO have learned something about how to resist tyranny after 40 years of Mao hard-core Communism, but the average Chinaman or Chinawoman has learned NOTHING. Other than the serious Christians, all I see is that they are out for their families and the money and nothing more.

    Yes, I saw a rainbow flag/gun rights combination flag and one pretty girl exiting the porta-potty who was possibly right up Twinkie’s alley (mine too!) – maybe 1/2 Korean, as I am pretty good at telling. I saw about 5 black guys while walking back.

    However, the picture below is completely representative of the crowd. Let me just tell you all, THESE are the people that will defend our rights – NOBODY ELSE will.

    Yes, I took that. I’ll put some more up in another comment.

  216. @Steve Sailer
    China has more headlines of the variety: "800 Peasants Battle 200 Club-Wielding Bandits Over Golf Course Expropriation."

    I thought your reply (before I noticed you were replying to the idiot Mullah Smith there) was gonna be in response to Hail and Reg about that Chinese sign.

    I’ll say this for them : On resistance to the abuses of eminent domain, we have nothing on some of the Chinamen armed with nothing but fireworks – In Fireworks from China, Peak Stupidity loosely translates one such rebel as saying “I’ve got your eminent domain right here, bitches!

    (No, I didn’t take this one.)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Chinese nail house resistance to eminent domain is pretty great.
  217. @Mr McKenna
    From the chopper footage I saw it didn't look like a large crowd. Glad it was peaceful, though. I'll check out your on-site materials later on today, thanks.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM9h971yDMw

    Aha...the comments say there were many more in the streets, not on the Capitol Grounds. At 00:10 to 00:12 you can see a very crowded street feeding into the area. I wonder if this is typical MSM obfuscation.

    The Capitol grounds crowd was smaller because people were being screened (last minute idea by The State, as I recall). That would eliminate people who brought weapons but also people like me, who didn’t have the time for that and/or didn’t want to go through that BS.

    Please note that I decreased the size in pixels from the much higher resolution originals. You can’t blow them up too much – I didn’t know for sure if Mr. Unz’s software would deal OK with larger ones. It would not matter once it was shrunk to fit the page anyway.

    Due to my reducing of the resolution, I’ll tell you this one says “The Constitution is my gun permit.”

    I honestly didn’t know who any of these well-dressed State big-wigs were. However, the ones with the orange stickers (“Guns save lives”) were obviously the good guys. They came from the left (NW) there and shook hands with members of the crowd that were nearest before they headed toward the State House.

    This is looking SE, but on the street behind me, on the other side of the big block containing the State House, there was another road full of people, along with pretty big crowds on the next street downhill, Cary Street (goes NW-SE)

    • Thanks: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    Sometimes the Chicago Police Department will have people videoing demonstrations in order to, what, ID troublemakers in the future?

    Did you notice any type of videoing by "the Man?"
    , @Hail
    A big success.

    Here is Gov. Northam lamely implying his crack team stopped all the many, many, very real (trust him) right-wing terror plots, just in time.

    With tens of thousands of armed men showing up and not one incident of any kind, Northam looks bad and has no choice but keep stringing this kite along even though it is in shambles.

    https://twitter.com/GovernorVA/status/1219378908685983744

    The teams successfully de-escalated what could have been a volatile situation. I will continue to listen to the voices of Virginians, and will do everything in my power to keep our Commonwealth safe.
     
    This tweet is one of the most brutal "ratios" I have ever seen. It was tweeted by @GovernorVA at 4:59pm EST (nearing sunset), Jan. 20; most of the demonstrators had by that time cleared out, and many of the buses even had 2pm departures to get back to other parts of the state before nightfall.

    As of this writing (4pm EST, Jan. 21):

    Replies: 24,700 (and hundreds more rolling in by the hour)
    Retweets: 1,200
    Likes: 4,900

    Reply to Retweet ratio: 20.6
    Reply to (RT+Like) ratio: 4.1

    This is a comparable ratio to the "I am doxxing this white female Target employee and hoping she gets fired for refusing to sell me an expensive toothbrush for a penny after a labeling error" by David Leavitt (32k replies to 1.3k retweets and 7.3k likes) late last week.

    ___________

    A Ralph Northam montage:

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EOxCQgQWkAAXbmI.jpg
  218. This past week I’ve been reading about the creeping increase in far right “incidents” during the 1930s among ultramilitarist nationalists in Japan. Had never read the pre war history of Japan and it’s fascinating.

    Same thing here….the deep state and the elites fear more a right wing revolt than a left wing or minority insurrection.

    Thus they’ve used events like the Vegas casino massacre of 2017 to creep along the gun ban like using that to ban bump stock & other assorted trigger toys that simulated automatic fire but used atf loopholes..

    The Vegas massacre btw as many have speculated was probably a botched assassination attempt on the current Saudi royal MBS by the CIA… But that’s another story for another time…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    MBS is a country music fan?

    Paul Johnson's chapter on pre-WWII Japan in "Modern Times" is memorable.

    , @J.Ross
    What books?
  219. Distrust of police is major driver of US gun violence, report warns

    Police brutality, over-enforcement of small infractions and high numbers of unsolved homicides have eroded trust in law enforcement Pro

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jan/21/police-gun-violence-trust-report

  220. @Steve Sailer
    China has more headlines of the variety: "800 Peasants Battle 200 Club-Wielding Bandits Over Golf Course Expropriation."

    China has much less generalized violence but I read about the occasional psycho mass stabbing an elementary school or taking gasoline and burning up a moving city bus with them & a load of ppl on it….

    But those seem to be isolated incidents.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    China has a lot of Paris in the 19th Century civic disorders with the proletariat hurling paving stones at the police, or sometimes peasants with clubs battling with crooks hired by the mayor to clear the farmers off the land he wants to build a golf course on.

    My impression is that the higher ups in Beijing don't necessarily side with the crooked local mayors, but instead want to see who wins these tests of strength. So China is not a totalitarian country but instead has a lot of tumult because Xi pays attention to who wins street fights.

  221. @Neoconned
    China has much less generalized violence but I read about the occasional psycho mass stabbing an elementary school or taking gasoline and burning up a moving city bus with them & a load of ppl on it....

    But those seem to be isolated incidents.

    China has a lot of Paris in the 19th Century civic disorders with the proletariat hurling paving stones at the police, or sometimes peasants with clubs battling with crooks hired by the mayor to clear the farmers off the land he wants to build a golf course on.

    My impression is that the higher ups in Beijing don’t necessarily side with the crooked local mayors, but instead want to see who wins these tests of strength. So China is not a totalitarian country but instead has a lot of tumult because Xi pays attention to who wins street fights.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    If that's the case then one can draw some solace from French military performance over the subsequent century.
  222. @Neoconned
    This past week I've been reading about the creeping increase in far right "incidents" during the 1930s among ultramilitarist nationalists in Japan. Had never read the pre war history of Japan and it's fascinating.

    Same thing here....the deep state and the elites fear more a right wing revolt than a left wing or minority insurrection.

    Thus they've used events like the Vegas casino massacre of 2017 to creep along the gun ban like using that to ban bump stock & other assorted trigger toys that simulated automatic fire but used atf loopholes..

    The Vegas massacre btw as many have speculated was probably a botched assassination attempt on the current Saudi royal MBS by the CIA... But that's another story for another time...

    MBS is a country music fan?

    Paul Johnson’s chapter on pre-WWII Japan in “Modern Times” is memorable.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    MbS is on video with a security detail in another Vegas attraction; the argument there is he was leading a coup and the coup targets owned the top four floors of the hotel, which would also enable the truckload of giant rifles to make it past Vegas security, as well as easy escape.
    Paddock is known to have looked at other music venues and rejected a rap concert in favor (if he was the shooter) of a country concert.
  223. @Achmed E. Newman
    I thought your reply (before I noticed you were replying to the idiot Mullah Smith there) was gonna be in response to Hail and Reg about that Chinese sign.

    I'll say this for them : On resistance to the abuses of eminent domain, we have nothing on some of the Chinamen armed with nothing but fireworks - In Fireworks from China, Peak Stupidity loosely translates one such rebel as saying "I've got your eminent domain right here, bitches!

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/post_906A.jpg

    (No, I didn't take this one.)

    Chinese nail house resistance to eminent domain is pretty great.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Indeed, and I couldn't remember that term "nail house" for the life of me. Thanks.
  224. @JohnPlywood
    It you were paying attention you would realize this teeny weeny increase is already described in the literature (known "Ferguson effect") and ended two years ago.

    Then again it's kind of hard to pay attention when you spent the last 30 years huffing radon gas as a substitute for LSD, and your sole source of information about the world are your niche altright web blogs.

    A PSA:

    Radon is expensive, has a short half-life, and is a noble gas. It is a very poor substitute for LSD.

    The more you know.

  225. @Peter Akuleyev
    Pretty much your entire post is nonsense. Europeans have a long gun culture. Europe was awash in guns in the 1940s, for obvious reasons. In the 1950s and 60s it was still common to find veterans with weapons at home. Compulsory military service, until very recently, assured that the average European male actually had more hands on experience with firearms than the average American male. The beauty of military service is that it usually treats you to respect firearms but not to fetishize them.

    The European criminal who wants a gun generally fails. Hence the high number of terrorist attacks with cars, knives, etc. Normal citizens (white indigenous population) can get guns fairly easily. All that the NRA does is put hand guns in the hands of blacks and Latinos and then lecture us about "freedom". Wake the hell up.

    “The European criminal who wants a gun generally fails. ”

  226. @Reg Cæsar
    I saved you the trouble. From WaPo's 12:30 pm diversity update:

    After the speeches wrapped up, rallygoers began marching along the streets of downtown Richmond — including Joe Evans, who hoisted a sign bearing black and red Chinese characters. Evans’s poster stood out amid a flood of Trump paraphernalia and “Don’t Tread on Me” signs.

    Also standing out in the crowd was his wife, a Chinese immigrant who recently obtained her U.S. citizenship. She held a sign that read: “Do I look like a white supremacist?”

    The couple had met in Beijing while Evans, who is white, was studying abroad, and have been married for seven years. They drove down from Arlington, Va., with their signs to prove that not everyone attending the rally — or every gun owner — is a white supremacist, or even white.

    “I’m an immigrant who’s a new U.S. citizen and I feel like the right to protect ourselves is important,” said Evans’s wife, who declined to give her name.

    Evans, an immigration attorney, held a sign with a Chinese proverb that translated as “water can support a ship and water can overturn it.”

    “It means that people put you in power, and people can remove you from power,” he said.

    Evans described the couple as “gay friendly and immigration friendly” but also passionately pro-gun rights.

    “There are more of us than you think in deep blue Arlington,” he said, adding that membership at their local gun range was diverse and included Asians, African Americans, Hispanics and members of the LGBTQ community.
    “We believe in equality for everyone,” said Evans, who is an independent. “That’s only possible if we have guns — or responsible people at least.”

    As they marched, they were approached by an African American man waving a giant Trump 2020 flag on a 20-foot pole.

    “Good afternoon young lady,” said Derrick Gibson. “We are the white supremacists, if you believe the news.”

    Gibson, 58, had driven down from Queens, N.Y. He, too, was at pains to point out that there was some diversity among the gun rights advocates in the primarily white crowd.

    “How are you doing? I’m Governor Northam in blackface,” he told passersby, drawing laughs.

    Northam was the target of much derision. Some signs showed him with a Hitler mustache and Nazi armband. Others showed a now-infamous photo from his medical school yearbook page which depicted one person in blackface and another under a Klan hood. “The man behind the sheet wants your guns,” one such sign said.

    “Governor Northam, I think I found the white supremacist,” said one such sign. “Unfortunately it’s you!”

    “This is not about race,” said Jonathan Austin, 46, from Chesterfield, Va. Austin, who is black, said he supports universal background checks but thought many of the other proposed gun-control bills went too far. “The government shouldn’t have the right to tell us what kind of guns we can have,” he said.

    “Gun Rights Are Also Gay Rights” read a sign held by Brandon Brod, 44.

    “My husband and I have collected guns for more than 20 years,” said Brod, who lives in Richmond and said he had attended Lobby Day since 2003. He was raised Quaker and still believes in pacifism, except when it comes to self-defense, he said. The country was a safer place now to be gay than in the mid-1990s, when he came out, he said.

    “Northam is making it out like we’re all white supremacists,” Brod said. “But I’m a gay man and a Quaker.”

    Brod, who said he’s a Libertarian, added that the response to his sign had been positive.

    “I’ve been feeling the love,” he said. “At least 100 people have asked me for a photo, including the militia guys.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-md-va/2020/01/20/virginia-gun-rally-updates/
     

    Sorry, I knew it was a reply to you, Reg, but it’s to both of you anyway.

  227. @Achmed E. Newman
    The Capitol grounds crowd was smaller because people were being screened (last minute idea by The State, as I recall). That would eliminate people who brought weapons but also people like me, who didn't have the time for that and/or didn't want to go through that BS.

    Please note that I decreased the size in pixels from the much higher resolution originals. You can't blow them up too much - I didn't know for sure if Mr. Unz's software would deal OK with larger ones. It would not matter once it was shrunk to fit the page anyway.

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_A.jpg


    Due to my reducing of the resolution, I'll tell you this one says "The Constitution is my gun permit."

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_B.jpg


    I honestly didn't know who any of these well-dressed State big-wigs were. However, the ones with the orange stickers ("Guns save lives") were obviously the good guys. They came from the left (NW) there and shook hands with members of the crowd that were nearest before they headed toward the State House.

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_D.jpg


    This is looking SE, but on the street behind me, on the other side of the big block containing the State House, there was another road full of people, along with pretty big crowds on the next street downhill, Cary Street (goes NW-SE)

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_E.jpg

    Sometimes the Chicago Police Department will have people videoing demonstrations in order to, what, ID troublemakers in the future?

    Did you notice any type of videoing by “the Man?”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Joe, the helicopters could easily have been carrying all manner of equipment to record whatever they wanted to analyze later.. However they weren't black helicopters, haha, so I'm not particularly paranoid about that. Still, recorded surveillance of all the people is almost a given anymore, Joe, right? The question is, was it was specifically done to analyze later - who knows?

    There were not policemen that I saw going around with visible cameras to intimidate though. That's probably my best answer.

  228. @Peter Akuleyev
    Pretty much your entire post is nonsense. Europeans have a long gun culture. Europe was awash in guns in the 1940s, for obvious reasons. In the 1950s and 60s it was still common to find veterans with weapons at home. Compulsory military service, until very recently, assured that the average European male actually had more hands on experience with firearms than the average American male. The beauty of military service is that it usually treats you to respect firearms but not to fetishize them.

    The European criminal who wants a gun generally fails. Hence the high number of terrorist attacks with cars, knives, etc. Normal citizens (white indigenous population) can get guns fairly easily. All that the NRA does is put hand guns in the hands of blacks and Latinos and then lecture us about "freedom". Wake the hell up.

    Europeans had guns for a long time.
    Yes.
    Europeans have a continuous spiritual-moral understanding of firearms informing how society and government work.
    Drink some coffee and then try again, champ.
    The historical Dutch fought house to house to rid themselves of Spanish oppressors.
    Yes.
    The modern Dutch are the same people.
    No.
    A major key here is that your guns have to be capable of defeating an army, not just going bang, and you have to know how to use them through lots of practice (this is what well-regulated means). Being able to have them at your place is a totally practical result of expecting them to be practiced with frequently. Resenting regulation, imposed hierarchy, and the use of the term “common sense” is a living memory of a specific gun grabbing attempt just before England’s revolution, not just an emotional reaction. TV news cannot prepare you for this issue, least of all European state propaganda.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    [Thanks] was in order. My 12 hours ain't up.
  229. @Neoconned
    This past week I've been reading about the creeping increase in far right "incidents" during the 1930s among ultramilitarist nationalists in Japan. Had never read the pre war history of Japan and it's fascinating.

    Same thing here....the deep state and the elites fear more a right wing revolt than a left wing or minority insurrection.

    Thus they've used events like the Vegas casino massacre of 2017 to creep along the gun ban like using that to ban bump stock & other assorted trigger toys that simulated automatic fire but used atf loopholes..

    The Vegas massacre btw as many have speculated was probably a botched assassination attempt on the current Saudi royal MBS by the CIA... But that's another story for another time...

    What books?

  230. @Steve Sailer
    MBS is a country music fan?

    Paul Johnson's chapter on pre-WWII Japan in "Modern Times" is memorable.

    MbS is on video with a security detail in another Vegas attraction; the argument there is he was leading a coup and the coup targets owned the top four floors of the hotel, which would also enable the truckload of giant rifles to make it past Vegas security, as well as easy escape.
    Paddock is known to have looked at other music venues and rejected a rap concert in favor (if he was the shooter) of a country concert.

  231. @ayatollah smith
    @bill P

    "Outside of heavily policed inner cities, China is definitely more violent than the US. This idea that it’s a peaceful society just isn’t true."

    China's inner cities are in no way "heavily policed". Except sometimes at intersections directing traffic, you seldom see a police officer anywhere. Your comment that China is more violent than the US is just foolish nonsense, ideology and bigotry masquerading as apparently self-evident facts.

