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From my movie review in Taki’s Magazine:

Tarantino Punches the Damn Dirty Hippies
by Steve Sailer

July 31, 2019

The stifling conformity of the Great Awokening has now driven even Quentin Tarantino to the subversive right. His immensely enjoyable buddy comedy Once Upon in a Time…in Hollywood, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt at their considerable best, has The New Yorker fulminating that it’s “obscenely regressive.” Critic Richard Brody complains, “Tarantino delivers a ridiculously white movie” that “celebrates white-male stardom (and behind-the-scenes command).” …

Prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi was much appreciated within the entertainment industry for portraying Charles Manson as an LSD-crazed apocalyptic avenger. Bugliosi’s masterful job of making Manson seem like the ultimate outsider sidetracked the question of why a lowlife jailbird like Manson had become something of an insider at the best parties in the Hollywood Hills.

Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls.

Without all the Helter Skelter stuff, Manson would seem less like the Antichrist and more like an ambitious pimp, an ex-con who was adept at chatting up runaway girls fresh off the Greyhound bus.

Read the whole thing there.

iSteve commenter TGGP notes:

One Upon a Time in America is a Sergio Leone movie. Your blog post is mistitled.

Sorry. Thanks.

iSteve commenter Mr. Anon replies:

Does no one get the joke implicit in Steve’s title for this review? I saw a few other commentators who made similar comments to yours.

He’s saying that back in 1969, America – even Hollywood – actually was still America.

Uh … yeah, that was totally not a typo!

 
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  1. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Critic Richard Brody complains, “Tarantino delivers a ridiculously white movie” that “celebrates white-male stardom (and behind-the-scenes command).”

    Would that apply to Catch Me If You Can, Almost Famous, Bridge of Spies, Hoffa, The Right Stuff, A Serious Man, Wolf of Wall Street, The Master, Broadway Danny Rose, etc?

    Blade Runner’s vision of 2019 was pro-regressive, I suppose. Looked ahead and preferred the lost past.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    Brody is jewish. He only approved of movies with non-colored cast if they are directed by jews, like Woody Allen (and preferably cast with mostly jews in actors as well, if possible).

    You can not understand these people as anything other than anti-White. I wish there was more sophistication to this issue, but there isn't.
    , @Mr McKenna
    https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/422447203/Brody_Jacket_photo.jpg

    This is the sort of person we have directing the cultural landscape.
  2. Killing white southerners = good/progressive/thumbs up

    Not demonising white male actors = bad/regressive/thumbs down

    Oh the tedium of being on the woke left where life is filtered through the lens of “is this progressive enough?”.

  3. “(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women. But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them… But wait, what about Manson’s murderous hippie chicks? Nobody would mind if they got flamed. Plus…bare feet!)”

    You hit the nail on the head, I suspect. (Particularly the feet.) I’m still going to go see it.

    I’m more curious to see what Tarantino does with Star Trek.

    “Damn it, [email protected]#$%^&! I’m a doctor, not a @#$%#%ing @#$%$#@^!”

    “Beam me up, Scotty, and make Nurse Chapel’s shoes disappear on the way.”

    “Fascinating. The music of your planet’s 1960s and 1970s is quite intricate despite its seeming simplicity.”

    “Damn it, Captain! I’m $#%@#$%$# @$#%#[email protected]%$#% @#$%$#$% giving her all she’s @#$!$ got!”

    “Live long and prosper.” (fires phaser)

    • LOL: IHTG
    • Replies: @El Dato
    As the Enterprise leaves the galactic plane, we see it is not actually a spiral, but a swastika. Then planet Woken XII gets blasted to hell.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Tarentino would include the true life subplot of Shatner living in the Valley in his truck after his divorce and the end of Star Trek. The unemployed actor would carefully keep his hairpiece in the glove compartment until TJ Hooker.

    Oh, and there would be a bloody fistfight between him and Nimoy, who was an alcoholic and would be drunk. Shatner guarded his screen time and was insanely jealous of Spock's popularity.

    Tarentino would also include a lewd, interracial ménage à trois scene involving the real-life triangle of series creator Gene Roddenberry with his wife, Majel Barrett (Nurse Chapel) and his mistress of the time, Nichelle Nichols (Uhura).

    I'd go see that.

    Now, after reading Steve's review of Once Upon a Time..., my resistance toward this latest Hollywood-Hollywood movie has softened. I had Hot Wheels in 1969 too and would appreciate the period and the unwoke perspective. Our host is undoubtedly right about this film.

    , @Anonymous

    I’m more curious to see what Tarantino does with Star Trek.
     
    As awful Star Trek is, it is right up Tarry's alley in terms of its core relational dynamics. I hate the term 'bromance', but Tarry's movies are really about love between men. Most powerful is the intense emotions that develop between Keitel and Roth in RESERVOIR.

    Tarry's character in a movie even has a theory about the 'gay' subtext of POP GUN.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZF1LXL6OOsM

    So, the true love story in HOLLYWOOD is between the fellas(though they are not homo). Likewise, the truest love in PULP was between Travolta and Jackson. And the most 'moving' moments(by relative standards of course) are when Walken hands the ring to the son -- from man to boy -- and when Willis goes back to save the gangster boss(the big black guy) because even hoodlums must stick together against total perverts, a cross between Rednecks and psycho-homos.

    I haven't seen the movie, but based on the SPOILERS, it seems Pitt doesn't even know he's doing something heroic to save Tate's life. He really fought to save his own hide and that of his buddy(DiCaprio). I haven't seen DJANGO, but the main 'love' seems to be between the Avenging Negro and the German in America. (Maybe Germans appreciated the movie as one of their own got to side with a Noble Negro against Bad Americans for a change.)
    , @donut
    William Shatner was in an amusing 1998 movie "Free Enterprise" where he made good natured fun of himself and his fans .

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tY_d4jskhMk

    BTW his version of Julius Caesar was a rap version and at the end of "Free Enterprise" we get to see him performing some of it .

    And of course he had a career as a recording artist :

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ainyK6fXku0
  4. “(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women. But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them… But wait, what about Manson’s murderous hippie chicks? Nobody would mind if they got flamed. Plus…bare feet!)”

    I suspect you’re right about this one, but with all the woke complaints about it I have to go see it now.

    I’m more curious to see what he’ll do with Star Trek though. 😉

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Tarantino was reportedly a script doctor on Crimson Tide (along with Robert Towne). I suspect the Star Trek references were his. Probably also the cleverly meta scene in which James Gandolfini and Viggo Mortensen quiz each other about submarine movies.
    , @danand
    “(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women.)”

    SFG, could be? But he just married one (a pretty, youngish, woman) days after finishing up the film. In interviews Tarantino has recently said he wants to start a family; have many children.

    https://flic.kr/p/2gM5zNB


    “Quentin Tarantino married his fiancée Daniella Pick in an intimate ceremony in Los Angeles today, PEOPLE can exclusively confirm. Tarantino, 55, and Pick, 35, an Israeli singer and model, will celebrate the nuptials at a larger gathering this evening. The writer-director met Pick, who is the daughter of Israeli singer and songwriter Tzvika Pick, in 2009 while promoting his film Inglorious Basterds. The pair got engaged in June 2017, after dating for about a year. The couple hosted an engagement party on September 2017 in New York City that served as a Pulp Fiction cast reunion, with a guest list including Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson and Uma Thurman.

    Just days before the wedding, Tarantino wrapped filming Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, his upcoming drama starring Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie. The director has never been married, previously explaining that work monopolizes his time. The movie will be released on July 26, 2019.

     
  5. Wow … just wow. As it goes with so many things in the context of diversity, all the good he did with Django Unchained is undone in one film, proving you can never once step off the diversity Merry-go-Round once you’ve climbed on board.

    • Replies: @Escher
    “Django Unchained” was one of the vilest movies I have had the misfortune to watch.
  6. Killing white southerners = good/progressive/thumbs up

    Not demonising white male actors = bad/regressive/thumbs down

    Oh the tedium of being on the woke left where life is filtered through the lens of “is this progressive enough?”.

    How long will this morally cartoonish view of the world and attitude last? A decade?

    Surely it is getting tiresome for even cultural arbiters on the left with half a brain?

    • Replies: @Lugash

    How long will this morally cartoonish view of the world and attitude last? A decade?

    Surely it is getting tiresome for even cultural arbiters on the left with half a brain?
     
    It's going to keep going and going. They're going to keep on doubling down. The only real question to me at this point is what sort of physical action they're going to take against whites.
  7. @The Alarmist
    Wow ... just wow. As it goes with so many things in the context of diversity, all the good he did with Django Unchained is undone in one film, proving you can never once step off the diversity Merry-go-Round once you've climbed on board.

    “Django Unchained” was one of the vilest movies I have had the misfortune to watch.

  8. … prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi was much appreciated within the entertainment industry for portraying Manson as an LSD-crazed apocalyptic avenger. Bugliosi’s masterful job of making Manson seem like the ultimate outsider sidetracked the question of why a lowlife jailbird like Manson had become something of an insider at the best parties in the Hollywood Hills.

    Another damn-good sidetracked question would be why Charlie Manson was never invited to join the Beach Boys. The original, Manson-version of the song “Never Learn Not to Love” (which he had called “Cease to Exist”) is actually better than the version the Beach Boys recorded. Very haunting! About like Donovan’s “Season of the Witch” being sung by … a warlock.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Never_Learn_Not_to_Love

    Anyhoo, I’m so glad Tarantino’s ‘woke’ phase seems to be over. Looks like I’ll be headed to movies again soon …

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/i-desire-195264/

    Adapting poetry written by a near-assassinator of a U.S. president is not exactly a common songwriting practice. But that is exactly what Devo did on “I Desire,” when they incorporated into the song several verses penned by John Hinckley Jr. — notorious for stalking Jodie Foster and shooting Ronald Reagan in 1981. As Mark Mothersbaugh recalled, “[Hinckley] let us take a poem that he had written, and we used it for the lyrics and turned it into a love song. It was not the best career move you could make. We had the FBI calling up and threatening us.”

     

    I Desire
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmtoqcmK0OI

    https://dangerousminds.net/comments/the_song_co-written_by_devo_and_john_hinckley_jr
    , @Neil Templeton

    Another damn-good sidetracked question would be why Charlie Manson was never invited to join the Beach Boys.
     
    Maybe because his talent was exceeded by doubt of his ability to function gracefully in the California Artist milieau. Or maybe the Beach Boys just weren't there yet.
  9. Well, even as far back as 2010 he did make Inglorious Basterds, one of the most anti-semitic films ever made

  10. I like the Manson Epstein comparison. Jailbait suppliers to the rich and famous.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    Probably a (very very close) second to the World’s oldest profession (prostitution.)
  11. Here’s a podcast episode, featuring two chicks and a gay guy, that gives a positive review of Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. They defend Tarantino and other White guys against SJW “cancel culture”.
    Jump to 12 mins 45 secs into the podcast because they natter on about Halloween costume ideas and reality TV before then: https://redscarepodcast.libsyn.com/once-upon-a-time-in-dimes-square

  12. @SFG
    "(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women. But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them… But wait, what about Manson’s murderous hippie chicks? Nobody would mind if they got flamed. Plus…bare feet!)"

    You hit the nail on the head, I suspect. (Particularly the feet.) I'm still going to go see it.


    I'm more curious to see what Tarantino does with Star Trek.


    "Damn it, [email protected]#$%^&! I'm a doctor, not a @#$%#%ing @#$%$#@^!"

    "Beam me up, Scotty, and make Nurse Chapel's shoes disappear on the way."

    "Fascinating. The music of your planet's 1960s and 1970s is quite intricate despite its seeming simplicity."

    "Damn it, Captain! I'm $#%@#$%$# @$#%#[email protected]%$#% @#$%$#$% giving her all she's @#$!$ got!"

    "Live long and prosper." (fires phaser)

    As the Enterprise leaves the galactic plane, we see it is not actually a spiral, but a swastika. Then planet Woken XII gets blasted to hell.

    • Replies: @Lurker

    Then planet Woken XII gets blasted to hell.
     
    57 genders genocided all at once.
  13. @SFG
    "(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women. But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them… But wait, what about Manson’s murderous hippie chicks? Nobody would mind if they got flamed. Plus…bare feet!)"

    I suspect you're right about this one, but with all the woke complaints about it I have to go see it now.

    I'm more curious to see what he'll do with Star Trek though. ;)

    Tarantino was reportedly a script doctor on Crimson Tide (along with Robert Towne). I suspect the Star Trek references were his. Probably also the cleverly meta scene in which James Gandolfini and Viggo Mortensen quiz each other about submarine movies.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    Good catch. Here's the scene:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvTbosdujv8
    , @syonredux

    Tarantino was reportedly a script doctor on Crimson Tide (along with Robert Towne). I suspect the Star Trek references were his.
     
    They were. QT was also responsible for the Silver Surfer argument scene (Who drew the Surfer better, Jack Kirby or Moebius?).
  14. One Upon a Time in America is a Sergio Leone movie. Your blog post is mistitled.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    One Upon a Time in America is a Sergio Leone movie. Your blog post is mistitled.
     
    Does no one get the joke implicit in Steve's title for this review? I saw a few other commentators who made similar comments to yours.

    He's saying that back in 1969, America - even Hollywood - actually was still America.
  15. Interesting review. Made me want to see the movie.

    Still, it’s nice to preface a review with major plot giveaways with a “SPOILERS” warning. For a movie that’s just been released, I mean.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @JimB
    I understand Steve’s excitement over seeing the LA of his childhood brought back to life, and I enjoyed the buddy film aspect of Once, but DiCapprio and Pitt come across as aging members of the Jackass crew. Anybody who remembers middle age men from the 60s, and their ability to make the world seem orderly and safe, would perceive Cliff and Rick as man babies. There were no character arcs to speak of, the rumor about Cliff getting away with killing his wife is gratuitous, except that it foreshadows he kills young women, and the picture occasionally stumbles on its own illogic. Like, why did the yokel hippie dude on the Spahn ranch stab Cliff’s car tire? Clearly, everybody wanted him to leave. So why disable his car? Also, I didn’t quite fathom why Tate didn’t want to pay the 75 cents to see her own movie. Like all Tarantino’s films, they seem to be the empowerment fantasies of middle school boys from a certain era.
  16. For example, Tate’s husband Roman Polanski, Hollywood’s hottest director, fingered John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas as a possible killer because Polanski, like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle.

    Meanwhile, the degenerate creep Phillips took to sleeping with his own daughter.

    Has it ever been alleged that Manson was pimping out the female members of his “family”, as Steve does here? I had never heard that before. The Manson girls were mostly pretty homely.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    He did.
    Not all were homely.

    He would have his prettiest girls hitchhike in the fancy parts of LA to get rides from rich guys.

    One time a couple of his girls were picked up by Dennis Wilson of The Beach Boys. Within hours Manson had his whole “family” living in Dennis Wilson’s house, spending all his money and wrecking his expensive cars.

    Wilson stole a song from Manson and abandoned his rented house when Manson threatened to kill him. According to Mike Love, Dennis Wilson saw Manson kill someone, and was justifiably scared.

    Wilson set Manson up with a record producer who rejected Manson. The producer was living with his girlfriend, Candice Bergen. The producer’s mother, Doris Day, warned her son and Candace to move out of the house. So Manson had his family kill the new folks who moved in. I think that was the La Bianca family that moved in.

    Dennis Wilson went on a downward spiral that ended with his death by drowning.

    Look up the interview Mike Love did about his cousin and Manson. Weird and chilling. Mike Love had dinner with his cousin and Manson, and Mike Love was the only one wearing clothes. Dennis Wilson loved the orgies with the jail bait. At one point Dennis Wilson had to take the entire “family” to get penicillin shots after an orgy. D Wilson needed a shot as well.
    , @Thirdeye
    Yes he did, but those favors never had much appeal in Hollywood where there was access to much higher quality pussy. According to Bugliosi, the elderly owner of the Spahn Ranch let the Family stay there in exchange for getting laid. He also pimped the girls out to people who he thought could do favors for the Family in Panamint Valley. But the Manson girls acquired a reputation for being dirty and crab-infested.
    , @foulkes
    The Manson girls were angelic singers

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1_1SzbCPV0
  17. Dakota Fanning, who plays Squeaky Fromme, was herself an alarmingly articulate child actor in “Man on Fire” with Denzel Washington. I thought of her before I thought of Jodie Foster.

  18. He’ll let the hippies be the indians. Or the Palestinians?

  19. But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them…

    ROFLMAO. Are you kidding me? How so many can make it into middle age with this sort of willful naivete intact, I’ll never quite understand.

    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    Uhh, being catty and flighty (main faults of attractive young girls) doesn't qualify as "very horrible things." There is a big difference between being annoying and being evil. Most people's definitions of "very horrible things" include things like robbery, murder, war crimes, genocide, etc. Original poster is right...Manson murders, Patty Hearst and perhaps some of the female concentration camp guards in Nazi Germany are some of the only examples of attractive young women doing high-profile terrible things in the 20th century.
  20. My Review of “Once Upon a Time … in America”

    Once upon a time in London, there were some English profiteers who formed something called the Virginia Company and they sailed to the new world, and set about starting the USA.

    Eventually, the sweet and kindly island people of England gently nudged aside the Dutch and the Swedes and the French and the Spaniards and others, and the island people of England are the political and cultural core of the USA.

    Trumpy just went down to Virginia to commemorate and celebrate the English colonists and profiteers and settlers who founded Jamestown in 1607 and had some kind of a political assembly in 1619.

    The Virginia Company is the heart and soul and spirit of the United States of America.

    Got that Nathaniel Philbrick, you nasty baby boomer slob!

    • Replies: @El Dato

    Eventually, the sweet and kindly island people of England gently nudged aside the Dutch and the Swedes and the French and the Spaniards and others, and the island people of England are the political and cultural core of the USA.
     
    > Not even mentioning the Germans who might well have become the "core" if there hadn't been a mighty banhammer during the Great War,
    , @Thirdeye
    Actually it was Rhode Island, under Roger Williams.

    The Atlantic south was ruled by people who wanted to be the new aristocracy and named their colonies after kings, like James, Charles, and George.

    New England was ruled by people who wanted to get away from the aristocracy but demanded religious conformity.

    Rhode Island broke away from Massachusetts in 1636 to establish Enlightenment values in place of religious dogma as a governing principle. Rhode Island was the precursor to the propositional nation with religious freedom.
  21. And now we have Alt Right propaganda infiltrating movie reviews. We begin with Mr. Sailer’s false premise- “The stifling conformity of the Great Awokening has now driven even Quentin Tarantino to the subversive right”. Taratino created this movie as a homage to a time period in his usual grandiose fashion, employing cinematic and pop-culture mythology for his version of reality. It is a culmination of the types of movies which have always inspired him, rather than being politically motivated by the current battle royal of the Coalition of the Fringes or being driven to digitally channel his inner disdain toward the Counter Cultural movement and the Baby Boomer lifestyle.

    As an aside, I did not realize having woman’s face being repeatedly smashed against a wall constitutes “comic mayhem” or liberal use of the gutter Hippie language (thanks George Carlin) as being “remarkably wholesome”.

    Regarding Tate, she serves as a figurative backdrop to the optimism of Hollywood at that time as it was undergoing radical changes in moviemaking and in the cultural landscape. She is dreamy, which serves as a counter to the two male leads who are gloomy about their future prospects as actors, not as white men. Tate’s limited presence was by design by Tarantino to underscore her eventual demise, for those audience members familiar with the heinous Manson murders, which is a product of individual neuroses rather than a generational mental illness.

    “Moreover, Tarantino, whose irresponsible 2012 hit Django Unchained espousing black gun violence likely contributed to the Great Awokening and the ensuing black-on-black murder binge”

    I just LOVE it when Mr. Sailer casually throws in these lines in the middle of his piece (burying the lede?) without offering a modicum of exploration, as if his statement is observably true and need not be properly vetted.

    “My guess is that well-indoctrinated young people will find Once puzzling, if not unsettling. Why, they will wonder, are the heroes white men? Why don’t they at least have the basic decency to feel ashamed of their whiteness?”

    Classic projection, confirmation bias, and wild speculation. A Sailer trifecta!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    lol, where is your god now
    , @Thirdeye
    You must have missed the part about Richard Brody of the NYT denouncing the "ridiculously white movie." So now portraying Hollywood demographics as they were in 1969, instead of as some version of how the woke volk wants to recreate them, makes Tarantino some sort of white supremacist.

    Interesting thing about the Helter Skelter idea was that Manson intended it to start a race war, which was supposed to make him some sort of world leader. It was a more overtly psycho version of ideas about race and revolution that had currency among the New Left at that time. Essentially, blacks were seen as the cannon fodder who would spark the revolution that would deliver power to the New Left. Once the New Lefties put revolution on hold so they could pursue their careers, a watered-down version of that idea arose. Playing off of anti-white racial animosity has provided a nice career path for woke volk in academia, media, bureaucracy, and electoral politics.
    , @Thirdeye

    As an aside, I did not realize having woman’s face being repeatedly smashed against a wall constitutes “comic mayhem” or liberal use of the gutter Hippie language (thanks George Carlin) as being “remarkably wholesome”.
     
    Why should it be any less comic than the watch in the POW's ass or the anal rape of the gangster (Pulp Fiction) or the one-second round-robin shootout (Reservoir Dogs)? Is it because you hold some special deference for skanks trying to kill everyone in the house?

    “Moreover, Tarantino, whose irresponsible 2012 hit Django Unchained espousing black gun violence likely contributed to the Great Awokening and the ensuing black-on-black murder binge”

    I just LOVE it when Mr. Sailer casually throws in these lines in the middle of his piece (burying the lede?) without offering a modicum of exploration, as if his statement is observably true and need not be properly vetted.
     
    Follow the links and you will find statistics on dramatically increased murder rates in St Louis, Baltimore, and Chicago following BLM riots. Pandering to the Great Awokening had serious real-world consequences.
  22. Is the ensuing New Improved America all that much better? Like the Coen brothers in their 2018 cowboy anthology, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, Tarantino doesn’t seem convinced.

    The “New Improved America” is a rotting Tower of Babel, Multicultural Mayhem bloated empire being demographically destroyed by non-White and non-Christian mass legal immigration and mass illegal immigration.

    The only thing holding the United States together is monetary extremism — asset purchases, money printing, low or zero interest rates…etc. — from the privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank.

    The evil and immoral JEW/WASP ruling class of the American Empire is actively engaged in an open conspiracy to attack and destroy the cultural cohesion and demographic integrity of the United States of America.

    I hereby declare that it is highly reasonable and historically correct to assert that the JEW/WASP ruling class of the American Empire is engaging in WHITE GENOCIDE against the European Christian ancestral core of the United States of America.

    Furthermore, and pursuant to the above, but not exclusive of the above, the JEW/WASP ruling class of the American Empire is using mass legal immigration and mass illegal immigration as demographic weapons to attack and destroy the European Christian ancestral core of the United States of America.

    I also hereby claim that many other ruling classes in European Christian nations, such as England, France, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Australia, Spain and Canada, are also using mass legal immigration and mass illegal immigration as demographic weapons to attack and replace their ancestral cores with foreigners.

  23. I avoided the other thread on this subject because I am NO fan of the movie biz. I like watching a good movie, mind you, usually something from 3 decades ago back or more, but I just don’t give a rat’s ass who directed it, who the stars are and who they’re doing, and all that.

    However, if you all here are recommending this movie as being Politically Incorrect and non-anti-white, then I may go see this one. Either way, I’ll go read the Taki column later on.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    You couldn't pay me to watch a Tarantino movie, not even if he remade Triumph of the Will.

    Or especially if, actually. He's the enemy of everything good about America, though granted that's not so much anymore.
  24. Apologies for the OT comment, but a previous post got me thinking about this:

    If Scientific American has been compromised (and I agree that it has), what’s the best non-political magazine of approximately the same scope and level?

    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    Not the New Scientist.

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23831740-800-i-experienced-the-patriarchy-from-both-sides-of-the-gender-gap/
    , @Anonymous
    Both of these are affected by wokepush but have good stuff:

    http://nautil.us/ - Has a web and print presence, had cash flow problems. Provides "light" science.

    https://www.quantamagazine.org/ - Sponsored by the Simons Foundation. Content quality depends on the writer, and can be quite excellent. Sometimes content is incomprehensible.

    In both cases, the comment section is unusable.

    There is also the French magazine

    https://www.science-et-vie.com/

    if you are good in french. That one is linked to the french MIC.

    , @Father O'Hara
    Mad?
    , @Crawfurdmuir
    The science and engineering honor society, Sigma Xi, publishes American Scientist, which is far superior to Scientific American. Non-members can subscribe.
  25. @somedude321
    Interesting review. Made me want to see the movie.

    Still, it's nice to preface a review with major plot giveaways with a "SPOILERS" warning. For a movie that's just been released, I mean.

    I understand Steve’s excitement over seeing the LA of his childhood brought back to life, and I enjoyed the buddy film aspect of Once, but DiCapprio and Pitt come across as aging members of the Jackass crew. Anybody who remembers middle age men from the 60s, and their ability to make the world seem orderly and safe, would perceive Cliff and Rick as man babies. There were no character arcs to speak of, the rumor about Cliff getting away with killing his wife is gratuitous, except that it foreshadows he kills young women, and the picture occasionally stumbles on its own illogic. Like, why did the yokel hippie dude on the Spahn ranch stab Cliff’s car tire? Clearly, everybody wanted him to leave. So why disable his car? Also, I didn’t quite fathom why Tate didn’t want to pay the 75 cents to see her own movie. Like all Tarantino’s films, they seem to be the empowerment fantasies of middle school boys from a certain era.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    My dad was 32 in 1969. He was a former paratrooper. We lived on a large semi rural property that was a magnet for the local pot smokers and pill poppers who wanted an out of the way place to party.
    Every once in a while he’d head out in the night with his single barrel shotgun and fire a few shells up in the air to run them off.
    Some of them came by the house one day when no one was home and stole some of his clothes from the line and, using them, constructed an effigy which they then hung by the neck from a tree branch overhanging the lane to our house.
    When my mother came home with a carload of children, she had a frightened moment before she saw it was only a dummy and not, in fact, my father hanging there.
    He went out in the night once more, without his shotgun, and we never saw hide nor hair of those amateur hippies again.
  26. Enjoyable review, as always. Hadn’t thought I’d see this (Tarantino stopped appealing to me after the Kill Bills) but just might now. On an entirely “perhaps this is interesting, I swear it’s not pedantic” note, words like blonde and brunette have different spellings to help visually communicate information, in this case sex. “[P]layed by Margot Robbie of … as the quintessence of blond beauty.” HTH (All right: Bring on the English major pummeling.)

  27. Do we get to see Margot’s Robbies?

    • Replies: @Blidg
    Nope

    You gotta go back to Wolf of Wall Street for that
  28. Saved at the last minute, you mean the spoiler that EVERYONE was being careful not to mention or at least label Spoilers? That’s real sweet, sport.
    J/k still a fan.
    I’ll watch it with a mind full of memories: at the time I lived in a 1930’s era apartment on Sunset Blvd, right where Hwy 101 dumped off the thousands of thrill-seekers headed up to the Strip. Site is now a Shell station, which I’m going to look for in all the driving around scenes.

  29. “Bugliosi’s masterful job of making Manson seem like the ultimate outsider sidetracked the question of why a lowlife jailbird like Manson had become something of an insider at the best parties in the Hollywood Hills.”

    Great plot idea. Tarantino blew it, he should have hired you as a writer, except then people would wonder how naughty iSteve become something of an insider at the best parties in the Hollywood Hills.

    • Agree: Prodigal son
  30. @megabar
    Apologies for the OT comment, but a previous post got me thinking about this:

    If Scientific American has been compromised (and I agree that it has), what's the best non-political magazine of approximately the same scope and level?
  31. Um… Tarantino makes a fairytale movie with elements that are counterfactual, like a reimagining of how Hollywood could have been but wasn’t. The white guys are portrayed well, but somehow we are not supposed to conclude that this element is a fantasy too?

    I doubt Tarantino is capable of seeing the real past the way Steve does.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The white guys are portrayed well

    But the bad guys are whites too.
  32. @PiltdownMan

    Killing white southerners = good/progressive/thumbs up

    Not demonising white male actors = bad/regressive/thumbs down

    Oh the tedium of being on the woke left where life is filtered through the lens of “is this progressive enough?”.

     

    How long will this morally cartoonish view of the world and attitude last? A decade?

    Surely it is getting tiresome for even cultural arbiters on the left with half a brain?

    How long will this morally cartoonish view of the world and attitude last? A decade?

    Surely it is getting tiresome for even cultural arbiters on the left with half a brain?

    It’s going to keep going and going. They’re going to keep on doubling down. The only real question to me at this point is what sort of physical action they’re going to take against whites.

    • Replies: @Cowboy shaw
    That's when things are going to get interesting.
  33. Tarantino sees a market for white oriented movies and capitalizes on it. I don’t suspect any deeper motives than that. Maybe a “reverse Dolemite” white-sploitation strategy? Admittedly, however, I haven’t seen this film and don’t intend to. I haven’t seen many Tarantino movies, but the ones I’ve seen indicate that he has a great reverence for crap. It seems to me he tries to elevate (generally) crappy old movie genres to a higher level, and probably succeeds, which isn’t that great of an accomplishment, IMO.

    Whatever this movie is, we will probably see more white-sploitation films in the future. It’s a manifestation of our diminished status. I just don’t want to be one of the idiots in the audience shouting, “Yeah! yeah!” (either literally or figuratively) like the blacks did at Dolemite. BTW, sounds like there’s a Dolemite remake coming out, so QT isn’t the only one with a reverence for crap.

    The essentially white movie I’m waiting for is Midway. I’m just wondering how many heroic black Navy cooks will be in it.