    I have traveled every part of China, from the largest cities to the smallest towns and rural areas, with friends and alone, during the day and in the darkest of night, and I can honestly say I have never once had the slightest fear for my physical safety. The very thought has never crossed my mind. By contrast, even in the safest of cities in the US or Canada, there are areas where I would never go after dark even in a large group.

    The fact is that the US is nation teeming with violence whereas China is safer and less violent by orders of magnitude. That's the truth and you don't have to like it.

    I apologize to you for calling you a name in that reply to Steve. That was probably unwarranted, but I definitely don’t agree with your first comment – lots of your opinions there are completely wrong. Just as a starter, BLACK Americans, and much-less, but still significantly, Hispanic Americans, are a violent people. Americans are not at all particularly violent people.

    Yeah, you saw someone take out those bills from the machine in China with no worries. You may have been all over China, but I don’t think you learn the real story. You don’t think there was a bodyguard or two? Are you conversant in Mandarin? Small crime is pretty widespread. In Canton, motorcycles were completely banned from big parts of the city because there were guys snatching purses off women from their bikes (yes, often times arms were broken in the process). I could tell you lots of stories. Read Peak Stupidity on “Cat burglars and entrepreneurship in China”. Welding burglar bars out on the sidewalk (because the shop is full-up) is a big thing. Why do you think that is, Mr. Smith?

    Your ability to walk around and feel safe there from violent crime is something I concur with. Some certain thugs seem to be missing from the scene… hmmmmm … However, for non-violent crime, I don’t agree with you. Secondly, because you are a foreigner, there will be much hesitation from a Chinaman up to no good in terms of petty crime. As far as he knows, you may be a big shot. If things ever get heated up between the US and China (and I sure hope NOT), you may get your ass kicked just for showing your face.

  232. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Why use the concept of states as a foundation for a national identity?
     
    The states already existed as separate colonies. It isn’t as if one single territory was suddenly divided into multiple states. Of course, differing “regional cultures” among those states led to the Civil War, whereupon massive violence was required to maintain “United” status.

    Why does the US Constitution allow those state constitutions to have their own wording and interpretation of the Second Amendment? (By my count, more than half the states have their own interpretation of the Second Amendment, some of which seem to be more restrictive than the wording in the Bill of Rights.)
     
    The more restrictive state constitutions are obsolete. See incorporation and Privileges or Immunities as linked in my earlier comment to NF.

    The answer to those questions is, in a word, culture.
     
    Nah. “Separate but Equal” was de jure Southern culture, and we all know how that ended up. “States’ rights” is dead. There may be some quaint state differences on issues that aren’t controversial, but on the big ones like 2A, “states’ rights” cries will again be smacked down by the Supremes or there will be real national trouble.

    Culture is too important, but there has to be a delicate dance between the rights of individuals and the rights of regional cultures to exist. Not an easy path to follow.
     
    It’s pretty easy from a legal standpoint, tiny dancer. Uphold the Bill of Rights.

    Dodge City, KS in the 19th century could tell people to turn over their firearms when entering the city limits, and that was probably an appropriate thing to do
     
    Nope. Look, if you’re scared of a present-day ‘Dodge City,’ don’t live there or travel there. OTOH, if you’re just a little wary, but heard they got the best steak and whores, go there strapped and be willing to accept a little potential chaos.

    There’s a necessary balancing act
     
    There’s no “balancing act” when it comes to slavery.

    It’s for this reason I didn’t support the national reciprocity law endorsed by the NRA a while back.
     
    National carry reciprocity is just a bridge move to national Constitutional Carry. I.e., if one has a gun possession permit, one shouldn’t need a carry permit—those should be one and the same: local state “culture” problem solved, like with standard driver’s licenses. Drive a Tesla or Explorer or Hellcat from state to state, it’s all good.

    Oh Lord…

    The states already existed as separate colonies.

    Which is why I said that…

    It isn’t as if one single territory was suddenly divided into multiple states.

    …and didn’t say (or imply) that.

    Of course, differing “regional cultures” among those states led to the Civil War, whereupon massive violence was required to maintain “United” status.

    For the millionth time, there was no single cause of the Civil War. Causes range from the Industrial Revolution to slavery to the Democrat’s screwed up convention in Charleston to the ceding of debates on national issues to radical elements in both the North and the South.

    The more restrictive state constitutions are obsolete.

    They are not obsolete. Travel through Illinois with your gun and see just how obsolete they are. Try to sell a gun that isn’t on California’s approved list in California and see how obsolete they are. There aren’t uniform gun laws from state to state just like there aren’t uniform knife laws. (Both guns and knives are “arms” that should be covered by the second amend.)

    [MORE]

    Nah. “Separate but Equal” was de jure Southern culture, and we all know how that ended up. “States’ rights” is dead.

    That was judicial overreach, IMHO, but it’s within the purview of the federal judiciary to determine the balance between the state’s legal rights as a collective vs. the individual’s legal rights as a citizen.

    If you believe state’s rights are dead as a principle, then you shouldn’t have a problem with the people who want to do away with the electoral college system during presidential elections…or decrease the number of senators from Wyoming to one while increasing the number of senators from New York to twenty five.

    There may be some quaint state differences on issues that aren’t controversial,

    So the differences in grand juries (as provided for in the Fifth Amendment) are quaint? Probably so, I guess…to everyone who isn’t in the midst of a grand jury proceeding.

    https://www.ncsc.org/Topics/Jury/Grand-Juries/Resource-Guide.aspx

    but on the big ones like 2A

    This is where all of this is going for far too many gun rights people…The Second Amendment is the only important amendment. (Where does it say THAT in the Constitution?) BTW, in case anyone’s wondering, the Bill of Rights doesn’t necessarily present it’s amendments in order of importance, as some people like to mythologize. The original draft First Amendment that Madison included was some rather procedural sounding item that I can’t even recall anymore. It was deleted for some reason.

    Regardless, all of the energy in the gun rights movement has led to great successes, which I value, but how many conservatives in the gun rights movement stay silent on First Amendment issues? Too many.

    Too many conservatives are willing to embrace a federal legal mono-culture on gun rights, while at the same time complain about an oppressive federal government. That’s typically a leftist tactic…latching on to whatever principle presents itself to your specific cause, even when the principle contradicts larger issues. Why are conservatives doing that?

    Because things are currently going their way (more or less) in the gun rights movement. They can’t envision a time when the federal legal mono-culture turns against them. I can envision that time. The number of non-gun owning households in the US is now significantly greater than gun owning households. Hunting is in great decline nationally, despite a need for hunting to properly cull wildlife. Those demographic trends don’t hold true in my state.

    The NRA is correct in promoting gun rights in all states like they do, and I support them in that, but further movement towards a national mono-culture should be resisted as much a possible, and that includes the issue of gun rights.

    • Replies: @J1234
    More stuff on grand juries.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_juries_in_the_United_States#State_laws
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    …and didn’t say (or imply) that.
     
    Ah, but your “states as a foundation” red herring did imply that the existence of separate states has relevance to today’s USA regarding this issue (2A and the BoR). I’m saying it doesn’t matter, because it’s only a matter of time before the major 2A state discrepancies are eliminated, one way or the other.

    For the millionth time, there was no single cause of the Civil War. Causes range from …
     
    We don’t disagree. Everything you wrote in that paragraph can be chalked up to differing regional cultures.

    [Restrictive state constitutions] are not obsolete.
     
    They’re obsolete in the sense that all state laws against gay marriage were obsolete as soon as some states started allowing it. Tick tock …

    (Both guns and knives are “arms” that should be covered by the second amend.)
     
    I agree.

    If you believe state’s rights are dead as a principle …
     
    I’m talking about “state’s rights” (note the quotes) only in the context of applying the BoR to individuals (as backed by the Fourteenth Amendment). Hence my linking of the historical segregationist meanings of “state’s rights” and “Separate but Equal.”

    So the differences in grand juries (as provided for in the Fifth Amendment) are quaint?
     
    Like I’ve clearly conveyed, if the differences between states are BoR related, that’s more than quaint. By contrast, you’re the one making appeals to the notion of fuzzy (and shifting—see Virginia) “regional cultures” in an argument about fundamental rights.

    Too many conservatives are willing to embrace a federal legal mono-culture on gun rights, while at the same time complain about an oppressive federal government.
     
    LOL. Jack D (as linked earlier) made a similar argument about guns:

    We were never meant to be centrally ruled from Washington.
     
    Here was my response:

    Are you speaking as a state or an individual? “Washington ruling” in Heller and McDonald isn’t requiring you, an individual, to own a gun—it’s merely the federal government suppressing local tyrants who would otherwise infringe on the basic rights of common citizens.
     
    You wrote:

    That’s typically a leftist tactic…
     
    Wot, using the courts, including SCOTUS, to get redress? Better cancel Heller and McDonald then! Feds running roughshod over regional culture—how rude! Best to take the sentimental high ground and reminisce about state’s rights, LOL.

    They can’t envision a time when the federal legal mono-culture turns against them.
     
    You’ve got it backwards. “Conservatives” as you say—or rather motivated right-wingers (“conservative” these days has the whiff of attenuated, passive sentimentalism, as exemplified by your commentary)—do envision a time (soon—hello, demographics!) when “federal legal mono-culture turns against them”—hence the continued push for increasing hardware (guns) accessibility.

    The number of non-gun owning households in the US is now significantly greater than gun owning households.
     
    Possibly indicating that if push comes to shove in a national crack-up, the gun-shy are gonna be spanked by the gun-happy. Because gun sales in recent years are higher than ever. Not all of those guns are duck guns …
  233. @J1234
    Oh Lord...


    The states already existed as separate colonies.
     
    Which is why I said that...

    It isn’t as if one single territory was suddenly divided into multiple states.
     
    ...and didn't say (or imply) that.

    Of course, differing “regional cultures” among those states led to the Civil War, whereupon massive violence was required to maintain “United” status.
     
    For the millionth time, there was no single cause of the Civil War. Causes range from the Industrial Revolution to slavery to the Democrat's screwed up convention in Charleston to the ceding of debates on national issues to radical elements in both the North and the South.

    The more restrictive state constitutions are obsolete.
     
    They are not obsolete. Travel through Illinois with your gun and see just how obsolete they are. Try to sell a gun that isn't on California's approved list in California and see how obsolete they are. There aren't uniform gun laws from state to state just like there aren't uniform knife laws. (Both guns and knives are "arms" that should be covered by the second amend.)



    Nah. “Separate but Equal” was de jure Southern culture, and we all know how that ended up. “States’ rights” is dead.
     
    That was judicial overreach, IMHO, but it's within the purview of the federal judiciary to determine the balance between the state's legal rights as a collective vs. the individual's legal rights as a citizen.

    If you believe state's rights are dead as a principle, then you shouldn't have a problem with the people who want to do away with the electoral college system during presidential elections...or decrease the number of senators from Wyoming to one while increasing the number of senators from New York to twenty five.

    There may be some quaint state differences on issues that aren’t controversial,
     
    So the differences in grand juries (as provided for in the Fifth Amendment) are quaint? Probably so, I guess...to everyone who isn't in the midst of a grand jury proceeding.

    https://www.ncsc.org/Topics/Jury/Grand-Juries/Resource-Guide.aspx


    but on the big ones like 2A
     
    This is where all of this is going for far too many gun rights people...The Second Amendment is the only important amendment. (Where does it say THAT in the Constitution?) BTW, in case anyone's wondering, the Bill of Rights doesn't necessarily present it's amendments in order of importance, as some people like to mythologize. The original draft First Amendment that Madison included was some rather procedural sounding item that I can't even recall anymore. It was deleted for some reason.

    Regardless, all of the energy in the gun rights movement has led to great successes, which I value, but how many conservatives in the gun rights movement stay silent on First Amendment issues? Too many.

    Too many conservatives are willing to embrace a federal legal mono-culture on gun rights, while at the same time complain about an oppressive federal government. That's typically a leftist tactic...latching on to whatever principle presents itself to your specific cause, even when the principle contradicts larger issues. Why are conservatives doing that?

    Because things are currently going their way (more or less) in the gun rights movement. They can't envision a time when the federal legal mono-culture turns against them. I can envision that time. The number of non-gun owning households in the US is now significantly greater than gun owning households. Hunting is in great decline nationally, despite a need for hunting to properly cull wildlife. Those demographic trends don't hold true in my state.

    The NRA is correct in promoting gun rights in all states like they do, and I support them in that, but further movement towards a national mono-culture should be resisted as much a possible, and that includes the issue of gun rights.
  234. @J.Ross
    Europeans had guns for a long time.
    Yes.
    Europeans have a continuous spiritual-moral understanding of firearms informing how society and government work.
    Drink some coffee and then try again, champ.
    The historical Dutch fought house to house to rid themselves of Spanish oppressors.
    Yes.
    The modern Dutch are the same people.
    No.
    A major key here is that your guns have to be capable of defeating an army, not just going bang, and you have to know how to use them through lots of practice (this is what well-regulated means). Being able to have them at your place is a totally practical result of expecting them to be practiced with frequently. Resenting regulation, imposed hierarchy, and the use of the term "common sense" is a living memory of a specific gun grabbing attempt just before England's revolution, not just an emotional reaction. TV news cannot prepare you for this issue, least of all European state propaganda.

    [Thanks] was in order. My 12 hours ain’t up.

    • Replies: @Hail

    My 12 hours ain’t up.
     
    There have been so many changes to the Reaction system in the past few months, it's been hard to get used to. Like adjusting one's life schedule if daylight-savings time shifted around every few weeks instead of twice a year.

    I think three per twelve hours is not ideal, at least for me, in that when I come across a comment I really want to mark as 'Agree' (or some other Reaction), I often cannot, while in other twelve-hour windows I do not get any reactions in at all. And I comment pretty regularly these days.

    I think Ron Unz wants to limit people from 'spamming' particular threads (or authors) with reactions (or forming mutual-admiration(-or-aversion)-society comment-gangs, as I believe he has described it), which is understandable. We've all seen how this kind of thumbs-up-thumbs-down spamming works in other comment systems where it's free to do so in an unlimited way.

    A higher reactions-per-24-hour quota might be a better fit but limiting reactions on any one author to a certain number, say four-per-24-hours (two per twelve hours).

    I am sure Ron won't read this, but I want to drop this idea here for future reference.

  235. @Joe Stalin
    Sometimes the Chicago Police Department will have people videoing demonstrations in order to, what, ID troublemakers in the future?

    Did you notice any type of videoing by "the Man?"

    Joe, the helicopters could easily have been carrying all manner of equipment to record whatever they wanted to analyze later.. However they weren’t black helicopters, haha, so I’m not particularly paranoid about that. Still, recorded surveillance of all the people is almost a given anymore, Joe, right? The question is, was it was specifically done to analyze later – who knows?

    There were not policemen that I saw going around with visible cameras to intimidate though. That’s probably my best answer.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Plus whatever's on your Apple brand iSupervisor. In Virginia they had some nice intel fixed-wing aircraft moving into theater (U-something; don't know if they used it for the rally, it was just spotted on an air traffic site being moved), but if they're concerned enough, they do not need to physically take cell phones to look at them. That's a good thing considering how Iraqi IEDs work. At the very least they can register numbers and track movement. It'd be interesting to see if the people who showed up are the first to get red flagged.
  236. @JerseyJeffersonian
    The scary publicity surrounding use of rifles, or more properly "assault rifles", has more to do with removing weaponry from the hands of the citizenry targeted by the left for terrorization & elimination. While I am under no illusions that a citizenry, even one armed with long guns, could go toe to toe with a military/para-military being used to forward the leftist goals of terrorization & elimination in a maximal assault, it still tips the balance away from a state monopoly on deadly violence; maybe the "Good Germans" of those state forces might think twice about their possible deaths if those deaths were a real possibility when they are following the orders of their tyrannical masters against the citizenry.

    After all, lefties have been fond of saying how things might have gone differently if the Gestapo was met with deadly violence when rounding up communists & Jews. Solzhenitsyn had similar things to say about deadly violence against roundups by communist thugs during the Red Terror. And death being dealt to the leaders of persecutions from hundreds of yards away in targeted assassinations using long guns might instill a healthy dose of fear in the apparatchiks, and a fear not limited to the minds of their frontline bully boys only.

    Also, if some death squad of leftist irregulars like antifas got wasted in enfilading fire when assaulting a mobilized, and prepared community, these freelance terrorists might stop their bullshit.

    The day is coming closer, maybe closer than you think, when bastards like Northam are openly gun grabbing like he and his allies want to do so they can grind us under their heels. The Tree of Liberty must from time to time be watered with the blood of Patriots and tyrants. So said my hero Thomas Jefferson.

    Lines are being drawn. As the old union song had it, "Which side are you on?"

    While I am under no illusions that a citizenry, even one armed with long guns, could go toe to toe with a military/para-military…

    Like, for instance, ANTIFA?

  237. @Steve Sailer
    Chinese nail house resistance to eminent domain is pretty great.

    Indeed, and I couldn’t remember that term “nail house” for the life of me. Thanks.

  238. 3 Israeli-style walls needed:

    #1 separating NE from the South.

    # 2 encircling the DC welfare counties.

    #3 from Mex border to Canadian border
    separating CA, OR, WA from states East.

    5ds

  239. @Kronos

    Hillary Clinton was more popular than Trump in 2016, but completely punted the Great Lakes area.
     
    But it raises the real question on why Hillary performed so badly in those areas. Many working class whites and welfare blacks must’ve been highly uneasy with another Clinton Presidency. Sure, they were part of the “blue wall” but many feared they’d be triangulated again on the Clinton torture rack. (Free-trade deals and welfare reform.) Did she avoid campaigning there because they’d be unessential in her presidential coalition? The whole “don’t call me, I’ll call you” treatment these blue strongholds received were nerve racking for voters and regional leaderships alike. The “deplorables” statement was likely seen as a “cut down the tall trees” backstabbing move. Most within the Coalition of the Fringes (except boomer yuppies) thought they’d be on the chopping block.

    http://www.top10fun.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/13082_The-rack-torture-740x416.jpg

    https://www.amazon.com/Shattered-Inside-Hillary-Clintons-Campaign/dp/0553447084

    https://youtu.be/6RW6tLBxxqg

    I don’t understand why it is so ‘effin difficult for the Democrats to privately admit they made a mistake with the nomination in 2016 and resolve to move on and just make a better choice this year. Maybe they have, but judging from how the primary is going, I don’t think so.

    If they can’t win this year, then there is going to be a split. The proto-socialists and the corporate wings of the party will blame each other. It shouldn’t be *difficult* to beat Trump, but screaming about Ukraine 24/7 isn’t going to do the trick. Bush in 2004 and Obama in 2012 were plenty beatable, too, but we know how those elections turned out as a result of the opposition refusing to do what was needed to win.

    • Replies: @Kronos

    I don’t understand why it is so ‘effin difficult for the Democrats to privately admit they made a mistake with the nomination in 2016 and resolve to move on and just make a better choice this year. Maybe they have, but judging from how the primary is going, I don’t think so.
     
    Probably because the Democratic Party is already in a state of quasi-civil war. The party leadership doesn’t want to add additional gasoline on this fire. The whole DNC rigging against Bernie in 2016 (and maybe 2020?) is still a major sore point. Clinton did some nasty political maneuvering to make things go in her favor. Some factions are also afraid they’ll be kicked from the inner party to the outer party. Also, many boomer wine aunts are so brainwashed from 30 years of self-help and antidepressants that any attack on Hillary is always a personal attack.

    http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51EqRpBaqZL.jpg

    Anyone here old enough to remember the big split between Perot and Bush I in 1992? I was still in diapers at the time so everything is fuzzy.
  240. @Bill P
    Outside of heavily policed inner cities, China is definitely more violent than the US. This idea that it's a peaceful society just isn't true.

    I’m sorry, but that’s just not true. The PRC has a lot of problems that Xinhua and the China-apologists will never own up to, like the spree knife attacks, but there is simply no equivalent to the war zones on display in places like Baltimore or Detroit anywhere in China, rural or urban. Or in the region in general.

    But if the majority of the PRC isn’t Lujiazui, then the majority of the US is not Baltimore or Detroit, either. The USA is way safer than it was in the 1980s, or at least it was until recently in some metro areas. (Was there a poop problem in the Bay Area back then?) As usual, the media wants bad things to happen, because if they don’t, they don’t get money and attention.

    • Replies: @Hail
    I don't know that the US is "way safer than it was in the 1980s" at all. Black urban crime rates are down for various reasons, but I'd say there is no real difference in White Middle America, certainly not enough to say "way safer."

    Crime has always been all but negligible in White-US core areas, and White-US crime rates mostly among the lowest in the world, essentially at the level of our ethnocultural cousins in Northwest Europe.

    Throw a dart at a US map from a distance, and you are likely to hit a place that is very, very safe, by any standard.

    To the extent people are saying China is less safe, there is something to be said for two factors I haven't seen mentioned: controlling for age (what share of the population is male age 15 to 45, or choose your favorite age bracket) and per-capita income. An older, wealthier society will always tend to have a lower crime rate, all else held tightly equal. China's lower per-capita GDP would be expected to cause a rise in crime by this model.

    There are also various possible ways to think about what 'safe' means. China is a notoriously low-trust society, while NW-Europe and its extensions abroad, including the US, is high-trust. Those with any substantial experience in the two will know this from lived experience; generalized low-trust vs. generalized high-trust, is just a totally different experience not reducible to some kind of line on a data chart, needless to say. And high trust puts upwards pressure on 'safety,' certainly in a broad sense and likely in a narrow sense, too, all else equal.

  241. Thank you for your civil reply. Much appreciated.

    I had almost forgotten the fantastic job your media have done in demonizing countries that refuse to bow to the Imperial Master. The theories and techniques began more than 100 years ago at the Tavistock Institute, and have proven spectacularly effective. They even got your country into two world wars your people didn’t want. Full marks.

    It is widely accepted throughout the world that the American media are nothing if not scrupulously even-handed and search only for truth and balanced reporting, more or less equivalent to the renowned integrity of your White House and politicians.

    I had also forgotten or, perhaps never really appreciated, that Americans who have never been to China have a much better understanding of the country than those who live there. Something about being out of the painting to be able to see it properly.

    However, I committed a transgression by going off-topic, and I apologise for leading the poster’s thread in an unrelated direction. I will be more careful in the future.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I have talked with many Americans who have lived in China that living there quickly makes you start thinking like they do, as if you were being assimilated into the Borg on the old Star Trek.(Not the really old Star Trek, the one merely old, when Marina Sirtis was still hot. )
  242. @Achmed E. Newman
    Joe, the helicopters could easily have been carrying all manner of equipment to record whatever they wanted to analyze later.. However they weren't black helicopters, haha, so I'm not particularly paranoid about that. Still, recorded surveillance of all the people is almost a given anymore, Joe, right? The question is, was it was specifically done to analyze later - who knows?

    There were not policemen that I saw going around with visible cameras to intimidate though. That's probably my best answer.

    Plus whatever’s on your Apple brand iSupervisor. In Virginia they had some nice intel fixed-wing aircraft moving into theater (U-something; don’t know if they used it for the rally, it was just spotted on an air traffic site being moved), but if they’re concerned enough, they do not need to physically take cell phones to look at them. That’s a good thing considering how Iraqi IEDs work. At the very least they can register numbers and track movement. It’d be interesting to see if the people who showed up are the first to get red flagged.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    At the very least they can register numbers and track movement.
     
    Too true, Mr Ross. There are ways to get around that, but it takes a lot of effort, the way people depend on their electronics nowadays. I could see it as overly paranoid, just because, with this big a crowd, can they all be red-flagged and screwed with later? If you think they will come for you later, then maybe you have figured the whole effort is a lost cause anyway. (I mean you generically, not you, Mr. Ross.)
  243. @Achmed E. Newman
    The Capitol grounds crowd was smaller because people were being screened (last minute idea by The State, as I recall). That would eliminate people who brought weapons but also people like me, who didn't have the time for that and/or didn't want to go through that BS.

    Please note that I decreased the size in pixels from the much higher resolution originals. You can't blow them up too much - I didn't know for sure if Mr. Unz's software would deal OK with larger ones. It would not matter once it was shrunk to fit the page anyway.

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_A.jpg


    Due to my reducing of the resolution, I'll tell you this one says "The Constitution is my gun permit."

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_B.jpg


    I honestly didn't know who any of these well-dressed State big-wigs were. However, the ones with the orange stickers ("Guns save lives") were obviously the good guys. They came from the left (NW) there and shook hands with members of the crowd that were nearest before they headed toward the State House.

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_D.jpg


    This is looking SE, but on the street behind me, on the other side of the big block containing the State House, there was another road full of people, along with pretty big crowds on the next street downhill, Cary Street (goes NW-SE)

    https://www.peakstupidity.com/images/Richmond_Gun_Rally_E.jpg

    A big success.

    Here is Gov. Northam lamely implying his crack team stopped all the many, many, very real (trust him) right-wing terror plots, just in time.

    With tens of thousands of armed men showing up and not one incident of any kind, Northam looks bad and has no choice but keep stringing this kite along even though it is in shambles.

    The teams successfully de-escalated what could have been a volatile situation. I will continue to listen to the voices of Virginians, and will do everything in my power to keep our Commonwealth safe.

    This tweet is one of the most brutal “ratios” I have ever seen. It was tweeted by @GovernorVA at 4:59pm EST (nearing sunset), Jan. 20; most of the demonstrators had by that time cleared out, and many of the buses even had 2pm departures to get back to other parts of the state before nightfall.

    As of this writing (4pm EST, Jan. 21):

    Replies: 24,700 (and hundreds more rolling in by the hour)
    Retweets: 1,200
    Likes: 4,900

    Reply to Retweet ratio: 20.6
    Reply to (RT+Like) ratio: 4.1

    This is a comparable ratio to the “I am doxxing this white female Target employee and hoping she gets fired for refusing to sell me an expensive toothbrush for a penny after a labeling error” by David Leavitt (32k replies to 1.3k retweets and 7.3k likes) late last week.

    ___________

    A Ralph Northam montage:

  244. @J1234
    Nebulafox is more correct than many of you who responded to him. The recognition of regional culture is one of the more important, yet less explicit, elements in our form of government as well as in the founding of our country. The importance of regional culture even reveals itself in the name of our country (to one degree or another): "The United States." Why use the concept of states as a foundation for a national identity? It's more than just being an evolutionary step from the Articles of Confederation, which were more in the vein of a treaty between states than a form of governance.

    One of the main problems that colonists had with the Crown and Parliament was representation; not just the absence of representation, but the nature of representation, when it existed. Many representatives of the colonies in Parliament had never even visited the colonies, let alone lived there. Three thousand miles of ocean and 170 years of salutary neglect (in one form or another, to one degree or another) had resulted in a colonial culture that was different from the culture of England, and that was a source of contention with the colonists. The founders wanted to address this "rule from afar" problem when forming their new secessionist polity...hence, maintaining colonial identities (which colonists had long been loyal to) as states.

    The thing is - as many of you rightly point out - there's also a national legal culture and tradition in the US that recognizes (for the time being) essential rights of individual citizens at the federal level, and protects them with constitutional authority. The supremacy clause correctly puts those rights ahead of state laws, but you have to ask yourself these questions: Why does the US Constitution allow states to have their own constitution? Why does the US Constitution allow those state constitutions to have their own wording and interpretation of the Second Amendment? (By my count, more than half the states have their own interpretation of the Second Amendment, some of which seem to be more restrictive than the wording in the Bill of Rights.)

    The answer to those questions is, in a word, culture. Should North Dakota or South Carolina be required to have the same obscenity laws (First Amendment) or alcohol laws as California? I don't think so. Even if those laws might become more uniform as time goes on, it should be the state's prerogative. Culture is too important, but there has to be a delicate dance between the rights of individuals and the rights of regional cultures to exist. Not an easy path to follow. Dodge City, KS in the 19th century could tell people to turn over their firearms when entering the city limits, and that was probably an appropriate thing to do because it probably wasn't part of coordinated national or statewide effort to nullify the Second Amendment. I'm guessing the new Virginia policy probably is.

    The NRA (which I'm a supporting member of) has been effective in getting concealed carry laws passed in most states. I support that effort and have a permit myself, but I also have to recognize that localities have the right to be different from the nation at large in terms of values and priorities, even when those values and priorities lean to the left. There's a necessary balancing act, and just because the left has dedicated itself to cultural destruction and a profound lack of balance through radicalism doesn't mean the right should also forsake the concept of culture in retaliation. It's for this reason I didn't support the national reciprocity law endorsed by the NRA a while back.

    There’s a necessary balancing act, and just because the left has dedicated itself to cultural destruction and a profound lack of balance through radicalism doesn’t mean the right should also forsake the concept of culture in retaliation.

    When the equilibrium is one side defecting while the other continues to cooperate, who wins? People who survive have a culture. People who get wiped out don’t.

    • Replies: @J1234

    People who survive have a culture. People who get wiped out don’t.
     
    I guess I've read too many old school history books, which often claim the opposite causality: People who had a (strong) culture survived. Those who didn't were wiped out. It isn't a formula, but a tendency, so there will always be exceptions, but it's a pretty strong tendency. I'm also probably unduly inspired/influenced by Oswald Spengler with regards to culture. Antipathy towards culture from the left and apathy towards culture from the right seem to create an almost insurmountable barrier to the West connecting to the past in a way that can synthesize a meaningful future.

    Talking about culture and guns reminds me of the big scandal (that most people
    haven't heard of) surrounding Michael Bellesiles, a history professor at Emory University 20 years ago. As a devoted leftist, his main assault against the pro-gun movement was directed at the cultural backdrop of gun ownership in the US. That's where he knew he could have the most impact and do the most damage.

    He claimed that the American gun culture was a myth fabricated by late 19th century gun makers who were trying to sell more product because the Industrial Revolution was allowing them to make more product. As America's frontier era was winding to a close, he claimed, gun makers falsely claimed that civilian gun ownership was a centuries old American tradition. He tried to "prove" all of this by inventing evidence and sources, which eventually got him fired (essentially) from Emory. Before that time, however, he'd already had a big selling book and had received tons of press from a sympathetic media.

    In typical fashion, the media's presentation of Bellesiles wild claims were the size of a hot air balloon, but the retractions made after the scandal broke were the size of a ping pong ball. One of his history colleagues admitted he was able to take the scam as far as he did because he was telling all of those leftist oriented academics what they wanted to hear.
  245. @nebulafox
    I'm sorry, but that's just not true. The PRC has a lot of problems that Xinhua and the China-apologists will never own up to, like the spree knife attacks, but there is simply no equivalent to the war zones on display in places like Baltimore or Detroit anywhere in China, rural or urban. Or in the region in general.

    But if the majority of the PRC isn't Lujiazui, then the majority of the US is not Baltimore or Detroit, either. The USA is way safer than it was in the 1980s, or at least it was until recently in some metro areas. (Was there a poop problem in the Bay Area back then?) As usual, the media wants bad things to happen, because if they don't, they don't get money and attention.

    I don’t know that the US is “way safer than it was in the 1980s” at all. Black urban crime rates are down for various reasons, but I’d say there is no real difference in White Middle America, certainly not enough to say “way safer.”

    Crime has always been all but negligible in White-US core areas, and White-US crime rates mostly among the lowest in the world, essentially at the level of our ethnocultural cousins in Northwest Europe.

    Throw a dart at a US map from a distance, and you are likely to hit a place that is very, very safe, by any standard.

    To the extent people are saying China is less safe, there is something to be said for two factors I haven’t seen mentioned: controlling for age (what share of the population is male age 15 to 45, or choose your favorite age bracket) and per-capita income. An older, wealthier society will always tend to have a lower crime rate, all else held tightly equal. China’s lower per-capita GDP would be expected to cause a rise in crime by this model.

    There are also various possible ways to think about what ‘safe’ means. China is a notoriously low-trust society, while NW-Europe and its extensions abroad, including the US, is high-trust. Those with any substantial experience in the two will know this from lived experience; generalized low-trust vs. generalized high-trust, is just a totally different experience not reducible to some kind of line on a data chart, needless to say. And high trust puts upwards pressure on ‘safety,’ certainly in a broad sense and likely in a narrow sense, too, all else equal.

  246. @J1234
    Oh Lord...


    The states already existed as separate colonies.
     
    Which is why I said that...

    It isn’t as if one single territory was suddenly divided into multiple states.
     
    ...and didn't say (or imply) that.

    Of course, differing “regional cultures” among those states led to the Civil War, whereupon massive violence was required to maintain “United” status.
     
    For the millionth time, there was no single cause of the Civil War. Causes range from the Industrial Revolution to slavery to the Democrat's screwed up convention in Charleston to the ceding of debates on national issues to radical elements in both the North and the South.

    The more restrictive state constitutions are obsolete.
     
    They are not obsolete. Travel through Illinois with your gun and see just how obsolete they are. Try to sell a gun that isn't on California's approved list in California and see how obsolete they are. There aren't uniform gun laws from state to state just like there aren't uniform knife laws. (Both guns and knives are "arms" that should be covered by the second amend.)



    Nah. “Separate but Equal” was de jure Southern culture, and we all know how that ended up. “States’ rights” is dead.
     
    That was judicial overreach, IMHO, but it's within the purview of the federal judiciary to determine the balance between the state's legal rights as a collective vs. the individual's legal rights as a citizen.

    If you believe state's rights are dead as a principle, then you shouldn't have a problem with the people who want to do away with the electoral college system during presidential elections...or decrease the number of senators from Wyoming to one while increasing the number of senators from New York to twenty five.