    • Replies: @Bernie
    Bet they won't make Dolemite white in the remake ....
    , @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    Agreed. I saw some other movie trailer where some evil "globalists" we stealing middle americans and putting them in a Hunger Games type environment. Very, very clear pandering to white middle americans. I say fuck 'em and I'm sticking a huge middle finger to Hollywood still, no matter what they put out.

    It's hard to say if it's degrading, though, or if Hollywood simply realized that they're losing a ton of money by making films that white males are not interested in.

    Also, I suspect that non-white audiences much prefer to see kickass white males, than wimpy white cucks with some strong women of colour. After all, how many brown people are there in Latin cinema? They're all white.
  34. @Dave Pinsen
    Tarantino was reportedly a script doctor on Crimson Tide (along with Robert Towne). I suspect the Star Trek references were his. Probably also the cleverly meta scene in which James Gandolfini and Viggo Mortensen quiz each other about submarine movies.

    Good catch. Here’s the scene:

  35. Anonymous[106] • Disclaimer says:

    What kind of reviewer starts out by misspelling the title of the movie?

  36. @SFG
    "(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women. But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them… But wait, what about Manson’s murderous hippie chicks? Nobody would mind if they got flamed. Plus…bare feet!)"

    You hit the nail on the head, I suspect. (Particularly the feet.) I'm still going to go see it.


    I'm more curious to see what Tarantino does with Star Trek.


    "Damn it, [email protected]#$%^&! I'm a doctor, not a @#$%#%ing @#$%$#@^!"

    "Beam me up, Scotty, and make Nurse Chapel's shoes disappear on the way."

    "Fascinating. The music of your planet's 1960s and 1970s is quite intricate despite its seeming simplicity."

    "Damn it, Captain! I'm $#%@#$%$# @$#%#[email protected]%$#% @#$%$#$% giving her all she's @#$!$ got!"

    "Live long and prosper." (fires phaser)

    Tarentino would include the true life subplot of Shatner living in the Valley in his truck after his divorce and the end of Star Trek. The unemployed actor would carefully keep his hairpiece in the glove compartment until TJ Hooker.

    Oh, and there would be a bloody fistfight between him and Nimoy, who was an alcoholic and would be drunk. Shatner guarded his screen time and was insanely jealous of Spock’s popularity.

    Tarentino would also include a lewd, interracial ménage à trois scene involving the real-life triangle of series creator Gene Roddenberry with his wife, Majel Barrett (Nurse Chapel) and his mistress of the time, Nichelle Nichols (Uhura).

    I’d go see that.

    Now, after reading Steve’s review of Once Upon a Time…, my resistance toward this latest Hollywood-Hollywood movie has softened. I had Hot Wheels in 1969 too and would appreciate the period and the unwoke perspective. Our host is undoubtedly right about this film.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    Didn't Shatner have a wife who died mysteriously?
  37. … the Manson girls, led by Dakota Fanning, Lena Dunham, and Andie MacDowell’s daughter Margaret Qualley, represent to Tarantino the sinister side of female susceptibility to propaganda.

    À propos your idea that the Manson Girls prefigure today’s SJW-feminazi types, it also seems that the Manson Family pioneered the modern Hate Hoax. Isn’t it true that after they stabbed Sharon Tate to death, they smeared the walls with her blood, writing a bunch of graffiti with it that they hoped would implicated the Black Panthers? Weren’t they trying to help ‘jump start’ the race war that Charles Manson had always prophesied? If so, it was kinda like what Jussie Smollett was doing, only in reverse and without the two Nigerian body-builders!

    So what should we call the Manson hate hoax then? Working towards Charlie, perhaps?

    • Replies: @Kronos
    Hey, it’s always a good way to throw off the scent. Especially near the end of a police department’s “quota-month.”

    https://youtu.be/4ElbUx6lFtY
  38. Tate’s husband Roman Polanski, Hollywood’s hottest director, fingered John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas as a possible killer because Polanski, like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle.

    Back in the early 1980s, before talk radio was so filtered, Michelle Phillips was a guest on Larry King’s late night radio show. One of the callers told her she was a whore, and boy did she fly off the handle. Whores really don’t like being called whores. De Rochefoucauld nailed it with “Hypocrisy is the homage that vice pays to virtue.”

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    "... like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle."
     
    Who wouldn't have?

    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Michelle-Phillips-Feet-518345.jpg
    Look, bare feet!

    Whores really don’t like being called whores.
     
    The best ones will just shrug it off and say, "yeah, so what?" and (rightly) accuse you of having a double standard. After the breakup you will discover that you contracted something minor and common that nevertheless requires antibiotics.
    , @njguy73
    Much of the entertainment industry was sleeping with Michelle Phillips.

    Except her husband, who was making the moves on his daughter from his first marriage.
  39. @Anonymous

    Critic Richard Brody complains, “Tarantino delivers a ridiculously white movie” that “celebrates white-male stardom (and behind-the-scenes command).”
     
    Would that apply to Catch Me If You Can, Almost Famous, Bridge of Spies, Hoffa, The Right Stuff, A Serious Man, Wolf of Wall Street, The Master, Broadway Danny Rose, etc?

    Blade Runner's vision of 2019 was pro-regressive, I suppose. Looked ahead and preferred the lost past.

    Brody is jewish. He only approved of movies with non-colored cast if they are directed by jews, like Woody Allen (and preferably cast with mostly jews in actors as well, if possible).

    You can not understand these people as anything other than anti-White. I wish there was more sophistication to this issue, but there isn’t.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    Brody is jewish. He only approved of movies with non-colored cast if they are directed by jews, like Woody Allen (and preferably cast with mostly jews in actors as well, if possible).
     
    Woody Allen the nebbishy anti-Semite? His movies famously do not have Jewish actors in them. Jewish actresses in his movies? ....lol....
  40. “Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls.”

    Manson paled around with Dennis Wilson of the nominally-wholesome Beach Boys, such that Wilson got Manson studio time to record some really awful stuff. Guns N Roses rightlty caught a world of shit for covering one of Manson’s songs in the 1990s, and then deleted it from later album releases.

    One guy who did not like the Manson girls: Steve McQueen’s Malibu next door neighbor, Keith Moon. Despite being a party animal, did not appreciate the Manson girls showing up unannounced at his house. Moon found it genuinely scary.

  41. @Harry Baldwin
    Tate’s husband Roman Polanski, Hollywood’s hottest director, fingered John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas as a possible killer because Polanski, like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle.

    Back in the early 1980s, before talk radio was so filtered, Michelle Phillips was a guest on Larry King's late night radio show. One of the callers told her she was a whore, and boy did she fly off the handle. Whores really don't like being called whores. De Rochefoucauld nailed it with "Hypocrisy is the homage that vice pays to virtue."

    “… like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle.”

    Who wouldn’t have?


    Look, bare feet!

    Whores really don’t like being called whores.

    The best ones will just shrug it off and say, “yeah, so what?” and (rightly) accuse you of having a double standard. After the breakup you will discover that you contracted something minor and common that nevertheless requires antibiotics.

    • Replies: @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Who wouldn’t have?

     

    St. Thomas Aquinas's decision to become a priest incensed his brothers for it went against their wishes.

    Being good Italian men, they sent a whore into his room to try and break his will.

    Being a good (dramatic) Italian man himself, young Thomas grabbed a log from the fire and chased the whore from the room. It was very cinematic; a good mix of comedy and furious piety.

    I'm hoping that this age of disgusting sexual license will soon inspire a vigorous reaction, creating a new emphasis not just on the restoration proper heterosexual marital relations, but the restoration of chastity and purity across the board, leading to the chasing of many whores with many burning objects.
    , @Stebbing Heuer
    Whoa.
  42. Neil Young knew Manson, and said of his songwriting ability words to the effect of, “His stuff wasn’t half bad, but man, he didn’t take rejection well at all.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7305999/College-bribery-scandal-Schools-accepted-white-student-believing-black-tennis-whiz.html


    Should stick to the movie, but this is really lol. Either the best flight from white we have or the " full dolezal "

    They arent even trying to hide it anymore or this guy is working a reverse sting at considerable peril.

    [email protected] can comeback as a woke NYT intern ?
    , @Anonymous

    Neil Young knew Manson, and said of his songwriting ability words to the effect of, “His stuff wasn’t half bad, but man, he didn’t take rejection well at all.”
     
    In the end, it all comes down to personality. John Milius had some crazy ideas while writing Apocalypse Now, but he knows difference between reality and fantasy. He knows the real world isn't of Conan the Barbarian. There seems to have been no barrier between real and unreal in Manson's mind.

    But if there one positive about Manson, he really acted out his sick fantasies. In that, he was truer and braver than all the artists and actors who played wild and crazy but didn't have the balls to do what they pulled off in fantasy. Warren Beatty, Arthur Penn, and Peckinpah pulled no heists. Milius didn't go 'dirty harry' with the public. Antonioni didn't use terror to blow up the bourgeoisie(as in end of Zabriskie Point). Lindsay Anderson didn't mow down the academia(as in If...). Paul Schrader and Scorsese didn't go Bickle. Dennis Hopper didn't kill anyone. But Manson walked the walk as well as talk the talk. Polanski came close in acting out his sickness, but he ran like a chicken and wrapped himself with Holocaust aura and artiste credentials to seek protection from the French.
    And at least in that regard, Manson will be Tarantino's master. Tarantino has an impressive body count in his movies but hasn't the balls in real life to hurt a fly. Manson really hurt people bad.
  43. Excellent review, Steve. One of your all time bests, which can in no small part be attributed to the subject matter–1969’s SoCal and the not so subtle nostalgia that ensues from yourself. It’s entirely natural and understandable feeling. Definitely makes one want to go and see the film.

    The first Earth Day was April 22, 1970, by the way; it wasn’t in 1969.

  44. “On the other hand, if you have less reason than I do to wax nostalgic over KHJ-AM Boss Radio or the Helm’s Bakery truck that Charles Manson is shown driving during his one cameo, well, you might wonder when Tarantino is finally going to get to the gore. The film is languidly paced and, while I found it hilarious, the rest of the audience only laughed occasionally.”

    When a new QT movie comes out, people always seem to forget how low his action/violence-to-rambling-dialogue ratio usually is.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFd2LaS7Eb8#t=17
  45. @Buzz Mohawk

    "... like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle."
     
    Who wouldn't have?

    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Michelle-Phillips-Feet-518345.jpg
    Look, bare feet!

    Whores really don’t like being called whores.
     
    The best ones will just shrug it off and say, "yeah, so what?" and (rightly) accuse you of having a double standard. After the breakup you will discover that you contracted something minor and common that nevertheless requires antibiotics.

    Who wouldn’t have?

    St. Thomas Aquinas’s decision to become a priest incensed his brothers for it went against their wishes.

    Being good Italian men, they sent a whore into his room to try and break his will.

    Being a good (dramatic) Italian man himself, young Thomas grabbed a log from the fire and chased the whore from the room. It was very cinematic; a good mix of comedy and furious piety.

    I’m hoping that this age of disgusting sexual license will soon inspire a vigorous reaction, creating a new emphasis not just on the restoration proper heterosexual marital relations, but the restoration of chastity and purity across the board, leading to the chasing of many whores with many burning objects.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I'm sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,...uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it's a necessary evil, but still evil. All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles. Which is of course hypocritical and double standard-ish for them to preach about virtue, chastity, and purity (the last two are best left for pre-teens and under the age of about 16).

    Like, just because a beta man turned down sex, somehow that makes him a virtuous moral individual? BS. It means he's a beta who doesn't understand what its really like. Yeah, hanging around other dudes for one's entire adult life is way more virtuous for men. Believe that we'll tell you another one.

    Regarding intellectual capacity, Aquinas was a man of no mean stature. Regarding living life as a regular person, not quite so much. Also was vs the Immaculate Conception, and for centuries the Dominicans followed his lead in this regard.

    Like it or not, Manson offered relatively young and famous Hollywood bigs what they wanted: young, fresh, nubile girls with no strings attached. And at first he was smart to trade it for studio recording time for his songs. If only he had had some major songwriting talent, perhaps the world would've had a much better opinion of him. Aside from Dennis, Dorris Day's son also got him some recording studio time. And Dorris's son was a record producer. It's like, Manson's songs aren't recorded today, but people can still turn on the radio and hear "It's bitsty teeny weeny poka dota bikini" and other novelty dreck. His songs couldn't have been any worse.

    , @David
    A little weirder than that, actually. Thomas Aquinas had been raised to become an Augustinian monk and to serve as the abbot of a local monastery that was traditionally lead by a member of his family. He decided he'd rather be a Dominican, an upstart order not wealthy and powerful like the Augustinians. His mother had him imprisoned and sent a prostitute so that he could learn about the pleasures awaiting him as an Augustinian abbot, vs an austere Dominican.
    , @El Dato
    Yeah no.

    Don't be the guy who hates that possibility that somewhere, someone is having fun.
  46. Richard Brody is probably the most intelligent movie critic on the market . But he has been infected by anti white hatred – except for old movies. His critic of First Man was entirely driven by white hatred. I made some sarcastic comments about it while insisting on the very interesting (other) aspects of its review. He blocked me in 5 minutes.

    In his twitter account he presents Once upon as a reactionary movie with a link to his NEwYorker article . The NEwYorker is both the most intelligent cultural paper and most anti white.

    The economist is the most intelligent paper among ultra-pro- third world invasion partisans.

    Studying The Economist and The New Yorker journalist and shareholders could be a very interesting way to know better our world true leaders and values.

    Your movie critic are far less good than you comments on patterns about news. But your seeing that Django was a cultural moment that unchained white hatred is extremely insightful, even if your are not the best at understanding or explaining the movie in itself.

    Unz is a chance for people interested in understanding society.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Richard Brody is probably the most intelligent movie critic on the market .
     
    He's just another Jewish supremacist hiding behind equality-diversity rhetoric. He wrote a book on Godard and accused his subject of 'antisemitism' for being critical of Zionism and critiquing Jewish cultural mindset. Never mind that Jews have theories about the cultural personalities of every other group: The Russian Tsarist mentality, the Conservative Protestant Authoritarian Personality, the village mentality of the Japanese, the Arab mentality, etc.

    Also, when push comes to shove, he's a propagandist than a truth-seeker. His best movies list of 2018 had historical lies. He's not for truth against lies but 'our lies' vs the Other Side, true or false. He will side with Jewish lies against even Goy truths.
    , @El Dato
    I would like an analysis of what's going on with the Greta Thurnberg dog-and-pony show.

    Let them sail yachts: Why Greta Thunberg and the environmental elite hate you

    Who is putting pedal to the metal by sending around Environmental Jeanne Darcs?
  47. “Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls.”

    It doesn’t get much more Occam’s Razor than that.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    The problem with Sailer's statement is he never quite defines "how many important people". Moreover, there is an assumption that those same individuals, the entire lot of them, had a hankering for young flesh. It is possible, but not certain.
  48. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG
    "(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women. But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them… But wait, what about Manson’s murderous hippie chicks? Nobody would mind if they got flamed. Plus…bare feet!)"

    You hit the nail on the head, I suspect. (Particularly the feet.) I'm still going to go see it.


    I'm more curious to see what Tarantino does with Star Trek.


    "Damn it, [email protected]#$%^&! I'm a doctor, not a @#$%#%ing @#$%$#@^!"

    "Beam me up, Scotty, and make Nurse Chapel's shoes disappear on the way."

    "Fascinating. The music of your planet's 1960s and 1970s is quite intricate despite its seeming simplicity."

    "Damn it, Captain! I'm $#%@#$%$# @$#%#[email protected]%$#% @#$%$#$% giving her all she's @#$!$ got!"

    "Live long and prosper." (fires phaser)

    I’m more curious to see what Tarantino does with Star Trek.

    As awful Star Trek is, it is right up Tarry’s alley in terms of its core relational dynamics. I hate the term ‘bromance’, but Tarry’s movies are really about love between men. Most powerful is the intense emotions that develop between Keitel and Roth in RESERVOIR.

    Tarry’s character in a movie even has a theory about the ‘gay’ subtext of POP GUN.

    So, the true love story in HOLLYWOOD is between the fellas(though they are not homo). Likewise, the truest love in PULP was between Travolta and Jackson. And the most ‘moving’ moments(by relative standards of course) are when Walken hands the ring to the son — from man to boy — and when Willis goes back to save the gangster boss(the big black guy) because even hoodlums must stick together against total perverts, a cross between Rednecks and psycho-homos.

    I haven’t seen the movie, but based on the SPOILERS, it seems Pitt doesn’t even know he’s doing something heroic to save Tate’s life. He really fought to save his own hide and that of his buddy(DiCaprio). I haven’t seen DJANGO, but the main ‘love’ seems to be between the Avenging Negro and the German in America. (Maybe Germans appreciated the movie as one of their own got to side with a Noble Negro against Bad Americans for a change.)

  49. Pro Publica Stasis take a break from monitoring thought to do societally valuable journalistic work:
    https://www.breitbart.com/education/2019/07/31/report-wealthy-parents-give-up-custody-so-children-quality-for-low-income-tuition-aid/

    Parents relinquish guardianship of their high-school-aged children during their junior or senior year. At that point, guardianship is transferred to an aunt, grandparent, or close friend. Once the guardianship has been transferred, the students are free to apply for financial aid, reporting only their own income.

    Andy Borst, director of undergraduate admissions at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, blasted the families that are exploiting the system.

    “It’s a scam,” Borst said. “Wealthy families are manipulating the financial aid process to be eligible for financial aid they would not be otherwise eligible for. They are taking away opportunities from families that really need it.”

  50. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:

    In STAR TREK, the core drama is between the men, esp Nimoy and Shatner.

  51. @Harry Baldwin
    Tate’s husband Roman Polanski, Hollywood’s hottest director, fingered John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas as a possible killer because Polanski, like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle.

    Back in the early 1980s, before talk radio was so filtered, Michelle Phillips was a guest on Larry King's late night radio show. One of the callers told her she was a whore, and boy did she fly off the handle. Whores really don't like being called whores. De Rochefoucauld nailed it with "Hypocrisy is the homage that vice pays to virtue."

    Much of the entertainment industry was sleeping with Michelle Phillips.

    Except her husband, who was making the moves on his daughter from his first marriage.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Oh - The Mamas and the Papas.

    When the Allman Brothers put two kids on the cover of her Rambling Man LP, it seemed a bit of a dangerous move - you know, as if there would be some twilight there, with the kids and stuff. Bob Christgau then remarked in his review of the LP in The Village Voice that you had to be the Allman Brothers to be naive enough to not even fear to be in the twilight zone. - - - - This was an (almost freakishly) cool remark then by Bob Christgau - and it is even more so in retrospect (didn't know about the husband of Michelle Phillips).
  52. @Buzz Mohawk
    Tarentino would include the true life subplot of Shatner living in the Valley in his truck after his divorce and the end of Star Trek. The unemployed actor would carefully keep his hairpiece in the glove compartment until TJ Hooker.

    Oh, and there would be a bloody fistfight between him and Nimoy, who was an alcoholic and would be drunk. Shatner guarded his screen time and was insanely jealous of Spock's popularity.

    Tarentino would also include a lewd, interracial ménage à trois scene involving the real-life triangle of series creator Gene Roddenberry with his wife, Majel Barrett (Nurse Chapel) and his mistress of the time, Nichelle Nichols (Uhura).

    I'd go see that.

    Now, after reading Steve's review of Once Upon a Time..., my resistance toward this latest Hollywood-Hollywood movie has softened. I had Hot Wheels in 1969 too and would appreciate the period and the unwoke perspective. Our host is undoubtedly right about this film.

    Didn’t Shatner have a wife who died mysteriously?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    In the swimming pool. Never get a swimming pool.

    People always seem to be dying in swimming pools. Plus, pools are an expensive maintenance pain in the ass that just sit there unused most of the time.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    His first marriage ended in divorce -- in that magical year of 1969 when Star Trek was cancelled. He really did end up sleeping in his truck for a while.
  53. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:

    Tarantino fails the Bechdel Test as Margot Robbie doesn’t get many lines as starlet Sharon Tate.

    Tuco had many more lines than Blondie, but I don’t think Eastwood complained much.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Right, and Lee Van Cleef told an interviewer that he actually crossed out a lot of his own character's dialogue in the script for The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, confident that he could communicate better non-verbally. The laconic Blondie and Angel Eyes come off as cool, hard men, while Tuco comes across as someone who talks too much when he's nervous. (Still a great character, though, and maybe Eli Wallach's best performance.)
  54. OT: It has now become a problem that the Swedish populace are wearing bullet proof vests; in Malmö, certain youths are even walking about wearing them openly. What to do? Why, make them illegal to wear for others than police and similar personnel!

    https://www.svt.se/nyheter/inrikes/kronofogden-saljer-skottsakra-vastar-trots-tal-om-forbud
    (In Swedish.)

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    They don't need those, they need flak jackets. Sweden still has a hilarious and terrifying normality of hand grenade attacks.
    , @Clyde

    OT: It has now become a problem that the Swedish populace are wearing bullet proof vests; in Malmö, certain youths are even walking about wearing them openly. What to do? Why, make them illegal to wear for others than police and similar personnel!
     
    How about their awful imitations of black American's rap music. All rap sucks but the rap that Muslims and blacks in Europe produce is the worst. Monkeys and orangutans in the zoo make more sense.
  55. The thing that is unforgivably dumb about Star Trek is not the fake science or the aliens who look exactly human but for one facial feature, it’s the deadpan UN propaganda about ethical and committed bureaucrats serving the galaxy. QT is fundamentally orthogonal to that and would probably make a genuinely interesting Trek product with real government mechanics, ie, running roughshod over the defenseless and correcting the record so that 2+2=5.

  56. Anonymous[182] • Disclaimer says:
    @megabar
    Apologies for the OT comment, but a previous post got me thinking about this:

    If Scientific American has been compromised (and I agree that it has), what's the best non-political magazine of approximately the same scope and level?

    Both of these are affected by wokepush but have good stuff:

    http://nautil.us/ – Has a web and print presence, had cash flow problems. Provides “light” science.

    https://www.quantamagazine.org/ – Sponsored by the Simons Foundation. Content quality depends on the writer, and can be quite excellent. Sometimes content is incomprehensible.

    In both cases, the comment section is unusable.

    There is also the French magazine

    https://www.science-et-vie.com/

    if you are good in french. That one is linked to the french MIC.

  57. @megabar
    Apologies for the OT comment, but a previous post got me thinking about this:

    If Scientific American has been compromised (and I agree that it has), what's the best non-political magazine of approximately the same scope and level?

    Mad?

  58. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @black sea
    Neil Young knew Manson, and said of his songwriting ability words to the effect of, "His stuff wasn't half bad, but man, he didn't take rejection well at all."

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7305999/College-bribery-scandal-Schools-accepted-white-student-believing-black-tennis-whiz.html

    Should stick to the movie, but this is really lol. Either the best flight from white we have or the ” full dolezal ”

    They arent even trying to hide it anymore or this guy is working a reverse sting at considerable peril.

    [email protected] can comeback as a woke NYT intern ?

  59. @SFG
    "(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women. But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them… But wait, what about Manson’s murderous hippie chicks? Nobody would mind if they got flamed. Plus…bare feet!)"

    You hit the nail on the head, I suspect. (Particularly the feet.) I'm still going to go see it.


    I'm more curious to see what Tarantino does with Star Trek.


    "Damn it, [email protected]#$%^&! I'm a doctor, not a @#$%#%ing @#$%$#@^!"

    "Beam me up, Scotty, and make Nurse Chapel's shoes disappear on the way."

    "Fascinating. The music of your planet's 1960s and 1970s is quite intricate despite its seeming simplicity."

    "Damn it, Captain! I'm $#%@#$%$# @$#%#[email protected]%$#% @#$%$#$% giving her all she's @#$!$ got!"

    "Live long and prosper." (fires phaser)

    William Shatner was in an amusing 1998 movie “Free Enterprise” where he made good natured fun of himself and his fans .

    BTW his version of Julius Caesar was a rap version and at the end of “Free Enterprise” we get to see him performing some of it .

    And of course he had a career as a recording artist :

  60. @Anonymous

    Tarantino fails the Bechdel Test as Margot Robbie doesn’t get many lines as starlet Sharon Tate.
     
    Tuco had many more lines than Blondie, but I don't think Eastwood complained much.

    Right, and Lee Van Cleef told an interviewer that he actually crossed out a lot of his own character’s dialogue in the script for The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, confident that he could communicate better non-verbally. The laconic Blondie and Angel Eyes come off as cool, hard men, while Tuco comes across as someone who talks too much when he’s nervous. (Still a great character, though, and maybe Eli Wallach’s best performance.)

  61. Did he consult Dan Inosanto about Bruce Lee? …catch Bruce Lee’s leg my ass ,his capabilities are legendary.

  62. @njguy73
    Didn't Shatner have a wife who died mysteriously?

    In the swimming pool. Never get a swimming pool.

    People always seem to be dying in swimming pools. Plus, pools are an expensive maintenance pain in the ass that just sit there unused most of the time.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    People always seem to be dying in swimming pools.
     
    And not always quickly. I wonder if Abigail Taylor's death is classified as a pool fatality.


    https://www.twincities.com/2008/03/20/abigail-taylor-girl-injured-in-pool-drain-accident-dies/

    https://www.twincities.com/2012/09/15/turning-point-after-daughters-pool-death-edina-woman-starts-foundation-to-promote-safety-honor-girl/
    , @Jack D
    She was an alcoholic and had taken Valium. If she hadn't accidentally drowned she would have eventually driven her car into a tree or her liver would have given out, etc. Alcohol will kill you (but I have it in my house anyway). People are also always dying in bathtubs, in cars, on ladders, etc. but I've got those too.

    In the Southern California climate pools are usable almost all year. Some people really enjoy them. Not swimming alone is a good idea. Having your pool fenced in a way that little kids can't wander into it is a good idea - most people have the pool fenced off from the world but not from their own house.
  63. “Tarantino could have disappeared down any one of the endless rabbit holes offered by the Manson case.”

    Such as Manson’s involvement with The Process Church, a British Scientology splinter group that MI6 used as a cutout.

    “He [Manson] had access to jailbait girls.”

    Kompromat.

    “My guess is that well-indoctrinated young people will find Once puzzling, if not unsettling. Why, they wonder, are the heroes white men? Why don’t they at least have the basic decency to feel ashamed of their whiteness?”

    And this is why QT is now under attack by Woke crickets.

    Good stuff, Steve.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    It's not really kompromat because it wasn't for blackmail.
  64. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Who wouldn’t have?

     

    St. Thomas Aquinas's decision to become a priest incensed his brothers for it went against their wishes.

    Being good Italian men, they sent a whore into his room to try and break his will.

    Being a good (dramatic) Italian man himself, young Thomas grabbed a log from the fire and chased the whore from the room. It was very cinematic; a good mix of comedy and furious piety.

    I'm hoping that this age of disgusting sexual license will soon inspire a vigorous reaction, creating a new emphasis not just on the restoration proper heterosexual marital relations, but the restoration of chastity and purity across the board, leading to the chasing of many whores with many burning objects.

    I’m sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,…uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it’s a necessary evil, but still evil. All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles. Which is of course hypocritical and double standard-ish for them to preach about virtue, chastity, and purity (the last two are best left for pre-teens and under the age of about 16).

    Like, just because a beta man turned down sex, somehow that makes him a virtuous moral individual? BS. It means he’s a beta who doesn’t understand what its really like. Yeah, hanging around other dudes for one’s entire adult life is way more virtuous for men. Believe that we’ll tell you another one.

    Regarding intellectual capacity, Aquinas was a man of no mean stature. Regarding living life as a regular person, not quite so much. Also was vs the Immaculate Conception, and for centuries the Dominicans followed his lead in this regard.

    Like it or not, Manson offered relatively young and famous Hollywood bigs what they wanted: young, fresh, nubile girls with no strings attached. And at first he was smart to trade it for studio recording time for his songs. If only he had had some major songwriting talent, perhaps the world would’ve had a much better opinion of him. Aside from Dennis, Dorris Day’s son also got him some recording studio time. And Dorris’s son was a record producer. It’s like, Manson’s songs aren’t recorded today, but people can still turn on the radio and hear “It’s bitsty teeny weeny poka dota bikini” and other novelty dreck. His songs couldn’t have been any worse.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    >Thomas Aquinas
    >beta
    I bet you think the Founding Fathers were trannies because of the wigs.
    , @Jack D
    Far be it from me to defend the Catholic Church, but I can see how living a life of chastity could be seen as virtuous and holy and a desirable thing in your clergy. Rather than having to juggle work and family or spend their time chasing tail, they can devote themselves solely to their mission.

    However, if "chastity" is really just a cover for buggery and child molestation, then not so good. The question is whether you can really find enough holy men who are truly able to keep their vows of chastity and who are not just repressed homosexuals, especially in the modern world. Magic 8 Ball says "Doubtful".
    , @guest
    Be fruitful and multiply, they say. Which doesn't sound like "ew, sex is yucky" to me.

    Used to be people made fun of Catholics for bearing too many children. I don't know if you know this, but one must do gross things to produce children.
    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    You're named after one of my favorite movies, but this is an utterly nonsense take:

    I’m sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,…uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting.

     

    Yes, that's why we used to have so many large families.

    *SARCASM*

    Of all the anti-Catholic tropes, the idea that we once treated sex for married people as "dirty, nasty, disgusting" is possibly the most remarkably asinine and insipid.

    If marriage was/is your vocation, you enjoyed making love and had lots of babies. Anything else is absolute nonsense.

    You also have no clue what chastity is, I suppose. Chastity is a virtue for ALL to exercise, because it means the moderate use of sex according to right reason.

    In any case, it's just amazing you could actually believe we could have huge families while simultaneously hating sex.