    There may be some quaint state differences on issues that aren’t controversial,
     
    So the differences in grand juries (as provided for in the Fifth Amendment) are quaint? Probably so, I guess...to everyone who isn't in the midst of a grand jury proceeding.

    https://www.ncsc.org/Topics/Jury/Grand-Juries/Resource-Guide.aspx


    but on the big ones like 2A
     
    This is where all of this is going for far too many gun rights people...The Second Amendment is the only important amendment. (Where does it say THAT in the Constitution?) BTW, in case anyone's wondering, the Bill of Rights doesn't necessarily present it's amendments in order of importance, as some people like to mythologize. The original draft First Amendment that Madison included was some rather procedural sounding item that I can't even recall anymore. It was deleted for some reason.

    Regardless, all of the energy in the gun rights movement has led to great successes, which I value, but how many conservatives in the gun rights movement stay silent on First Amendment issues? Too many.

    Too many conservatives are willing to embrace a federal legal mono-culture on gun rights, while at the same time complain about an oppressive federal government. That's typically a leftist tactic...latching on to whatever principle presents itself to your specific cause, even when the principle contradicts larger issues. Why are conservatives doing that?

    Because things are currently going their way (more or less) in the gun rights movement. They can't envision a time when the federal legal mono-culture turns against them. I can envision that time. The number of non-gun owning households in the US is now significantly greater than gun owning households. Hunting is in great decline nationally, despite a need for hunting to properly cull wildlife. Those demographic trends don't hold true in my state.

    The NRA is correct in promoting gun rights in all states like they do, and I support them in that, but further movement towards a national mono-culture should be resisted as much a possible, and that includes the issue of gun rights.

    …and didn’t say (or imply) that.

    Ah, but your “states as a foundation” red herring did imply that the existence of separate states has relevance to today’s USA regarding this issue (2A and the BoR). I’m saying it doesn’t matter, because it’s only a matter of time before the major 2A state discrepancies are eliminated, one way or the other.

    For the millionth time, there was no single cause of the Civil War. Causes range from …

    We don’t disagree. Everything you wrote in that paragraph can be chalked up to differing regional cultures.

    [Restrictive state constitutions] are not obsolete.

    They’re obsolete in the sense that all state laws against gay marriage were obsolete as soon as some states started allowing it. Tick tock …

    (Both guns and knives are “arms” that should be covered by the second amend.)

    I agree.

    If you believe state’s rights are dead as a principle …

    I’m talking about “state’s rights” (note the quotes) only in the context of applying the BoR to individuals (as backed by the Fourteenth Amendment). Hence my linking of the historical segregationist meanings of “state’s rights” and “Separate but Equal.”

    So the differences in grand juries (as provided for in the Fifth Amendment) are quaint?

    Like I’ve clearly conveyed, if the differences between states are BoR related, that’s more than quaint. By contrast, you’re the one making appeals to the notion of fuzzy (and shifting—see Virginia) “regional cultures” in an argument about fundamental rights.

    Too many conservatives are willing to embrace a federal legal mono-culture on gun rights, while at the same time complain about an oppressive federal government.

    LOL. Jack D (as linked earlier) made a similar argument about guns:

    We were never meant to be centrally ruled from Washington.

    Here was my response:

    Are you speaking as a state or an individual? “Washington ruling” in Heller and McDonald isn’t requiring you, an individual, to own a gun—it’s merely the federal government suppressing local tyrants who would otherwise infringe on the basic rights of common citizens.

    You wrote:

    That’s typically a leftist tactic…

    Wot, using the courts, including SCOTUS, to get redress? Better cancel Heller and McDonald then! Feds running roughshod over regional culture—how rude! Best to take the sentimental high ground and reminisce about state’s rights, LOL.

    They can’t envision a time when the federal legal mono-culture turns against them.

    You’ve got it backwards. “Conservatives” as you say—or rather motivated right-wingers (“conservative” these days has the whiff of attenuated, passive sentimentalism, as exemplified by your commentary)—do envision a time (soon—hello, demographics!) when “federal legal mono-culture turns against them”—hence the continued push for increasing hardware (guns) accessibility.

    The number of non-gun owning households in the US is now significantly greater than gun owning households.

    Possibly indicating that if push comes to shove in a national crack-up, the gun-shy are gonna be spanked by the gun-happy. Because gun sales in recent years are higher than ever. Not all of those guns are duck guns …

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Washington's Farewell Address 1796

    https://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/washing.asp

  247. @nebulafox
    I don't understand why it is so 'effin difficult for the Democrats to privately admit they made a mistake with the nomination in 2016 and resolve to move on and just make a better choice this year. Maybe they have, but judging from how the primary is going, I don't think so.

    If they can't win this year, then there is going to be a split. The proto-socialists and the corporate wings of the party will blame each other. It shouldn't be *difficult* to beat Trump, but screaming about Ukraine 24/7 isn't going to do the trick. Bush in 2004 and Obama in 2012 were plenty beatable, too, but we know how those elections turned out as a result of the opposition refusing to do what was needed to win.

    I don’t understand why it is so ‘effin difficult for the Democrats to privately admit they made a mistake with the nomination in 2016 and resolve to move on and just make a better choice this year. Maybe they have, but judging from how the primary is going, I don’t think so.

    Probably because the Democratic Party is already in a state of quasi-civil war. The party leadership doesn’t want to add additional gasoline on this fire. The whole DNC rigging against Bernie in 2016 (and maybe 2020?) is still a major sore point. Clinton did some nasty political maneuvering to make things go in her favor. Some factions are also afraid they’ll be kicked from the inner party to the outer party. Also, many boomer wine aunts are so brainwashed from 30 years of self-help and antidepressants that any attack on Hillary is always a personal attack.

    Anyone here old enough to remember the big split between Perot and Bush I in 1992? I was still in diapers at the time so everything is fuzzy.

  248. @Wilmingtonian

    There’s a necessary balancing act, and just because the left has dedicated itself to cultural destruction and a profound lack of balance through radicalism doesn’t mean the right should also forsake the concept of culture in retaliation.
     
    When the equilibrium is one side defecting while the other continues to cooperate, who wins? People who survive have a culture. People who get wiped out don't.

    People who survive have a culture. People who get wiped out don’t.

    I guess I’ve read too many old school history books, which often claim the opposite causality: People who had a (strong) culture survived. Those who didn’t were wiped out. It isn’t a formula, but a tendency, so there will always be exceptions, but it’s a pretty strong tendency. I’m also probably unduly inspired/influenced by Oswald Spengler with regards to culture. Antipathy towards culture from the left and apathy towards culture from the right seem to create an almost insurmountable barrier to the West connecting to the past in a way that can synthesize a meaningful future.

    Talking about culture and guns reminds me of the big scandal (that most people
    haven’t heard of) surrounding Michael Bellesiles, a history professor at Emory University 20 years ago. As a devoted leftist, his main assault against the pro-gun movement was directed at the cultural backdrop of gun ownership in the US. That’s where he knew he could have the most impact and do the most damage.

    He claimed that the American gun culture was a myth fabricated by late 19th century gun makers who were trying to sell more product because the Industrial Revolution was allowing them to make more product. As America’s frontier era was winding to a close, he claimed, gun makers falsely claimed that civilian gun ownership was a centuries old American tradition. He tried to “prove” all of this by inventing evidence and sources, which eventually got him fired (essentially) from Emory. Before that time, however, he’d already had a big selling book and had received tons of press from a sympathetic media.

    In typical fashion, the media’s presentation of Bellesiles wild claims were the size of a hot air balloon, but the retractions made after the scandal broke were the size of a ping pong ball. One of his history colleagues admitted he was able to take the scam as far as he did because he was telling all of those leftist oriented academics what they wanted to hear.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Wow, that was a real blast from the past, J1234! I remember the controversy about this book from Instapundit (UT Law Prof. Glenn Reynolds). The author's Bancroft prize was even rescinded, a first. I'd guess nowadays, historians would let it slide, like a lot of other lying that goes on.

    A certain old review from Amazon came to mind, so I'll paste it right after the Amazon editorial review that still appears!:


    While gun supporters use the nation's gun-toting history in defense of their way of life, and revolutionary enthusiasts replay skirmishes on historic battlefields, it now turns out that America has not always had a gun culture, and wide-scale gun ownership is much newer than we think. After a 10-year search for "a world that isn't there," professor and scholar Michael Bellesiles discovered that Americans not only rarely owned guns prior to the Civil War, they wouldn't even take them for free from a government that wanted to arm its reluctant public. No sharpshooters, no gun in every home, no children learning to hunt beside their fathers. Bellesiles--whose research methods have generated a great deal of controversy and even a subsequent investigation by Emory University--searched legal, probate, military, and business records; fiction and personal letters; hunting magazines; and legislation in his quest for the legendary gun-wielding frontiersman, only to discover that he is a myth. There are other revelations: gun ownership and storage was strictly legislated in colonial days, and frivolous shooting of a musket was backed by the death penalty; men rarely died in duels because the guns were far too inaccurate (duels were about honor, not murder); pioneers didn't hunt (they trapped and farmed); frontier folk loved books, not guns; and the militia never won a war (it was too inept). In fact, prior to the Civil War, when mass production of higher quality guns became a reality, the republic's greatest problem was a dearth of guns, and a public that was too peaceable to care about civil defense. As Bellesiles writes, "Probably the major reason why the American Revolution lasted eight years, longer than any war in American history before Vietnam, was that when that brave patriot reached above the mantel, he pulled down a rusty, decaying, unusable musket (not a rifle), or found no gun there at all." Strangely, the eagle-eye frontiersman was created by East Coast fiction writers, while the idea of a gun as a household necessity was an advertising ploy of gun maker Samuel Colt (both just prior to the Civil War). The former group fabricated a historic and heroic past while Colt preyed on overblown fears of Indians and blacks.

    Bellesiles, who is highly knowledgeable about weapons and military history, never comes out against guns. He is more interested in discovering the truth than in taking sides. Nevertheless, his work shatters some time-honored myths and icons--including the usual reading of the Second Amendment--and will
     

    Next is the review of the amazon-employee book review by the un-paid "content provider":

    Amazon.com book reviewer debunked in academic skirmish

    OK, here's what the impartial amazon book reviewer had so say. I quote:
    "it now turns out that America has not always had a gun culture, and wide-scale gun ownership is much newer than we think."
    Oops, after being checked by real history professors, it turns out that, yes, dangit, we did have a gun culture and wide-scale gun ownership is old just like we thought.
    "No sharpshooters, no gun in every home, no children learning to hunt beside their fathers"
    Oops, yeah there were sharpshooters, most homes had at least one long gun, and who in heck else did children learn to hunt from, the family cat (ha, ha!)
    "Bellesiles--whose research methods have generated a great deal of controversy and even a subsequent investigation by Emory University- ..." (Oh, and subsequent firing and revocation of his 4-grand in cash.) "...
    "Strangely, the eagle-eye frontiersman was created by East Coast fiction writers,..."
    Oops, predictably, the four-eyed anti-gun frontiersman was created by an East Coast fiction writer (name starts with B, rhymes with a female body part.)
    "He [Bellesiles]is more interested in discovering the truth than in taking sides."
    Oops, no, uh, sorry, here's where I beg to differ with you, Mr. Reviewer.
    "His work .... will be hard to refute." No problem - all in a day's work, my friend.
     

    There is but one star by this one.
    , @Joe Stalin

    Bellesiles’ Arming America Redux: Does the Gunning of America Rewrite American History to Suit Modern Sensibilities?

    Abstract

    Fifteen years ago, Michael Bellesiles’ Arming America was the darling of antigun intellectuals because it created an entirely new perception of the American relationship to guns. It implicitly argued for a much narrower reading of the Second Amendment, one compliant with an America (then) that hated guns and did not own them and an ivory tower today that hates guns and the Americans who bought at least 23 million guns in 2015. Questions were soon raised about the accuracy of the statistics in Bellesiles’ articles and book, and then his honesty about where he researched documents, his widespread alteration of quotes, and his citations to documents that directly refuted his claims. He rapidly went from tenured professor of history at Emory University to bartender, picking up some unprecedented punishments along the way for fraud. A new book, Pamela Haag’s The Gunning of America: Business and the Making of American Gun Culture (Basic Books, 2015) makes (by the author’s own admission) many of the same arguments and demonstrates the dangers of unexamined assumptions. Judges and their clerks need to be aware that while the future is known; the past changes at the whim of careless historians.

    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2789895
     
    https://poseidon01.ssrn.com/delivery.php?ID=187086122071108113120016073084071078040042019051000035078085070025002093009101091085012057017035111035003031105023114102022118123053088016087092064098019102089120042014046073001015030001096020029090090099001071094094002079066066003120103023004103102&EXT=pdf
  249. @Achmed E. Newman
    Yep, we'll see this morning. One thing I should mention is that many here seem to have gotten every bit of news about this rally so far from the Lyin' Press to begin with, Twinkie being one exception.

    This is exactly how it's been working to the advantage of the ctrl-left. I went to the 2nd page of search results about the rally yeserday and got to a source I trusted more - the Virginia Citizen's Defense League. It has lots of logistics info. about buses one could sign up to take from all over the state to get to Richmond. There was no "white nationalist" "neo-Nazi" provocateuring, just "this is our yearly rally" and "this one is important", and then logistics info.

    Every blurb off DuckDuckGo before that was to a Lyin' Press source. One can just read the headlines, if not the blurbs, and see where they stand. At least make the effort to get real news.. Anything else is playing into the hands of the other side.

    (post event)
    The lying MSM never got the notice. For that matter, VCDL was scrambling to keep up with the Sanctuary movement; it really was organic. Facebook, PMs, calls, Instagram, texts, etc. The NRA was even slower on the uptake.

    The Richmond event is a yearly ritual for VCDL, it’s their Lobby Day to talk to legislators . . . . on the MLK holiday because gun rights are civil rights. This time the Sanctuary movement then drifted into the Lobby Day and it became ‘an event’. Just hope VCDL got lots of contact names from all those folks who showed up.

    To your media point, yes, the media made their position clear. NBC stated it was a white supremacist rally with gun groups and militias; posting a video of the crowd reciting the Pledge and headlining it as ‘Crowd chants “We won’t comply” ‘.

  250. @J.Ross
    Plus whatever's on your Apple brand iSupervisor. In Virginia they had some nice intel fixed-wing aircraft moving into theater (U-something; don't know if they used it for the rally, it was just spotted on an air traffic site being moved), but if they're concerned enough, they do not need to physically take cell phones to look at them. That's a good thing considering how Iraqi IEDs work. At the very least they can register numbers and track movement. It'd be interesting to see if the people who showed up are the first to get red flagged.

    At the very least they can register numbers and track movement.

    Too true, Mr Ross. There are ways to get around that, but it takes a lot of effort, the way people depend on their electronics nowadays. I could see it as overly paranoid, just because, with this big a crowd, can they all be red-flagged and screwed with later? If you think they will come for you later, then maybe you have figured the whole effort is a lost cause anyway. (I mean you generically, not you, Mr. Ross.)

  251. @Steve Sailer
    China has a lot of Paris in the 19th Century civic disorders with the proletariat hurling paving stones at the police, or sometimes peasants with clubs battling with crooks hired by the mayor to clear the farmers off the land he wants to build a golf course on.

    My impression is that the higher ups in Beijing don't necessarily side with the crooked local mayors, but instead want to see who wins these tests of strength. So China is not a totalitarian country but instead has a lot of tumult because Xi pays attention to who wins street fights.

    If that’s the case then one can draw some solace from French military performance over the subsequent century.

  252. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    …and didn’t say (or imply) that.
     
    Ah, but your “states as a foundation” red herring did imply that the existence of separate states has relevance to today’s USA regarding this issue (2A and the BoR). I’m saying it doesn’t matter, because it’s only a matter of time before the major 2A state discrepancies are eliminated, one way or the other.

    For the millionth time, there was no single cause of the Civil War. Causes range from …
     
    We don’t disagree. Everything you wrote in that paragraph can be chalked up to differing regional cultures.

    [Restrictive state constitutions] are not obsolete.
     
    They’re obsolete in the sense that all state laws against gay marriage were obsolete as soon as some states started allowing it. Tick tock …

    (Both guns and knives are “arms” that should be covered by the second amend.)
     
    I agree.

    If you believe state’s rights are dead as a principle …
     
    I’m talking about “state’s rights” (note the quotes) only in the context of applying the BoR to individuals (as backed by the Fourteenth Amendment). Hence my linking of the historical segregationist meanings of “state’s rights” and “Separate but Equal.”

    So the differences in grand juries (as provided for in the Fifth Amendment) are quaint?
     
    Like I’ve clearly conveyed, if the differences between states are BoR related, that’s more than quaint. By contrast, you’re the one making appeals to the notion of fuzzy (and shifting—see Virginia) “regional cultures” in an argument about fundamental rights.

    Too many conservatives are willing to embrace a federal legal mono-culture on gun rights, while at the same time complain about an oppressive federal government.
     
    LOL. Jack D (as linked earlier) made a similar argument about guns:

    We were never meant to be centrally ruled from Washington.
     
    Here was my response:

    Are you speaking as a state or an individual? “Washington ruling” in Heller and McDonald isn’t requiring you, an individual, to own a gun—it’s merely the federal government suppressing local tyrants who would otherwise infringe on the basic rights of common citizens.
     