    We only stopped enjoying sex once you damned non-Catholics let the non-Catholic leaders (The Rockefeller's) brainwash us into accepting birth control. Once we accepted sex as merely for pleasure, as opposed to an incredibly pleasurable act for an even more beautiful end, lo and behold we ALL stopped enjoying it at all! Social engineering for the win!

    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles.
     
    Correct, after the Soviet Union successfully planted homosexuals in our midst. Bella Dodd's revelations are all anyone needs to know.

    Before that, in centuries past, we have documented examples of homosexual infiltrators who were caught and executed for attempting to subvert the Church's life.

    But you clearly have no idea what you are talking about and are probably just another hater.
    , @Precious
    I’m sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,…uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it’s a necessary evil, but still evil.

    ^Absurd caricature.

    All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles.

    Now this is at least reasonably accurate when it comes to the Vatican going back at least 60 years. In hindsight, the Catholic Church was nipping problems in the bud back when they burned people at the stake.
  65. @SFG
    "(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women. But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them… But wait, what about Manson’s murderous hippie chicks? Nobody would mind if they got flamed. Plus…bare feet!)"

    I suspect you're right about this one, but with all the woke complaints about it I have to go see it now.

    I'm more curious to see what he'll do with Star Trek though. ;)

    “(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women.)”

    SFG, could be? But he just married one (a pretty, youngish, woman) days after finishing up the film. In interviews Tarantino has recently said he wants to start a family; have many children.

    Tarantinos Wife

    “Quentin Tarantino married his fiancée Daniella Pick in an intimate ceremony in Los Angeles today, PEOPLE can exclusively confirm. Tarantino, 55, and Pick, 35, an Israeli singer and model, will celebrate the nuptials at a larger gathering this evening. The writer-director met Pick, who is the daughter of Israeli singer and songwriter Tzvika Pick, in 2009 while promoting his film Inglorious Basterds. The pair got engaged in June 2017, after dating for about a year. The couple hosted an engagement party on September 2017 in New York City that served as a Pulp Fiction cast reunion, with a guest list including Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson and Uma Thurman.

    Just days before the wedding, Tarantino wrapped filming Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, his upcoming drama starring Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie. The director has never been married, previously explaining that work monopolizes his time. The movie will be released on July 26, 2019.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Beautiful backdrop, good bride, beta lean. You'd think an auteur director wouldn't wreck his own photograph.
    , @SFG
    See, you can do that if you're a man and 55. Oh, and if you're also a famous director.

    As for the beta lean...he's getting old. Time and chance happeneth to us all.

    It's also possible they're both right...he could have some aggressive urges he's (sort of) sublimated through his movies. Wouldn't be too surprised if the bride likes a little of the rough stuff, but now we're well into the realm of speculation.

  66. @Dave Pinsen
    Tarantino was reportedly a script doctor on Crimson Tide (along with Robert Towne). I suspect the Star Trek references were his. Probably also the cleverly meta scene in which James Gandolfini and Viggo Mortensen quiz each other about submarine movies.

    Tarantino was reportedly a script doctor on Crimson Tide (along with Robert Towne). I suspect the Star Trek references were his.

    They were. QT was also responsible for the Silver Surfer argument scene (Who drew the Surfer better, Jack Kirby or Moebius?).

  67. @El Dato
    As the Enterprise leaves the galactic plane, we see it is not actually a spiral, but a swastika. Then planet Woken XII gets blasted to hell.

    Then planet Woken XII gets blasted to hell.

    57 genders genocided all at once.

    • LOL: BB753
  68. @njguy73
    Didn't Shatner have a wife who died mysteriously?

    His first marriage ended in divorce — in that magical year of 1969 when Star Trek was cancelled. He really did end up sleeping in his truck for a while.

    • Replies: @njguy73
    Yeah, and he did game shows because he needed the prize money.

    He took them very, very seriously.
  69. @Lugash

    How long will this morally cartoonish view of the world and attitude last? A decade?

    Surely it is getting tiresome for even cultural arbiters on the left with half a brain?
     
    It's going to keep going and going. They're going to keep on doubling down. The only real question to me at this point is what sort of physical action they're going to take against whites.

    That’s when things are going to get interesting.

  70. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bruno
    Richard Brody is probably the most intelligent movie critic on the market . But he has been infected by anti white hatred - except for old movies. His critic of First Man was entirely driven by white hatred. I made some sarcastic comments about it while insisting on the very interesting (other) aspects of its review. He blocked me in 5 minutes.

    In his twitter account he presents Once upon as a reactionary movie with a link to his NEwYorker article . The NEwYorker is both the most intelligent cultural paper and most anti white.

    The economist is the most intelligent paper among ultra-pro- third world invasion partisans.

    Studying The Economist and The New Yorker journalist and shareholders could be a very interesting way to know better our world true leaders and values.

    Your movie critic are far less good than you comments on patterns about news. But your seeing that Django was a cultural moment that unchained white hatred is extremely insightful, even if your are not the best at understanding or explaining the movie in itself.

    Unz is a chance for people interested in understanding society.

    Richard Brody is probably the most intelligent movie critic on the market .

    He’s just another Jewish supremacist hiding behind equality-diversity rhetoric. He wrote a book on Godard and accused his subject of ‘antisemitism’ for being critical of Zionism and critiquing Jewish cultural mindset. Never mind that Jews have theories about the cultural personalities of every other group: The Russian Tsarist mentality, the Conservative Protestant Authoritarian Personality, the village mentality of the Japanese, the Arab mentality, etc.

    Also, when push comes to shove, he’s a propagandist than a truth-seeker. His best movies list of 2018 had historical lies. He’s not for truth against lies but ‘our lies’ vs the Other Side, true or false. He will side with Jewish lies against even Goy truths.

    • Replies: @Bruno
    I am not reading Brody for any piece of advice on Jewish versus non Jewish merits. Neither for objective choice of movies nor impartial dispensation of his views pro and contra for each movie.

    He just happens to see and understand in movies things that other people don’t see nor understand and that are true. I wish he would be impartial and give more analysis on movies I like. But his point of view is in-valuable.

    At the same times, he has less than 1k followers and his tweets rarely get more than 10 comments. So he is a next to 0 influencer.

    The other critic with noticeable brain power is Emily Nussbaum. She writes on TV series mostly. She also is gifted - to a lesser extent than RB - of a not usual understanding skill.

    Both are Jewish. Liberal. Totally biased. But they wear that as discreetly as a Celtic tattoo (I think this métaphore if from Nussbaum).

    You understand more what you see when you read them. As you understand news and society patterns when you read Steve Sailer. Like it or not.

  71. @danand
    “(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women.)”

    SFG, could be? But he just married one (a pretty, youngish, woman) days after finishing up the film. In interviews Tarantino has recently said he wants to start a family; have many children.

    https://flic.kr/p/2gM5zNB


    “Quentin Tarantino married his fiancée Daniella Pick in an intimate ceremony in Los Angeles today, PEOPLE can exclusively confirm. Tarantino, 55, and Pick, 35, an Israeli singer and model, will celebrate the nuptials at a larger gathering this evening. The writer-director met Pick, who is the daughter of Israeli singer and songwriter Tzvika Pick, in 2009 while promoting his film Inglorious Basterds. The pair got engaged in June 2017, after dating for about a year. The couple hosted an engagement party on September 2017 in New York City that served as a Pulp Fiction cast reunion, with a guest list including Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson and Uma Thurman.

    Just days before the wedding, Tarantino wrapped filming Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, his upcoming drama starring Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie. The director has never been married, previously explaining that work monopolizes his time. The movie will be released on July 26, 2019.

     

    Beautiful backdrop, good bride, beta lean. You’d think an auteur director wouldn’t wreck his own photograph.

  72. @CK
    I like the Manson Epstein comparison. Jailbait suppliers to the rich and famous.

    Probably a (very very close) second to the World’s oldest profession (prostitution.)

  73. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I'm sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,...uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it's a necessary evil, but still evil. All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles. Which is of course hypocritical and double standard-ish for them to preach about virtue, chastity, and purity (the last two are best left for pre-teens and under the age of about 16).

    Like, just because a beta man turned down sex, somehow that makes him a virtuous moral individual? BS. It means he's a beta who doesn't understand what its really like. Yeah, hanging around other dudes for one's entire adult life is way more virtuous for men. Believe that we'll tell you another one.

    Regarding intellectual capacity, Aquinas was a man of no mean stature. Regarding living life as a regular person, not quite so much. Also was vs the Immaculate Conception, and for centuries the Dominicans followed his lead in this regard.

    Like it or not, Manson offered relatively young and famous Hollywood bigs what they wanted: young, fresh, nubile girls with no strings attached. And at first he was smart to trade it for studio recording time for his songs. If only he had had some major songwriting talent, perhaps the world would've had a much better opinion of him. Aside from Dennis, Dorris Day's son also got him some recording studio time. And Dorris's son was a record producer. It's like, Manson's songs aren't recorded today, but people can still turn on the radio and hear "It's bitsty teeny weeny poka dota bikini" and other novelty dreck. His songs couldn't have been any worse.

    >Thomas Aquinas
    >beta
    I bet you think the Founding Fathers were trannies because of the wigs.

  74. @SunBakedSuburb
    "Tarantino could have disappeared down any one of the endless rabbit holes offered by the Manson case."

    Such as Manson's involvement with The Process Church, a British Scientology splinter group that MI6 used as a cutout.

    "He [Manson] had access to jailbait girls."

    Kompromat.

    "My guess is that well-indoctrinated young people will find Once puzzling, if not unsettling. Why, they wonder, are the heroes white men? Why don't they at least have the basic decency to feel ashamed of their whiteness?"

    And this is why QT is now under attack by Woke crickets.

    Good stuff, Steve.

    It’s not really kompromat because it wasn’t for blackmail.

  75. My theory about why Tate was murdered:

    She threatened to tell the police that her husband raped one of Manson’s girls; then Polanski told Manson that he needed to put out the fire before they both got burned.

    • Replies: @Alden
    Polanski and Tate never met the Manson crew. By the summer of the murder, Manson knew his career was never going to happen. Brian Wilson has dumped him. Terry Melcher got rid of him. Manson didn’t know Melcher had moved out and the Polanski’s has rented the house. Sharon left England and arrived back in the US July 20 and the Manson’s killed her 3 weeks later. The Manson’s didn’t know the LaBianca’s whom they killed a few days later either..

    The Manson’s were never suspects at all. One of the girls was in city jail on one of their auto theft charges and talked about the killings. That led to their arrest.
  76. @Pericles
    OT: It has now become a problem that the Swedish populace are wearing bullet proof vests; in Malmö, certain youths are even walking about wearing them openly. What to do? Why, make them illegal to wear for others than police and similar personnel!

    https://www.svt.se/nyheter/inrikes/kronofogden-saljer-skottsakra-vastar-trots-tal-om-forbud
    (In Swedish.)

    They don’t need those, they need flak jackets. Sweden still has a hilarious and terrifying normality of hand grenade attacks.

  77. Anonymous[458] • Disclaimer says:
    @black sea
    Neil Young knew Manson, and said of his songwriting ability words to the effect of, "His stuff wasn't half bad, but man, he didn't take rejection well at all."

    Neil Young knew Manson, and said of his songwriting ability words to the effect of, “His stuff wasn’t half bad, but man, he didn’t take rejection well at all.”

    In the end, it all comes down to personality. John Milius had some crazy ideas while writing Apocalypse Now, but he knows difference between reality and fantasy. He knows the real world isn’t of Conan the Barbarian. There seems to have been no barrier between real and unreal in Manson’s mind.

    But if there one positive about Manson, he really acted out his sick fantasies. In that, he was truer and braver than all the artists and actors who played wild and crazy but didn’t have the balls to do what they pulled off in fantasy. Warren Beatty, Arthur Penn, and Peckinpah pulled no heists. Milius didn’t go ‘dirty harry’ with the public. Antonioni didn’t use terror to blow up the bourgeoisie(as in end of Zabriskie Point). Lindsay Anderson didn’t mow down the academia(as in If…). Paul Schrader and Scorsese didn’t go Bickle. Dennis Hopper didn’t kill anyone. But Manson walked the walk as well as talk the talk. Polanski came close in acting out his sickness, but he ran like a chicken and wrapped himself with Holocaust aura and artiste credentials to seek protection from the French.
    And at least in that regard, Manson will be Tarantino’s master. Tarantino has an impressive body count in his movies but hasn’t the balls in real life to hurt a fly. Manson really hurt people bad.

  78. Twitter is currently mad that Margot Robbie doesn’t get many lines as starlet Sharon Tate. But the hoopla over the Bechdel Test overlooks that film is a visual medium. Robbie is memorable at being a young woman whose beauty and sweetness make life a little happier for everyone around her.

    SJWs are fundamentally verbally oriented. They don’t understand the power of beauty:

    Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls.

    QT does seem to avoid that angle….although he does employ the favors-for-sex angle with Bruce Dern’s George Spahn, who allows the Manson Family to stay on his ranch in exchange for sex.I think that the scene where Pitt’s Cliff Booth turns down fellatio from the underage Manson girl also hints at the idea….

    Polanski’s suspicions later turned toward his own kung fu instructor Bruce Lee. (Lee is portrayed in the film as a pompous cult leader whom Pitt easily outfights.)

    Interesting take on Lee.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Surprising when I encountered it but certain circles (think: grad students) harbor disdain if not outright contempt for Lee's, uhhh, "philosophical pretenses?" Something like his more orotund, wind-chimey pronouncements on the Tao (sp?) being quite dumbed-down vs. the original Cantonese; personally I'd never taken him for an intellectual...
    , @syonredux

    Polanski’s suspicions later turned toward his own kung fu instructor Bruce Lee. (Lee is portrayed in the film as a pompous cult leader whom Pitt easily outfights.)
     
    Lee's blowhard/braggart schtick is counter to the Cowboy ethos that Pitt's Cliff Booth embodies.
  79. Anonymous[458] • Disclaimer says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    Um... Tarantino makes a fairytale movie with elements that are counterfactual, like a reimagining of how Hollywood could have been but wasn't. The white guys are portrayed well, but somehow we are not supposed to conclude that this element is a fantasy too?

    I doubt Tarantino is capable of seeing the real past the way Steve does.

    The white guys are portrayed well

    But the bad guys are whites too.

  80. @Buzz Mohawk
    In the swimming pool. Never get a swimming pool.

    People always seem to be dying in swimming pools. Plus, pools are an expensive maintenance pain in the ass that just sit there unused most of the time.

  81. Without all the Helter Skelter stuff…

  82. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Who wouldn’t have?

     

    St. Thomas Aquinas's decision to become a priest incensed his brothers for it went against their wishes.

    Being good Italian men, they sent a whore into his room to try and break his will.

    Being a good (dramatic) Italian man himself, young Thomas grabbed a log from the fire and chased the whore from the room. It was very cinematic; a good mix of comedy and furious piety.

    I'm hoping that this age of disgusting sexual license will soon inspire a vigorous reaction, creating a new emphasis not just on the restoration proper heterosexual marital relations, but the restoration of chastity and purity across the board, leading to the chasing of many whores with many burning objects.

    A little weirder than that, actually. Thomas Aquinas had been raised to become an Augustinian monk and to serve as the abbot of a local monastery that was traditionally lead by a member of his family. He decided he’d rather be a Dominican, an upstart order not wealthy and powerful like the Augustinians. His mother had him imprisoned and sent a prostitute so that he could learn about the pleasures awaiting him as an Augustinian abbot, vs an austere Dominican.

  83. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    Do we get to see Margot's Robbies?

    Nope

    You gotta go back to Wolf of Wall Street for that

  84. @Buzz Mohawk
    His first marriage ended in divorce -- in that magical year of 1969 when Star Trek was cancelled. He really did end up sleeping in his truck for a while.

    Yeah, and he did game shows because he needed the prize money.

    He took them very, very seriously.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    You gotta go back to Wolf of Wall Street for that
     
    You should go back to Wolf of Wall Street for that. FIFY.

    WWS is a pretty good movie, but kinda long. Di Caprio is a strange looking guy but he has the rare ability to disappear into his roles.
  85. The scene where Pitt is walking back to his car after talking to Spahn and the Manson Girls are yelling at him is 100% a Twitter metaphor

    • Agree: syonredux
  86. @megabar
    Apologies for the OT comment, but a previous post got me thinking about this:

    If Scientific American has been compromised (and I agree that it has), what's the best non-political magazine of approximately the same scope and level?

    The science and engineering honor society, Sigma Xi, publishes American Scientist, which is far superior to Scientific American. Non-members can subscribe.

    • Replies: @megabar
    > Sigma Xi, publishes American Scientist,

    That looks encouraging. I'll take a look. Thanks! Thanks to the others with their suggestions, as well.
    , @Russ
    Gerard Piel was the prime mover behind Scientific American, and it was after he left SciAm that SciAm became popularist and Piel joined American Scientist. Piel has been deceased for 15 years, yet AmSci still bears his thumbprint. I second the AmSci recommendation, though alas the whiff of feminization does tickle the nostril increasingly.
  87. @JimB
    I understand Steve’s excitement over seeing the LA of his childhood brought back to life, and I enjoyed the buddy film aspect of Once, but DiCapprio and Pitt come across as aging members of the Jackass crew. Anybody who remembers middle age men from the 60s, and their ability to make the world seem orderly and safe, would perceive Cliff and Rick as man babies. There were no character arcs to speak of, the rumor about Cliff getting away with killing his wife is gratuitous, except that it foreshadows he kills young women, and the picture occasionally stumbles on its own illogic. Like, why did the yokel hippie dude on the Spahn ranch stab Cliff’s car tire? Clearly, everybody wanted him to leave. So why disable his car? Also, I didn’t quite fathom why Tate didn’t want to pay the 75 cents to see her own movie. Like all Tarantino’s films, they seem to be the empowerment fantasies of middle school boys from a certain era.

    My dad was 32 in 1969. He was a former paratrooper. We lived on a large semi rural property that was a magnet for the local pot smokers and pill poppers who wanted an out of the way place to party.
    Every once in a while he’d head out in the night with his single barrel shotgun and fire a few shells up in the air to run them off.
    Some of them came by the house one day when no one was home and stole some of his clothes from the line and, using them, constructed an effigy which they then hung by the neck from a tree branch overhanging the lane to our house.
    When my mother came home with a carload of children, she had a frightened moment before she saw it was only a dummy and not, in fact, my father hanging there.
    He went out in the night once more, without his shotgun, and we never saw hide nor hair of those amateur hippies again.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Ever tell you where he buried them?
  88. @Jim bob Lassiter
    "Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls."

    It doesn't get much more Occam's Razor than that.

    The problem with Sailer’s statement is he never quite defines “how many important people”. Moreover, there is an assumption that those same individuals, the entire lot of them, had a hankering for young flesh. It is possible, but not certain.

    • Replies: @Thirdeye
    It's how he got in with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys (which connected Manson to the Tate house), but it was mostly for small time favors from small time people.
  89. @Thulean Friend
    Brody is jewish. He only approved of movies with non-colored cast if they are directed by jews, like Woody Allen (and preferably cast with mostly jews in actors as well, if possible).

    You can not understand these people as anything other than anti-White. I wish there was more sophistication to this issue, but there isn't.

    Brody is jewish. He only approved of movies with non-colored cast if they are directed by jews, like Woody Allen (and preferably cast with mostly jews in actors as well, if possible).

    Woody Allen the nebbishy anti-Semite? His movies famously do not have Jewish actors in them. Jewish actresses in his movies? ….lol….

  90. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus
    And now we have Alt Right propaganda infiltrating movie reviews. We begin with Mr. Sailer's false premise- "The stifling conformity of the Great Awokening has now driven even Quentin Tarantino to the subversive right". Taratino created this movie as a homage to a time period in his usual grandiose fashion, employing cinematic and pop-culture mythology for his version of reality. It is a culmination of the types of movies which have always inspired him, rather than being politically motivated by the current battle royal of the Coalition of the Fringes or being driven to digitally channel his inner disdain toward the Counter Cultural movement and the Baby Boomer lifestyle.

    As an aside, I did not realize having woman's face being repeatedly smashed against a wall constitutes "comic mayhem" or liberal use of the gutter Hippie language (thanks George Carlin) as being "remarkably wholesome".

    Regarding Tate, she serves as a figurative backdrop to the optimism of Hollywood at that time as it was undergoing radical changes in moviemaking and in the cultural landscape. She is dreamy, which serves as a counter to the two male leads who are gloomy about their future prospects as actors, not as white men. Tate's limited presence was by design by Tarantino to underscore her eventual demise, for those audience members familiar with the heinous Manson murders, which is a product of individual neuroses rather than a generational mental illness.

    "Moreover, Tarantino, whose irresponsible 2012 hit Django Unchained espousing black gun violence likely contributed to the Great Awokening and the ensuing black-on-black murder binge"

    I just LOVE it when Mr. Sailer casually throws in these lines in the middle of his piece (burying the lede?) without offering a modicum of exploration, as if his statement is observably true and need not be properly vetted.

    "My guess is that well-indoctrinated young people will find Once puzzling, if not unsettling. Why, they will wonder, are the heroes white men? Why don’t they at least have the basic decency to feel ashamed of their whiteness?"

    Classic projection, confirmation bias, and wild speculation. A Sailer trifecta!

    lol, where is your god now

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "lol, where is your god now"

    Jesus Christ--you know, the one who died for our sins--is with you and I.
  91. Critic Richard Brody complains, “Tarantino delivers a ridiculously white movie”

    Well, the whole Manson thing was very white.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    Do you think Brody would like a (factual) movie about the NOI/Zebra murders? That would be a "black" movie.
  92. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    Twitter is currently mad that Margot Robbie doesn’t get many lines as starlet Sharon Tate. But the hoopla over the Bechdel Test overlooks that film is a visual medium. Robbie is memorable at being a young woman whose beauty and sweetness make life a little happier for everyone around her.
     
    SJWs are fundamentally verbally oriented. They don't understand the power of beauty:

    https://bloody-disgusting.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/margot-robbie-sharon-tate.png


    Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls.
     
    QT does seem to avoid that angle....although he does employ the favors-for-sex angle with Bruce Dern's George Spahn, who allows the Manson Family to stay on his ranch in exchange for sex.I think that the scene where Pitt's Cliff Booth turns down fellatio from the underage Manson girl also hints at the idea....

    Polanski’s suspicions later turned toward his own kung fu instructor Bruce Lee. (Lee is portrayed in the film as a pompous cult leader whom Pitt easily outfights.)
     
    Interesting take on Lee.

    Surprising when I encountered it but certain circles (think: grad students) harbor disdain if not outright contempt for Lee’s, uhhh, “philosophical pretenses?” Something like his more orotund, wind-chimey pronouncements on the Tao (sp?) being quite dumbed-down vs. the original Cantonese; personally I’d never taken him for an intellectual…

  93. Anonymous[258] • Disclaimer says:
    @WowJustWow
    “On the other hand, if you have less reason than I do to wax nostalgic over KHJ-AM Boss Radio or the Helm’s Bakery truck that Charles Manson is shown driving during his one cameo, well, you might wonder when Tarantino is finally going to get to the gore. The film is languidly paced and, while I found it hilarious, the rest of the audience only laughed occasionally.”

    When a new QT movie comes out, people always seem to forget how low his action/violence-to-rambling-dialogue ratio usually is.
  94. Jeffrey Epstein – Eugenicist:

  95. @L Woods

    But there aren’t all that many times in history in which attractive girls did something so horrible that they deserved what Tarantino’s depraved imagination can dream up for them…
     
    ROFLMAO. Are you kidding me? How so many can make it into middle age with this sort of willful naivete intact, I'll never quite understand.

    Uhh, being catty and flighty (main faults of attractive young girls) doesn’t qualify as “very horrible things.” There is a big difference between being annoying and being evil. Most people’s definitions of “very horrible things” include things like robbery, murder, war crimes, genocide, etc. Original poster is right…Manson murders, Patty Hearst and perhaps some of the female concentration camp guards in Nazi Germany are some of the only examples of attractive young women doing high-profile terrible things in the 20th century.

  96. Speaking of Jeffery Epstein, I’d like to hear everyone’s take on these bizarre revelations. Lots of great lines in here.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/31/business/jeffrey-epstein-eugenics.html

  97. @Buzz Mohawk
    In the swimming pool. Never get a swimming pool.

    People always seem to be dying in swimming pools. Plus, pools are an expensive maintenance pain in the ass that just sit there unused most of the time.

    She was an alcoholic and had taken Valium. If she hadn’t accidentally drowned she would have eventually driven her car into a tree or her liver would have given out, etc. Alcohol will kill you (but I have it in my house anyway). People are also always dying in bathtubs, in cars, on ladders, etc. but I’ve got those too.

    In the Southern California climate pools are usable almost all year. Some people really enjoy them. Not swimming alone is a good idea. Having your pool fenced in a way that little kids can’t wander into it is a good idea – most people have the pool fenced off from the world but not from their own house.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    A sad reason for a SoCal resident to have a pool was illustrated in Portugal last year: you can hide from a fire you failed to evacuate from in there.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Never eat alone either. Lots of people choke on food, and there wouldn't be anyone around to do the Heimlich maneuver. Even better, just avoid solid food altogether.

    CT law here requires pool fences, but I wasn't being serious.

    A friend of my parents did die at his own pool party though. Everybody was drinking and having a good, Mad Men time of the era, when suddenly they noticed that their host was motionless under the water. My father pulled him out, but it was too late. It might have been a heart attack or drunkenness, but I was too young then to remember now what the explanation was.

    BTW we just have to conclude that Mrs. Shatner was murdered as part of some Jewish conspiracy. I mean, Bill was one, and so was Leonard Nimoy. What are the odds? Star Trek was one of my favorite TV shows, but I never read any mention of the Jewish angle in any of my morning newspapers. Years later I read some books about the series. When I connected the dots, I realized that is is not impossible that the Federation of Planets was a Jewish cabal.

  98. @Pericles
    OT: It has now become a problem that the Swedish populace are wearing bullet proof vests; in Malmö, certain youths are even walking about wearing them openly. What to do? Why, make them illegal to wear for others than police and similar personnel!

    https://www.svt.se/nyheter/inrikes/kronofogden-saljer-skottsakra-vastar-trots-tal-om-forbud
    (In Swedish.)

    OT: It has now become a problem that the Swedish populace are wearing bullet proof vests; in Malmö, certain youths are even walking about wearing them openly. What to do? Why, make them illegal to wear for others than police and similar personnel!

    How about their awful imitations of black American’s rap music. All rap sucks but the rap that Muslims and blacks in Europe produce is the worst. Monkeys and orangutans in the zoo make more sense.

    • Replies: @Pericles

    How about their awful imitations of black American’s rap music. All rap sucks but the rap that Muslims and blacks in Europe produce is the worst. Monkeys and orangutans in the zoo make more sense.

     

    Aww, but it's so genuine and uh like something third world uhhh global south? ... I got nothing.

    (White cringe rap)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OEWwZqqBps

    (Chilean socialist imports, 2nd gen:)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeNtRTnRUHM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEPZ3HwOgbY

    (Chilean socialist import 3rd gen? Possibly:)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hv759wmsSFk

    , @UrbaneFrancoOntarian
    link to some muslim and black rappers from Europe?

    i actually pity most young people who listen to rap. it's the only mainstream option nowadays. but it's just negroid garbage.
  99. @Jack D
    She was an alcoholic and had taken Valium. If she hadn't accidentally drowned she would have eventually driven her car into a tree or her liver would have given out, etc. Alcohol will kill you (but I have it in my house anyway). People are also always dying in bathtubs, in cars, on ladders, etc. but I've got those too.

    In the Southern California climate pools are usable almost all year. Some people really enjoy them. Not swimming alone is a good idea. Having your pool fenced in a way that little kids can't wander into it is a good idea - most people have the pool fenced off from the world but not from their own house.

    A sad reason for a SoCal resident to have a pool was illustrated in Portugal last year: you can hide from a fire you failed to evacuate from in there.

    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
    So long as the water doesn't boil.

    Sometimes it does.
  100. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I'm sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,...uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it's a necessary evil, but still evil. All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles. Which is of course hypocritical and double standard-ish for them to preach about virtue, chastity, and purity (the last two are best left for pre-teens and under the age of about 16).

    Like, just because a beta man turned down sex, somehow that makes him a virtuous moral individual? BS. It means he's a beta who doesn't understand what its really like. Yeah, hanging around other dudes for one's entire adult life is way more virtuous for men. Believe that we'll tell you another one.

    Regarding intellectual capacity, Aquinas was a man of no mean stature. Regarding living life as a regular person, not quite so much. Also was vs the Immaculate Conception, and for centuries the Dominicans followed his lead in this regard.

    Like it or not, Manson offered relatively young and famous Hollywood bigs what they wanted: young, fresh, nubile girls with no strings attached. And at first he was smart to trade it for studio recording time for his songs. If only he had had some major songwriting talent, perhaps the world would've had a much better opinion of him. Aside from Dennis, Dorris Day's son also got him some recording studio time. And Dorris's son was a record producer. It's like, Manson's songs aren't recorded today, but people can still turn on the radio and hear "It's bitsty teeny weeny poka dota bikini" and other novelty dreck. His songs couldn't have been any worse.

    Far be it from me to defend the Catholic Church, but I can see how living a life of chastity could be seen as virtuous and holy and a desirable thing in your clergy. Rather than having to juggle work and family or spend their time chasing tail, they can devote themselves solely to their mission.

    However, if “chastity” is really just a cover for buggery and child molestation, then not so good. The question is whether you can really find enough holy men who are truly able to keep their vows of chastity and who are not just repressed homosexuals, especially in the modern world. Magic 8 Ball says “Doubtful”.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    As the putatively Jewish Nick Lowe would say in song --- "You gotta be cruel to be kind in the right measure"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=92&v=b0l3QWUXVho
    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Chastity is the virtue that moderates the sexual drive and helps it achieve the creation of human life in a civilized way.

    People constantly - and I do mean constantly - misunderstand chastity to mean the same thing as celibacy.

    Chastity is practiced by all reasonable people.

    And, yes, it's hard to give up sex (that is, to be celibate). But not impossible. The advent of Catholic priest as homosexual is largely new (20th century) problem, and it's to a large degree a problem of leftists (including the Soviets and, of course, the Masons) infiltrating the Church.
    , @Hibernian
    In the Eastern Churches, both Orthodox (don't recognize the primacy of the Pope) and Uniate (kinda sorta acknowledge him provided they are allowed to largely run their own affairs) ordinary parish priests are generally married while celibacy is required of monks (by definition) and Bishops are drawn from the ranks of the monks. The Uniates, however, are allowed to follow this rule in their own countries but have to follow the celibacy rule in the US. (They're aren't very many of them here.) Also married Anglican priests who convert to Roman Catholicism have sometimes been given a dispensation from the rule, in the UK and the US.
  101. @Digital Samizdat

    ... prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi was much appreciated within the entertainment industry for portraying Manson as an LSD-crazed apocalyptic avenger. Bugliosi’s masterful job of making Manson seem like the ultimate outsider sidetracked the question of why a lowlife jailbird like Manson had become something of an insider at the best parties in the Hollywood Hills.
     
    Another damn-good sidetracked question would be why Charlie Manson was never invited to join the Beach Boys. The original, Manson-version of the song "Never Learn Not to Love" (which he had called "Cease to Exist") is actually better than the version the Beach Boys recorded. Very haunting! About like Donovan's "Season of the Witch" being sung by ... a warlock.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1MmHGoKq1Y

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Never_Learn_Not_to_Love

    Anyhoo, I'm so glad Tarantino's 'woke' phase seems to be over. Looks like I'll be headed to movies again soon ...

    https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/i-desire-195264/

    Adapting poetry written by a near-assassinator of a U.S. president is not exactly a common songwriting practice. But that is exactly what Devo did on “I Desire,” when they incorporated into the song several verses penned by John Hinckley Jr. — notorious for stalking Jodie Foster and shooting Ronald Reagan in 1981. As Mark Mothersbaugh recalled, “[Hinckley] let us take a poem that he had written, and we used it for the lyrics and turned it into a love song. It was not the best career move you could make. We had the FBI calling up and threatening us.”

    I Desire

    https://dangerousminds.net/comments/the_song_co-written_by_devo_and_john_hinckley_jr

  102. We’ll find out Tarantino has an anon groyper Twitter account and managed to get tummy and feet pics of all the blue tick women Brahmin pundits as protection.

  103. Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls.

    Funny enough, it’s come out today that, like Manson, Epstein also may have had grandiose, apocalyptic plans involving breeding the future of the human race on a ranch in the Southwestern deserts.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/31/business/jeffrey-epstein-eugenics.html

    • Replies: @El Dato

    Mr. Epstein’s vision reflected his longstanding fascination with what has become known as transhumanism: the science of improving the human population through technologies like genetic engineering and artificial intelligence. Critics have likened transhumanism to a modern-day version of eugenics, the discredited field of improving the human race through controlled breeding.
     
    It's good that the NYT tells us what is "discredited".

    Mr. Epstein attracted a glittering array of prominent scientists. They included the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann, who discovered the quark
     
    [LOLNO]

    Lunches will persist until the human race is full of little Epsteins:

    Alan M. Dershowitz, a professor emeritus of law at Harvard, recalled that at a lunch Mr. Epstein hosted in Cambridge, Mass., he steered the conversation toward the question of how humans could be improved genetically. Mr. Dershowitz said he was appalled, given the Nazis’ use of eugenics to justify their genocidal effort to purify the Aryan race.

    Yet the lunches persisted.
     
    , @David
    Just more smoke to obscure what he really was, an agent of Israel. If he'd wanted offspring, he would have had some.
  104. I was enjoying this until you ran off the page with DJango and Gun violence. I would have thought you have known better.

    The glorification of gun violence is parked by the early gangster films of the late 1920’s forward. Films like:

    Machine Kelly, Little Caesar, Underworld, White Heat, Public Enemy, Scarface an endless list of tommy gun toting, drive by shoot-outs.

    Laugh. I do think its funny that anyone would decry the lack of black presence about event that involved white people. Despite its supposed liberal progressive cocktail pate’ platter to served to cover the truth — in year in question hollywood was not that much more filled with blacks than it was in 1959.

  105. @njguy73
    Much of the entertainment industry was sleeping with Michelle Phillips.

    Except her husband, who was making the moves on his daughter from his first marriage.

    Oh – The Mamas and the Papas.

    When the Allman Brothers put two kids on the cover of her Rambling Man LP, it seemed a bit of a dangerous move – you know, as if there would be some twilight there, with the kids and stuff. Bob Christgau then remarked in his review of the LP in The Village Voice that you had to be the Allman Brothers to be naive enough to not even fear to be in the twilight zone. – – – – This was an (almost freakishly) cool remark then by Bob Christgau – and it is even more so in retrospect (didn’t know about the husband of Michelle Phillips).

  106. @Digital Samizdat

    ... the Manson girls, led by Dakota Fanning, Lena Dunham, and Andie MacDowell’s daughter Margaret Qualley, represent to Tarantino the sinister side of female susceptibility to propaganda.
     
    À propos your idea that the Manson Girls prefigure today's SJW-feminazi types, it also seems that the Manson Family pioneered the modern Hate Hoax. Isn't it true that after they stabbed Sharon Tate to death, they smeared the walls with her blood, writing a bunch of graffiti with it that they hoped would implicated the Black Panthers? Weren't they trying to help 'jump start' the race war that Charles Manson had always prophesied? If so, it was kinda like what Jussie Smollett was doing, only in reverse and without the two Nigerian body-builders!

    So what should we call the Manson hate hoax then? Working towards Charlie, perhaps?

    Hey, it’s always a good way to throw off the scent. Especially near the end of a police department’s “quota-month.”

  107. I’ll go see the movie. And I’m curious just how often this remark of the insightful Mr. Steve will pop up in my mind while watching. It will happen more than once, I guess. I was delighted to read this reference).

    Longshoreman philosopher Eric Hoffer argued that in a movie intent on revivifying the past, a strong plot is a distraction because human motivations are too timeless.

    Hoffer would have liked Once.

    I also liked the hint at the often overlooked fact, that film is an optical medium. True (that’s film’s strength – and marks its limitations).

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    My reaction when I read the Hoffer quote was this: "Dieter will like that". Never mind that Hoffer was a "homespun" media creation of no enduring value.

    But I follow him here: I can watch the Sisi films over and over again, for one reason only, nostalgia.
    The minimal plot is just there in the background, what matters are the sets, the uniforms, the stupendous '50s colour film, the music, the unspoilt land- and city-scapes, the beauty, the beauty, the beauty, and of course THAT beauty, Romi Schneider.

    If I want a certain profundity along with history and nostalgia (well, perhaps not exactly that in this case) I turn, say, to Ivan the Terrible, where the plot is essential to one's full enjoyment of what Eisenstein is doing, even if, as is certainly the case, each frame, taken alone, is a work of artistic genius. Put together as they then are, and melded with Prokofiev's magical score, the whole becomes nearly unbearable with the weight of its inventive power.
  108. Over the years, I have read a bunch of reviews making delusional claims by delusional conservatives that the movie under discussion had a conservative or at least subversive (to the lib status quo) message.

    Usually, it’s…all a delusion.

    Tarantino seems to be creating a series of simulacra in the sense Baudrillard uses the term (copies of a non-existent reality).

    Viewed as iterations of realities that did not exist (Jews did not kill Hitler, slaves did not rise up, middle aged white guys did not effectively resist hippies) Basterds, Django, and now this movie likely have a meaning (perhaps not fully conscious) to their creator to which their surface meaning is irrelevant.

    • Replies: @Thirdeye
    If it's not subversive to current "woke" fashions, why did the critic Richard Brody denounce its "ridiculous whiteness?" Brody, not Sailer, picked the fight.
  109. @Charles Pewitt

    My Review of "Once Upon a Time ... in America"

     

    Once upon a time in London, there were some English profiteers who formed something called the Virginia Company and they sailed to the new world, and set about starting the USA.

    Eventually, the sweet and kindly island people of England gently nudged aside the Dutch and the Swedes and the French and the Spaniards and others, and the island people of England are the political and cultural core of the USA.

    Trumpy just went down to Virginia to commemorate and celebrate the English colonists and profiteers and settlers who founded Jamestown in 1607 and had some kind of a political assembly in 1619.

    The Virginia Company is the heart and soul and spirit of the United States of America.

    Got that Nathaniel Philbrick, you nasty baby boomer slob!

    Eventually, the sweet and kindly island people of England gently nudged aside the Dutch and the Swedes and the French and the Spaniards and others, and the island people of England are the political and cultural core of the USA.

    > Not even mentioning the Germans who might well have become the “core” if there hadn’t been a mighty banhammer during the Great War,

  110. “My guess is that well-indoctrinated young people will find Once puzzling, if not unsettling. Why, they wonder, are the heroes white men? Why don’t they at least have the basic decency to feel ashamed of their whiteness?”

    I’m insulted, there’s been plenty of backlash from the young against SJW themed films. Especially when they’re defiling a dearly loved film brand. The female-ghostbusters film was harshly criticized and unprofitable. The upcoming black female “James Bond” is going to be a flop. (Does Hollywood do this to kill two birds with one stone? Prove their virtue signaling while making up the loss as a tax deduction?)

    At least we have the Kingsman series.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Kingsman blows dead dogs. I can't believe Colin Firth was so desperate for $$ that he did not one, but two, of these POS.
  111. @J1234
    Tarantino sees a market for white oriented movies and capitalizes on it. I don't suspect any deeper motives than that. Maybe a "reverse Dolemite" white-sploitation strategy? Admittedly, however, I haven't seen this film and don't intend to. I haven't seen many Tarantino movies, but the ones I've seen indicate that he has a great reverence for crap. It seems to me he tries to elevate (generally) crappy old movie genres to a higher level, and probably succeeds, which isn't that great of an accomplishment, IMO.

    Whatever this movie is, we will probably see more white-sploitation films in the future. It's a manifestation of our diminished status. I just don't want to be one of the idiots in the audience shouting, "Yeah! yeah!" (either literally or figuratively) like the blacks did at Dolemite. BTW, sounds like there's a Dolemite remake coming out, so QT isn't the only one with a reverence for crap.

    The essentially white movie I'm waiting for is Midway. I'm just wondering how many heroic black Navy cooks will be in it.

    Bet they won’t make Dolemite white in the remake ….

  112. @Thomas

    Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls.
     
    Funny enough, it’s come out today that, like Manson, Epstein also may have had grandiose, apocalyptic plans involving breeding the future of the human race on a ranch in the Southwestern deserts.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/31/business/jeffrey-epstein-eugenics.html

    Mr. Epstein’s vision reflected his longstanding fascination with what has become known as transhumanism: the science of improving the human population through technologies like genetic engineering and artificial intelligence. Critics have likened transhumanism to a modern-day version of eugenics, the discredited field of improving the human race through controlled breeding.

    It’s good that the NYT tells us what is “discredited”.

    Mr. Epstein attracted a glittering array of prominent scientists. They included the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann, who discovered the quark

    [LOLNO]

    Lunches will persist until the human race is full of little Epsteins:

    Alan M. Dershowitz, a professor emeritus of law at Harvard, recalled that at a lunch Mr. Epstein hosted in Cambridge, Mass., he steered the conversation toward the question of how humans could be improved genetically. Mr. Dershowitz said he was appalled, given the Nazis’ use of eugenics to justify their genocidal effort to purify the Aryan race.

    Yet the lunches persisted.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    It’s good that the NYT tells us what is “discredited”.

    Mr. Epstein attracted a glittering array of prominent scientists. They included the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann, who discovered the quark
     

     
    The Times ought to be discredited on account of capsule histories like that one. Gell-Mann did not "discover the quark". He posited the quark. Not the same thing.
  113. OT:
    The Irishman | Official Teaser

    Published on Jul 31, 2019
    Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci star in Martin Scorsese’s THE IRISHMAN, an epic saga of organized crime in post-war America told through the eyes of World War II veteran Frank Sheeran, a hustler and hitman who worked alongside some of the most notorious figures of the 20th Century. Spanning decades, the film chronicles one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in American history, the disappearance of legendary union boss Jimmy Hoffa, and offers a monumental journey through the hidden corridors of organized crime: its inner workings, rivalries and connections to mainstream politics.

    Watch The Irishman, Only on Netflix:
    https://www.netflix.com/theirishman

  114. @Anonymous

    Critic Richard Brody complains, “Tarantino delivers a ridiculously white movie” that “celebrates white-male stardom (and behind-the-scenes command).”
     
    Would that apply to Catch Me If You Can, Almost Famous, Bridge of Spies, Hoffa, The Right Stuff, A Serious Man, Wolf of Wall Street, The Master, Broadway Danny Rose, etc?

    Blade Runner's vision of 2019 was pro-regressive, I suppose. Looked ahead and preferred the lost past.

    This is the sort of person we have directing the cultural landscape.

  115. @Bruno
    Richard Brody is probably the most intelligent movie critic on the market . But he has been infected by anti white hatred - except for old movies. His critic of First Man was entirely driven by white hatred. I made some sarcastic comments about it while insisting on the very interesting (other) aspects of its review. He blocked me in 5 minutes.

    In his twitter account he presents Once upon as a reactionary movie with a link to his NEwYorker article . The NEwYorker is both the most intelligent cultural paper and most anti white.

    The economist is the most intelligent paper among ultra-pro- third world invasion partisans.

    Studying The Economist and The New Yorker journalist and shareholders could be a very interesting way to know better our world true leaders and values.

    Your movie critic are far less good than you comments on patterns about news. But your seeing that Django was a cultural moment that unchained white hatred is extremely insightful, even if your are not the best at understanding or explaining the movie in itself.

    Unz is a chance for people interested in understanding society.

    I would like an analysis of what’s going on with the Greta Thurnberg dog-and-pony show.

    Let them sail yachts: Why Greta Thunberg and the environmental elite hate you

    Who is putting pedal to the metal by sending around Environmental Jeanne Darcs?

  116. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    Who wouldn’t have?

     

    St. Thomas Aquinas's decision to become a priest incensed his brothers for it went against their wishes.

    Being good Italian men, they sent a whore into his room to try and break his will.

    Being a good (dramatic) Italian man himself, young Thomas grabbed a log from the fire and chased the whore from the room. It was very cinematic; a good mix of comedy and furious piety.

    I'm hoping that this age of disgusting sexual license will soon inspire a vigorous reaction, creating a new emphasis not just on the restoration proper heterosexual marital relations, but the restoration of chastity and purity across the board, leading to the chasing of many whores with many burning objects.

    Yeah no.

    Don’t be the guy who hates that possibility that somewhere, someone is having fun.

  117. @Achmed E. Newman
    I avoided the other thread on this subject because I am NO fan of the movie biz. I like watching a good movie, mind you, usually something from 3 decades ago back or more, but I just don't give a rat's ass who directed it, who the stars are and who they're doing, and all that.

    However, if you all here are recommending this movie as being Politically Incorrect and non-anti-white, then I may go see this one. Either way, I'll go read the Taki column later on.

    You couldn’t pay me to watch a Tarantino movie, not even if he remade Triumph of the Will.

    Or especially if, actually. He’s the enemy of everything good about America, though granted that’s not so much anymore.

  118. @Thomas

    Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls.
     
    Funny enough, it’s come out today that, like Manson, Epstein also may have had grandiose, apocalyptic plans involving breeding the future of the human race on a ranch in the Southwestern deserts.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/31/business/jeffrey-epstein-eugenics.html

    Just more smoke to obscure what he really was, an agent of Israel. If he’d wanted offspring, he would have had some.

  119. Not just regressive but obscenely so? What, they don’t count Bruce Lee as diverse? Isn’t there any Tarantinoian feminine ass-kicking present in the fipm? Isn’t the bad guy white?

  120. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I'm sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,...uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it's a necessary evil, but still evil. All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles. Which is of course hypocritical and double standard-ish for them to preach about virtue, chastity, and purity (the last two are best left for pre-teens and under the age of about 16).

    Like, just because a beta man turned down sex, somehow that makes him a virtuous moral individual? BS. It means he's a beta who doesn't understand what its really like. Yeah, hanging around other dudes for one's entire adult life is way more virtuous for men. Believe that we'll tell you another one.

    Regarding intellectual capacity, Aquinas was a man of no mean stature. Regarding living life as a regular person, not quite so much. Also was vs the Immaculate Conception, and for centuries the Dominicans followed his lead in this regard.

    Like it or not, Manson offered relatively young and famous Hollywood bigs what they wanted: young, fresh, nubile girls with no strings attached. And at first he was smart to trade it for studio recording time for his songs. If only he had had some major songwriting talent, perhaps the world would've had a much better opinion of him. Aside from Dennis, Dorris Day's son also got him some recording studio time. And Dorris's son was a record producer. It's like, Manson's songs aren't recorded today, but people can still turn on the radio and hear "It's bitsty teeny weeny poka dota bikini" and other novelty dreck. His songs couldn't have been any worse.

    Be fruitful and multiply, they say. Which doesn’t sound like “ew, sex is yucky” to me.

    Used to be people made fun of Catholics for bearing too many children. I don’t know if you know this, but one must do gross things to produce children.

  121. @Jack D
    Far be it from me to defend the Catholic Church, but I can see how living a life of chastity could be seen as virtuous and holy and a desirable thing in your clergy. Rather than having to juggle work and family or spend their time chasing tail, they can devote themselves solely to their mission.

    However, if "chastity" is really just a cover for buggery and child molestation, then not so good. The question is whether you can really find enough holy men who are truly able to keep their vows of chastity and who are not just repressed homosexuals, especially in the modern world. Magic 8 Ball says "Doubtful".

    As the putatively Jewish Nick Lowe would say in song — “You gotta be cruel to be kind in the right measure”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=92&v=b0l3QWUXVho

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    Hardcover – August 20, 2019
    https://www.amazon.com/Cruel-Be-Kind-Life-Music/dp/0306921952/

    The definitive biography of singer-songwriter Nick Lowe, best-known for "Cruel to Be Kind" and "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding"

    Described as "Britain's greatest living songwriter," Nick Lowe has made his mark as a pioneer of pub rock, power-pop, and punk rock and as a producer of Elvis Costello, Graham Parker, the Damned, and the Pretenders. He has been a pop star with his bands Brinsley Schwarz and Rockpile, a stepson-in-law to Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, and is the writer behind hits including "Cruel to Be Kind" and "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding." In the past decades, however, he has distinguished himself as an artist who is equally acclaimed for the second act of his career as a tender yet sharp-tongued acoustic balladeer.

    Biographer Will Birch, who in addition to being a music writer was a drummer and songwriter with The Records, has known Lowe for over forty years and melds Lowe's gift as a witty raconteur with his own authoritative analysis of Lowe's background and the cultural scenes he exemplifies. Lowe's parallel fame as one of the best interviews in the business will contribute to this first look into his life and work--and likely the closest thing fans will get to an autobiography by this notoriously charming cult figure.

    This is not an authorized biography, but Lowe has given it his spiritual blessing and his management and label are fully on board. Cruel to Be Kind will be the colorful yet serious account of one of the world's most talented and admired musicians.
     
  122. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I'm sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,...uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it's a necessary evil, but still evil. All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles. Which is of course hypocritical and double standard-ish for them to preach about virtue, chastity, and purity (the last two are best left for pre-teens and under the age of about 16).

    Like, just because a beta man turned down sex, somehow that makes him a virtuous moral individual? BS. It means he's a beta who doesn't understand what its really like. Yeah, hanging around other dudes for one's entire adult life is way more virtuous for men. Believe that we'll tell you another one.

    Regarding intellectual capacity, Aquinas was a man of no mean stature. Regarding living life as a regular person, not quite so much. Also was vs the Immaculate Conception, and for centuries the Dominicans followed his lead in this regard.

    Like it or not, Manson offered relatively young and famous Hollywood bigs what they wanted: young, fresh, nubile girls with no strings attached. And at first he was smart to trade it for studio recording time for his songs. If only he had had some major songwriting talent, perhaps the world would've had a much better opinion of him. Aside from Dennis, Dorris Day's son also got him some recording studio time. And Dorris's son was a record producer. It's like, Manson's songs aren't recorded today, but people can still turn on the radio and hear "It's bitsty teeny weeny poka dota bikini" and other novelty dreck. His songs couldn't have been any worse.

    You’re named after one of my favorite movies, but this is an utterly nonsense take:

    I’m sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,…uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting.

    Yes, that’s why we used to have so many large families.

    *SARCASM*

    Of all the anti-Catholic tropes, the idea that we once treated sex for married people as “dirty, nasty, disgusting” is possibly the most remarkably asinine and insipid.

    If marriage was/is your vocation, you enjoyed making love and had lots of babies. Anything else is absolute nonsense.

    You also have no clue what chastity is, I suppose. Chastity is a virtue for ALL to exercise, because it means the moderate use of sex according to right reason.

    In any case, it’s just amazing you could actually believe we could have huge families while simultaneously hating sex.

    We only stopped enjoying sex once you damned non-Catholics let the non-Catholic leaders (The Rockefeller’s) brainwash us into accepting birth control. Once we accepted sex as merely for pleasure, as opposed to an incredibly pleasurable act for an even more beautiful end, lo and behold we ALL stopped enjoying it at all! Social engineering for the win!

  123. @Jack D
    Far be it from me to defend the Catholic Church, but I can see how living a life of chastity could be seen as virtuous and holy and a desirable thing in your clergy. Rather than having to juggle work and family or spend their time chasing tail, they can devote themselves solely to their mission.

    However, if "chastity" is really just a cover for buggery and child molestation, then not so good. The question is whether you can really find enough holy men who are truly able to keep their vows of chastity and who are not just repressed homosexuals, especially in the modern world. Magic 8 Ball says "Doubtful".

    Chastity is the virtue that moderates the sexual drive and helps it achieve the creation of human life in a civilized way.

    People constantly – and I do mean constantly – misunderstand chastity to mean the same thing as celibacy.

    Chastity is practiced by all reasonable people.

    And, yes, it’s hard to give up sex (that is, to be celibate). But not impossible. The advent of Catholic priest as homosexual is largely new (20th century) problem, and it’s to a large degree a problem of leftists (including the Soviets and, of course, the Masons) infiltrating the Church.

  124. Anonymous[277] • Disclaimer says:

    Good review. Tarantino kind of lost me with Basterds and Django; both had plenty of snappy writing and good/great performances but the over-the-top sadistic violence and generally pornographic feel of both movies left a bad taste in my mouth. Sounds like this is less Django and more Pulp Fiction. I’ll probably go see it now.

    Re: Manson, you could come up with no greater argument against the 60s and its peculiar–mostly hypocritical–morality than Charlie and the Family. “Sexual liberation” becomes a guise under which to objectify women, drugs are just a means to ensnare and hypnotize the weak and vulnerable, children and “young adults” without strong parental oversight can easily fall into ruin…when you suddenly remove traditional moral restraints in what is essentially still a high-trust society, people who haven’t developed antibodies against exploitation are going to be especially vulnerable to it. I don’t think a Manson-type figure could operate as such in 2019; guys like that could only exist in a time when e.g. hitch-hiking was still an acceptable and widely-practiced mode of transporation for teenaged girls. When the hitch-hikers disappeared, the Mansons disappeared too.

  125. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I'm sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,...uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it's a necessary evil, but still evil. All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles. Which is of course hypocritical and double standard-ish for them to preach about virtue, chastity, and purity (the last two are best left for pre-teens and under the age of about 16).

    Like, just because a beta man turned down sex, somehow that makes him a virtuous moral individual? BS. It means he's a beta who doesn't understand what its really like. Yeah, hanging around other dudes for one's entire adult life is way more virtuous for men. Believe that we'll tell you another one.

    Regarding intellectual capacity, Aquinas was a man of no mean stature. Regarding living life as a regular person, not quite so much. Also was vs the Immaculate Conception, and for centuries the Dominicans followed his lead in this regard.

    Like it or not, Manson offered relatively young and famous Hollywood bigs what they wanted: young, fresh, nubile girls with no strings attached. And at first he was smart to trade it for studio recording time for his songs. If only he had had some major songwriting talent, perhaps the world would've had a much better opinion of him. Aside from Dennis, Dorris Day's son also got him some recording studio time. And Dorris's son was a record producer. It's like, Manson's songs aren't recorded today, but people can still turn on the radio and hear "It's bitsty teeny weeny poka dota bikini" and other novelty dreck. His songs couldn't have been any worse.

    All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles.

    Correct, after the Soviet Union successfully planted homosexuals in our midst. Bella Dodd’s revelations are all anyone needs to know.

    Before that, in centuries past, we have documented examples of homosexual infiltrators who were caught and executed for attempting to subvert the Church’s life.

    But you clearly have no idea what you are talking about and are probably just another hater.

  126. Bruce Lee was not bested by Pitt. It was a tie. “Best two out of three.” The third round, undertaken after each character got a wake-up-blast of the power of the other, was broken up, but not before it was clear they were evenly matched.

    The real Lee did come off as pompous at times. It worked for him, though, in his position as Oriental guru to celebrity clients. For his guest spot on the TV show Longstreet he essentially played himself as he wanted to be perceived, and often was.

    Real life stuntman on the set of The Green Hornet and professional wrestler, Gene LeBell, has both praised Lee’s skill and dedication to martial arts and tweaked Lee’s most fanatic fans by telling how he once made Lee squeal like an angry piglet by lifting him off the ground and taunting him to try and punch or kick his way out.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Real life stuntman on the set of The Green Hornet and professional wrestler, Gene LeBell, has both praised Lee’s skill and dedication to martial arts and tweaked Lee’s most fanatic fans by telling how he once made Lee squeal like an angry piglet by lifting him off the ground and taunting him to try and punch or kick his way out.
     
    Gene LeBell was a noted Judo practitioner and cross-trained with Bruce Lee. He taught Lee Judo and wrestling and Lee taught him punching and kicking. LeBell was also in one of the earliest "MMA" fights in U.S. history against boxer Milo Savage.

    https://youtu.be/nIBo4Y3JTfU

    A much more interesting story is what he did to Steven Seagal.
  127. Half in the Bag: Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

    Published on Jul 31, 2019
    Mike and Jay talk about Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, the new film from Quentin Tarantino where people talk a whole lot.

    • Agree: danand
  128. OT:
    Bad news guys, Jeffery Epstein was into eugenics. Now he’s really crossed the line!

    Jeffrey Epstein Hoped to Seed Human Race With His DNA
    By James B. Stewart, Matthew Goldstein and Jessica Silver-Greenberg

    Mr. Epstein’s vision reflected his longstanding fascination with what has become known as transhumanism: the science of improving the human population through technologies like genetic engineering and artificial intelligence. Critics have likened transhumanism to a modern-day version of eugenics, the discredited field of improving the human race through controlled breeding.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/31/business/jeffrey-epstein-eugenics.html

  129. @Crawfurdmuir
    The science and engineering honor society, Sigma Xi, publishes American Scientist, which is far superior to Scientific American. Non-members can subscribe.

    > Sigma Xi, publishes American Scientist,

    That looks encouraging. I’ll take a look. Thanks! Thanks to the others with their suggestions, as well.

  130. OT (but related to Hollywood):

    Marvel Studios wants to put a tranny in the new Thor movie:
    https://boundingintocomics.com/2019/07/31/report-marvel-studios-to-cast-transgender-female-character-in-phase-4/

    They might as well go full woketard and make Thor a tranny. My first casting choice would be Australian handball player Hannah Mouncey. At 6’2” and 220 pounds, with flowing blonde locks, s/he/it would be a perfect choice:

  131. Anonymous[100] • Disclaimer says:

    runaway girls fresh off the Greyhound bus.

    Was there really such a phenomenon? Or is that more myth/meme than reality?

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I hitchhiked across the country in 1970 and back then you'd see a fair number of girls hitchhiking, alone or in pairs. A lot of these would be the types Manson would find. The hippie worldview put great faith in the kindness of strangers.
  132. I’ve read nearly everything Steve has written since 2007 and that’s one of his finest essays, right up there with his last longform essay is for Vdare (2012?).

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    This one was right in his wheelhouse.
  133. @Jack D
    She was an alcoholic and had taken Valium. If she hadn't accidentally drowned she would have eventually driven her car into a tree or her liver would have given out, etc. Alcohol will kill you (but I have it in my house anyway). People are also always dying in bathtubs, in cars, on ladders, etc. but I've got those too.

    In the Southern California climate pools are usable almost all year. Some people really enjoy them. Not swimming alone is a good idea. Having your pool fenced in a way that little kids can't wander into it is a good idea - most people have the pool fenced off from the world but not from their own house.

    Never eat alone either. Lots of people choke on food, and there wouldn’t be anyone around to do the Heimlich maneuver. Even better, just avoid solid food altogether.

    CT law here requires pool fences, but I wasn’t being serious.

    A friend of my parents did die at his own pool party though. Everybody was drinking and having a good, Mad Men time of the era, when suddenly they noticed that their host was motionless under the water. My father pulled him out, but it was too late. It might have been a heart attack or drunkenness, but I was too young then to remember now what the explanation was.

    BTW we just have to conclude that Mrs. Shatner was murdered as part of some Jewish conspiracy. I mean, Bill was one, and so was Leonard Nimoy. What are the odds? Star Trek was one of my favorite TV shows, but I never read any mention of the Jewish angle in any of my morning newspapers. Years later I read some books about the series. When I connected the dots, I realized that is is not impossible that the Federation of Planets was a Jewish cabal.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    Nimoy came up with the Vulcan salute (“Live long and prosper). It’s based on a Jewish blessing gesture:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vulcan_salute

    The original Star Trek was fairly hippy-dippy, but it was not until TNG that the full-blown Marxism set in.