    You wrote:

    That’s typically a leftist tactic…
     
    Wot, using the courts, including SCOTUS, to get redress? Better cancel Heller and McDonald then! Feds running roughshod over regional culture—how rude! Best to take the sentimental high ground and reminisce about state’s rights, LOL.

    They can’t envision a time when the federal legal mono-culture turns against them.
     
    You’ve got it backwards. “Conservatives” as you say—or rather motivated right-wingers (“conservative” these days has the whiff of attenuated, passive sentimentalism, as exemplified by your commentary)—do envision a time (soon—hello, demographics!) when “federal legal mono-culture turns against them”—hence the continued push for increasing hardware (guns) accessibility.

    The number of non-gun owning households in the US is now significantly greater than gun owning households.
     
    Possibly indicating that if push comes to shove in a national crack-up, the gun-shy are gonna be spanked by the gun-happy. Because gun sales in recent years are higher than ever. Not all of those guns are duck guns …

    Washington’s Farewell Address 1796

    https://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/washing.asp

    • Thanks: Jenner Ickham Errican
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Washington’s Farewell Address 1796
     
    Magnificent! Thank you, Des. I’ve skimmed it before, but only shallowly.

    Could be that some of it stuck nonetheless. :)

    For J1234, the excerpts most relevant to our debate:

    The unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquility at home, your peace abroad; of your safety; of your prosperity; of that very liberty which you so highly prize. But as it is easy to foresee that, from different causes and from different quarters, much pains will be taken, many artifices employed to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth; as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed, it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.

    For this you have every inducement of sympathy and interest. Citizens, by birth or choice, of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of American, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. (…)

    With such powerful and obvious motives to union, affecting all parts of our country, while experience shall not have demonstrated its impracticability, there will always be reason to distrust the patriotism of those who in any quarter may endeavor to weaken its bands. (…)

    The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.

    All obstructions to the execution of the laws, all combinations and associations, under whatever plausible character, with the real design to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fundamental principle, and of fatal tendency. They serve to organize faction, to give it an artificial and extraordinary force; to put, in the place of the delegated will of the nation the will of a party, often a small but artful and enterprising minority of the community; and, according to the alternate triumphs of different parties, to make the public administration the mirror of the ill-concerted and incongruous projects of faction, rather than the organ of consistent and wholesome plans digested by common counsels and modified by mutual interests.

    However combinations or associations of the above description may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely, in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion.

     

  253. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ayatollah Smith
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Thank you for your civil reply. Much appreciated.

    I had almost forgotten the fantastic job your media have done in demonizing countries that refuse to bow to the Imperial Master. The theories and techniques began more than 100 years ago at the Tavistock Institute, and have proven spectacularly effective. They even got your country into two world wars your people didn't want. Full marks.

    It is widely accepted throughout the world that the American media are nothing if not scrupulously even-handed and search only for truth and balanced reporting, more or less equivalent to the renowned integrity of your White House and politicians.

    I had also forgotten or, perhaps never really appreciated, that Americans who have never been to China have a much better understanding of the country than those who live there. Something about being out of the painting to be able to see it properly.

    However, I committed a transgression by going off-topic, and I apologise for leading the poster's thread in an unrelated direction. I will be more careful in the future.

    I have talked with many Americans who have lived in China that living there quickly makes you start thinking like they do, as if you were being assimilated into the Borg on the old Star Trek.(Not the really old Star Trek, the one merely old, when Marina Sirtis was still hot. )

  254. @MikeatMikedotMike
    Cracking down on handguns would require law enforcement to crack down on negroes. Cracking down on negroes is bad publicity. Politicians, bureaucrats, and media honchos know this.

    Easier to invent a crisis (like frat boy campus rape culture) than to honestly deal with one (college negro athletes raping white coeds on campus.)

    Funny thing, but the Elites see the high IQ ethnostate of Japan as a role model for enlightened gun control. No mention of Japan being a homogeneous, high achieving, low violence nation to begin with. Noticed that Jake Adelstein was quoted in the story. More intra-Hive circlejerkery. Adelstein was noted recently for articles which fete the half-Haitian, half-Japanese Tennis star “Osaka” and why Japan needs more diversity & immigration.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-38365729

  255. @J1234

    People who survive have a culture. People who get wiped out don’t.
     
    I guess I've read too many old school history books, which often claim the opposite causality: People who had a (strong) culture survived. Those who didn't were wiped out. It isn't a formula, but a tendency, so there will always be exceptions, but it's a pretty strong tendency. I'm also probably unduly inspired/influenced by Oswald Spengler with regards to culture. Antipathy towards culture from the left and apathy towards culture from the right seem to create an almost insurmountable barrier to the West connecting to the past in a way that can synthesize a meaningful future.

    Talking about culture and guns reminds me of the big scandal (that most people
    haven't heard of) surrounding Michael Bellesiles, a history professor at Emory University 20 years ago. As a devoted leftist, his main assault against the pro-gun movement was directed at the cultural backdrop of gun ownership in the US. That's where he knew he could have the most impact and do the most damage.

    He claimed that the American gun culture was a myth fabricated by late 19th century gun makers who were trying to sell more product because the Industrial Revolution was allowing them to make more product. As America's frontier era was winding to a close, he claimed, gun makers falsely claimed that civilian gun ownership was a centuries old American tradition. He tried to "prove" all of this by inventing evidence and sources, which eventually got him fired (essentially) from Emory. Before that time, however, he'd already had a big selling book and had received tons of press from a sympathetic media.

    In typical fashion, the media's presentation of Bellesiles wild claims were the size of a hot air balloon, but the retractions made after the scandal broke were the size of a ping pong ball. One of his history colleagues admitted he was able to take the scam as far as he did because he was telling all of those leftist oriented academics what they wanted to hear.

    Wow, that was a real blast from the past, J1234! I remember the controversy about this book from Instapundit (UT Law Prof. Glenn Reynolds). The author’s Bancroft prize was even rescinded, a first. I’d guess nowadays, historians would let it slide, like a lot of other lying that goes on.

    A certain old review from Amazon came to mind, so I’ll paste it right after the Amazon editorial review that still appears!:

    While gun supporters use the nation’s gun-toting history in defense of their way of life, and revolutionary enthusiasts replay skirmishes on historic battlefields, it now turns out that America has not always had a gun culture, and wide-scale gun ownership is much newer than we think. After a 10-year search for “a world that isn’t there,” professor and scholar Michael Bellesiles discovered that Americans not only rarely owned guns prior to the Civil War, they wouldn’t even take them for free from a government that wanted to arm its reluctant public. No sharpshooters, no gun in every home, no children learning to hunt beside their fathers. Bellesiles–whose research methods have generated a great deal of controversy and even a subsequent investigation by Emory University–searched legal, probate, military, and business records; fiction and personal letters; hunting magazines; and legislation in his quest for the legendary gun-wielding frontiersman, only to discover that he is a myth. There are other revelations: gun ownership and storage was strictly legislated in colonial days, and frivolous shooting of a musket was backed by the death penalty; men rarely died in duels because the guns were far too inaccurate (duels were about honor, not murder); pioneers didn’t hunt (they trapped and farmed); frontier folk loved books, not guns; and the militia never won a war (it was too inept). In fact, prior to the Civil War, when mass production of higher quality guns became a reality, the republic’s greatest problem was a dearth of guns, and a public that was too peaceable to care about civil defense. As Bellesiles writes, “Probably the major reason why the American Revolution lasted eight years, longer than any war in American history before Vietnam, was that when that brave patriot reached above the mantel, he pulled down a rusty, decaying, unusable musket (not a rifle), or found no gun there at all.” Strangely, the eagle-eye frontiersman was created by East Coast fiction writers, while the idea of a gun as a household necessity was an advertising ploy of gun maker Samuel Colt (both just prior to the Civil War). The former group fabricated a historic and heroic past while Colt preyed on overblown fears of Indians and blacks.

    Bellesiles, who is highly knowledgeable about weapons and military history, never comes out against guns. He is more interested in discovering the truth than in taking sides. Nevertheless, his work shatters some time-honored myths and icons–including the usual reading of the Second Amendment–and will

    Next is the review of the amazon-employee book review by the un-paid “content provider”:

    Amazon.com book reviewer debunked in academic skirmish

    OK, here’s what the impartial amazon book reviewer had so say. I quote:
    “it now turns out that America has not always had a gun culture, and wide-scale gun ownership is much newer than we think.”
    Oops, after being checked by real history professors, it turns out that, yes, dangit, we did have a gun culture and wide-scale gun ownership is old just like we thought.
    “No sharpshooters, no gun in every home, no children learning to hunt beside their fathers”
    Oops, yeah there were sharpshooters, most homes had at least one long gun, and who in heck else did children learn to hunt from, the family cat (ha, ha!)
    “Bellesiles–whose research methods have generated a great deal of controversy and even a subsequent investigation by Emory University- …” (Oh, and subsequent firing and revocation of his 4-grand in cash.) “…
    “Strangely, the eagle-eye frontiersman was created by East Coast fiction writers,…”
    Oops, predictably, the four-eyed anti-gun frontiersman was created by an East Coast fiction writer (name starts with B, rhymes with a female body part.)
    “He [Bellesiles]is more interested in discovering the truth than in taking sides.”
    Oops, no, uh, sorry, here’s where I beg to differ with you, Mr. Reviewer.
    “His work …. will be hard to refute.” No problem – all in a day’s work, my friend.

    There is but one star by this one.

    • Replies: @J1234
    I remember all of the hoopla surrounding Bellesiles' radical historical premise in the late 1990's, when it was a cover story on Newsweek and created much discussion on TV morning shows. I'd forgotten all about that, however, when I was reading the book, A Necessary Evil by progressive historian Garry Wills. (I was reading Will's book about 2007, but it had been published in the late '90's, about the time Bellesiles' bogus claims were getting a big reception from the media.)

    Wills cited Bellesiles' research extensively when trying to make his own case that early America and it's antecedent colonies weren't what tradition had made them out to be. I thought to myself, why haven't I heard about Bellesiles and his "groundbreaking" scholarship over the last decade? This isn't the kind of story that the leftist media just forgets about (as Steve's references to the NYT's obsession with Emmett Till illustrate.)

    Going on nothing more than a great suspicion centered around the leftist tactics of the American mainstream media (turning off the "microphone" when the narrative is wrong or backfires on them) I did a quick google search and in a minute or two learned about one of the great academic scandals of our time (which you'd think would have as much media presence as Bellesile's crazy theory.) My, my...isn't it strange that the story that advanced the leftist historical narrative found me, but I had to go looking for the story that negated it.

    One old article I found recently even said that the story was best forgotten about, but said that crazy "Charleton Heston" types were keeping it alive (for nefarious purposes, I presume.)

  256. @JohnPlywood
    It you were paying attention you would realize this teeny weeny increase is already described in the literature (known "Ferguson effect") and ended two years ago.

    Then again it's kind of hard to pay attention when you spent the last 30 years huffing radon gas as a substitute for LSD, and your sole source of information about the world are your niche altright web blogs.

    It you were paying attention you would realize this teeny weeny increase is already described in the literature (known “Ferguson effect”) and ended two years ago.

    Teeny weeny 10% increase in homicide rates from 2014 to 2015. Got it. You’ll notice that I actually included the numbers showing what you said. Unlike you.

    And if this was so well known, why did you say “steadily declining”?

    Then again it’s kind of hard to pay attention when you spent the last 30 years huffing radon gas as a substitute for LSD, and your sole source of information about the world are your niche altright web blogs.

    At least that was kind of funny. Totally wrong, but at least a little amusing. And that is an improvement over your usual just wrong.

    • Replies: @JohnPlywood

    And if this was so well known, why did you say “steadily declining”?
     
    Because when you look at the homicide trend going back to 1993, not just 2013-2018 as white nationalists like to do, you realize how small the Ferguson effect was - and the impressiveness of the +25 year downward trend.

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/asher-ucr-2016-0922-1-corrected.png


    Yet another swift, debilitating blow is delivered to the sigmoid colon of resident retard, closeted transsexual, and dissociative drug addict, "res." I suspect he/she will perform his/her usual deny+flail+disappear act, in the sight of that chart.

  257. @Desiderius
    Washington's Farewell Address 1796

    https://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/washing.asp

    Washington’s Farewell Address 1796

    Magnificent! Thank you, Des. I’ve skimmed it before, but only shallowly.

    Could be that some of it stuck nonetheless. 🙂

    For J1234, the excerpts most relevant to our debate:

    [MORE]

    The unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquility at home, your peace abroad; of your safety; of your prosperity; of that very liberty which you so highly prize. But as it is easy to foresee that, from different causes and from different quarters, much pains will be taken, many artifices employed to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth; as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed, it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.

    For this you have every inducement of sympathy and interest. Citizens, by birth or choice, of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of American, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. (…)

    With such powerful and obvious motives to union, affecting all parts of our country, while experience shall not have demonstrated its impracticability, there will always be reason to distrust the patriotism of those who in any quarter may endeavor to weaken its bands. (…)

    The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.

    All obstructions to the execution of the laws, all combinations and associations, under whatever plausible character, with the real design to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fundamental principle, and of fatal tendency. They serve to organize faction, to give it an artificial and extraordinary force; to put, in the place of the delegated will of the nation the will of a party, often a small but artful and enterprising minority of the community; and, according to the alternate triumphs of different parties, to make the public administration the mirror of the ill-concerted and incongruous projects of faction, rather than the organ of consistent and wholesome plans digested by common counsels and modified by mutual interests.

    However combinations or associations of the above description may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely, in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2020/01/trump-in-the-lions-den.php
  258. @J1234

    People who survive have a culture. People who get wiped out don’t.
     
    I guess I've read too many old school history books, which often claim the opposite causality: People who had a (strong) culture survived. Those who didn't were wiped out. It isn't a formula, but a tendency, so there will always be exceptions, but it's a pretty strong tendency. I'm also probably unduly inspired/influenced by Oswald Spengler with regards to culture. Antipathy towards culture from the left and apathy towards culture from the right seem to create an almost insurmountable barrier to the West connecting to the past in a way that can synthesize a meaningful future.

    Talking about culture and guns reminds me of the big scandal (that most people
    haven't heard of) surrounding Michael Bellesiles, a history professor at Emory University 20 years ago. As a devoted leftist, his main assault against the pro-gun movement was directed at the cultural backdrop of gun ownership in the US. That's where he knew he could have the most impact and do the most damage.

    He claimed that the American gun culture was a myth fabricated by late 19th century gun makers who were trying to sell more product because the Industrial Revolution was allowing them to make more product. As America's frontier era was winding to a close, he claimed, gun makers falsely claimed that civilian gun ownership was a centuries old American tradition. He tried to "prove" all of this by inventing evidence and sources, which eventually got him fired (essentially) from Emory. Before that time, however, he'd already had a big selling book and had received tons of press from a sympathetic media.

    In typical fashion, the media's presentation of Bellesiles wild claims were the size of a hot air balloon, but the retractions made after the scandal broke were the size of a ping pong ball. One of his history colleagues admitted he was able to take the scam as far as he did because he was telling all of those leftist oriented academics what they wanted to hear.

    Bellesiles’ Arming America Redux: Does the Gunning of America Rewrite American History to Suit Modern Sensibilities?

    Abstract

    Fifteen years ago, Michael Bellesiles’ Arming America was the darling of antigun intellectuals because it created an entirely new perception of the American relationship to guns. It implicitly argued for a much narrower reading of the Second Amendment, one compliant with an America (then) that hated guns and did not own them and an ivory tower today that hates guns and the Americans who bought at least 23 million guns in 2015. Questions were soon raised about the accuracy of the statistics in Bellesiles’ articles and book, and then his honesty about where he researched documents, his widespread alteration of quotes, and his citations to documents that directly refuted his claims. He rapidly went from tenured professor of history at Emory University to bartender, picking up some unprecedented punishments along the way for fraud. A new book, Pamela Haag’s The Gunning of America: Business and the Making of American Gun Culture (Basic Books, 2015) makes (by the author’s own admission) many of the same arguments and demonstrates the dangers of unexamined assumptions. Judges and their clerks need to be aware that while the future is known; the past changes at the whim of careless historians.

    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2789895

    https://poseidon01.ssrn.com/delivery.php?ID=187086122071108113120016073084071078040042019051000035078085070025002093009101091085012057017035111035003031105023114102022118123053088016087092064098019102089120042014046073001015030001096020029090090099001071094094002079066066003120103023004103102&EXT=pdf

  259. anon[340] • Disclaimer says:

    Bellesiles lies were initially exposed by deplorable gun nuts living in flyover country.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arming_America

    Clayton Cramer, a historian, software engineer, gun enthusiast and early critic of Bellesiles, later argued that the reason “why historians swallowed Arming America’s preposterous claims so readily is that it fit into their political worldview so well… Arming America said things, and created a system of thought so comfortable for the vast majority of historians, that they didn’t even pause to consider the possibility that something wasn’t right.”

    • Thanks: Achmed E. Newman
  260. Not OT:

    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-japan-has-almost-eradicated-gun-crime

    This is a link to an older BBC piece, but the author studiously ignores the bigger question of why crime in general is lower in Japan, but that Japanese juries also rubberstamp all prosecutions as guilty. (To be fair, Japanese prosecutors are generally more careful, more honest and more thorough than those in the West;nevertheless….)