    Interestingly enough, the money-hungry, physically-repulsive Ferengi (originally envisioned as TNG’s Klingons - i.e., the main villains) embodied every single negative Jewish stereotype in the book. Joseph Goebbels would have been embarrassed to create such grotesque caricatures. And almost all of them were played by Jewish actors.

    Useless irrelevant trivia: Edward James Olmos was offered the role of Jean-Luc Picard, but turned it down. Gene Roddenberry initially opposed the casting of Patrick Stewart.
  134. @Buzz Mohawk
    Never eat alone either. Lots of people choke on food, and there wouldn't be anyone around to do the Heimlich maneuver. Even better, just avoid solid food altogether.

    CT law here requires pool fences, but I wasn't being serious.

    A friend of my parents did die at his own pool party though. Everybody was drinking and having a good, Mad Men time of the era, when suddenly they noticed that their host was motionless under the water. My father pulled him out, but it was too late. It might have been a heart attack or drunkenness, but I was too young then to remember now what the explanation was.

    BTW we just have to conclude that Mrs. Shatner was murdered as part of some Jewish conspiracy. I mean, Bill was one, and so was Leonard Nimoy. What are the odds? Star Trek was one of my favorite TV shows, but I never read any mention of the Jewish angle in any of my morning newspapers. Years later I read some books about the series. When I connected the dots, I realized that is is not impossible that the Federation of Planets was a Jewish cabal.

    Nimoy came up with the Vulcan salute (“Live long and prosper). It’s based on a Jewish blessing gesture:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vulcan_salute

    The original Star Trek was fairly hippy-dippy, but it was not until TNG that the full-blown Marxism set in.

    Interestingly enough, the money-hungry, physically-repulsive Ferengi (originally envisioned as TNG’s Klingons – i.e., the main villains) embodied every single negative Jewish stereotype in the book. Joseph Goebbels would have been embarrassed to create such grotesque caricatures. And almost all of them were played by Jewish actors.

    Useless irrelevant trivia: Edward James Olmos was offered the role of Jean-Luc Picard, but turned it down. Gene Roddenberry initially opposed the casting of Patrick Stewart.

  135. “And now we have Alt Right propaganda infiltrating movie reviews.”

    Why does Steve approve this imbecile’s comments? He detracts from every thread he is allowed to post on.

  136. I thought it was a lot of fun. Loved the photography of LA and SoCal.

    The New Yorker reviewer is upset because Tarantino didn’t give him any SJW material to hector his readers with. That and the fact that it’s about people in Hollywood who never invite him to their parties.

  137. OT – There’s an article in Slate about some rapper in Sweden. It seems to hit every iSteve bingo word.

    https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/07/asap-rocky-sweden-race-crime-immigration.html

    The question of immigrants and crime is a sensitive one in Sweden, not only because Sweden prides itself as a “humanitarian superpower” that has admitted large numbers of refugees from war-torn countries, but also because it is deeply committed to integrating immigrants into Swedish life, not vilifying them. In 2017, for example, Prime Minister Stefan Löfven refused to update statistics on the countries of origin of criminal offenders, in a bid to fend off charges that a majority of crimes were being committed by immigrants. Instead, Löfven has consistently stressed the vibrant diversity that immigrants bring to Sweden, meanwhile lobbying for increased social programs to address problems of alienation and unemployment in immigrant communities.

  138. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    I'm sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,...uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it's a necessary evil, but still evil. All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles. Which is of course hypocritical and double standard-ish for them to preach about virtue, chastity, and purity (the last two are best left for pre-teens and under the age of about 16).

    Like, just because a beta man turned down sex, somehow that makes him a virtuous moral individual? BS. It means he's a beta who doesn't understand what its really like. Yeah, hanging around other dudes for one's entire adult life is way more virtuous for men. Believe that we'll tell you another one.

    Regarding intellectual capacity, Aquinas was a man of no mean stature. Regarding living life as a regular person, not quite so much. Also was vs the Immaculate Conception, and for centuries the Dominicans followed his lead in this regard.

    Like it or not, Manson offered relatively young and famous Hollywood bigs what they wanted: young, fresh, nubile girls with no strings attached. And at first he was smart to trade it for studio recording time for his songs. If only he had had some major songwriting talent, perhaps the world would've had a much better opinion of him. Aside from Dennis, Dorris Day's son also got him some recording studio time. And Dorris's son was a record producer. It's like, Manson's songs aren't recorded today, but people can still turn on the radio and hear "It's bitsty teeny weeny poka dota bikini" and other novelty dreck. His songs couldn't have been any worse.

    I’m sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,…uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it’s a necessary evil, but still evil.

    ^Absurd caricature.

    All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles.

    Now this is at least reasonably accurate when it comes to the Vatican going back at least 60 years. In hindsight, the Catholic Church was nipping problems in the bud back when they burned people at the stake.

  139. anon[505] • Disclaimer says:

    Hollywood was founded by aspiring filmmakers moving West to escape the clutches of the corrupt NYC film industry. One wonders when another competing industry might form to escape this similarly oppressive climate. If you’re a talented young (white male) artist who also isn’t a self-hating racist, then you can’t in good conscience work with Hollywood or sell your property to them because they’d ruin it with their politics (or denounce it for not being racist propaganda if it stayed faithful to the source material). Just look at what they’ve done to all the major franchises since 2010 – race and gender swapped most of the white male leads. There’s also a rumor now that Marvel is swapping a female superhero character for a trans M2F character in one of these upcoming flicks. Marvel is looking to crater in this next phase because we now live in a post-profit era…sorta. The Hollywood left outmaneuvered Trump just like everyone else. Now that Disney owns a third of all the box office thanks to the corrupt FTC, they can afford to infuse their films with insane propaganda. Who in the industry cares that they make less money overall than they otherwise might have when there is no competition? They WILL make money because people have no other choices, as the thinking goes, so profit and art become less of a motivation and woke virtue signalling among upperclass peers takes center stage. A lot of this has been aided by the corrupt GOP and their subservience to large corporate donors. Thanks for selling your constituents down the river for a quick buck instead of doing your job and blocking all these mergers.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara

    One wonders when another competing industry might form to escape this similarly oppressive climate
     
    So long as Hollywood studios' distribution and production monopolies remain unchecked, there's little chance.
  140. It’s almost as if Trump is the kind of guy an increasingly Hispanicized America will vote for.

    Maybe liberals should have thought of that before Latinoizing the US?

    Along those lines, it’s interesting to note that, although Blacks are absent, there’s a Latinx undercurrent running though the film. The characters keep going to Mexican restaurants; Pitt’s Cliff Booth tells DiCaprio’s Dalton not to cry in front of the Mexicans; and the co-lead on Lancer (the show on which Dalton is guest-starring ) is a half-Mexican, half-Scottish gunfighter named Johnny Madrid ( who speaks a good deal of Spanish in the scenes that he shares with Dalton).

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Southern California had plenty of Mexican flavor back then (maybe just the right amount) but it wasn't a de facto part of Mexico the way it is now. There were Mexicans and Mexican restaurants, and my sister got an abortion in Tijuana, but the population seemed something like 90% White (not Hispanic).
  141. anon[145] • Disclaimer says:

    “the money-hungry, physically-repulsive Ferengi (originally envisioned as TNG’s Klingons – i.e., the main villains) embodied every single negative Jewish stereotype in the book. Joseph Goebbels would have been embarrassed to create such grotesque caricatures. And almost all of them were played by Jewish actors.”

    Ironically, the Ferengi turned out to be one of the better races in the Star Trek universe in the end. There was an interesting dynamic that developed whereby the Ferengi, although money-hungry and sexist, were actually somewhat better people than most other races, including humans in our age. They delight in pointing out to high-minded humans that they never did anything like slavery or genocide. They were just greedy businessmen and cheats; is that really so bad compared to war and death? Of course, DS9 ruined them in the end by making them go politically correct in the final season. Nothing like the Ferengi could be done in this day’s industry, sadly.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    They delight in pointing out to high-minded humans that they never did anything like slavery or genocide.
     
    They weren't proxies for Jews then.
    , @R.G. Camara
    The Trek guys played coy with the Ferengi on DS9. They deliberately set them up as the worst stereotypes of Jews, and then said it was satire.

    Funny how when they were originally introduced it was through a plot line where one renegade Ferengi leader was obsessed with vengeance against Picard in The Next Generation. Nothing at all to do with profit.
    , @J.Ross
    Ferengi Jewishness even extended to their alphabet, which like Hebrew is based around variations of a square. But the best thing about them was that their leader was none other than Wallace Shawn, who is great in everything even if it's Trek.
  142. @syonredux

    Twitter is currently mad that Margot Robbie doesn’t get many lines as starlet Sharon Tate. But the hoopla over the Bechdel Test overlooks that film is a visual medium. Robbie is memorable at being a young woman whose beauty and sweetness make life a little happier for everyone around her.
     
    SJWs are fundamentally verbally oriented. They don't understand the power of beauty:

    https://bloody-disgusting.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/margot-robbie-sharon-tate.png


    Why exactly did Manson know so many important people in showbiz? The answer was the same as for why Jeffrey Epstein knew so many important people in politics: He had access to jailbait girls.
     
    QT does seem to avoid that angle....although he does employ the favors-for-sex angle with Bruce Dern's George Spahn, who allows the Manson Family to stay on his ranch in exchange for sex.I think that the scene where Pitt's Cliff Booth turns down fellatio from the underage Manson girl also hints at the idea....

    Polanski’s suspicions later turned toward his own kung fu instructor Bruce Lee. (Lee is portrayed in the film as a pompous cult leader whom Pitt easily outfights.)
     
    Interesting take on Lee.

    Polanski’s suspicions later turned toward his own kung fu instructor Bruce Lee. (Lee is portrayed in the film as a pompous cult leader whom Pitt easily outfights.)

    Lee’s blowhard/braggart schtick is counter to the Cowboy ethos that Pitt’s Cliff Booth embodies.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara

    Lee’s blowhard/braggart schtick is counter to the Cowboy ethos that Pitt’s Cliff Booth embodies.
     
    It's amazing to read that Tarantino did that. As he is a huge fan of 70s chopsocky flicks (see Kill Bill), all of which were inspired and led by Lee's charisma, for him to degrade Lee to an all-talk-no-action guy smacks of blasphemy from Tarantino.'s point of view. Plus, as Tarantino loves blaxploitation films and being "in touch" with blacks in his films, he must know that any black man who's heard of Bruce Lee and seen his films (even to this day) thinks he's awesome and believes 100% that he could beat up any man in a fight.

    I haven't seen this film, but is the scene supposed to be ironic? As it is an alternate history, perhaps this was supposed to be one more alternate history?

    I don't buy that Lee was some sort of superman-fighter myself, just a smart guy who used a great body and some excellent flashy moves and some Asian-mystic-sounding flimflam to garner a good cult following and successful movie career in the West. What I'm saying is that many of the people Tarantino identifies with and Tarantino himself would've have bought Lee's nonsense, so for Tarantino to come out against it seems shocking.
  143. @syonredux

    It's almost as if Trump is the kind of guy an increasingly Hispanicized America will vote for.

    Maybe liberals should have thought of that before Latinoizing the US?
     

    https://twitter.com/Steve_Sailer/status/1156533952481357824


    Along those lines, it's interesting to note that, although Blacks are absent, there's a Latinx undercurrent running though the film. The characters keep going to Mexican restaurants; Pitt's Cliff Booth tells DiCaprio's Dalton not to cry in front of the Mexicans; and the co-lead on Lancer (the show on which Dalton is guest-starring ) is a half-Mexican, half-Scottish gunfighter named Johnny Madrid ( who speaks a good deal of Spanish in the scenes that he shares with Dalton).

    Southern California had plenty of Mexican flavor back then (maybe just the right amount) but it wasn’t a de facto part of Mexico the way it is now. There were Mexicans and Mexican restaurants, and my sister got an abortion in Tijuana, but the population seemed something like 90% White (not Hispanic).

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    The chart has been posted here before, LA was white until the late seventies, and still very white until the early to mid eighties.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    Those of who lived there, then, can tell you how it was: the Mexicans were the defeated ones. California had been theirs, but now it was ours.
    Therefore we could be relaxed about their minimal and picturesque presence, enjoy their food, respect their Faith (particularly if we shared it), and otherwise ignore them. If we suddenly noticed that there were too many, we sent them back where they came from.

    But eternal vigilance was not exercised, and here we are.

  144. Here’s another way to look at the film.

    Including this film, three of Tarantino’s movies are of a specific, self-created genre: alternate histories designed to flatter groups who are otherwise extremely embarrassed/unmanned by what actually happened.

    1. Inglorious Basterds: In the movie, a very masculine, intimidating, special forces unit of Jews kill Hitler and a horde of other Nazis using brutal, heroic methods (burning to death, beating with a baseball bats, blasted with a machine gun, etc.).

    In reality: Jews were rounded up and murdered by the Nazis with very little physical resistance (outside of a few overblown uprisings) , and no such Jew-revenge squad existed. Instead, white gentiles beat the Nazis, with few Jews joining them for the fight on the front lines, and Jews had to be rescued like women and children. Hitler committed suicide in a bunker to avoid being captured by the blood-thirsty Soviet army crashing into Berlin.

    2. Django Unchained: In the movie, a tough black man in the antebellum South rescues his black woman from slavery and brutalizes the white racist Southerners who enslaved them.

    Reality: Besides one failed, minor uprising (Nat Turner’s rebellion), blacks meekly allowed themselves to be human chattel, only a small percentage escaping. White gentiles (again) rode to the rescue, laying waste to 1/3 of their own country and sacrificing 600,000 of her own sons to set blacks free from a condition blacks not only had sold their own brethren into, but also a condition that blacks imposed on other blacks when they were prosperous.

    3. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: In the movie, Hollywood workers prevent a massacre by killing a psychopath and his followers, allowing a beautiful symbol of 1960s Hollywood to survive.

    Reality: Sharon Tate and others were butchered by a cult whose leader got power by being very close to many Hollywood powerbrokers, and no one in Hollywood saved anyone or had the morality to kick Manson out of their circles when his creepiness was apparent. It took a forceful, limelight-loving prosecutor and the goyim cops to get Manson and his followers, and Manson survived for decades and recruited other young girls who became part of his prison-led cult.

    In short, Tarantino has made fantasy movies for Jews, blacks, and Hollywood Lefties to assuage their guilt over each groups ‘ collective moral and masculine failings in the past. In the reality, all three groups depended on White Christian men doing the job that Jews, blacks, and Hollywood lefties couldn’t do.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    Some men seem to see more clearly than others and you sir, are one of those men.
    , @Corvinus
    "In the reality, all three groups depended on White Christian men doing the job that Jews, blacks, and Hollywood lefties couldn’t do."

    The same White Christian men who were responsible for the butchery in the first place, who then assuaged the guilt of their own by enlisting Jews, blacks, and progressives to clean up the mess they made?

    And resistance by black slaves and Jews was far more fierce than you describe. Do you revel in revisionist history?
  145. Anonymous[156] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon
    "the money-hungry, physically-repulsive Ferengi (originally envisioned as TNG’s Klingons – i.e., the main villains) embodied every single negative Jewish stereotype in the book. Joseph Goebbels would have been embarrassed to create such grotesque caricatures. And almost all of them were played by Jewish actors."

    Ironically, the Ferengi turned out to be one of the better races in the Star Trek universe in the end. There was an interesting dynamic that developed whereby the Ferengi, although money-hungry and sexist, were actually somewhat better people than most other races, including humans in our age. They delight in pointing out to high-minded humans that they never did anything like slavery or genocide. They were just greedy businessmen and cheats; is that really so bad compared to war and death? Of course, DS9 ruined them in the end by making them go politically correct in the final season. Nothing like the Ferengi could be done in this day's industry, sadly.

    They delight in pointing out to high-minded humans that they never did anything like slavery or genocide.

    They weren’t proxies for Jews then.

  146. @Buzz Mohawk
    Southern California had plenty of Mexican flavor back then (maybe just the right amount) but it wasn't a de facto part of Mexico the way it is now. There were Mexicans and Mexican restaurants, and my sister got an abortion in Tijuana, but the population seemed something like 90% White (not Hispanic).

    The chart has been posted here before, LA was white until the late seventies, and still very white until the early to mid eighties.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara

    LA was white until the late seventies, and still very white until the early to mid eighties.
     
    That's why lots of 80's hair bands (an alpha male, party hard, white man's rock) got their start in LA. White people flocked to their early shows (including loads of blonds looking for a white alpha lead singer to date), and local record execs took notice.

    Then the white population of LA dried up, so the post-hair bands had a harder time drawing crowds and moved off to different places to start, decrying "LA sucks!" Metallica was one such band, which decamped to San Francisco to become big. Seattle (a large white city then) started the grunge movement (a white rock movement) that obliterated the desire for hair bands. Etc.

    , @Buzz Mohawk
    I know. I just remember the little Mexican and even older Spanish features it always had, which came from history and proximity to the border. Those were nice and normal aspects of being close to a foreign country and having a varied past. (The family moved away in 1968, but one sister stayed behind. I visited many times and even lived in Seal Beach for six months in the late 1970s. Pre-invasion Orange County was a familiar place.)
  147. @syonredux

    Polanski’s suspicions later turned toward his own kung fu instructor Bruce Lee. (Lee is portrayed in the film as a pompous cult leader whom Pitt easily outfights.)
     
    Lee's blowhard/braggart schtick is counter to the Cowboy ethos that Pitt's Cliff Booth embodies.

    Lee’s blowhard/braggart schtick is counter to the Cowboy ethos that Pitt’s Cliff Booth embodies.

    It’s amazing to read that Tarantino did that. As he is a huge fan of 70s chopsocky flicks (see Kill Bill), all of which were inspired and led by Lee’s charisma, for him to degrade Lee to an all-talk-no-action guy smacks of blasphemy from Tarantino.’s point of view. Plus, as Tarantino loves blaxploitation films and being “in touch” with blacks in his films, he must know that any black man who’s heard of Bruce Lee and seen his films (even to this day) thinks he’s awesome and believes 100% that he could beat up any man in a fight.

    I haven’t seen this film, but is the scene supposed to be ironic? As it is an alternate history, perhaps this was supposed to be one more alternate history?

    I don’t buy that Lee was some sort of superman-fighter myself, just a smart guy who used a great body and some excellent flashy moves and some Asian-mystic-sounding flimflam to garner a good cult following and successful movie career in the West. What I’m saying is that many of the people Tarantino identifies with and Tarantino himself would’ve have bought Lee’s nonsense, so for Tarantino to come out against it seems shocking.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    The best defenses I've heard:
    --Remember Tarentino telling the angry movie reviewer that it's a movie, remember that this is the guy who wants you to see the zipper on the gorilla suit, remember that his style is hyper-anti-reality.
    --Apparently this is based closely on a specific fight and matches witness statements.
    --It wasn't a defeat, it was a draw, with the third section for best two out of three interrupted.
    , @Corvinus
    "I haven’t seen this film, but is the scene supposed to be ironic? As it is an alternate history, perhaps this was supposed to be one more alternate history?"

    Great catch. I'm surprised Mr. Sailer did not NOTICE this irony. From Pitt's character point of view, the "old" style of action is losing its popularity to the "new" style of action. So from his perspective, Lee represents a threat, even though deep down he appreciates it, while not openly admitting there was a similar trajectory with the "cowboy genre" eventually replacing the "gangster genre".
  148. @anon
    "the money-hungry, physically-repulsive Ferengi (originally envisioned as TNG’s Klingons – i.e., the main villains) embodied every single negative Jewish stereotype in the book. Joseph Goebbels would have been embarrassed to create such grotesque caricatures. And almost all of them were played by Jewish actors."

    Ironically, the Ferengi turned out to be one of the better races in the Star Trek universe in the end. There was an interesting dynamic that developed whereby the Ferengi, although money-hungry and sexist, were actually somewhat better people than most other races, including humans in our age. They delight in pointing out to high-minded humans that they never did anything like slavery or genocide. They were just greedy businessmen and cheats; is that really so bad compared to war and death? Of course, DS9 ruined them in the end by making them go politically correct in the final season. Nothing like the Ferengi could be done in this day's industry, sadly.

    The Trek guys played coy with the Ferengi on DS9. They deliberately set them up as the worst stereotypes of Jews, and then said it was satire.

    Funny how when they were originally introduced it was through a plot line where one renegade Ferengi leader was obsessed with vengeance against Picard in The Next Generation. Nothing at all to do with profit.

  149. @anon
    "the money-hungry, physically-repulsive Ferengi (originally envisioned as TNG’s Klingons – i.e., the main villains) embodied every single negative Jewish stereotype in the book. Joseph Goebbels would have been embarrassed to create such grotesque caricatures. And almost all of them were played by Jewish actors."

    Ironically, the Ferengi turned out to be one of the better races in the Star Trek universe in the end. There was an interesting dynamic that developed whereby the Ferengi, although money-hungry and sexist, were actually somewhat better people than most other races, including humans in our age. They delight in pointing out to high-minded humans that they never did anything like slavery or genocide. They were just greedy businessmen and cheats; is that really so bad compared to war and death? Of course, DS9 ruined them in the end by making them go politically correct in the final season. Nothing like the Ferengi could be done in this day's industry, sadly.

    Ferengi Jewishness even extended to their alphabet, which like Hebrew is based around variations of a square. But the best thing about them was that their leader was none other than Wallace Shawn, who is great in everything even if it’s Trek.

  150. anon[189] • Disclaimer says:

    “The New Yorker reviewer is upset because Tarantino didn’t give him any SJW material to hector his readers with.”

    That’s usually how it works. The Guardian, for instance, regularly reviews products its woke, self-hating readership has no interest in buying or using just to get the hate for “The Other” flowing in their veins. The new Wolfenstein video game (a series based on killing Nazis) was met with critical praise by the Guardian despite the game being widely panned elsewhere as sophomoric, poorly written, and technically flawed (no pause or map features).

    The title of their review was “Wolfenstein Youngblood review: two women blast racists into goo”. The author goes on to state the game “ends up the most entertaining of all the recent Wolfenstein games” and “this is a game about two young women blasting racists into goo – for me, that equals a bloody good time.” Clearly, his cat lady and hipster audience doesn’t play video games, let alone games with graphic violence and shooting guns; that’s something for males with appreciable levels of testosterone. But his racist audience loooves hearing about their socioeconomic enemies being violently put down, even though they will never touch the product themselves. The Guardian audience experiences its fantasy of killing white men through a video game with the review author praising it as a result of this feature, purposely ignoring its many flaws.

    Of course, they won’t say that. Their disingenuous retort will be “who has a problem with killing Nazis”? However, I’m sure these people aren’t reading these kinds reviews or playing this kind of game for the thrill of killing Nazis. More likely, they get a kick of out fantasizing about killing white conservatives, as the review indicates with its focus on “racists” en lieu of “Nazis”. That’s the same reason why Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds was widely praised in the press. Do you notice the difference between the reception of that movie compared with this one?

    Compare and contrast for an exercise in how to spot propaganda.

    Guardian Review: https://www.theguardian.com/games/2019/jul/25/wolfenstein-youngblood-review-two-women-blast-racists?CMP=twt_a-culture_b-gdnculture

    True Review:

  151. @anon
    Hollywood was founded by aspiring filmmakers moving West to escape the clutches of the corrupt NYC film industry. One wonders when another competing industry might form to escape this similarly oppressive climate. If you're a talented young (white male) artist who also isn't a self-hating racist, then you can't in good conscience work with Hollywood or sell your property to them because they'd ruin it with their politics (or denounce it for not being racist propaganda if it stayed faithful to the source material). Just look at what they've done to all the major franchises since 2010 - race and gender swapped most of the white male leads. There's also a rumor now that Marvel is swapping a female superhero character for a trans M2F character in one of these upcoming flicks. Marvel is looking to crater in this next phase because we now live in a post-profit era...sorta. The Hollywood left outmaneuvered Trump just like everyone else. Now that Disney owns a third of all the box office thanks to the corrupt FTC, they can afford to infuse their films with insane propaganda. Who in the industry cares that they make less money overall than they otherwise might have when there is no competition? They WILL make money because people have no other choices, as the thinking goes, so profit and art become less of a motivation and woke virtue signalling among upperclass peers takes center stage. A lot of this has been aided by the corrupt GOP and their subservience to large corporate donors. Thanks for selling your constituents down the river for a quick buck instead of doing your job and blocking all these mergers.

    One wonders when another competing industry might form to escape this similarly oppressive climate

    So long as Hollywood studios’ distribution and production monopolies remain unchecked, there’s little chance.

  152. @Jack D
    Far be it from me to defend the Catholic Church, but I can see how living a life of chastity could be seen as virtuous and holy and a desirable thing in your clergy. Rather than having to juggle work and family or spend their time chasing tail, they can devote themselves solely to their mission.

    However, if "chastity" is really just a cover for buggery and child molestation, then not so good. The question is whether you can really find enough holy men who are truly able to keep their vows of chastity and who are not just repressed homosexuals, especially in the modern world. Magic 8 Ball says "Doubtful".

    In the Eastern Churches, both Orthodox (don’t recognize the primacy of the Pope) and Uniate (kinda sorta acknowledge him provided they are allowed to largely run their own affairs) ordinary parish priests are generally married while celibacy is required of monks (by definition) and Bishops are drawn from the ranks of the monks. The Uniates, however, are allowed to follow this rule in their own countries but have to follow the celibacy rule in the US. (They’re aren’t very many of them here.) Also married Anglican priests who convert to Roman Catholicism have sometimes been given a dispensation from the rule, in the UK and the US.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    The Uniates, however, are allowed to follow this rule in their own countries but have to follow the celibacy rule in the US. (They’re aren’t very many of them here.)
     
    An actual knowledgeable Catholic can correct me, but i don't believe this is true anymore.

    This was the old rule--for most of the 20th century--but the Pope tossed it about 5 years ago. All Eastern Catholic clergy can now follow their church's celibacy rules even in the West. (And quite a few are now in the West.)

    My guess is the celibacy requirement in the Latin Church is on the chopping block. A matter of time. It will be a good thing when it's gone and the clergy is less homosexual.
  153. @J.Ross
    The chart has been posted here before, LA was white until the late seventies, and still very white until the early to mid eighties.

    LA was white until the late seventies, and still very white until the early to mid eighties.

    That’s why lots of 80’s hair bands (an alpha male, party hard, white man’s rock) got their start in LA. White people flocked to their early shows (including loads of blonds looking for a white alpha lead singer to date), and local record execs took notice.

    Then the white population of LA dried up, so the post-hair bands had a harder time drawing crowds and moved off to different places to start, decrying “LA sucks!” Metallica was one such band, which decamped to San Francisco to become big. Seattle (a large white city then) started the grunge movement (a white rock movement) that obliterated the desire for hair bands. Etc.

  154. anon[239] • Disclaimer says:

    “Critics have likened transhumanism to a modern-day version of eugenics, the discredited field of improving the human race through controlled breeding.”

    These people just can’t resist infusing their pages with their jihad against modern genetics, can they? In what sense exactly has this idea been discredited? Certainly not in a scientific sense as the practice provably works for horses, dogs, cats, and any number of domesticated animals. Do they mean “discredited” as in “no longer permitted for public discourse”? Maybe then, I guess. But in that case, you’d think NYT journalists would be more careful with their word choice.

  155. I haven’t seen this film, but is the scene supposed to be ironic? As it is an alternate history, perhaps this was supposed to be one more alternate history?

    The scene was intended to display the bonafide bad-assery of Pitt’s character. Elsewhere in the movie one actor explains to Leo’s character that washed-up tough-guy actors are used as heavies on new shows so that the new stars can be established by beating up the old heroes.

    Tarantino had Pitt fight Lee to a draw, but our image Bruce Lee is that of a real-life comic book hero so virtually everyone who saw the movie thinks Lee lost.

  156. “They weren’t proxies for Jews then.”

    I’ve always thought the Ferengi/Jewish connection was overblown. More likely, the liberals who made TNG probably just wanted an overblown caricature of the modern capitalist to contrast against the enlightened socialists of TNG.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    So the big noses and penchant for cruelty and whining speech and entire culture based around argument and trade, that's, just, like, capitalism, man?
  157. @Mr. Anon

    For example, Tate’s husband Roman Polanski, Hollywood’s hottest director, fingered John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas as a possible killer because Polanski, like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle.
     
    Meanwhile, the degenerate creep Phillips took to sleeping with his own daughter.

    Has it ever been alleged that Manson was pimping out the female members of his "family", as Steve does here? I had never heard that before. The Manson girls were mostly pretty homely.

    He did.
    Not all were homely.

    He would have his prettiest girls hitchhike in the fancy parts of LA to get rides from rich guys.

    One time a couple of his girls were picked up by Dennis Wilson of The Beach Boys. Within hours Manson had his whole “family” living in Dennis Wilson’s house, spending all his money and wrecking his expensive cars.

    Wilson stole a song from Manson and abandoned his rented house when Manson threatened to kill him. According to Mike Love, Dennis Wilson saw Manson kill someone, and was justifiably scared.

    Wilson set Manson up with a record producer who rejected Manson. The producer was living with his girlfriend, Candice Bergen. The producer’s mother, Doris Day, warned her son and Candace to move out of the house. So Manson had his family kill the new folks who moved in. I think that was the La Bianca family that moved in.

    Dennis Wilson went on a downward spiral that ended with his death by drowning.

    Look up the interview Mike Love did about his cousin and Manson. Weird and chilling. Mike Love had dinner with his cousin and Manson, and Mike Love was the only one wearing clothes. Dennis Wilson loved the orgies with the jail bait. At one point Dennis Wilson had to take the entire “family” to get penicillin shots after an orgy. D Wilson needed a shot as well.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    "I think it was the Labianca family that moved in."

    No, it was Roman Polanski and Sharon Tate who moved in.
  158. @Mr. Anon

    For example, Tate’s husband Roman Polanski, Hollywood’s hottest director, fingered John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas as a possible killer because Polanski, like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle.
     
    Meanwhile, the degenerate creep Phillips took to sleeping with his own daughter.

    Has it ever been alleged that Manson was pimping out the female members of his "family", as Steve does here? I had never heard that before. The Manson girls were mostly pretty homely.

    Yes he did, but those favors never had much appeal in Hollywood where there was access to much higher quality pussy. According to Bugliosi, the elderly owner of the Spahn Ranch let the Family stay there in exchange for getting laid. He also pimped the girls out to people who he thought could do favors for the Family in Panamint Valley. But the Manson girls acquired a reputation for being dirty and crab-infested.

  159. @J.Ross
    The chart has been posted here before, LA was white until the late seventies, and still very white until the early to mid eighties.

    I know. I just remember the little Mexican and even older Spanish features it always had, which came from history and proximity to the border. Those were nice and normal aspects of being close to a foreign country and having a varied past. (The family moved away in 1968, but one sister stayed behind. I visited many times and even lived in Seal Beach for six months in the late 1970s. Pre-invasion Orange County was a familiar place.)

    • Replies: @Jack D
    LA is about 150 miles from the (post Mexican-American War) border, so whatever Mexican or Spanish features it had were more the result of history than any proximity to the border. Places that are much closer to the border (e.g. San Diego) had even less Mexican influence. It should be noted that at one time Baja California was sparsely inhabited and could not exert much influence to the giant neighbor to the north. Tijuana exists as a big city BECAUSE of the border and because of the desire of Americans to cross the border and partake of various vices that were unavailable on the American side - before the Americans showed up it was a tiny village.

    You should also understand that the "Mexican" or "Spanish" sites that can be seen in Old Los Angeles (Olvera St.) are largely Disneyland style reconstructions for tourists and are not really authentic. In 1848, LA was itself a small town. Structures were made of adobe, which is not a durable material unless continuously refreshed - adobe buildings naturally dissolve back into the mud that they are made of. So whatever you see that is "old" is not really what was there in 1848.
  160. @R.G. Camara

    Lee’s blowhard/braggart schtick is counter to the Cowboy ethos that Pitt’s Cliff Booth embodies.
     
    It's amazing to read that Tarantino did that. As he is a huge fan of 70s chopsocky flicks (see Kill Bill), all of which were inspired and led by Lee's charisma, for him to degrade Lee to an all-talk-no-action guy smacks of blasphemy from Tarantino.'s point of view. Plus, as Tarantino loves blaxploitation films and being "in touch" with blacks in his films, he must know that any black man who's heard of Bruce Lee and seen his films (even to this day) thinks he's awesome and believes 100% that he could beat up any man in a fight.

    I haven't seen this film, but is the scene supposed to be ironic? As it is an alternate history, perhaps this was supposed to be one more alternate history?

    I don't buy that Lee was some sort of superman-fighter myself, just a smart guy who used a great body and some excellent flashy moves and some Asian-mystic-sounding flimflam to garner a good cult following and successful movie career in the West. What I'm saying is that many of the people Tarantino identifies with and Tarantino himself would've have bought Lee's nonsense, so for Tarantino to come out against it seems shocking.

    The best defenses I’ve heard:
    –Remember Tarentino telling the angry movie reviewer that it’s a movie, remember that this is the guy who wants you to see the zipper on the gorilla suit, remember that his style is hyper-anti-reality.
    –Apparently this is based closely on a specific fight and matches witness statements.
    –It wasn’t a defeat, it was a draw, with the third section for best two out of three interrupted.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    People who think Lee was some kind of fight master probably think the Bloodsport tournaments were real. But it's amusing to think there are people even today seriously defending Lee's fighting honor.
  161. @Digital Samizdat

    ... prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi was much appreciated within the entertainment industry for portraying Manson as an LSD-crazed apocalyptic avenger. Bugliosi’s masterful job of making Manson seem like the ultimate outsider sidetracked the question of why a lowlife jailbird like Manson had become something of an insider at the best parties in the Hollywood Hills.
     
    Another damn-good sidetracked question would be why Charlie Manson was never invited to join the Beach Boys. The original, Manson-version of the song "Never Learn Not to Love" (which he had called "Cease to Exist") is actually better than the version the Beach Boys recorded. Very haunting! About like Donovan's "Season of the Witch" being sung by ... a warlock.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1MmHGoKq1Y

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Never_Learn_Not_to_Love

    Anyhoo, I'm so glad Tarantino's 'woke' phase seems to be over. Looks like I'll be headed to movies again soon ...

    Another damn-good sidetracked question would be why Charlie Manson was never invited to join the Beach Boys.

    Maybe because his talent was exceeded by doubt of his ability to function gracefully in the California Artist milieau. Or maybe the Beach Boys just weren’t there yet.

  162. @Crawfurdmuir
    The science and engineering honor society, Sigma Xi, publishes American Scientist, which is far superior to Scientific American. Non-members can subscribe.

    Gerard Piel was the prime mover behind Scientific American, and it was after he left SciAm that SciAm became popularist and Piel joined American Scientist. Piel has been deceased for 15 years, yet AmSci still bears his thumbprint. I second the AmSci recommendation, though alas the whiff of feminization does tickle the nostril increasingly.

  163. Nah. I ain’t falling for it. Quentin gets some progs to flog him for being unprogressive, just to get me to go see his new flick. He’s going to be real pissed that I didn’t fall for it. I know he was counting on my ticket purchase.

  164. @R.G. Camara
    Here's another way to look at the film.

    Including this film, three of Tarantino's movies are of a specific, self-created genre: alternate histories designed to flatter groups who are otherwise extremely embarrassed/unmanned by what actually happened.

    1. Inglorious Basterds: In the movie, a very masculine, intimidating, special forces unit of Jews kill Hitler and a horde of other Nazis using brutal, heroic methods (burning to death, beating with a baseball bats, blasted with a machine gun, etc.).

    In reality: Jews were rounded up and murdered by the Nazis with very little physical resistance (outside of a few overblown uprisings) , and no such Jew-revenge squad existed. Instead, white gentiles beat the Nazis, with few Jews joining them for the fight on the front lines, and Jews had to be rescued like women and children. Hitler committed suicide in a bunker to avoid being captured by the blood-thirsty Soviet army crashing into Berlin.

    2. Django Unchained: In the movie, a tough black man in the antebellum South rescues his black woman from slavery and brutalizes the white racist Southerners who enslaved them.

    Reality: Besides one failed, minor uprising (Nat Turner's rebellion), blacks meekly allowed themselves to be human chattel, only a small percentage escaping. White gentiles (again) rode to the rescue, laying waste to 1/3 of their own country and sacrificing 600,000 of her own sons to set blacks free from a condition blacks not only had sold their own brethren into, but also a condition that blacks imposed on other blacks when they were prosperous.

    3. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: In the movie, Hollywood workers prevent a massacre by killing a psychopath and his followers, allowing a beautiful symbol of 1960s Hollywood to survive.

    Reality: Sharon Tate and others were butchered by a cult whose leader got power by being very close to many Hollywood powerbrokers, and no one in Hollywood saved anyone or had the morality to kick Manson out of their circles when his creepiness was apparent. It took a forceful, limelight-loving prosecutor and the goyim cops to get Manson and his followers, and Manson survived for decades and recruited other young girls who became part of his prison-led cult.

    In short, Tarantino has made fantasy movies for Jews, blacks, and Hollywood Lefties to assuage their guilt over each groups ' collective moral and masculine failings in the past. In the reality, all three groups depended on White Christian men doing the job that Jews, blacks, and Hollywood lefties couldn't do.

    Some men seem to see more clearly than others and you sir, are one of those men.

  165. @Anonymous
    lol, where is your god now

    “lol, where is your god now”

    Jesus Christ–you know, the one who died for our sins–is with you and I.

  166. @Clyde
    As the putatively Jewish Nick Lowe would say in song --- "You gotta be cruel to be kind in the right measure"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=92&v=b0l3QWUXVho

    Hardcover – August 20, 2019

    [MORE]

    The definitive biography of singer-songwriter Nick Lowe, best-known for “Cruel to Be Kind” and “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding”

    Described as “Britain’s greatest living songwriter,” Nick Lowe has made his mark as a pioneer of pub rock, power-pop, and punk rock and as a producer of Elvis Costello, Graham Parker, the Damned, and the Pretenders. He has been a pop star with his bands Brinsley Schwarz and Rockpile, a stepson-in-law to Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, and is the writer behind hits including “Cruel to Be Kind” and “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding.” In the past decades, however, he has distinguished himself as an artist who is equally acclaimed for the second act of his career as a tender yet sharp-tongued acoustic balladeer.

    Biographer Will Birch, who in addition to being a music writer was a drummer and songwriter with The Records, has known Lowe for over forty years and melds Lowe’s gift as a witty raconteur with his own authoritative analysis of Lowe’s background and the cultural scenes he exemplifies. Lowe’s parallel fame as one of the best interviews in the business will contribute to this first look into his life and work–and likely the closest thing fans will get to an autobiography by this notoriously charming cult figure.

    This is not an authorized biography, but Lowe has given it his spiritual blessing and his management and label are fully on board. Cruel to Be Kind will be the colorful yet serious account of one of the world’s most talented and admired musicians.

    • Replies: @Clyde
    Many thanks and I just might read this. NL Jewish or not? ... I hope Nick Lowe is doing ok financially in his later years/ I think he is.
  167. @Bud Light
    I’ve read nearly everything Steve has written since 2007 and that’s one of his finest essays, right up there with his last longform essay is for Vdare (2012?).

    This one was right in his wheelhouse.

  168. The Soundtrack’s pretty good:

  169. @El Dato

    Mr. Epstein’s vision reflected his longstanding fascination with what has become known as transhumanism: the science of improving the human population through technologies like genetic engineering and artificial intelligence. Critics have likened transhumanism to a modern-day version of eugenics, the discredited field of improving the human race through controlled breeding.
     
    It's good that the NYT tells us what is "discredited".

    Mr. Epstein attracted a glittering array of prominent scientists. They included the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann, who discovered the quark
     
    [LOLNO]

    Lunches will persist until the human race is full of little Epsteins:

    Alan M. Dershowitz, a professor emeritus of law at Harvard, recalled that at a lunch Mr. Epstein hosted in Cambridge, Mass., he steered the conversation toward the question of how humans could be improved genetically. Mr. Dershowitz said he was appalled, given the Nazis’ use of eugenics to justify their genocidal effort to purify the Aryan race.

    Yet the lunches persisted.
     

    It’s good that the NYT tells us what is “discredited”.

    Mr. Epstein attracted a glittering array of prominent scientists. They included the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann, who discovered the quark

    The Times ought to be discredited on account of capsule histories like that one. Gell-Mann did not “discover the quark”. He posited the quark. Not the same thing.

  170. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:

    While I generally despise Quintin Tarantino movies and Leonardo Dicaprio, I love movies about Hollywood and Brad Pitt. So I’m kind of on the fence about going to see this one. It does seem to piss off all the right people though…

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    I love movies about Hollywood
     
    How many good movies about American movie industry? I thought THE PLAYER was lame. Is SUNSET BOULEVARD the gold standard? I haven't seen DAY OF THE LOCUST, but it's long been forgotten. LAST TYCOON was made with big hype but fizzled. I love HAIL CAESAR. Sternberg's LAST COMMAND is one of the best movies about the movie world. The final moments of BLAZING SADDLES are inspired. NASHVILLE is set in country music town but it's proxy for Hollywood like Korean War in MASH was really about Vietnam. AVIATOR had ambition but barely got off the ground. TUCKER is really disguised autobio of Coppola's struggles in Hollywood. MAP OF THE STARS is one of the most damning and depressing probing movie world psychology. MULHOLLAND DR may edge out SUNSET BLVD.
  171. @TGGP
    One Upon a Time in America is a Sergio Leone movie. Your blog post is mistitled.

    One Upon a Time in America is a Sergio Leone movie. Your blog post is mistitled.

    Does no one get the joke implicit in Steve’s title for this review? I saw a few other commentators who made similar comments to yours.

    He’s saying that back in 1969, America – even Hollywood – actually was still America.

  172. @Frank L. Francis
    Bruce Lee was not bested by Pitt. It was a tie. "Best two out of three." The third round, undertaken after each character got a wake-up-blast of the power of the other, was broken up, but not before it was clear they were evenly matched.

    The real Lee did come off as pompous at times. It worked for him, though, in his position as Oriental guru to celebrity clients. For his guest spot on the TV show Longstreet he essentially played himself as he wanted to be perceived, and often was.

    Real life stuntman on the set of The Green Hornet and professional wrestler, Gene LeBell, has both praised Lee's skill and dedication to martial arts and tweaked Lee's most fanatic fans by telling how he once made Lee squeal like an angry piglet by lifting him off the ground and taunting him to try and punch or kick his way out.

    Real life stuntman on the set of The Green Hornet and professional wrestler, Gene LeBell, has both praised Lee’s skill and dedication to martial arts and tweaked Lee’s most fanatic fans by telling how he once made Lee squeal like an angry piglet by lifting him off the ground and taunting him to try and punch or kick his way out.

    Gene LeBell was a noted Judo practitioner and cross-trained with Bruce Lee. He taught Lee Judo and wrestling and Lee taught him punching and kicking. LeBell was also in one of the earliest “MMA” fights in U.S. history against boxer Milo Savage.

    A much more interesting story is what he did to Steven Seagal.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    A much more interesting story is what he did to Steven Seagal.
     
    What did he do to Seagal?
  173. The stifling conformity of the Great Awokening has now driven even Quentin Tarantino to the subversive right.

    Haven’t seen the film, and don’t plant to see it, but this seems wishful thinking. Like those “conservative” movie critics that keep seeing “conservative” themes in Hollywood movies. Fact is, art is subjective and many times people see what they already want to see. To me Tarantino is unfunny, sick, boring. And probably no filmmaker has had a more negative influence on cinema, creating all those Tarantino wannabes in the 90s and early 2000s.

  174. @Hibernian
    In the Eastern Churches, both Orthodox (don't recognize the primacy of the Pope) and Uniate (kinda sorta acknowledge him provided they are allowed to largely run their own affairs) ordinary parish priests are generally married while celibacy is required of monks (by definition) and Bishops are drawn from the ranks of the monks. The Uniates, however, are allowed to follow this rule in their own countries but have to follow the celibacy rule in the US. (They're aren't very many of them here.) Also married Anglican priests who convert to Roman Catholicism have sometimes been given a dispensation from the rule, in the UK and the US.

    The Uniates, however, are allowed to follow this rule in their own countries but have to follow the celibacy rule in the US. (They’re aren’t very many of them here.)

    An actual knowledgeable Catholic can correct me, but i don’t believe this is true anymore.

    This was the old rule–for most of the 20th century–but the Pope tossed it about 5 years ago. All Eastern Catholic clergy can now follow their church’s celibacy rules even in the West. (And quite a few are now in the West.)

    My guess is the celibacy requirement in the Latin Church is on the chopping block. A matter of time. It will be a good thing when it’s gone and the clergy is less homosexual.

    • Replies: @SOL
    Yes. https://www.catholicnews.com/services/englishnews/2014/vatican-lifts-ban-on-married-priests-for-eastern-catholics-in-diaspora.cfm
  175. @AnotherDad

    The Uniates, however, are allowed to follow this rule in their own countries but have to follow the celibacy rule in the US. (They’re aren’t very many of them here.)
     
    An actual knowledgeable Catholic can correct me, but i don't believe this is true anymore.

    This was the old rule--for most of the 20th century--but the Pope tossed it about 5 years ago. All Eastern Catholic clergy can now follow their church's celibacy rules even in the West. (And quite a few are now in the West.)

    My guess is the celibacy requirement in the Latin Church is on the chopping block. A matter of time. It will be a good thing when it's gone and the clergy is less homosexual.
  176. @Corvinus
    The problem with Sailer's statement is he never quite defines "how many important people". Moreover, there is an assumption that those same individuals, the entire lot of them, had a hankering for young flesh. It is possible, but not certain.

    It’s how he got in with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys (which connected Manson to the Tate house), but it was mostly for small time favors from small time people.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "It’s how he got in with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys (which connected Manson to the Tate house), but it was mostly for small time favors from small time people."

    Mr. Sailer insisted there were "many important people", and you are characterizing them as "small time people". Is there a disconnect here?
  177. @MEH 0910
    Hardcover – August 20, 2019
    https://www.amazon.com/Cruel-Be-Kind-Life-Music/dp/0306921952/

    The definitive biography of singer-songwriter Nick Lowe, best-known for "Cruel to Be Kind" and "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding"

    Described as "Britain's greatest living songwriter," Nick Lowe has made his mark as a pioneer of pub rock, power-pop, and punk rock and as a producer of Elvis Costello, Graham Parker, the Damned, and the Pretenders. He has been a pop star with his bands Brinsley Schwarz and Rockpile, a stepson-in-law to Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, and is the writer behind hits including "Cruel to Be Kind" and "(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding." In the past decades, however, he has distinguished himself as an artist who is equally acclaimed for the second act of his career as a tender yet sharp-tongued acoustic balladeer.

    Biographer Will Birch, who in addition to being a music writer was a drummer and songwriter with The Records, has known Lowe for over forty years and melds Lowe's gift as a witty raconteur with his own authoritative analysis of Lowe's background and the cultural scenes he exemplifies. Lowe's parallel fame as one of the best interviews in the business will contribute to this first look into his life and work--and likely the closest thing fans will get to an autobiography by this notoriously charming cult figure.

    This is not an authorized biography, but Lowe has given it his spiritual blessing and his management and label are fully on board. Cruel to Be Kind will be the colorful yet serious account of one of the world's most talented and admired musicians.
     

    Many thanks and I just might read this. NL Jewish or not? … I hope Nick Lowe is doing ok financially in his later years/ I think he is.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/NickLoweBio/status/1156289295969222656

    http://wordpodcast.co.uk/2019/07/24/word-podcast-303-will-birch-on-the-career-of-nick-lowe-least-hardworking-man-in-show-business/
  178. @Anonymous

    Richard Brody is probably the most intelligent movie critic on the market .
     
    He's just another Jewish supremacist hiding behind equality-diversity rhetoric. He wrote a book on Godard and accused his subject of 'antisemitism' for being critical of Zionism and critiquing Jewish cultural mindset. Never mind that Jews have theories about the cultural personalities of every other group: The Russian Tsarist mentality, the Conservative Protestant Authoritarian Personality, the village mentality of the Japanese, the Arab mentality, etc.

    Also, when push comes to shove, he's a propagandist than a truth-seeker. His best movies list of 2018 had historical lies. He's not for truth against lies but 'our lies' vs the Other Side, true or false. He will side with Jewish lies against even Goy truths.

    I am not reading Brody for any piece of advice on Jewish versus non Jewish merits. Neither for objective choice of movies nor impartial dispensation of his views pro and contra for each movie.

    He just happens to see and understand in movies things that other people don’t see nor understand and that are true. I wish he would be impartial and give more analysis on movies I like. But his point of view is in-valuable.

    At the same times, he has less than 1k followers and his tweets rarely get more than 10 comments. So he is a next to 0 influencer.

    The other critic with noticeable brain power is Emily Nussbaum. She writes on TV series mostly. She also is gifted – to a lesser extent than RB – of a not usual understanding skill.

    Both are Jewish. Liberal. Totally biased. But they wear that as discreetly as a Celtic tattoo (I think this métaphore if from Nussbaum).

    You understand more what you see when you read them. As you understand news and society patterns when you read Steve Sailer. Like it or not.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    He just happens to see and understand in movies things that other people don’t see nor understand and that are true. I wish he would be impartial and give more analysis on movies I like. But his point of view is in-valuable.
     
    He sees value in things of no value, like later Godard films. He's like a vegan who pretends celery constitutes a complete meal. His stupid beard says it all.
  179. @Clyde

    OT: It has now become a problem that the Swedish populace are wearing bullet proof vests; in Malmö, certain youths are even walking about wearing them openly. What to do? Why, make them illegal to wear for others than police and similar personnel!
     
    How about their awful imitations of black American's rap music. All rap sucks but the rap that Muslims and blacks in Europe produce is the worst. Monkeys and orangutans in the zoo make more sense.

    How about their awful imitations of black American’s rap music. All rap sucks but the rap that Muslims and blacks in Europe produce is the worst. Monkeys and orangutans in the zoo make more sense.

    Aww, but it’s so genuine and uh like something third world uhhh global south? … I got nothing.

    (White cringe rap)

    (Chilean socialist imports, 2nd gen:)

    (Chilean socialist import 3rd gen? Possibly:)

    • Replies: @Clyde
    Just to let you know Mr Pericles, I have enduring memories of Malmo (Such nice old buildings from 400 years ago) and more interior Sweden as we drove to his farm. Probably his parent vacation place. He cut down/ topped off nettle plants so were more edible later and we ate cloud berries. This was after I was working 3 months in a Copenhagen restaurant. Way back my friend in a nicer freer era.
    Thus I have much liking for Scandinavia besides the very full breasted (seemed to be milk fed) women.
  180. @danand
    “(On the other hand, in a less charitable mood I could also imagine that Once Upon a Time started out with Tarantino deciding, perversely, that he wanted to get audiences to cheer horrific violence against pretty young women.)”

    SFG, could be? But he just married one (a pretty, youngish, woman) days after finishing up the film. In interviews Tarantino has recently said he wants to start a family; have many children.

    https://flic.kr/p/2gM5zNB


    “Quentin Tarantino married his fiancée Daniella Pick in an intimate ceremony in Los Angeles today, PEOPLE can exclusively confirm. Tarantino, 55, and Pick, 35, an Israeli singer and model, will celebrate the nuptials at a larger gathering this evening. The writer-director met Pick, who is the daughter of Israeli singer and songwriter Tzvika Pick, in 2009 while promoting his film Inglorious Basterds. The pair got engaged in June 2017, after dating for about a year. The couple hosted an engagement party on September 2017 in New York City that served as a Pulp Fiction cast reunion, with a guest list including Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson and Uma Thurman.

    Just days before the wedding, Tarantino wrapped filming Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, his upcoming drama starring Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie. The director has never been married, previously explaining that work monopolizes his time. The movie will be released on July 26, 2019.

     

    See, you can do that if you’re a man and 55. Oh, and if you’re also a famous director.

    As for the beta lean…he’s getting old. Time and chance happeneth to us all.

    It’s also possible they’re both right…he could have some aggressive urges he’s (sort of) sublimated through his movies. Wouldn’t be too surprised if the bride likes a little of the rough stuff, but now we’re well into the realm of speculation.

  181. “I’m sorry, but you ever notice that throughout Catholic Church history,…uh, chastity is held to be some kind of virtue, whereas having sex is dirty, nasty, disgusting. At best, it’s a necessary evil, but still evil.”

    Utter nonsense. The Catholic Church has never held that relations between men and women were dirt, etc. It has a history of standing firm against relations out of wedlock: adultery, premarital relations of nearly every manner . . . there are some caveats as to courtship behavior but by and large most such exchanges before marriage are ion keeping with scripture — and “foreknowledge” absolutely out.

    I was a cradle raised catholic in Germany, Panama, Colorado, Texas, Washington State, Georgia, etc. And i never heard once a preist, or a nun express that sex was anything akin to what you claim.

    “All the while who are the leaders of the Church? For the most part, homosexuals and pedophiles.”

    Just complete nonsense. In fact, even if one takes the allegations as presented the incidents amount to less than 2% of the clergy and i am being generous.

  182. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bruno
    I am not reading Brody for any piece of advice on Jewish versus non Jewish merits. Neither for objective choice of movies nor impartial dispensation of his views pro and contra for each movie.

    He just happens to see and understand in movies things that other people don’t see nor understand and that are true. I wish he would be impartial and give more analysis on movies I like. But his point of view is in-valuable.

    At the same times, he has less than 1k followers and his tweets rarely get more than 10 comments. So he is a next to 0 influencer.

    The other critic with noticeable brain power is Emily Nussbaum. She writes on TV series mostly. She also is gifted - to a lesser extent than RB - of a not usual understanding skill.

    Both are Jewish. Liberal. Totally biased. But they wear that as discreetly as a Celtic tattoo (I think this métaphore if from Nussbaum).

    You understand more what you see when you read them. As you understand news and society patterns when you read Steve Sailer. Like it or not.

    He just happens to see and understand in movies things that other people don’t see nor understand and that are true. I wish he would be impartial and give more analysis on movies I like. But his point of view is in-valuable.

    He sees value in things of no value, like later Godard films. He’s like a vegan who pretends celery constitutes a complete meal. His stupid beard says it all.

  183. @Anonymous

    runaway girls fresh off the Greyhound bus.
     
    Was there really such a phenomenon? Or is that more myth/meme than reality?

    I hitchhiked across the country in 1970 and back then you’d see a fair number of girls hitchhiking, alone or in pairs. A lot of these would be the types Manson would find. The hippie worldview put great faith in the kindness of strangers.

  184. @Thirdeye
    It's how he got in with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys (which connected Manson to the Tate house), but it was mostly for small time favors from small time people.

    “It’s how he got in with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys (which connected Manson to the Tate house), but it was mostly for small time favors from small time people.”

    Mr. Sailer insisted there were “many important people”, and you are characterizing them as “small time people”. Is there a disconnect here?

    • Replies: @Thirdeye
    Yes, and I think the comparison of Manson and Epstein is silly for that reason. Manson never got in with power brokers the way Epstein did. In fact he was consistently rejected by them and that led to the Tate house becoming a target for retribution.
  185. @R.G. Camara

    Lee’s blowhard/braggart schtick is counter to the Cowboy ethos that Pitt’s Cliff Booth embodies.
     
    It's amazing to read that Tarantino did that. As he is a huge fan of 70s chopsocky flicks (see Kill Bill), all of which were inspired and led by Lee's charisma, for him to degrade Lee to an all-talk-no-action guy smacks of blasphemy from Tarantino.'s point of view. Plus, as Tarantino loves blaxploitation films and being "in touch" with blacks in his films, he must know that any black man who's heard of Bruce Lee and seen his films (even to this day) thinks he's awesome and believes 100% that he could beat up any man in a fight.

    I haven't seen this film, but is the scene supposed to be ironic? As it is an alternate history, perhaps this was supposed to be one more alternate history?

    I don't buy that Lee was some sort of superman-fighter myself, just a smart guy who used a great body and some excellent flashy moves and some Asian-mystic-sounding flimflam to garner a good cult following and successful movie career in the West. What I'm saying is that many of the people Tarantino identifies with and Tarantino himself would've have bought Lee's nonsense, so for Tarantino to come out against it seems shocking.

    “I haven’t seen this film, but is the scene supposed to be ironic? As it is an alternate history, perhaps this was supposed to be one more alternate history?”

    Great catch. I’m surprised Mr. Sailer did not NOTICE this irony. From Pitt’s character point of view, the “old” style of action is losing its popularity to the “new” style of action. So from his perspective, Lee represents a threat, even though deep down he appreciates it, while not openly admitting there was a similar trajectory with the “cowboy genre” eventually replacing the “gangster genre”.

  186. @Charles Pewitt

    My Review of "Once Upon a Time ... in America"

     

    Once upon a time in London, there were some English profiteers who formed something called the Virginia Company and they sailed to the new world, and set about starting the USA.

    Eventually, the sweet and kindly island people of England gently nudged aside the Dutch and the Swedes and the French and the Spaniards and others, and the island people of England are the political and cultural core of the USA.

    Trumpy just went down to Virginia to commemorate and celebrate the English colonists and profiteers and settlers who founded Jamestown in 1607 and had some kind of a political assembly in 1619.

    The Virginia Company is the heart and soul and spirit of the United States of America.

    Got that Nathaniel Philbrick, you nasty baby boomer slob!

    Actually it was Rhode Island, under Roger Williams.

    The Atlantic south was ruled by people who wanted to be the new aristocracy and named their colonies after kings, like James, Charles, and George.

    New England was ruled by people who wanted to get away from the aristocracy but demanded religious conformity.

    Rhode Island broke away from Massachusetts in 1636 to establish Enlightenment values in place of religious dogma as a governing principle. Rhode Island was the precursor to the propositional nation with religious freedom.

  187. @R.G. Camara
    Here's another way to look at the film.

    Including this film, three of Tarantino's movies are of a specific, self-created genre: alternate histories designed to flatter groups who are otherwise extremely embarrassed/unmanned by what actually happened.

    1. Inglorious Basterds: In the movie, a very masculine, intimidating, special forces unit of Jews kill Hitler and a horde of other Nazis using brutal, heroic methods (burning to death, beating with a baseball bats, blasted with a machine gun, etc.).

    In reality: Jews were rounded up and murdered by the Nazis with very little physical resistance (outside of a few overblown uprisings) , and no such Jew-revenge squad existed. Instead, white gentiles beat the Nazis, with few Jews joining them for the fight on the front lines, and Jews had to be rescued like women and children. Hitler committed suicide in a bunker to avoid being captured by the blood-thirsty Soviet army crashing into Berlin.

    2. Django Unchained: In the movie, a tough black man in the antebellum South rescues his black woman from slavery and brutalizes the white racist Southerners who enslaved them.

    Reality: Besides one failed, minor uprising (Nat Turner's rebellion), blacks meekly allowed themselves to be human chattel, only a small percentage escaping. White gentiles (again) rode to the rescue, laying waste to 1/3 of their own country and sacrificing 600,000 of her own sons to set blacks free from a condition blacks not only had sold their own brethren into, but also a condition that blacks imposed on other blacks when they were prosperous.