    My Perfect Country

    In a world where a lot is going wrong there is also a lot going right. So what if you could build a country with policies that actually worked, by homing in ideas around the world that have been truly successful?

    The current gun control law was introduced in 1958, but the idea behind the policy dates back centuries.

    “Ever since guns entered the country, Japan has always had strict gun laws,” says Iain Overton, executive director of Action on Armed Violence and the author of Gun Baby Gun.

    “They are the first nation to impose gun laws in the whole world and I think it laid down a bedrock saying that guns really don’t play a part in civilian society.”

    People were being rewarded for giving up firearms as far back as 1685, a policy Overton describes as “perhaps the first ever gun buyback initiative.”

    Japan actually is not a perfect country. It has a very high suicide rate, Japanese are probably in objective terms the most racist people in the world, (I approve of a certain level of racism but they really overdo it sometimes) and they are obsessed with sex. And most importantly, they like other orientals are not capable of genuinely new and radical development. They are extremely good at perfecting other people’s ideas though and combining existing ones in new better ways, such as the Mazda Wankel engine (which they substantially improved over other’s attempts), the Nikon camera that combined the best of Leica and Contax (Zeiss) designs, and the oxygen torpedo of WWII. The first and last of these had been given up on by their originators in fact.

    The world is a better place for Japan staying Japanese, but what works in Japan does not necessarily work elsewhere.

    • Replies: @Lars Porsena

    “Ever since guns entered the country, Japan has always had strict gun laws,”
     
    Since long before guns entered the country they had sword laws and sword control.
  261. Speaking of problems with rifles:

    Penis, Cock and Meat Rifle – Bhutan’s Phallus Cult

    Paging Andrew Sullivan!

  262. @Achmed E. Newman
    [Thanks] was in order. My 12 hours ain't up.

    My 12 hours ain’t up.

    There have been so many changes to the Reaction system in the past few months, it’s been hard to get used to. Like adjusting one’s life schedule if daylight-savings time shifted around every few weeks instead of twice a year.

    I think three per twelve hours is not ideal, at least for me, in that when I come across a comment I really want to mark as ‘Agree’ (or some other Reaction), I often cannot, while in other twelve-hour windows I do not get any reactions in at all. And I comment pretty regularly these days.

    I think Ron Unz wants to limit people from ‘spamming’ particular threads (or authors) with reactions (or forming mutual-admiration(-or-aversion)-society comment-gangs, as I believe he has described it), which is understandable. We’ve all seen how this kind of thumbs-up-thumbs-down spamming works in other comment systems where it’s free to do so in an unlimited way.

    A higher reactions-per-24-hour quota might be a better fit but limiting reactions on any one author to a certain number, say four-per-24-hours (two per twelve hours).

    I am sure Ron won’t read this, but I want to drop this idea here for future reference.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    AGREED

    Hail, per Ron's' own admission, he only reads 0.3% of the comments, so it's not likely. Occasionally he will get on a thread, but anyway, there is a Bugs and Suggestions thread that I bet he keeps up with much better than with the other stuff. Try there with your suggestion.

    .

    * OK, I don't know if he really calculated this, but knowing Mr. Unz, perhaps he did.
  263. @Hail

    My 12 hours ain’t up.
     
    There have been so many changes to the Reaction system in the past few months, it's been hard to get used to. Like adjusting one's life schedule if daylight-savings time shifted around every few weeks instead of twice a year.

    I think three per twelve hours is not ideal, at least for me, in that when I come across a comment I really want to mark as 'Agree' (or some other Reaction), I often cannot, while in other twelve-hour windows I do not get any reactions in at all. And I comment pretty regularly these days.

    I think Ron Unz wants to limit people from 'spamming' particular threads (or authors) with reactions (or forming mutual-admiration(-or-aversion)-society comment-gangs, as I believe he has described it), which is understandable. We've all seen how this kind of thumbs-up-thumbs-down spamming works in other comment systems where it's free to do so in an unlimited way.

    A higher reactions-per-24-hour quota might be a better fit but limiting reactions on any one author to a certain number, say four-per-24-hours (two per twelve hours).

    I am sure Ron won't read this, but I want to drop this idea here for future reference.

    AGREED

    Hail, per Ron’s’ own admission, he only reads 0.3% of the comments, so it’s not likely. Occasionally he will get on a thread, but anyway, there is a Bugs and Suggestions thread that I bet he keeps up with much better than with the other stuff. Try there with your suggestion.

    .

    * OK, I don’t know if he really calculated this, but knowing Mr. Unz, perhaps he did.

  264. Many in the above comments likely said this in different ways, but here it is again.

    We don’t have a gun crime problem, we have a black crime problem.

  265. @res

    It you were paying attention you would realize this teeny weeny increase is already described in the literature (known “Ferguson effect”) and ended two years ago.
     
    Teeny weeny 10% increase in homicide rates from 2014 to 2015. Got it. You'll notice that I actually included the numbers showing what you said. Unlike you.

    And if this was so well known, why did you say "steadily declining"?

    Then again it’s kind of hard to pay attention when you spent the last 30 years huffing radon gas as a substitute for LSD, and your sole source of information about the world are your niche altright web blogs.
     
    At least that was kind of funny. Totally wrong, but at least a little amusing. And that is an improvement over your usual just wrong.

    And if this was so well known, why did you say “steadily declining”?

    Because when you look at the homicide trend going back to 1993, not just 2013-2018 as white nationalists like to do, you realize how small the Ferguson effect was – and the impressiveness of the +25 year downward trend.

    Yet another swift, debilitating blow is delivered to the sigmoid colon of resident retard, closeted transsexual, and dissociative drug addict, “res.” I suspect he/she will perform his/her usual deny+flail+disappear act, in the sight of that chart.

    • Replies: @res


    And if this was so well known, why did you say “steadily declining”?
     
    Because when you look at the homicide trend going back to 1993, not just 2013-2018
     
    stead·i·ly
    adverb
    1. in a regular and even manner.

    A good description of 1993-2000. With 2000-2008 being roughly flat. Followed by a dip then an increase of about 18%. That last increase makes "steadily" a reach for the period 1993-2018.

    Starting in comment 83 I have been talking about crime trends since 1960. Take your white nationalist strawman somewhere else. You picked the wrong target for it. But I always like it when people make their biases clear by judging things like that incorrectly.

    Yet another swift, debilitating blow is delivered to the sigmoid colon of resident retard, closeted transsexual, and dissociative drug addict, “res.” I suspect he/she will perform his/her usual deny+flail+disappear act, in the sight of that chart.
     
    Right now my sigmoid colon is quite happy with the pleasure of having excreted yet another of your bogus arguments (aka steaming piles).

    How about you link to some examples of "usual deny+flail+disappear act"? Because I can assure you that is unlikely to happen here. You must have me confused with someone else. Projecting perhaps?

    You post that graphic like it is a revelation? How about taking a look all the way back to comment 83 (a reply to you) where I posted it first?
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/usa-has-a-big-handgun-murder-problem-and-a-small-rifle-murder-problem/#comment-3670753

    Even compared to the steep decline from 1993-2000 and the equally steep, but longer, increase from 1963-1974 the 2014-2016 Ferguson Effect change was steep (10% then another 8%). It is just that happily it only lasted two years rather than seven or eleven.
  266. @SunBakedSuburb
    "barbed wire around freeway signs"

    This is something I noticed after moving to LA from NorCal in the late 1990s: the prevalence of barbed wire. Even in such sedate settings (for LA) like Studio City and Burbank, barbed wire spread like ivy around parking lots, strip malls, garbage dumpsters, and so on. There is a siege mentality at work in LA, even in the more desirable areas. I still like LA, but full time residency is not conducive to mental health.

    Even in such sedate settings (for LA) like Studio City and Burbank, barbed wire spread like ivy around parking lots, strip malls, garbage dumpsters, and so on. There is a siege mentality at work in LA, even in the more desirable areas.

    I think this is a good observation and want to quote it. It is in line with my experiences in Southern California (by now certainly not just LA). Though I have spent only a cumulative few weeks of my life in the state, in various visits and passings-through.

    I wonder if Steve Sailer or other native/lifelong Californians feel the same. (I understand Steve lived in/around LA from birth to 1976, and 2000 to present and frequent visits during the intervening years). And when they’d peg the siege mentality as emerging.

    I cannot imagine it was true in the 1950s, but it was certainly true by the 1990s. I think a glance at this graph might give a clue…:

    (“‘Who Lost California?’ The ‘When,’ the ‘Who,’ and the ‘Why’ of California’s Decline from Midwest-on-the-Pacific to Brazil-on-the-Pacific“)

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    That's a great graph, Hail, both in formatting and content. The proportion is one thing, but then the pure absolute numbers are another. I read your "Who Lost California" post on your blog, and it was a nice job! I can't remember if I commented, tried to comment but couldn't (I'm shy about joining FB , all that), or not.

    BTW, I didn't know Steve was gone for so long. What a shock it must have been to see the new "improved" California, unless he was visiting very regularly.
    , @Alden
    I’ll read the entire article later. Here’s the opinion of a life long Nor Californian who’s roots go back to the. Gold Rush.

    The farmers ruined California by importing Hispanic illegals for cheap labor. The anti union capitalists, especially of S California ruined California by importing cheap Asian and Hispanic labor for every job.

    The old hippies, gays and today’s trannies are just decoration??? I don’t know how to describe these inessentials. The big problem is overcrowded housing and cheap non White labor.

    California’s problem’s stem from the 1968 affirmative action act Griggs vs Duke Power and Kaiser vs Weber that destroyed the existing merit hiring system

    And don’t tell me the employers resisted the Supreme Court orders to hire non Whites. They were probably behind it.

    Still, we’re the 6th largest economy in the world.
    Whites still rule commercial industrial construction. As long as the population and economy expands commercial businesses ndustrial construction will be ok. All those endless building codes favor White , not non White immigrant sub contractors.

    If you want your kids to stay in California, buy them a small apartment house instead of a useless college education, including tech as a tech education is worthless for a White man in California. The business classes at community college are no different than university business classes.

    Rental property, family clans and commercial industrial construction are the future of California Whites. Make a living by renting to the cubicle coolies and Home Depot laborers who beg for work every day.
  267. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    I am reluctant to continue this discussion since it’s off-topic and I genuinely don’t want to disrupt the thread for the original poster, but your comment raised a question worth asking.

    “I have talked with many Americans who have lived in China that living there quickly makes you start thinking like they do, as if you were being assimilated into the Borg . . .”

    So you have talked with “many Americans who have lived in China” and who “quickly” begin thinking like the Chinese, as if they were being assimilated.

    Only two possibilities for causing this strange state of affairs come to mind:

    (1) Americans are so weak-minded that after two weeks of exposure they will helplessly adopt whatever foreign cultures or ideologies to which they are exposed. Not plausible.

    (2) After two weeks of exposure to a foreign culture they begin to realize that everything they were told by their mass media, was in fact wrong, that they were simply being propagandized to hate whomever the deep state wanted them to hate. That 90% or even 95% of everything they knew, or thought they knew, or that they believed to be true (about China, in this case), was wrong.

    Instead of worrying about fixing China, maybe you should focus on your own problems. Your trains crawl, your bridges collapse, your dams burst, your middle class is gone, 25% of your people cannot exist without food stamps, your millions of homeless urinate and defecate openly on the sidewalks of your lovely cities, by your own government’s figures a full 40% of you have no job while half of the rest are in the Task Rabbit economy, half of your people have no health care to speak of, few can afford to retire, and Homeland Security has its 800 interment camps and its 3 billion bullets to ensure none of you complain too much about your new fascist police state masquerading as the bastion of democracy.

    And of course between your police killing 1,000 or so of you every year and you killing another 30,000 or so of each other while sending another 100,000 to the hospital with gunshot wounds, with more than one mass shooting every day on average, to say nothing of the 80,000+ “kick in the door at 5:00 AM” FBI raids per year, I think you have more than enough problems to occupy your free time.

    Again, the problem is not guns, nor is it handguns vs assault rifles. The problem is that you are a violent, belligerent and aggressive people by nature and a great many of you are totally f***ing crazy.

    And it isn’t China where a full 75% of the people can’t find their own country on a map of the world.

    • Replies: @Alden
    12 percent of the American population are belligerent violent and aggressive and commit about 70 percent of the crimes. If we got rid of that 12 percent crime would drop by about 70 percent. Look at the cities where that 12 percent live, the most violent crime ridden in the country,The. cities and areas where the 12 percent don’t live are crime free.
    , @Mr. Rational

    Instead of worrying about fixing China, maybe you should focus on your own problems. Your trains crawl, your bridges collapse, your dams burst, your middle class is gone
     
    The only trains that matter are the commuter trains in and out of big cities, and they are plenty fast; nobody rides the other ones.  Our dams burst because our treasonous governments spend the repair funds on illegal aliens, and our middle-class jobs have either been wage-arbitraged to poverty levels with various immigrants or exported to China.

    you killing another 30,000 or so of each other while sending another 100,000 to the hospital with gunshot wounds, with more than one mass shooting every day on average
     
    It's closer to 10,000 per year, and almost every one of those "mass shootings" is a n----r on n----r offense that the media covers up.

    The problem is that you are a violent, belligerent and aggressive people by nature
     
    If you remove the few most violent cities from our crime statistics, the USA's crime rate is solidly in the European mainstream.  Those "violent, belligerent and aggressive people" are easily recognizable as something quite different from actual Americans by sight.
  268. @Dave Pinsen
    Because policy trends now (eliminating bail, reducing incarceration, decriminalizing various offenses due to disparate impact) threaten to reverse that decline.

    Because policy trends now (eliminating bail, reducing incarceration, decriminalizing various offenses due to disparate impact) threaten to reverse that decline.

    Eliminating pretrial detention.

  269. @Arclight
    The liberal obsession with long guns shows they aren't really serious about reducing gun deaths, they just want to be able to aim rhetoric and policy at whites who are the most common owners of rifles and commit a disproportionate share of the (rare) high publicity mass shootings.

    I'll know the left is serious about actually preserving lives when they propose enhanced penalties for crimes committed with illegal firearms (or possession of) and stick with it even when it's pointed out this will disproportionately affect the sons and boyfriends of their most loyal voting bloc.

    The liberal obsession with long guns shows they aren’t really serious about reducing gun deaths, they just want to be able to aim rhetoric and policy at whites who are the most common owners of rifles and commit a disproportionate share of the (rare) high publicity mass shootings.

    Disproportionately high, or low?

  270. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Washington’s Farewell Address 1796
     
    Magnificent! Thank you, Des. I’ve skimmed it before, but only shallowly.

    Could be that some of it stuck nonetheless. :)

    For J1234, the excerpts most relevant to our debate:

    The unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquility at home, your peace abroad; of your safety; of your prosperity; of that very liberty which you so highly prize. But as it is easy to foresee that, from different causes and from different quarters, much pains will be taken, many artifices employed to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth; as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed, it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.

    For this you have every inducement of sympathy and interest. Citizens, by birth or choice, of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of American, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. (…)

    With such powerful and obvious motives to union, affecting all parts of our country, while experience shall not have demonstrated its impracticability, there will always be reason to distrust the patriotism of those who in any quarter may endeavor to weaken its bands. (…)

    The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.

    All obstructions to the execution of the laws, all combinations and associations, under whatever plausible character, with the real design to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fundamental principle, and of fatal tendency. They serve to organize faction, to give it an artificial and extraordinary force; to put, in the place of the delegated will of the nation the will of a party, often a small but artful and enterprising minority of the community; and, according to the alternate triumphs of different parties, to make the public administration the mirror of the ill-concerted and incongruous projects of faction, rather than the organ of consistent and wholesome plans digested by common counsels and modified by mutual interests.

    However combinations or associations of the above description may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely, in the course of time and things, to become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion.

     

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    https://twitter.com/that_groyper/status/1014529198587826176
  271. @Hail

    Even in such sedate settings (for LA) like Studio City and Burbank, barbed wire spread like ivy around parking lots, strip malls, garbage dumpsters, and so on. There is a siege mentality at work in LA, even in the more desirable areas.
     
    I think this is a good observation and want to quote it. It is in line with my experiences in Southern California (by now certainly not just LA). Though I have spent only a cumulative few weeks of my life in the state, in various visits and passings-through.

    I wonder if Steve Sailer or other native/lifelong Californians feel the same. (I understand Steve lived in/around LA from birth to 1976, and 2000 to present and frequent visits during the intervening years). And when they'd peg the siege mentality as emerging.

    I cannot imagine it was true in the 1950s, but it was certainly true by the 1990s. I think a glance at this graph might give a clue...:

    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/california-population-by-race-1940-to-2020-five-year-intervals.png

    ("‘Who Lost California?’ The ‘When,’ the ‘Who,’ and the ‘Why’ of California’s Decline from Midwest-on-the-Pacific to Brazil-on-the-Pacific")

    That’s a great graph, Hail, both in formatting and content. The proportion is one thing, but then the pure absolute numbers are another. I read your “Who Lost California” post on your blog, and it was a nice job! I can’t remember if I commented, tried to comment but couldn’t (I’m shy about joining FB , all that), or not.