    3. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood: In the movie, Hollywood workers prevent a massacre by killing a psychopath and his followers, allowing a beautiful symbol of 1960s Hollywood to survive.

    Reality: Sharon Tate and others were butchered by a cult whose leader got power by being very close to many Hollywood powerbrokers, and no one in Hollywood saved anyone or had the morality to kick Manson out of their circles when his creepiness was apparent. It took a forceful, limelight-loving prosecutor and the goyim cops to get Manson and his followers, and Manson survived for decades and recruited other young girls who became part of his prison-led cult.

    In short, Tarantino has made fantasy movies for Jews, blacks, and Hollywood Lefties to assuage their guilt over each groups ' collective moral and masculine failings in the past. In the reality, all three groups depended on White Christian men doing the job that Jews, blacks, and Hollywood lefties couldn't do.

    “In the reality, all three groups depended on White Christian men doing the job that Jews, blacks, and Hollywood lefties couldn’t do.”

    The same White Christian men who were responsible for the butchery in the first place, who then assuaged the guilt of their own by enlisting Jews, blacks, and progressives to clean up the mess they made?

    And resistance by black slaves and Jews was far more fierce than you describe. Do you revel in revisionist history?

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
    Lmao. Nice try, little George Soros-liar.

    Jews exploit the population and import foreign commie thugs and money to attack all non-commies in an attempt to make Germany commie. Germans respond to save their country by throwing their lot behind tough local guys promising to opposing commies violently -- aka the Nazis.

    Blacks sell their captured prisoners into slavery and buy their own when they are freed from it. Still do it to this day.

    Hollywood Lefties give Manson enormous prestige and power because he gets the dumb slutty underage girls.

    So the groups create their own problems, and White Christian American goyim save them from it.

    Nice try with the lies, little David Brock bot.

    Next!
  188. @Corvinus
    "It’s how he got in with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys (which connected Manson to the Tate house), but it was mostly for small time favors from small time people."

    Mr. Sailer insisted there were "many important people", and you are characterizing them as "small time people". Is there a disconnect here?

    Yes, and I think the comparison of Manson and Epstein is silly for that reason. Manson never got in with power brokers the way Epstein did. In fact he was consistently rejected by them and that led to the Tate house becoming a target for retribution.

  189. @Pericles

    How about their awful imitations of black American’s rap music. All rap sucks but the rap that Muslims and blacks in Europe produce is the worst. Monkeys and orangutans in the zoo make more sense.

     

    Aww, but it's so genuine and uh like something third world uhhh global south? ... I got nothing.

    (White cringe rap)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OEWwZqqBps

    (Chilean socialist imports, 2nd gen:)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeNtRTnRUHM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEPZ3HwOgbY

    (Chilean socialist import 3rd gen? Possibly:)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hv759wmsSFk

    Just to let you know Mr Pericles, I have enduring memories of Malmo (Such nice old buildings from 400 years ago) and more interior Sweden as we drove to his farm. Probably his parent vacation place. He cut down/ topped off nettle plants so were more edible later and we ate cloud berries. This was after I was working 3 months in a Copenhagen restaurant. Way back my friend in a nicer freer era.
    Thus I have much liking for Scandinavia besides the very full breasted (seemed to be milk fed) women.

  190. @Corvinus
    And now we have Alt Right propaganda infiltrating movie reviews. We begin with Mr. Sailer's false premise- "The stifling conformity of the Great Awokening has now driven even Quentin Tarantino to the subversive right". Taratino created this movie as a homage to a time period in his usual grandiose fashion, employing cinematic and pop-culture mythology for his version of reality. It is a culmination of the types of movies which have always inspired him, rather than being politically motivated by the current battle royal of the Coalition of the Fringes or being driven to digitally channel his inner disdain toward the Counter Cultural movement and the Baby Boomer lifestyle.

    As an aside, I did not realize having woman's face being repeatedly smashed against a wall constitutes "comic mayhem" or liberal use of the gutter Hippie language (thanks George Carlin) as being "remarkably wholesome".

    Regarding Tate, she serves as a figurative backdrop to the optimism of Hollywood at that time as it was undergoing radical changes in moviemaking and in the cultural landscape. She is dreamy, which serves as a counter to the two male leads who are gloomy about their future prospects as actors, not as white men. Tate's limited presence was by design by Tarantino to underscore her eventual demise, for those audience members familiar with the heinous Manson murders, which is a product of individual neuroses rather than a generational mental illness.

    "Moreover, Tarantino, whose irresponsible 2012 hit Django Unchained espousing black gun violence likely contributed to the Great Awokening and the ensuing black-on-black murder binge"

    I just LOVE it when Mr. Sailer casually throws in these lines in the middle of his piece (burying the lede?) without offering a modicum of exploration, as if his statement is observably true and need not be properly vetted.

    "My guess is that well-indoctrinated young people will find Once puzzling, if not unsettling. Why, they will wonder, are the heroes white men? Why don’t they at least have the basic decency to feel ashamed of their whiteness?"

    Classic projection, confirmation bias, and wild speculation. A Sailer trifecta!

    You must have missed the part about Richard Brody of the NYT denouncing the “ridiculously white movie.” So now portraying Hollywood demographics as they were in 1969, instead of as some version of how the woke volk wants to recreate them, makes Tarantino some sort of white supremacist.

    Interesting thing about the Helter Skelter idea was that Manson intended it to start a race war, which was supposed to make him some sort of world leader. It was a more overtly psycho version of ideas about race and revolution that had currency among the New Left at that time. Essentially, blacks were seen as the cannon fodder who would spark the revolution that would deliver power to the New Left. Once the New Lefties put revolution on hold so they could pursue their careers, a watered-down version of that idea arose. Playing off of anti-white racial animosity has provided a nice career path for woke volk in academia, media, bureaucracy, and electoral politics.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "You must have missed the part about Richard Brody of the NYT denouncing the “ridiculously white movie.”

    Actually, I read that New Yorker piece, and it is no different than Mr. Sailer's review--a political statement rather than a social dissection of a film. Both are grandstanding for their own ends.

    "Why should it be any less comic..."

    Sailer's irony is comical.

    "So now portraying Hollywood demographics as they were in 1969, instead of as some version of how the woke volk wants to recreate them, makes Tarantino some sort of white supremacist."

    White normies who go to the film are going to be entertained, rather than contemplating if Taratino is a "white supremacist", is "woke", is immersed with "white guilt", or is doing the bidding of the Alt Right. He makes films. People go to watch his movies and escape from the realities of their life and of society. Both authors are trying to make the film an existential battle between ideologies.

    "Follow the links and you will find statistics on dramatically increased murder rates in St Louis, Baltimore, and Chicago following BLM riots. Pandering to the Great Awokening had serious real-world consequences."

    Correlation does not equal causation. Mr. Sailer made a specific argument--one of Taratino's films likely contributed to the Great Awokening--without a shred of specific evidence directly linking his work to that "event". Since you seem interested in coming to his defense, why don't you offer a particular argument?

  191. @Daniel H
    Critic Richard Brody complains, “Tarantino delivers a ridiculously white movie”

    Well, the whole Manson thing was very white.

    Do you think Brody would like a (factual) movie about the NOI/Zebra murders? That would be a “black” movie.

  192. @Paleo Liberal
    He did.
    Not all were homely.

    He would have his prettiest girls hitchhike in the fancy parts of LA to get rides from rich guys.

    One time a couple of his girls were picked up by Dennis Wilson of The Beach Boys. Within hours Manson had his whole “family” living in Dennis Wilson’s house, spending all his money and wrecking his expensive cars.

    Wilson stole a song from Manson and abandoned his rented house when Manson threatened to kill him. According to Mike Love, Dennis Wilson saw Manson kill someone, and was justifiably scared.

    Wilson set Manson up with a record producer who rejected Manson. The producer was living with his girlfriend, Candice Bergen. The producer’s mother, Doris Day, warned her son and Candace to move out of the house. So Manson had his family kill the new folks who moved in. I think that was the La Bianca family that moved in.

    Dennis Wilson went on a downward spiral that ended with his death by drowning.

    Look up the interview Mike Love did about his cousin and Manson. Weird and chilling. Mike Love had dinner with his cousin and Manson, and Mike Love was the only one wearing clothes. Dennis Wilson loved the orgies with the jail bait. At one point Dennis Wilson had to take the entire “family” to get penicillin shots after an orgy. D Wilson needed a shot as well.

    “I think it was the Labianca family that moved in.”

    No, it was Roman Polanski and Sharon Tate who moved in.

  193. @Clyde
    Many thanks and I just might read this. NL Jewish or not? ... I hope Nick Lowe is doing ok financially in his later years/ I think he is.
    • Replies: @Clyde
    I love that line-- Least hardworking man in show business. I get the James Brown joke. I shall listen. Meanwhile I like this immortal super blast from Dave Edmunds >>>>
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MVeZSK6OyY
  194. @Corvinus
    And now we have Alt Right propaganda infiltrating movie reviews. We begin with Mr. Sailer's false premise- "The stifling conformity of the Great Awokening has now driven even Quentin Tarantino to the subversive right". Taratino created this movie as a homage to a time period in his usual grandiose fashion, employing cinematic and pop-culture mythology for his version of reality. It is a culmination of the types of movies which have always inspired him, rather than being politically motivated by the current battle royal of the Coalition of the Fringes or being driven to digitally channel his inner disdain toward the Counter Cultural movement and the Baby Boomer lifestyle.

    As an aside, I did not realize having woman's face being repeatedly smashed against a wall constitutes "comic mayhem" or liberal use of the gutter Hippie language (thanks George Carlin) as being "remarkably wholesome".

    Regarding Tate, she serves as a figurative backdrop to the optimism of Hollywood at that time as it was undergoing radical changes in moviemaking and in the cultural landscape. She is dreamy, which serves as a counter to the two male leads who are gloomy about their future prospects as actors, not as white men. Tate's limited presence was by design by Tarantino to underscore her eventual demise, for those audience members familiar with the heinous Manson murders, which is a product of individual neuroses rather than a generational mental illness.

    "Moreover, Tarantino, whose irresponsible 2012 hit Django Unchained espousing black gun violence likely contributed to the Great Awokening and the ensuing black-on-black murder binge"

    I just LOVE it when Mr. Sailer casually throws in these lines in the middle of his piece (burying the lede?) without offering a modicum of exploration, as if his statement is observably true and need not be properly vetted.

    "My guess is that well-indoctrinated young people will find Once puzzling, if not unsettling. Why, they will wonder, are the heroes white men? Why don’t they at least have the basic decency to feel ashamed of their whiteness?"

    Classic projection, confirmation bias, and wild speculation. A Sailer trifecta!

    As an aside, I did not realize having woman’s face being repeatedly smashed against a wall constitutes “comic mayhem” or liberal use of the gutter Hippie language (thanks George Carlin) as being “remarkably wholesome”.

    Why should it be any less comic than the watch in the POW’s ass or the anal rape of the gangster (Pulp Fiction) or the one-second round-robin shootout (Reservoir Dogs)? Is it because you hold some special deference for skanks trying to kill everyone in the house?

    “Moreover, Tarantino, whose irresponsible 2012 hit Django Unchained espousing black gun violence likely contributed to the Great Awokening and the ensuing black-on-black murder binge”

    I just LOVE it when Mr. Sailer casually throws in these lines in the middle of his piece (burying the lede?) without offering a modicum of exploration, as if his statement is observably true and need not be properly vetted.

    Follow the links and you will find statistics on dramatically increased murder rates in St Louis, Baltimore, and Chicago following BLM riots. Pandering to the Great Awokening had serious real-world consequences.

  195. @Buzz Mohawk
    I know. I just remember the little Mexican and even older Spanish features it always had, which came from history and proximity to the border. Those were nice and normal aspects of being close to a foreign country and having a varied past. (The family moved away in 1968, but one sister stayed behind. I visited many times and even lived in Seal Beach for six months in the late 1970s. Pre-invasion Orange County was a familiar place.)

    LA is about 150 miles from the (post Mexican-American War) border, so whatever Mexican or Spanish features it had were more the result of history than any proximity to the border. Places that are much closer to the border (e.g. San Diego) had even less Mexican influence. It should be noted that at one time Baja California was sparsely inhabited and could not exert much influence to the giant neighbor to the north. Tijuana exists as a big city BECAUSE of the border and because of the desire of Americans to cross the border and partake of various vices that were unavailable on the American side – before the Americans showed up it was a tiny village.

    You should also understand that the “Mexican” or “Spanish” sites that can be seen in Old Los Angeles (Olvera St.) are largely Disneyland style reconstructions for tourists and are not really authentic. In 1848, LA was itself a small town. Structures were made of adobe, which is not a durable material unless continuously refreshed – adobe buildings naturally dissolve back into the mud that they are made of. So whatever you see that is “old” is not really what was there in 1848.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Jack, please. I was referring to the inspiration for such things, as well as the fact that there were some Mexican people there. I lived there. Did you?

    Your encyclopedia entry here is of course factually correct, but one senses that its only purpose is to somehow prove me wrong.

    By the 1960s, Tijuana was a place in a foreign country where my sister could get an abortion when that was illegal in this country. Ergo, Mexican features close our home in Orange County. You write (in your effort to discredit me!) "Tijuana exists as a big city BECAUSE of the border and because of the desire of Americans to cross the border and partake of various vices that were unavailable on the American side..." Yes, exactly. That WAS part of the Southern California experience to which I was referring.


    When my parents took us out to a Mexican restaurant, it was possible long before it was in many other parts of the US. Here in Connecticut, I still lament the lack of good Mexican food. Ergo, Mexican-American cuisine was available in SoCal when I was a boy and still isn't now that I am an adult in Connecticut.

    Even all the way up north in Modesto, California, my father's home town (and George Lucas's) there was a Mexican family-run restaurant that my father took us to. That is where I learned what real tamales are like.

    Furthermore, even you can't deny the Spanish-era influence on California architecture. That is a well-known fact, and one of the things I was thinking of.

    Honestly, Jack, what is your motivation for constantly trying to disprove my innocent comments here? It is particularly offensive when you lecture me about my own life experiences.

  196. @donald j tingle
    Over the years, I have read a bunch of reviews making delusional claims by delusional conservatives that the movie under discussion had a conservative or at least subversive (to the lib status quo) message.

    Usually, it’s...all a delusion.

    Tarantino seems to be creating a series of simulacra in the sense Baudrillard uses the term (copies of a non-existent reality).

    Viewed as iterations of realities that did not exist (Jews did not kill Hitler, slaves did not rise up, middle aged white guys did not effectively resist hippies) Basterds, Django, and now this movie likely have a meaning (perhaps not fully conscious) to their creator to which their surface meaning is irrelevant.

    If it’s not subversive to current “woke” fashions, why did the critic Richard Brody denounce its “ridiculous whiteness?” Brody, not Sailer, picked the fight.

  197. @Jack D
    LA is about 150 miles from the (post Mexican-American War) border, so whatever Mexican or Spanish features it had were more the result of history than any proximity to the border. Places that are much closer to the border (e.g. San Diego) had even less Mexican influence. It should be noted that at one time Baja California was sparsely inhabited and could not exert much influence to the giant neighbor to the north. Tijuana exists as a big city BECAUSE of the border and because of the desire of Americans to cross the border and partake of various vices that were unavailable on the American side - before the Americans showed up it was a tiny village.

    You should also understand that the "Mexican" or "Spanish" sites that can be seen in Old Los Angeles (Olvera St.) are largely Disneyland style reconstructions for tourists and are not really authentic. In 1848, LA was itself a small town. Structures were made of adobe, which is not a durable material unless continuously refreshed - adobe buildings naturally dissolve back into the mud that they are made of. So whatever you see that is "old" is not really what was there in 1848.

    Jack, please. I was referring to the inspiration for such things, as well as the fact that there were some Mexican people there. I lived there. Did you?

    Your encyclopedia entry here is of course factually correct, but one senses that its only purpose is to somehow prove me wrong.

    By the 1960s, Tijuana was a place in a foreign country where my sister could get an abortion when that was illegal in this country. Ergo, Mexican features close our home in Orange County. You write (in your effort to discredit me!) “Tijuana exists as a big city BECAUSE of the border and because of the desire of Americans to cross the border and partake of various vices that were unavailable on the American side…” Yes, exactly. That WAS part of the Southern California experience to which I was referring.

    When my parents took us out to a Mexican restaurant, it was possible long before it was in many other parts of the US. Here in Connecticut, I still lament the lack of good Mexican food. Ergo, Mexican-American cuisine was available in SoCal when I was a boy and still isn’t now that I am an adult in Connecticut.

    Even all the way up north in Modesto, California, my father’s home town (and George Lucas’s) there was a Mexican family-run restaurant that my father took us to. That is where I learned what real tamales are like.

    Furthermore, even you can’t deny the Spanish-era influence on California architecture. That is a well-known fact, and one of the things I was thinking of.

    Honestly, Jack, what is your motivation for constantly trying to disprove my innocent comments here? It is particularly offensive when you lecture me about my own life experiences.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I don't mean to denigrate your personal experiences, just to put them in a larger context. Obviously California had a lot more Mexican influence than Connecticut, where, as you say, it was virtually non-existent. Even though NYC had millions of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans, there was virtually no Mexican presence until the 1980s.

    However, as much "Spanish" influence as California had, a lot of it (especially the architectural part) was really artificial and recent, just as much of "colonial" architecture in the East was fake.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    Jack can't help himself. He is often priceless, but often too a rather obtuse know-it-all, laboriously explaining the background "facts" to a comment like yours, or a recent one of mine about amusing errors in films. We know, Jack, we know: we take all that as read.
    But he won't have it, and the encyclopedia is whipped out triumphantly, time and again.

    It's not meant personally I'm sure.

    And if you think you are deprived of real Mexican food living in Connecticut, just imagine living in North Britain. A human tragedy.

  198. @Buzz Mohawk
    Jack, please. I was referring to the inspiration for such things, as well as the fact that there were some Mexican people there. I lived there. Did you?

    Your encyclopedia entry here is of course factually correct, but one senses that its only purpose is to somehow prove me wrong.

    By the 1960s, Tijuana was a place in a foreign country where my sister could get an abortion when that was illegal in this country. Ergo, Mexican features close our home in Orange County. You write (in your effort to discredit me!) "Tijuana exists as a big city BECAUSE of the border and because of the desire of Americans to cross the border and partake of various vices that were unavailable on the American side..." Yes, exactly. That WAS part of the Southern California experience to which I was referring.


    When my parents took us out to a Mexican restaurant, it was possible long before it was in many other parts of the US. Here in Connecticut, I still lament the lack of good Mexican food. Ergo, Mexican-American cuisine was available in SoCal when I was a boy and still isn't now that I am an adult in Connecticut.

    Even all the way up north in Modesto, California, my father's home town (and George Lucas's) there was a Mexican family-run restaurant that my father took us to. That is where I learned what real tamales are like.

    Furthermore, even you can't deny the Spanish-era influence on California architecture. That is a well-known fact, and one of the things I was thinking of.

    Honestly, Jack, what is your motivation for constantly trying to disprove my innocent comments here? It is particularly offensive when you lecture me about my own life experiences.

    I don’t mean to denigrate your personal experiences, just to put them in a larger context. Obviously California had a lot more Mexican influence than Connecticut, where, as you say, it was virtually non-existent. Even though NYC had millions of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans, there was virtually no Mexican presence until the 1980s.

    However, as much “Spanish” influence as California had, a lot of it (especially the architectural part) was really artificial and recent, just as much of “colonial” architecture in the East was fake.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    In the town where I live now, and the surrounding territory, there are many colonial houses that date from before the revolution. They have little signs on the front with dates: 1750, 1768, etc. and the names of the original inhabitants, some of whom actually participated in the revolution.

    We even buy produce in a barn dating to that era and built by one of those people. It is just down the road, and the farm is still in the very same family name.

    A personal friend lives in a farmhouse from that era, raises livestock on that farm, and sells the meat to us and to other locals... as a hobby. Inside that old house from the 1700s, things are completely modern, with all the fancy Viking appliances etc. that affluent 21st century Americans can buy.

    I don't need your larger context, because I already know what it is, in California and Connecticut. That was not the topic.

    , @Steve Sailer
    I think the Mission Santa Barbara is more or less original from 1820 (the towers were rebuilt after the 1925 earthquake). Oddly, it doesn't look all that much like the classic Mission Style, which, I'm guessing, might have been more or less an invention of 1920s money, romanticism, and good taste.
    , @syonredux

    However, as much “Spanish” influence as California had, a lot of it (especially the architectural part) was really artificial and recent, just as much of “colonial” architecture in the East was fake.
     
    That's not a good comparison. Even allowing for restoration/reconstruction, the colonial "footprint" on the East Coast is far more extensive than anything that the Spanish left in CA.
  199. @Jack D
    I don't mean to denigrate your personal experiences, just to put them in a larger context. Obviously California had a lot more Mexican influence than Connecticut, where, as you say, it was virtually non-existent. Even though NYC had millions of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans, there was virtually no Mexican presence until the 1980s.

    However, as much "Spanish" influence as California had, a lot of it (especially the architectural part) was really artificial and recent, just as much of "colonial" architecture in the East was fake.

    In the town where I live now, and the surrounding territory, there are many colonial houses that date from before the revolution. They have little signs on the front with dates: 1750, 1768, etc. and the names of the original inhabitants, some of whom actually participated in the revolution.

    We even buy produce in a barn dating to that era and built by one of those people. It is just down the road, and the farm is still in the very same family name.

    A personal friend lives in a farmhouse from that era, raises livestock on that farm, and sells the meat to us and to other locals… as a hobby. Inside that old house from the 1700s, things are completely modern, with all the fancy Viking appliances etc. that affluent 21st century Americans can buy.

    I don’t need your larger context, because I already know what it is, in California and Connecticut. That was not the topic.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Yes, no doubt that some structures from the 18th century remain in the East, though I think you would be surprised to see how many of these looked different in the past and were later restored to look more "original" (or some later era's idea of what was original). Starting with Rockefeller's reconstruction of "Colonial Williamsburg" in the 1920, there was a revival of interest in American history and American historic structures, which until then were thought of as just being old eyesores that could be altered to look more "modern" for the time (e.g. you could add Victorian gingerbread to them) or knocked down without a second thought.

    However for every "authentic" Colonial building, no matter how altered or restored, there are 100 "Colonial style" buildings that were built starting (again) from the 1920s and continuing until the present day. "Colonial" shopping centers and movie theaters and tract houses, etc. etc. And in CA, as I am sure you know, instead of "Colonial" fakes, the fashion was for "Spanish" fakes.

    When you go to Europe, there are certain places which really look pretty much the way that they did 200 or 400 years ago but the US was a dynamic society and it was common for buildings (esp. in urban areas) to be razed every 30 or 40 years as the neighborhood changed in character or use. If you look at pictures of the Paul Revere House in Boston in the early 20th century, it's some kind of bank in the middle of the Italian ghetto with a storefront and signs in Italian and looks little like it does today.

    Ironically, some of the best preserved areas, such as the brownstone neighborhoods of Brooklyn, were preserved because they became black ghettos and nobody want to invest any money in radically altering the structures or building anything new.

  200. @Buzz Mohawk
    In the town where I live now, and the surrounding territory, there are many colonial houses that date from before the revolution. They have little signs on the front with dates: 1750, 1768, etc. and the names of the original inhabitants, some of whom actually participated in the revolution.

    We even buy produce in a barn dating to that era and built by one of those people. It is just down the road, and the farm is still in the very same family name.

    A personal friend lives in a farmhouse from that era, raises livestock on that farm, and sells the meat to us and to other locals... as a hobby. Inside that old house from the 1700s, things are completely modern, with all the fancy Viking appliances etc. that affluent 21st century Americans can buy.

    I don't need your larger context, because I already know what it is, in California and Connecticut. That was not the topic.

    Yes, no doubt that some structures from the 18th century remain in the East, though I think you would be surprised to see how many of these looked different in the past and were later restored to look more “original” (or some later era’s idea of what was original). Starting with Rockefeller’s reconstruction of “Colonial Williamsburg” in the 1920, there was a revival of interest in American history and American historic structures, which until then were thought of as just being old eyesores that could be altered to look more “modern” for the time (e.g. you could add Victorian gingerbread to them) or knocked down without a second thought.

    However for every “authentic” Colonial building, no matter how altered or restored, there are 100 “Colonial style” buildings that were built starting (again) from the 1920s and continuing until the present day. “Colonial” shopping centers and movie theaters and tract houses, etc. etc. And in CA, as I am sure you know, instead of “Colonial” fakes, the fashion was for “Spanish” fakes.

    When you go to Europe, there are certain places which really look pretty much the way that they did 200 or 400 years ago but the US was a dynamic society and it was common for buildings (esp. in urban areas) to be razed every 30 or 40 years as the neighborhood changed in character or use. If you look at pictures of the Paul Revere House in Boston in the early 20th century, it’s some kind of bank in the middle of the Italian ghetto with a storefront and signs in Italian and looks little like it does today.

    Ironically, some of the best preserved areas, such as the brownstone neighborhoods of Brooklyn, were preserved because they became black ghettos and nobody want to invest any money in radically altering the structures or building anything new.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Many of the old houses here were added to. Even my neighbor, who is an architect BTW, lives in a house with a central core section that dates from the 1850s but with wings added. Our whole neighborhood was a farm belonging to the family that lived in the middle part of that house.

    My brother-in-law in western NJ grew up in a house with an oldest portion that was built by Dutch settlers even earlier than colonial times. I was in that house many times, because he and my sister lived a long time in the old servants' cottage on the property. I had to bend my head down in the kitchen, because it was in the oldest, shortest part. I guess those Dutch people back then were kind of short. The cottage included a huge, arching fireplace with an iron rod for hanging pots and cooking, from "back in the day." The one in the big house was even grander, a big, arching thing. The East is full of these things.

    In Europe, the old buildings and architecture are so much more beautiful, full and detailed than anything in America. I love our country, but I must admit that many of our structures suffer from that dynamism to which you refer. We are also a land of the "balloon frame" wood house, while the Old World is lots of masonry, with all the gravitas and inter-room privacy that implies. (Have you ever suffered in a bachelor apartment with paper-thin walls? It, um, kind of cramps one's style during intimate moments. No passionate moaning and growling unless you just want to invite the neighbors to listen to your most intimate conquests.)

    Also, the style of even our solid, large edifices, such as churches, tends to be more bas relief than in Europe, flatter and simpler. It is an imitation, made with love by the memory of the New World Europeans here.

  201. @anon
    "They weren’t proxies for Jews then."

    I've always thought the Ferengi/Jewish connection was overblown. More likely, the liberals who made TNG probably just wanted an overblown caricature of the modern capitalist to contrast against the enlightened socialists of TNG.

    So the big noses and penchant for cruelty and whining speech and entire culture based around argument and trade, that’s, just, like, capitalism, man?

    • Agree: R.G. Camara
  202. @Jack D
    Yes, no doubt that some structures from the 18th century remain in the East, though I think you would be surprised to see how many of these looked different in the past and were later restored to look more "original" (or some later era's idea of what was original). Starting with Rockefeller's reconstruction of "Colonial Williamsburg" in the 1920, there was a revival of interest in American history and American historic structures, which until then were thought of as just being old eyesores that could be altered to look more "modern" for the time (e.g. you could add Victorian gingerbread to them) or knocked down without a second thought.

    However for every "authentic" Colonial building, no matter how altered or restored, there are 100 "Colonial style" buildings that were built starting (again) from the 1920s and continuing until the present day. "Colonial" shopping centers and movie theaters and tract houses, etc. etc. And in CA, as I am sure you know, instead of "Colonial" fakes, the fashion was for "Spanish" fakes.

    When you go to Europe, there are certain places which really look pretty much the way that they did 200 or 400 years ago but the US was a dynamic society and it was common for buildings (esp. in urban areas) to be razed every 30 or 40 years as the neighborhood changed in character or use. If you look at pictures of the Paul Revere House in Boston in the early 20th century, it's some kind of bank in the middle of the Italian ghetto with a storefront and signs in Italian and looks little like it does today.

    Ironically, some of the best preserved areas, such as the brownstone neighborhoods of Brooklyn, were preserved because they became black ghettos and nobody want to invest any money in radically altering the structures or building anything new.

    Many of the old houses here were added to. Even my neighbor, who is an architect BTW, lives in a house with a central core section that dates from the 1850s but with wings added. Our whole neighborhood was a farm belonging to the family that lived in the middle part of that house.

    My brother-in-law in western NJ grew up in a house with an oldest portion that was built by Dutch settlers even earlier than colonial times. I was in that house many times, because he and my sister lived a long time in the old servants’ cottage on the property. I had to bend my head down in the kitchen, because it was in the oldest, shortest part. I guess those Dutch people back then were kind of short. The cottage included a huge, arching fireplace with an iron rod for hanging pots and cooking, from “back in the day.” The one in the big house was even grander, a big, arching thing. The East is full of these things.

    In Europe, the old buildings and architecture are so much more beautiful, full and detailed than anything in America. I love our country, but I must admit that many of our structures suffer from that dynamism to which you refer. We are also a land of the “balloon frame” wood house, while the Old World is lots of masonry, with all the gravitas and inter-room privacy that implies. (Have you ever suffered in a bachelor apartment with paper-thin walls? It, um, kind of cramps one’s style during intimate moments. No passionate moaning and growling unless you just want to invite the neighbors to listen to your most intimate conquests.)