    BTW, I didn’t know Steve was gone for so long. What a shock it must have been to see the new “improved” California, unless he was visiting very regularly.

  272. @donvonburg
    Not OT:

    https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-japan-has-almost-eradicated-gun-crime

    This is a link to an older BBC piece, but the author studiously ignores the bigger question of why crime in general is lower in Japan, but that Japanese juries also rubberstamp all prosecutions as guilty. (To be fair, Japanese prosecutors are generally more careful, more honest and more thorough than those in the West;nevertheless....)

    My Perfect Country

    In a world where a lot is going wrong there is also a lot going right. So what if you could build a country with policies that actually worked, by homing in ideas around the world that have been truly successful?

    The current gun control law was introduced in 1958, but the idea behind the policy dates back centuries.

    "Ever since guns entered the country, Japan has always had strict gun laws," says Iain Overton, executive director of Action on Armed Violence and the author of Gun Baby Gun.

    "They are the first nation to impose gun laws in the whole world and I think it laid down a bedrock saying that guns really don't play a part in civilian society."

    People were being rewarded for giving up firearms as far back as 1685, a policy Overton describes as "perhaps the first ever gun buyback initiative."
     
    Japan actually is not a perfect country. It has a very high suicide rate, Japanese are probably in objective terms the most racist people in the world, (I approve of a certain level of racism but they really overdo it sometimes) and they are obsessed with sex. And most importantly, they like other orientals are not capable of genuinely new and radical development. They are extremely good at perfecting other people's ideas though and combining existing ones in new better ways, such as the Mazda Wankel engine (which they substantially improved over other's attempts), the Nikon camera that combined the best of Leica and Contax (Zeiss) designs, and the oxygen torpedo of WWII. The first and last of these had been given up on by their originators in fact.

    The world is a better place for Japan staying Japanese, but what works in Japan does not necessarily work elsewhere.

    “Ever since guns entered the country, Japan has always had strict gun laws,”

    Since long before guns entered the country they had sword laws and sword control.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    Exactly. Didn’t they use peasants to test the edge of a new sword. Not by holding a sheet of paper either.
  273. @Desiderius
    https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2020/01/trump-in-the-lions-den.php

  274. @Lars Porsena

    “Ever since guns entered the country, Japan has always had strict gun laws,”
     
    Since long before guns entered the country they had sword laws and sword control.

    Exactly. Didn’t they use peasants to test the edge of a new sword. Not by holding a sheet of paper either.

  275. @JohnPlywood

    And if this was so well known, why did you say “steadily declining”?
     
    Because when you look at the homicide trend going back to 1993, not just 2013-2018 as white nationalists like to do, you realize how small the Ferguson effect was - and the impressiveness of the +25 year downward trend.

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/asher-ucr-2016-0922-1-corrected.png


    Yet another swift, debilitating blow is delivered to the sigmoid colon of resident retard, closeted transsexual, and dissociative drug addict, "res." I suspect he/she will perform his/her usual deny+flail+disappear act, in the sight of that chart.

    And if this was so well known, why did you say “steadily declining”?

    Because when you look at the homicide trend going back to 1993, not just 2013-2018

    stead·i·ly
    adverb
    1. in a regular and even manner.

    A good description of 1993-2000. With 2000-2008 being roughly flat. Followed by a dip then an increase of about 18%. That last increase makes “steadily” a reach for the period 1993-2018.

    Starting in comment 83 I have been talking about crime trends since 1960. Take your white nationalist strawman somewhere else. You picked the wrong target for it. But I always like it when people make their biases clear by judging things like that incorrectly.

    Yet another swift, debilitating blow is delivered to the sigmoid colon of resident retard, closeted transsexual, and dissociative drug addict, “res.” I suspect he/she will perform his/her usual deny+flail+disappear act, in the sight of that chart.

    Right now my sigmoid colon is quite happy with the pleasure of having excreted yet another of your bogus arguments (aka steaming piles).

    How about you link to some examples of “usual deny+flail+disappear act”? Because I can assure you that is unlikely to happen here. You must have me confused with someone else. Projecting perhaps?

    You post that graphic like it is a revelation? How about taking a look all the way back to comment 83 (a reply to you) where I posted it first?
    https://www.unz.com/isteve/usa-has-a-big-handgun-murder-problem-and-a-small-rifle-murder-problem/#comment-3670753

    Even compared to the steep decline from 1993-2000 and the equally steep, but longer, increase from 1963-1974 the 2014-2016 Ferguson Effect change was steep (10% then another 8%). It is just that happily it only lasted two years rather than seven or eleven.

  276. @Ayatollah Smith
    Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    @Ayatollah Smith

    I am reluctant to continue this discussion since it's off-topic and I genuinely don't want to disrupt the thread for the original poster, but your comment raised a question worth asking.

    "I have talked with many Americans who have lived in China that living there quickly makes you start thinking like they do, as if you were being assimilated into the Borg . . ."

    So you have talked with "many Americans who have lived in China" and who "quickly" begin thinking like the Chinese, as if they were being assimilated.

    Only two possibilities for causing this strange state of affairs come to mind:

    (1) Americans are so weak-minded that after two weeks of exposure they will helplessly adopt whatever foreign cultures or ideologies to which they are exposed. Not plausible.

    (2) After two weeks of exposure to a foreign culture they begin to realize that everything they were told by their mass media, was in fact wrong, that they were simply being propagandized to hate whomever the deep state wanted them to hate. That 90% or even 95% of everything they knew, or thought they knew, or that they believed to be true (about China, in this case), was wrong.

    Instead of worrying about fixing China, maybe you should focus on your own problems. Your trains crawl, your bridges collapse, your dams burst, your middle class is gone, 25% of your people cannot exist without food stamps, your millions of homeless urinate and defecate openly on the sidewalks of your lovely cities, by your own government's figures a full 40% of you have no job while half of the rest are in the Task Rabbit economy, half of your people have no health care to speak of, few can afford to retire, and Homeland Security has its 800 interment camps and its 3 billion bullets to ensure none of you complain too much about your new fascist police state masquerading as the bastion of democracy.

    And of course between your police killing 1,000 or so of you every year and you killing another 30,000 or so of each other while sending another 100,000 to the hospital with gunshot wounds, with more than one mass shooting every day on average, to say nothing of the 80,000+ "kick in the door at 5:00 AM" FBI raids per year, I think you have more than enough problems to occupy your free time.

    Again, the problem is not guns, nor is it handguns vs assault rifles. The problem is that you are a violent, belligerent and aggressive people by nature and a great many of you are totally f***ing crazy.

    And it isn't China where a full 75% of the people can't find their own country on a map of the world.

    12 percent of the American population are belligerent violent and aggressive and commit about 70 percent of the crimes. If we got rid of that 12 percent crime would drop by about 70 percent. Look at the cities where that 12 percent live, the most violent crime ridden in the country,The. cities and areas where the 12 percent don’t live are crime free.

  277. @Ayatollah Smith
    Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    @Ayatollah Smith

    I am reluctant to continue this discussion since it's off-topic and I genuinely don't want to disrupt the thread for the original poster, but your comment raised a question worth asking.

    "I have talked with many Americans who have lived in China that living there quickly makes you start thinking like they do, as if you were being assimilated into the Borg . . ."

    So you have talked with "many Americans who have lived in China" and who "quickly" begin thinking like the Chinese, as if they were being assimilated.

    Only two possibilities for causing this strange state of affairs come to mind:

    (1) Americans are so weak-minded that after two weeks of exposure they will helplessly adopt whatever foreign cultures or ideologies to which they are exposed. Not plausible.

    (2) After two weeks of exposure to a foreign culture they begin to realize that everything they were told by their mass media, was in fact wrong, that they were simply being propagandized to hate whomever the deep state wanted them to hate. That 90% or even 95% of everything they knew, or thought they knew, or that they believed to be true (about China, in this case), was wrong.

    Instead of worrying about fixing China, maybe you should focus on your own problems. Your trains crawl, your bridges collapse, your dams burst, your middle class is gone, 25% of your people cannot exist without food stamps, your millions of homeless urinate and defecate openly on the sidewalks of your lovely cities, by your own government's figures a full 40% of you have no job while half of the rest are in the Task Rabbit economy, half of your people have no health care to speak of, few can afford to retire, and Homeland Security has its 800 interment camps and its 3 billion bullets to ensure none of you complain too much about your new fascist police state masquerading as the bastion of democracy.

    And of course between your police killing 1,000 or so of you every year and you killing another 30,000 or so of each other while sending another 100,000 to the hospital with gunshot wounds, with more than one mass shooting every day on average, to say nothing of the 80,000+ "kick in the door at 5:00 AM" FBI raids per year, I think you have more than enough problems to occupy your free time.

    Again, the problem is not guns, nor is it handguns vs assault rifles. The problem is that you are a violent, belligerent and aggressive people by nature and a great many of you are totally f***ing crazy.

    And it isn't China where a full 75% of the people can't find their own country on a map of the world.

    Instead of worrying about fixing China, maybe you should focus on your own problems. Your trains crawl, your bridges collapse, your dams burst, your middle class is gone

    The only trains that matter are the commuter trains in and out of big cities, and they are plenty fast; nobody rides the other ones.  Our dams burst because our treasonous governments spend the repair funds on illegal aliens, and our middle-class jobs have either been wage-arbitraged to poverty levels with various immigrants or exported to China.

    you killing another 30,000 or so of each other while sending another 100,000 to the hospital with gunshot wounds, with more than one mass shooting every day on average

    It’s closer to 10,000 per year, and almost every one of those “mass shootings” is a n—-r on n—-r offense that the media covers up.

    The problem is that you are a violent, belligerent and aggressive people by nature

    If you remove the few most violent cities from our crime statistics, the USA’s crime rate is solidly in the European mainstream.  Those “violent, belligerent and aggressive people” are easily recognizable as something quite different from actual Americans by sight.

  278. @Achmed E. Newman
    Wow, that was a real blast from the past, J1234! I remember the controversy about this book from Instapundit (UT Law Prof. Glenn Reynolds). The author's Bancroft prize was even rescinded, a first. I'd guess nowadays, historians would let it slide, like a lot of other lying that goes on.

    A certain old review from Amazon came to mind, so I'll paste it right after the Amazon editorial review that still appears!:


    While gun supporters use the nation's gun-toting history in defense of their way of life, and revolutionary enthusiasts replay skirmishes on historic battlefields, it now turns out that America has not always had a gun culture, and wide-scale gun ownership is much newer than we think. After a 10-year search for "a world that isn't there," professor and scholar Michael Bellesiles discovered that Americans not only rarely owned guns prior to the Civil War, they wouldn't even take them for free from a government that wanted to arm its reluctant public. No sharpshooters, no gun in every home, no children learning to hunt beside their fathers. Bellesiles--whose research methods have generated a great deal of controversy and even a subsequent investigation by Emory University--searched legal, probate, military, and business records; fiction and personal letters; hunting magazines; and legislation in his quest for the legendary gun-wielding frontiersman, only to discover that he is a myth. There are other revelations: gun ownership and storage was strictly legislated in colonial days, and frivolous shooting of a musket was backed by the death penalty; men rarely died in duels because the guns were far too inaccurate (duels were about honor, not murder); pioneers didn't hunt (they trapped and farmed); frontier folk loved books, not guns; and the militia never won a war (it was too inept). In fact, prior to the Civil War, when mass production of higher quality guns became a reality, the republic's greatest problem was a dearth of guns, and a public that was too peaceable to care about civil defense. As Bellesiles writes, "Probably the major reason why the American Revolution lasted eight years, longer than any war in American history before Vietnam, was that when that brave patriot reached above the mantel, he pulled down a rusty, decaying, unusable musket (not a rifle), or found no gun there at all." Strangely, the eagle-eye frontiersman was created by East Coast fiction writers, while the idea of a gun as a household necessity was an advertising ploy of gun maker Samuel Colt (both just prior to the Civil War). The former group fabricated a historic and heroic past while Colt preyed on overblown fears of Indians and blacks.

    Bellesiles, who is highly knowledgeable about weapons and military history, never comes out against guns. He is more interested in discovering the truth than in taking sides. Nevertheless, his work shatters some time-honored myths and icons--including the usual reading of the Second Amendment--and will
     

    Next is the review of the amazon-employee book review by the un-paid "content provider":

    Amazon.com book reviewer debunked in academic skirmish

    OK, here's what the impartial amazon book reviewer had so say. I quote:
    "it now turns out that America has not always had a gun culture, and wide-scale gun ownership is much newer than we think."
    Oops, after being checked by real history professors, it turns out that, yes, dangit, we did have a gun culture and wide-scale gun ownership is old just like we thought.
    "No sharpshooters, no gun in every home, no children learning to hunt beside their fathers"
    Oops, yeah there were sharpshooters, most homes had at least one long gun, and who in heck else did children learn to hunt from, the family cat (ha, ha!)
    "Bellesiles--whose research methods have generated a great deal of controversy and even a subsequent investigation by Emory University- ..." (Oh, and subsequent firing and revocation of his 4-grand in cash.) "...
    "Strangely, the eagle-eye frontiersman was created by East Coast fiction writers,..."
    Oops, predictably, the four-eyed anti-gun frontiersman was created by an East Coast fiction writer (name starts with B, rhymes with a female body part.)
    "He [Bellesiles]is more interested in discovering the truth than in taking sides."
    Oops, no, uh, sorry, here's where I beg to differ with you, Mr. Reviewer.
    "His work .... will be hard to refute." No problem - all in a day's work, my friend.
     

    There is but one star by this one.

    I remember all of the hoopla surrounding Bellesiles’ radical historical premise in the late 1990’s, when it was a cover story on Newsweek and created much discussion on TV morning shows. I’d forgotten all about that, however, when I was reading the book, A Necessary Evil by progressive historian Garry Wills. (I was reading Will’s book about 2007, but it had been published in the late ’90’s, about the time Bellesiles’ bogus claims were getting a big reception from the media.)

    Wills cited Bellesiles’ research extensively when trying to make his own case that early America and it’s antecedent colonies weren’t what tradition had made them out to be. I thought to myself, why haven’t I heard about Bellesiles and his “groundbreaking” scholarship over the last decade? This isn’t the kind of story that the leftist media just forgets about (as Steve’s references to the NYT’s obsession with Emmett Till illustrate.)

    Going on nothing more than a great suspicion centered around the leftist tactics of the American mainstream media (turning off the “microphone” when the narrative is wrong or backfires on them) I did a quick google search and in a minute or two learned about one of the great academic scandals of our time (which you’d think would have as much media presence as Bellesile’s crazy theory.) My, my…isn’t it strange that the story that advanced the leftist historical narrative found me, but I had to go looking for the story that negated it.

    One old article I found recently even said that the story was best forgotten about, but said that crazy “Charleton Heston” types were keeping it alive (for nefarious purposes, I presume.)

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Heads up J, in case you missed it—I responded to your last reply to me here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/usa-has-a-big-handgun-murder-problem-and-a-small-rifle-murder-problem/#comment-3672900 (#249)

  279. @Hail

    Even in such sedate settings (for LA) like Studio City and Burbank, barbed wire spread like ivy around parking lots, strip malls, garbage dumpsters, and so on. There is a siege mentality at work in LA, even in the more desirable areas.
     
    I think this is a good observation and want to quote it. It is in line with my experiences in Southern California (by now certainly not just LA). Though I have spent only a cumulative few weeks of my life in the state, in various visits and passings-through.

    I wonder if Steve Sailer or other native/lifelong Californians feel the same. (I understand Steve lived in/around LA from birth to 1976, and 2000 to present and frequent visits during the intervening years). And when they'd peg the siege mentality as emerging.

    I cannot imagine it was true in the 1950s, but it was certainly true by the 1990s. I think a glance at this graph might give a clue...:

    https://hailtoyou.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/california-population-by-race-1940-to-2020-five-year-intervals.png

    ("‘Who Lost California?’ The ‘When,’ the ‘Who,’ and the ‘Why’ of California’s Decline from Midwest-on-the-Pacific to Brazil-on-the-Pacific")

    I’ll read the entire article later. Here’s the opinion of a life long Nor Californian who’s roots go back to the. Gold Rush.

    The farmers ruined California by importing Hispanic illegals for cheap labor. The anti union capitalists, especially of S California ruined California by importing cheap Asian and Hispanic labor for every job.

    The old hippies, gays and today’s trannies are just decoration??? I don’t know how to describe these inessentials. The big problem is overcrowded housing and cheap non White labor.

    California’s problem’s stem from the 1968 affirmative action act Griggs vs Duke Power and Kaiser vs Weber that destroyed the existing merit hiring system

    And don’t tell me the employers resisted the Supreme Court orders to hire non Whites. They were probably behind it.

    Still, we’re the 6th largest economy in the world.
    Whites still rule commercial industrial construction. As long as the population and economy expands commercial businesses ndustrial construction will be ok. All those endless building codes favor White , not non White immigrant sub contractors.

    If you want your kids to stay in California, buy them a small apartment house instead of a useless college education, including tech as a tech education is worthless for a White man in California. The business classes at community college are no different than university business classes.

    Rental property, family clans and commercial industrial construction are the future of California Whites. Make a living by renting to the cubicle coolies and Home Depot laborers who beg for work every day.

    • Agree: Lot
  280. @J1234
    I remember all of the hoopla surrounding Bellesiles' radical historical premise in the late 1990's, when it was a cover story on Newsweek and created much discussion on TV morning shows. I'd forgotten all about that, however, when I was reading the book, A Necessary Evil by progressive historian Garry Wills. (I was reading Will's book about 2007, but it had been published in the late '90's, about the time Bellesiles' bogus claims were getting a big reception from the media.)

    Wills cited Bellesiles' research extensively when trying to make his own case that early America and it's antecedent colonies weren't what tradition had made them out to be. I thought to myself, why haven't I heard about Bellesiles and his "groundbreaking" scholarship over the last decade? This isn't the kind of story that the leftist media just forgets about (as Steve's references to the NYT's obsession with Emmett Till illustrate.)

    Going on nothing more than a great suspicion centered around the leftist tactics of the American mainstream media (turning off the "microphone" when the narrative is wrong or backfires on them) I did a quick google search and in a minute or two learned about one of the great academic scandals of our time (which you'd think would have as much media presence as Bellesile's crazy theory.) My, my...isn't it strange that the story that advanced the leftist historical narrative found me, but I had to go looking for the story that negated it.

    One old article I found recently even said that the story was best forgotten about, but said that crazy "Charleton Heston" types were keeping it alive (for nefarious purposes, I presume.)

    Heads up J, in case you missed it—I responded to your last reply to me here:

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/usa-has-a-big-handgun-murder-problem-and-a-small-rifle-murder-problem/#comment-3672900 (#249)

  281. Thanks for the update.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    ;) hahaha
  282. @J1234
    Thanks for the update.

    😉 hahaha

  283. “China is a notoriously low-trust society . . .”

    That is almost certainly the dumbest thing you have ever said.

    Americans live in an illusionary black and white world framed for them by the programming from their Zionist media and are mostly incapable of escaping their ideological indoctrination. There is an adage that you cannot understand a painting when you are inside the painting, that you must step out of that painting and look back on it, to see it as it really is. Few Americans are capable of this because of the propagandised indoctrination taking place from birth. This social indoctrination is true of course for all societies, but ZOG Americans, unlike the vast majority of the world’s population, view virtually everything about other nations and peoples through a series of political-religious ideological lenses that cast a rather severe chromatic aberration on anything seen through those lenses.

    The Chinese are not handicapped by the horrors of Christianity or party politics, and they mostly do not view outside events through a distorting lens. Americans are fond of portraying the Chinese as being brainwashed, but in my long experience the Chinese are the least brainwashed of all peoples while Americans are the poster boys in this regard.

    In China, friendships and so-called ‘connections’ have a flavor of trust and responsibility that exists nowhere else in the world, at least not to my knowledge. A good friend was purchasing a new house for her parents and wanted to pay the full price in cash with the signing of the contract so as to benefit from an attractive discount. She was $200,000 short and called to ask if I would lend her the money to complete the payment. I agreed without even having to think about it, and transferred the money to her account the same day. If I recall correctly, she gave me an IOU at one point but I have no idea what I did with it, and the loan was repaid. In reverse, when I purchased my last house I wanted to pay the entire amount in cash with the purchase contract for the same reason, but most of my money was sequestered in bank GICs that didn’t mature for several months and I was $35,000 short. I was chatting about my house with another friend and asked if she would lend me the money. We immediately walked across the street to her bank and she gave me the cash, no questions asked.

    On the same note, over 90% of Chinese ownn their own homes, and more than 80% of those homes have no bank mortgage, any needed cash borrowed interest-free from close friends or within the extended family – aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents.

    To say that such things wouldn’t occur in the West, even with family, is a huge understatement. In China, they are normal, underpinned by a cultural quality of trust and obligation that cannot be fathomed by someone living in the West. The English language, precise as it is, has no vocabulary to explain the quality of these relationships and the inseparable obligation inherent therein.

    There are no existing facts to support your assertion of China being “a notoriously low-trust society . . .”.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    Thank you for that, what an insight into another culture. No disrespect meant, but what would happen if the money was not repaid? I’ve lent money to friends and never seen a dime come back. No longer friends of course, but I have family members who know the situation who still associate with my debtors. Not their problem seems to be the attitude.
    , @Anonymous
    A simple test of this is whether the society in question has sit-down public toilets. You can only have those in a high-trust society for reasons that should be obvious. If your country's public toilets consist of a hole in the ground that can be washed with a hose, then you are a low trust society.
  284. Many posters have commented on the negative effects of immigration to the US in terms of responsibility for the nation’s gun crimes. I haven’t seen studies on the link, but I doubt there is any correlation – in terms of causality – between immigration and gun use or violence any more than with poverty. Canada is similar to the US in terms of immigration, though without the baggage of slavery, but Canada is much less a gun culture and less crime-ridden than is much of the US, so there is more at play.

    I grew up in a poor family in a poor neighborhood where most of us were immigrants of one sort or another, yet we had no crime to speak of and people felt no particular need to lock their doors.

    However, one poster (at least) commented that immigration had “destroyed American society”, or something equivalent, and there may be truth in that sentiment as some European countries are experiencing today. Political refugees and economic hopefuls do not share the same values as the receiving country, nor have they any particular sentiment about sovereignty or patriotism.

    From my research, if a particular segment of immigration passes the 10% mark, the fundamentals of the receiving society can be in danger and, if it reaches 30%, it may be true that nothing can mitigate major social upheavals.

    As one obvious example, recent immigrants are unlikely to participate in an ‘Occupy Wall Street’ or similar protest, their very numbers perhaps making it impossible to create the necessary critical mass for protests toward social change which the immigrants neither fully understand nor view as safe conduct, to say nothing of a lack of passion.

    Perhaps the realization, even unconsciously, of the values chasm between native citizens and newcomers is itself responsible for generating emotions of unrest that contribute to violence. If so, there is no simple outlet for those sentiments toward ‘the other’ and, if we combine this with the American passion for firearms, the fuse is probably lit.

    I make no claim to sociological credentials so this is speculation on my part, but there may be something here.

  285. @Ayatollah Smith
    @Hail:

    "China is a notoriously low-trust society . . ."


    That is almost certainly the dumbest thing you have ever said.


    Americans live in an illusionary black and white world framed for them by the programming from their Zionist media and are mostly incapable of escaping their ideological indoctrination. There is an adage that you cannot understand a painting when you are inside the painting, that you must step out of that painting and look back on it, to see it as it really is. Few Americans are capable of this because of the propagandised indoctrination taking place from birth. This social indoctrination is true of course for all societies, but ZOG Americans, unlike the vast majority of the world's population, view virtually everything about other nations and peoples through a series of political-religious ideological lenses that cast a rather severe chromatic aberration on anything seen through those lenses.


    The Chinese are not handicapped by the horrors of Christianity or party politics, and they mostly do not view outside events through a distorting lens. Americans are fond of portraying the Chinese as being brainwashed, but in my long experience the Chinese are the least brainwashed of all peoples while Americans are the poster boys in this regard.


    In China, friendships and so-called 'connections' have a flavor of trust and responsibility that exists nowhere else in the world, at least not to my knowledge. A good friend was purchasing a new house for her parents and wanted to pay the full price in cash with the signing of the contract so as to benefit from an attractive discount. She was $200,000 short and called to ask if I would lend her the money to complete the payment. I agreed without even having to think about it, and transferred the money to her account the same day. If I recall correctly, she gave me an IOU at one point but I have no idea what I did with it, and the loan was repaid. In reverse, when I purchased my last house I wanted to pay the entire amount in cash with the purchase contract for the same reason, but most of my money was sequestered in bank GICs that didn't mature for several months and I was $35,000 short. I was chatting about my house with another friend and asked if she would lend me the money. We immediately walked across the street to her bank and she gave me the cash, no questions asked.


    On the same note, over 90% of Chinese ownn their own homes, and more than 80% of those homes have no bank mortgage, any needed cash borrowed interest-free from close friends or within the extended family - aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents.


    To say that such things wouldn't occur in the West, even with family, is a huge understatement. In China, they are normal, underpinned by a cultural quality of trust and obligation that cannot be fathomed by someone living in the West. The English language, precise as it is, has no vocabulary to explain the quality of these relationships and the inseparable obligation inherent therein.


    There are no existing facts to support your assertion of China being "a notoriously low-trust society . . .".

    Thank you for that, what an insight into another culture. No disrespect meant, but what would happen if the money was not repaid? I’ve lent money to friends and never seen a dime come back. No longer friends of course, but I have family members who know the situation who still associate with my debtors. Not their problem seems to be the attitude.

  286. 289.JMcG says:

    “Thank you for that, what an insight into another culture. No disrespect meant, but what would happen if the money was not repaid? I’ve lent money to friends and never seen a dime come back. No longer friends of course, but I have family members who know the situation who still associate with my debtors. Not their problem seems to be the attitude.”

    If the money could not be repaid by the individual, it would normally become an outstanding debt of the extended family, meaning that all members – parents, aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents, would feel shame and would share the obligation of repayment. Their attitude would be that it was very much their problem, an outlook stemming from the fundamental concept of ‘family’ (which can include outsiders or foreigners) and which is almost unfathomable to Westerners.

    However, the Chinese have a saying that if the forest is large enough you can find every kind of bird, so I think we could conclude that there must be debts that remained unpaid. I have never heard of this myself, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen.

    I understand the experience you outlined, not only losing money and friend, but with the added chagrin of friends and family maintaining that relationship. It feels like such a betrayal.

    • Thanks: JMcG
  287. @J.Ross
    Yes, this is pretty normal East Asian We Alien (1979) Now "The Company Says So" morality. But don't get your flavor enhanced -- the Japs are pretty much the least awful by far at this. When they admit fault (which Japanese formally do in a much wider range of situations than their US counterparts) they resign; when they admit fault to the public on something big like faulty safety equipment or that one really big carcinogen situation in the 70s they physically get down on the floor.
    You know which East Aaian nationality doesn't do that, and wouldn't anyway to American complainants? The ones who outnumber Japanese by over a billion, and who Trump wants in here in bigger numbers than ever.
    ----------
    Rape of Nanking - that's a whole other thing but, as dumb and gratuitously violent as the interwar militarist Japanese were, RoN is a premier example of a purely tribalist grievance. The absolute worst stories pale next to normal treatment of Chinese people in that period by not even the worst Chinese people. Every Chinese who could, got out from under a Chinese government and into a town or territory governed by foreigners, because everything was objectively better there. All the factions of the Chinese civil war routinely took, abused, raped, and killed slaves, and the people they were enslaving were of course Chinese. The Japanese shouldn't have been there and shouldn't have done what they did, but no way in frozen hell is whining about the least atrocious atrocity of the civil war era meaningful coming from the state that Mao built out of acres of human gore.
    While this is about East Asians and disputed in degree but fundamentally undoubted historical events, and not about Africans or Semites and mythohistorical events, it does illustrate my second named law: in tribalism, reality itself is negotiable, and Tribe A talks up The Terrible Historical Tragedy not because it happened but as a negotiation ploy against equally cynical Tribe B. A non-tribalist community wandering into the middle of that might be inclined to start believing in this Great Historical tragedy business, but that's a mistake. Even if the event has provable elements the negotiation aspect cannot be forgotten, and policy should never be based on such a story.

    A Jewish poster here recently called Arabs liars who routinely inflate their civilian war casualties for cynical reasons. An eyebrow went up when I saw that.

  288. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ayatollah Smith
    @Hail:

    "China is a notoriously low-trust society . . ."


    That is almost certainly the dumbest thing you have ever said.


    Americans live in an illusionary black and white world framed for them by the programming from their Zionist media and are mostly incapable of escaping their ideological indoctrination. There is an adage that you cannot understand a painting when you are inside the painting, that you must step out of that painting and look back on it, to see it as it really is. Few Americans are capable of this because of the propagandised indoctrination taking place from birth. This social indoctrination is true of course for all societies, but ZOG Americans, unlike the vast majority of the world's population, view virtually everything about other nations and peoples through a series of political-religious ideological lenses that cast a rather severe chromatic aberration on anything seen through those lenses.


    The Chinese are not handicapped by the horrors of Christianity or party politics, and they mostly do not view outside events through a distorting lens. Americans are fond of portraying the Chinese as being brainwashed, but in my long experience the Chinese are the least brainwashed of all peoples while Americans are the poster boys in this regard.


    In China, friendships and so-called 'connections' have a flavor of trust and responsibility that exists nowhere else in the world, at least not to my knowledge. A good friend was purchasing a new house for her parents and wanted to pay the full price in cash with the signing of the contract so as to benefit from an attractive discount. She was $200,000 short and called to ask if I would lend her the money to complete the payment. I agreed without even having to think about it, and transferred the money to her account the same day. If I recall correctly, she gave me an IOU at one point but I have no idea what I did with it, and the loan was repaid. In reverse, when I purchased my last house I wanted to pay the entire amount in cash with the purchase contract for the same reason, but most of my money was sequestered in bank GICs that didn't mature for several months and I was $35,000 short. I was chatting about my house with another friend and asked if she would lend me the money. We immediately walked across the street to her bank and she gave me the cash, no questions asked.


    On the same note, over 90% of Chinese ownn their own homes, and more than 80% of those homes have no bank mortgage, any needed cash borrowed interest-free from close friends or within the extended family - aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents.


    To say that such things wouldn't occur in the West, even with family, is a huge understatement. In China, they are normal, underpinned by a cultural quality of trust and obligation that cannot be fathomed by someone living in the West. The English language, precise as it is, has no vocabulary to explain the quality of these relationships and the inseparable obligation inherent therein.


    There are no existing facts to support your assertion of China being "a notoriously low-trust society . . .".

    A simple test of this is whether the society in question has sit-down public toilets. You can only have those in a high-trust society for reasons that should be obvious. If your country’s public toilets consist of a hole in the ground that can be washed with a hose, then you are a low trust society.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  289. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:

    “A simple test of (trust) is whether the society in question has sit-down public toilets. You can only have those in a high-trust society for reasons that should be obvious. If your country’s public toilets consist of a hole in the ground that can be washed with a hose, then you are a low trust society.”

    Thank you for making my evening. I laughed so hard at this, I almost wet my pants.

    Let’s see. A “high-trust society” is one with sit-down toilets – PUBLIC sit-down toilets, as in the corridors of shopping malls? Trust among humans is fundamentally determined by their dumping facilities? If I need evidence to support my claim that many Americans are totally crazy, I rest my case here.

    I have another measure, one more in keeping with the topic of this thread: guns.

    A high-trust society to me would be one where none of us had guns and none of us felt any need for firearms to ‘defend’ ourselves. A low-trust society would be one where all of us had guns because we felt the need for them to defend ourselves.

    I’m tempted to ask your thoughts on this, but I’m not sure I want to know more about what you think.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    A low-trust society is one where knives at the dinner table are considered barbaric because people would stab each other with them.

    A high-trust society is one where nobody would even think of using the knives on the dinner table as weapons.  Ditto firearms; a high-trust society is one where kids keep hunting rifles in their trucks because they hunt both before and after school, and nobody ever shoots anyone else.  America, actual America populated by un-hyphenated original-stock Americans, is just that kind of high-trust society.  The non-Americans squatting in America can't even begin to understand that, and that is just one part of why they have to go back.
  290. @Ayatollah Smith
    Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:

    "A simple test of (trust) is whether the society in question has sit-down public toilets. You can only have those in a high-trust society for reasons that should be obvious. If your country’s public toilets consist of a hole in the ground that can be washed with a hose, then you are a low trust society."

    Thank you for making my evening. I laughed so hard at this, I almost wet my pants.

    Let's see. A "high-trust society" is one with sit-down toilets - PUBLIC sit-down toilets, as in the corridors of shopping malls? Trust among humans is fundamentally determined by their dumping facilities? If I need evidence to support my claim that many Americans are totally crazy, I rest my case here.

    I have another measure, one more in keeping with the topic of this thread: guns.

    A high-trust society to me would be one where none of us had guns and none of us felt any need for firearms to 'defend' ourselves. A low-trust society would be one where all of us had guns because we felt the need for them to defend ourselves.

    I'm tempted to ask your thoughts on this, but I'm not sure I want to know more about what you think.

    A low-trust society is one where knives at the dinner table are considered barbaric because people would stab each other with them.

    A high-trust society is one where nobody would even think of using the knives on the dinner table as weapons.  Ditto firearms; a high-trust society is one where kids keep hunting rifles in their trucks because they hunt both before and after school, and nobody ever shoots anyone else.  America, actual America populated by un-hyphenated original-stock Americans, is just that kind of high-trust society.  The non-Americans squatting in America can’t even begin to understand that, and that is just one part of why they have to go back.

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