    Also, the style of even our solid, large edifices, such as churches, tends to be more bas relief than in Europe, flatter and simpler. It is an imitation, made with love by the memory of the New World Europeans here.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Of the 17th-18th century Anglo-American buildings that I have personally visited, these are some of my favorites:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/59/Hammond-Harwood_House_(Md._Ave._Facade).jpg


    https://www.bluffton.edu/homepages/facstaff/sullivanm/virginia/williamsburg/bruton/side.jpg




    https://assets.visitphilly.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Powel_House_MKENNEDY-2200VP-1024x576.jpg


    https://notesfromalargecontinent.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/paul-sagars-boston-pictures-017.jpg



    http://www.lancashireinfantrymuseum.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/800px-Cliveden_Mansion_Philadelphia_HABS_PA-1184-88.jpg
  203. To Tarantino, 1969 isn’t the year of the moon landing or Woodstock or Earth Day or Women’s Lib or Gay Lib, it’s the last year of the Cowboy Era, when Hollywood made Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, True Grit, and The Wild Bunch.

    True Grit: Nostalgia Western. Coming out in 1969, it could just as easily have been made in 1959.

    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid: Old West outlaws with a 1969 veneer.

    The Wild Bunch: Armageddon.The Death of the Western as the Death of Western Civilization.

  204. @Buzz Mohawk
    Many of the old houses here were added to. Even my neighbor, who is an architect BTW, lives in a house with a central core section that dates from the 1850s but with wings added. Our whole neighborhood was a farm belonging to the family that lived in the middle part of that house.

    My brother-in-law in western NJ grew up in a house with an oldest portion that was built by Dutch settlers even earlier than colonial times. I was in that house many times, because he and my sister lived a long time in the old servants' cottage on the property. I had to bend my head down in the kitchen, because it was in the oldest, shortest part. I guess those Dutch people back then were kind of short. The cottage included a huge, arching fireplace with an iron rod for hanging pots and cooking, from "back in the day." The one in the big house was even grander, a big, arching thing. The East is full of these things.

    In Europe, the old buildings and architecture are so much more beautiful, full and detailed than anything in America. I love our country, but I must admit that many of our structures suffer from that dynamism to which you refer. We are also a land of the "balloon frame" wood house, while the Old World is lots of masonry, with all the gravitas and inter-room privacy that implies. (Have you ever suffered in a bachelor apartment with paper-thin walls? It, um, kind of cramps one's style during intimate moments. No passionate moaning and growling unless you just want to invite the neighbors to listen to your most intimate conquests.)

    Also, the style of even our solid, large edifices, such as churches, tends to be more bas relief than in Europe, flatter and simpler. It is an imitation, made with love by the memory of the New World Europeans here.

    Of the 17th-18th century Anglo-American buildings that I have personally visited, these are some of my favorites:

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    If you haven't been to Monticello, you should go, and not just for the architecture.

    http://www.tabulousdesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/monticello_14.jpg

    http://s3.amazonaws.com/virginiablog/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/16115710/CN09021905X_12.jpg

    https://monticello-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/old/uploaded-content-images/writing-reading-arrangment.png
    , @Old Palo Altan
    Your third photo is nearly the spitting image of a cousin's house in Georgetown, so much so that at first I thought it was they you had visited.

    What is it?
  205. @J.Ross
    The best defenses I've heard:
    --Remember Tarentino telling the angry movie reviewer that it's a movie, remember that this is the guy who wants you to see the zipper on the gorilla suit, remember that his style is hyper-anti-reality.
    --Apparently this is based closely on a specific fight and matches witness statements.
    --It wasn't a defeat, it was a draw, with the third section for best two out of three interrupted.

    People who think Lee was some kind of fight master probably think the Bloodsport tournaments were real. But it’s amusing to think there are people even today seriously defending Lee’s fighting honor.

  206. @Mr. Anon

    For example, Tate’s husband Roman Polanski, Hollywood’s hottest director, fingered John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas as a possible killer because Polanski, like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle.
     
    Meanwhile, the degenerate creep Phillips took to sleeping with his own daughter.

    Has it ever been alleged that Manson was pimping out the female members of his "family", as Steve does here? I had never heard that before. The Manson girls were mostly pretty homely.

    The Manson girls were angelic singers

  207. @JMcG
    My dad was 32 in 1969. He was a former paratrooper. We lived on a large semi rural property that was a magnet for the local pot smokers and pill poppers who wanted an out of the way place to party.
    Every once in a while he’d head out in the night with his single barrel shotgun and fire a few shells up in the air to run them off.
    Some of them came by the house one day when no one was home and stole some of his clothes from the line and, using them, constructed an effigy which they then hung by the neck from a tree branch overhanging the lane to our house.
    When my mother came home with a carload of children, she had a frightened moment before she saw it was only a dummy and not, in fact, my father hanging there.
    He went out in the night once more, without his shotgun, and we never saw hide nor hair of those amateur hippies again.

    Ever tell you where he buried them?

    • Replies: @JMcG
    I don’t think he actually laid a hand on any of them, mostly they were kids of the local gentry and there would have been an outcry. I think he left the gun behind so it wouldn’t get used.
    They didn’t come back though.
  208. Updating the Manson story, where are they now?

    Tex Watson who did much of the killing is still in prison. However, he got married in
    1979, and through conjugal visits had four children with his wife. He also repented
    and is now a Christian minister. One thing that never ceases to amaze me is that
    there are women, and not trashy women either, who are willing to marry murderers
    and have not one or two but four children with them. Speaking of dysgenics, Tex
    Watson certainly spread his genes far and wide! I’ll bet that in terms of the number
    of kids he is much more successful than most of the commentariat on this blog.

    Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme came from a middle class family – her father was
    an aeronautical engineer. As a child she performed with a group at the White
    House and the Hollywood Bowl. She apparently got her nickname at the
    Spahn Movie Ranch where the Manson “family” lived at the time of the
    murders. Her role was to take care of the ranch owner, including sexually.
    He was by then 80 and blind. She would emit squeaking noises as he ran
    his hand up her thigh. She didn’t participate in the murders but tried to
    assassinate President Ford in September 1975. Since her release from prison
    she has lived quietly in Marcy, New York, which, ironically, is located near
    the site of the famous 19th century Oneida Colony, notorious for (principled)
    free love, and perhaps the most successful commune in American history.

  209. @syonredux
    Of the 17th-18th century Anglo-American buildings that I have personally visited, these are some of my favorites:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/59/Hammond-Harwood_House_(Md._Ave._Facade).jpg


    https://www.bluffton.edu/homepages/facstaff/sullivanm/virginia/williamsburg/bruton/side.jpg




    https://assets.visitphilly.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Powel_House_MKENNEDY-2200VP-1024x576.jpg


    https://notesfromalargecontinent.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/paul-sagars-boston-pictures-017.jpg



    http://www.lancashireinfantrymuseum.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/800px-Cliveden_Mansion_Philadelphia_HABS_PA-1184-88.jpg

    If you haven’t been to Monticello, you should go, and not just for the architecture.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Visited it about a half-dozen times. Very impressive.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Charlottesville just voted to stop celebrating Thomas Jefferson's birthday so razing Monticello is probably next on their to do list.

    Monticello is a spectacular place in one of the prettiest parts of the Old Dominion. Oddly, it was a Jew who saved it in the 1800s after it had fallen into disrepair.
  210. @Buzz Mohawk
    If you haven't been to Monticello, you should go, and not just for the architecture.

    http://www.tabulousdesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/monticello_14.jpg

    http://s3.amazonaws.com/virginiablog/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/16115710/CN09021905X_12.jpg

    https://monticello-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/old/uploaded-content-images/writing-reading-arrangment.png

    Visited it about a half-dozen times. Very impressive.

  211. @Buzz Mohawk
    Southern California had plenty of Mexican flavor back then (maybe just the right amount) but it wasn't a de facto part of Mexico the way it is now. There were Mexicans and Mexican restaurants, and my sister got an abortion in Tijuana, but the population seemed something like 90% White (not Hispanic).

    Those of who lived there, then, can tell you how it was: the Mexicans were the defeated ones. California had been theirs, but now it was ours.
    Therefore we could be relaxed about their minimal and picturesque presence, enjoy their food, respect their Faith (particularly if we shared it), and otherwise ignore them. If we suddenly noticed that there were too many, we sent them back where they came from.

    But eternal vigilance was not exercised, and here we are.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
  212. @Buzz Mohawk
    Jack, please. I was referring to the inspiration for such things, as well as the fact that there were some Mexican people there. I lived there. Did you?

    Your encyclopedia entry here is of course factually correct, but one senses that its only purpose is to somehow prove me wrong.

    By the 1960s, Tijuana was a place in a foreign country where my sister could get an abortion when that was illegal in this country. Ergo, Mexican features close our home in Orange County. You write (in your effort to discredit me!) "Tijuana exists as a big city BECAUSE of the border and because of the desire of Americans to cross the border and partake of various vices that were unavailable on the American side..." Yes, exactly. That WAS part of the Southern California experience to which I was referring.


    When my parents took us out to a Mexican restaurant, it was possible long before it was in many other parts of the US. Here in Connecticut, I still lament the lack of good Mexican food. Ergo, Mexican-American cuisine was available in SoCal when I was a boy and still isn't now that I am an adult in Connecticut.

    Even all the way up north in Modesto, California, my father's home town (and George Lucas's) there was a Mexican family-run restaurant that my father took us to. That is where I learned what real tamales are like.

    Furthermore, even you can't deny the Spanish-era influence on California architecture. That is a well-known fact, and one of the things I was thinking of.

    Honestly, Jack, what is your motivation for constantly trying to disprove my innocent comments here? It is particularly offensive when you lecture me about my own life experiences.

    Jack can’t help himself. He is often priceless, but often too a rather obtuse know-it-all, laboriously explaining the background “facts” to a comment like yours, or a recent one of mine about amusing errors in films. We know, Jack, we know: we take all that as read.
    But he won’t have it, and the encyclopedia is whipped out triumphantly, time and again.

    It’s not meant personally I’m sure.

    And if you think you are deprived of real Mexican food living in Connecticut, just imagine living in North Britain. A human tragedy.

  213. @syonredux
    Of the 17th-18th century Anglo-American buildings that I have personally visited, these are some of my favorites:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/59/Hammond-Harwood_House_(Md._Ave._Facade).jpg


    https://www.bluffton.edu/homepages/facstaff/sullivanm/virginia/williamsburg/bruton/side.jpg




    https://assets.visitphilly.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Powel_House_MKENNEDY-2200VP-1024x576.jpg


    https://notesfromalargecontinent.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/paul-sagars-boston-pictures-017.jpg



    http://www.lancashireinfantrymuseum.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/800px-Cliveden_Mansion_Philadelphia_HABS_PA-1184-88.jpg

    Your third photo is nearly the spitting image of a cousin’s house in Georgetown, so much so that at first I thought it was they you had visited.

    What is it?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Your third photo is nearly the spitting image of a cousin’s house in Georgetown, so much so that at first I thought it was they you had visited.

    What is it?
     
    Powel House in Philadelphia:

    The Powel House is a historic house museum located at 244 South 3rd Street, between Willings Alley and Spruce Street, in the Society Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Built in 1765 in the Georgian style,[1] and embellished by second owner Samuel Powel (1738–1793), it has been called "the finest Georgian row house in the city."
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_House
  214. @Old Palo Altan
    Your third photo is nearly the spitting image of a cousin's house in Georgetown, so much so that at first I thought it was they you had visited.

    What is it?

    Your third photo is nearly the spitting image of a cousin’s house in Georgetown, so much so that at first I thought it was they you had visited.

    What is it?

    Powel House in Philadelphia:

    The Powel House is a historic house museum located at 244 South 3rd Street, between Willings Alley and Spruce Street, in the Society Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Built in 1765 in the Georgian style,[1] and embellished by second owner Samuel Powel (1738–1793), it has been called “the finest Georgian row house in the city.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_House

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Thank you.
    , @Jack D
    What you see today, beautiful as it is, is not so much the Powel House as an imaginative reconstruction of the Powel House. By the early 20th century, the Powel House was smack in the middle of the Jewish ghetto of Philadelphia (my wife's great grandparents lived around the corner) and was being used as a warehouse for imported Russian horse hair. It's glory days were long past. The interiors had been stripped out. They did a great job in putting back to the way it once was from old paintings, the surviving real interiors which are now in museums, etc., but not much of what you see is original.

    Here's a "before and after" of a similar vintage structure:

    https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/600SpruceSt.jpg

    https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/SocietyHillHouse-575x581.png

    The ground floor of these structures particularly suffered because they were often converted to retail space with shopfronts of cast iron and glass and the back yards were filled in with additional structures.

  215. @Old Palo Altan
    Ever tell you where he buried them?

    I don’t think he actually laid a hand on any of them, mostly they were kids of the local gentry and there would have been an outcry. I think he left the gun behind so it wouldn’t get used.
    They didn’t come back though.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Perhaps if we'd had more of that, and on a national scale, we wouldn't be in the terminal mess we are in now.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    A good beating will get your attention. The cops used to do that to the local bad guys if they got out of line. Take them down to the station house and tune them up. Can't do that anymore because of "muh civil rights" and the fact that most of bad guys are POCs.
  216. @syonredux

    Your third photo is nearly the spitting image of a cousin’s house in Georgetown, so much so that at first I thought it was they you had visited.

    What is it?
     
    Powel House in Philadelphia:

    The Powel House is a historic house museum located at 244 South 3rd Street, between Willings Alley and Spruce Street, in the Society Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Built in 1765 in the Georgian style,[1] and embellished by second owner Samuel Powel (1738–1793), it has been called "the finest Georgian row house in the city."
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_House

    Thank you.

  217. And since we’ve been talking about Cowboy America, here are some of my favorite sites associated with the era of the Old West:

    Fourth Ward School in Nevada:

    Fort Laramie in Wyoming:

    Georgetown, Colorado:

    Old Sacramento:

  218. @syonredux

    Your third photo is nearly the spitting image of a cousin’s house in Georgetown, so much so that at first I thought it was they you had visited.

    What is it?
     
    Powel House in Philadelphia:

    The Powel House is a historic house museum located at 244 South 3rd Street, between Willings Alley and Spruce Street, in the Society Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Built in 1765 in the Georgian style,[1] and embellished by second owner Samuel Powel (1738–1793), it has been called "the finest Georgian row house in the city."
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_House

    What you see today, beautiful as it is, is not so much the Powel House as an imaginative reconstruction of the Powel House. By the early 20th century, the Powel House was smack in the middle of the Jewish ghetto of Philadelphia (my wife’s great grandparents lived around the corner) and was being used as a warehouse for imported Russian horse hair. It’s glory days were long past. The interiors had been stripped out. They did a great job in putting back to the way it once was from old paintings, the surviving real interiors which are now in museums, etc., but not much of what you see is original.

    Here’s a “before and after” of a similar vintage structure:

    The ground floor of these structures particularly suffered because they were often converted to retail space with shopfronts of cast iron and glass and the back yards were filled in with additional structures.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    What you see today, beautiful as it is, is not so much the Powel House as an imaginative reconstruction of the Powel House.
     
    More painstaking than imaginative:

    Early in the 20th century, the house served as a warehouse for a business that imported and exported Russian and Siberian horse hair and bristles. In 1918, the owners sold the second floor rear parlor's architectural woodwork to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where it is now a period room in the American Wing.[18] The ballroom's plaster ceiling and architectural woodwork was sold to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1925.[4] By 1930, the Powel House was slated for demolition, with the property to be converted into a parking lot.
     

    Antiquarian Frances Wister saved the house, forming the Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks and raising the funds to purchase the property in 1931. Over the next decade, Wister and the Society bought and demolished the 19th-century building that covered the east end of the walled garden, and hired architect H. Louis Duhring, Jr. to restore the house to its appearance during Powel's residency and re-create its lost interiors. The Society opened the restored house as a museum interpreting the daily lives of wealthy Philadelphians at the time of the American Revolution.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_House
    , @syonredux
    Ship of Theseus, anyone?


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ship_of_Theseus
  219. @Dieter Kief
    I'll go see the movie. And I'm curious just how often this remark of the insightful Mr. Steve will pop up in my mind while watching. It will happen more than once, I guess. I was delighted to read this reference).

    Longshoreman philosopher Eric Hoffer argued that in a movie intent on revivifying the past, a strong plot is a distraction because human motivations are too timeless.

    Hoffer would have liked Once.
     

    I also liked the hint at the often overlooked fact, that film is an optical medium. True (that's film's strength - and marks its limitations).

    My reaction when I read the Hoffer quote was this: “Dieter will like that”. Never mind that Hoffer was a “homespun” media creation of no enduring value.

    But I follow him here: I can watch the Sisi films over and over again, for one reason only, nostalgia.
    The minimal plot is just there in the background, what matters are the sets, the uniforms, the stupendous ’50s colour film, the music, the unspoilt land- and city-scapes, the beauty, the beauty, the beauty, and of course THAT beauty, Romi Schneider.

    If I want a certain profundity along with history and nostalgia (well, perhaps not exactly that in this case) I turn, say, to Ivan the Terrible, where the plot is essential to one’s full enjoyment of what Eisenstein is doing, even if, as is certainly the case, each frame, taken alone, is a work of artistic genius. Put together as they then are, and melded with Prokofiev’s magical score, the whole becomes nearly unbearable with the weight of its inventive power.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    I've read quite a bit of Eric Hoffer and do like his proud (may I say: Work-based /bodily) self-consciousness a lot. So - your idea was spot on.

    That Eric Hoffer had such precious insights as the one cited by Steve Sailer - who today wrote, that he too has become a tad more body-oriented - this might be no coincidence), is in no way accidental.

    I made 20 fantastic kilometers on the bike today - after having met a Bronesse of B., - who was in terrific shape (think of Romy Schneider). She lacked mental presence though. I then left the city on my bike and spotted three kinds of dragonflies in the woods and an overwhelmingly beautiful red Milan, gliding over me in perfectly clear summer evening light, the bird's feathers bursting of reds and oranges and browns. A Peregrine waiting on a little power-line in the distance. Wild doves in the trees at the border of the Bodman woods.

  220. @JMcG
    I don’t think he actually laid a hand on any of them, mostly they were kids of the local gentry and there would have been an outcry. I think he left the gun behind so it wouldn’t get used.
    They didn’t come back though.

    Perhaps if we’d had more of that, and on a national scale, we wouldn’t be in the terminal mess we are in now.

  221. @Jack D
    What you see today, beautiful as it is, is not so much the Powel House as an imaginative reconstruction of the Powel House. By the early 20th century, the Powel House was smack in the middle of the Jewish ghetto of Philadelphia (my wife's great grandparents lived around the corner) and was being used as a warehouse for imported Russian horse hair. It's glory days were long past. The interiors had been stripped out. They did a great job in putting back to the way it once was from old paintings, the surviving real interiors which are now in museums, etc., but not much of what you see is original.

    Here's a "before and after" of a similar vintage structure:

    https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/600SpruceSt.jpg

    https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/SocietyHillHouse-575x581.png

    The ground floor of these structures particularly suffered because they were often converted to retail space with shopfronts of cast iron and glass and the back yards were filled in with additional structures.

    What you see today, beautiful as it is, is not so much the Powel House as an imaginative reconstruction of the Powel House.

    More painstaking than imaginative:

    Early in the 20th century, the house served as a warehouse for a business that imported and exported Russian and Siberian horse hair and bristles. In 1918, the owners sold the second floor rear parlor’s architectural woodwork to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where it is now a period room in the American Wing.[18] The ballroom’s plaster ceiling and architectural woodwork was sold to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1925.[4] By 1930, the Powel House was slated for demolition, with the property to be converted into a parking lot.

    Antiquarian Frances Wister saved the house, forming the Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks and raising the funds to purchase the property in 1931. Over the next decade, Wister and the Society bought and demolished the 19th-century building that covered the east end of the walled garden, and hired architect H. Louis Duhring, Jr. to restore the house to its appearance during Powel’s residency and re-create its lost interiors. The Society opened the restored house as a museum interpreting the daily lives of wealthy Philadelphians at the time of the American Revolution.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powel_House

  222. @Old Palo Altan
    My reaction when I read the Hoffer quote was this: "Dieter will like that". Never mind that Hoffer was a "homespun" media creation of no enduring value.

    But I follow him here: I can watch the Sisi films over and over again, for one reason only, nostalgia.
    The minimal plot is just there in the background, what matters are the sets, the uniforms, the stupendous '50s colour film, the music, the unspoilt land- and city-scapes, the beauty, the beauty, the beauty, and of course THAT beauty, Romi Schneider.

    If I want a certain profundity along with history and nostalgia (well, perhaps not exactly that in this case) I turn, say, to Ivan the Terrible, where the plot is essential to one's full enjoyment of what Eisenstein is doing, even if, as is certainly the case, each frame, taken alone, is a work of artistic genius. Put together as they then are, and melded with Prokofiev's magical score, the whole becomes nearly unbearable with the weight of its inventive power.

    I’ve read quite a bit of Eric Hoffer and do like his proud (may I say: Work-based /bodily) self-consciousness a lot. So – your idea was spot on.

    That Eric Hoffer had such precious insights as the one cited by Steve Sailer – who today wrote, that he too has become a tad more body-oriented – this might be no coincidence), is in no way accidental.

    I made 20 fantastic kilometers on the bike today – after having met a Bronesse of B., – who was in terrific shape (think of Romy Schneider). She lacked mental presence though. I then left the city on my bike and spotted three kinds of dragonflies in the woods and an overwhelmingly beautiful red Milan, gliding over me in perfectly clear summer evening light, the bird’s feathers bursting of reds and oranges and browns. A Peregrine waiting on a little power-line in the distance. Wild doves in the trees at the border of the Bodman woods.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    "she lacked mental presence though"

    What did she do - fall off her bike?


    And, since you were skirting the Bodman woods, I am assuming that she was of that family?

    The site (in German) about the Bodmans and their forests is very amusing (the introductory bits at least), and could almost have been written by you.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Sounds like good weed.
  223. @Jack D
    What you see today, beautiful as it is, is not so much the Powel House as an imaginative reconstruction of the Powel House. By the early 20th century, the Powel House was smack in the middle of the Jewish ghetto of Philadelphia (my wife's great grandparents lived around the corner) and was being used as a warehouse for imported Russian horse hair. It's glory days were long past. The interiors had been stripped out. They did a great job in putting back to the way it once was from old paintings, the surviving real interiors which are now in museums, etc., but not much of what you see is original.

    Here's a "before and after" of a similar vintage structure:

    https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/600SpruceSt.jpg

    https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/SocietyHillHouse-575x581.png

    The ground floor of these structures particularly suffered because they were often converted to retail space with shopfronts of cast iron and glass and the back yards were filled in with additional structures.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    It's worse than the Ship of Theseus because presumably in the Ship, every time a timber rotted they immediately replaced it with an identical timber. Whereas in these houses various alterations were made and then put back decades or centuries later based upon (sometimes) little more than guesswork. It would be as if the Ship of Theseus was converted from a warship to a garbage scow and then back again 100 years later.
  224. @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/NickLoweBio/status/1156289295969222656

    http://wordpodcast.co.uk/2019/07/24/word-podcast-303-will-birch-on-the-career-of-nick-lowe-least-hardworking-man-in-show-business/

    I love that line– Least hardworking man in show business. I get the James Brown joke. I shall listen. Meanwhile I like this immortal super blast from Dave Edmunds >>>>

  225. I do love listing favorite 18th century buildings that I have visited….

  226. @syonredux
    Ship of Theseus, anyone?


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ship_of_Theseus

    It’s worse than the Ship of Theseus because presumably in the Ship, every time a timber rotted they immediately replaced it with an identical timber. Whereas in these houses various alterations were made and then put back decades or centuries later based upon (sometimes) little more than guesswork. It would be as if the Ship of Theseus was converted from a warship to a garbage scow and then back again 100 years later.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    It’s worse than the Ship of Theseus because presumably in the Ship, every time a timber rotted they immediately replaced it with an identical timber.
     
    Can anything truly be identical ?

    Whereas in these houses various alterations were made and then put back decades or centuries later based upon (sometimes) little more than guesswork. It would be as if the Ship of Theseus was converted from a warship to a garbage scow and then back again 100 years later.
     
    There's guesswork....and then there's educated guesswork.....

    At any rate, one can offer some guidelines....


    Structures that have survived more-or-less intact to the present day:

    Westover, King's Chapel


    Structures that have been heavily modified/restored:

    Powel House

    Structures that have been entirely re-built:

    Governor's Palace, Williamsburg
  227. @Jack D
    It's worse than the Ship of Theseus because presumably in the Ship, every time a timber rotted they immediately replaced it with an identical timber. Whereas in these houses various alterations were made and then put back decades or centuries later based upon (sometimes) little more than guesswork. It would be as if the Ship of Theseus was converted from a warship to a garbage scow and then back again 100 years later.

    It’s worse than the Ship of Theseus because presumably in the Ship, every time a timber rotted they immediately replaced it with an identical timber.

    Can anything truly be identical ?

    Whereas in these houses various alterations were made and then put back decades or centuries later based upon (sometimes) little more than guesswork. It would be as if the Ship of Theseus was converted from a warship to a garbage scow and then back again 100 years later.

    There’s guesswork….and then there’s educated guesswork…..

    At any rate, one can offer some guidelines….

    Structures that have survived more-or-less intact to the present day:

    Westover, King’s Chapel

    Structures that have been heavily modified/restored:

    Powel House

    Structures that have been entirely re-built:

    Governor’s Palace, Williamsburg

    • Replies: @MEH 0910

    Can anything truly be identical ?
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identical_particles

    Identical particles, also called indistinguishable or indiscernible particles, are particles that cannot be distinguished from one another, even in principle.
     
  228. @Jack D
    I don't mean to denigrate your personal experiences, just to put them in a larger context. Obviously California had a lot more Mexican influence than Connecticut, where, as you say, it was virtually non-existent. Even though NYC had millions of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans, there was virtually no Mexican presence until the 1980s.

    However, as much "Spanish" influence as California had, a lot of it (especially the architectural part) was really artificial and recent, just as much of "colonial" architecture in the East was fake.

    I think the Mission Santa Barbara is more or less original from 1820 (the towers were rebuilt after the 1925 earthquake). Oddly, it doesn’t look all that much like the classic Mission Style, which, I’m guessing, might have been more or less an invention of 1920s money, romanticism, and good taste.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Here is the mission after some earthquake, possibly '25:

    https://missionsb.weebly.com/uploads/4/9/0/4/49044221/1429591013.png

    You can see that a lot of what is there today has been rebuilt - not just the towers but also the central pediment. Perhaps rebuilt to resemble the original but this is not the same thing as actually BEING original. Masonry buildings rarely remain standing for centuries in earthquake zones.

    , @Alden
    The monks never left. They kept building and improving all through the 19th century. They didn’t know they were living and farming in a historical monument

    In fact they’re not really historical monuments. They’re parish churches and schools, community centers, kids sports, venues. Some in S California are big and imposing. The farther north you go the smaller and more modest.
  229. @Jack D
    I don't mean to denigrate your personal experiences, just to put them in a larger context. Obviously California had a lot more Mexican influence than Connecticut, where, as you say, it was virtually non-existent. Even though NYC had millions of Puerto Ricans and Dominicans, there was virtually no Mexican presence until the 1980s.

    However, as much "Spanish" influence as California had, a lot of it (especially the architectural part) was really artificial and recent, just as much of "colonial" architecture in the East was fake.

    However, as much “Spanish” influence as California had, a lot of it (especially the architectural part) was really artificial and recent, just as much of “colonial” architecture in the East was fake.

    That’s not a good comparison. Even allowing for restoration/reconstruction, the colonial “footprint” on the East Coast is far more extensive than anything that the Spanish left in CA.

    • Replies: @Alden
    The legacy of the Spanish priests isn’t the mission buildings. It’s the orchards and vineyards they started planting as soon as they landed.
    , @Jack D
    Absolutely. By 1776 the 13 colonies already had well over 2 million people. California had maybe 8,000 non-Indian residents (not a typo) in 1840. One of the reasons that Mexico was willing to let California go (not that it had a choice) was that hardly any Mexicans lived there aside from a few priests and ranchers.
  230. Caitlin Flanagan has some thoughts on Once Upon A Time In Hollywood

    Tarantino’s Most Transgressive Film

    What’s really got the justice critics worked up, however, isn’t the violence or the nostalgia or the silencing of Sharon Tate. What’s rattling them more than they realize is that this movie is transgressive as hell. Only Tarantino would have the balls to make something like it, something that embraces values that have repeatedly been proved—proved!—to be dangerous, outdated, the thing that people don’t want anymore. Box-office poison. And only Tarantino could do it so skillfully that it’s not until you’re back in the car that you realize what he’s done: made a major motion picture in 2019 about a man with a code, a man who hews to the old values of the Western hero.

    The movie is about Leonardo DiCaprio’s character, Rick Dalton. But this is Brad Pitt’s picture, and he carries it so easily that you don’t realize it until the end. Rick is the washed-up star of a TV Western, whose career has wound down to guest-star appearances on other actors’ Westerns (in the career-killing role of villain), heavy drinking, and indulging in fits of crying. He’s weak. Pitt is Cliff Booth, Rick’s stunt double, the one who does all the dangerous things and who—literally—takes no credit. Rick is so dependent on Cliff that he has hired him as driver and houseman, a role that should diminish Cliff in our eyes—1968’s Kato Kaelin—but doesn’t. Cliff is cool, funny, laconic, and tough. His competence and emotional reserve make us more aware of Rick’s weakness. So it’s a depth charge of misgiving to learn that he’s not welcome on some television sets. He brings a bad energy, apparently, because many people believe he killed his wife. It’s an anvil dropping: Is he a threat? Did he do it? In the one flashback, the truth is never revealed. For most of the picture, we know we can’t trust him, and Pitt plays with us throughout, one moment charming, the next lost in something inward.

    At the end of the movie, after he’s redeemed tenfold, we realize who he was all along and why we couldn’t help falling for him—a hero. Rick spent the movie trying to portray a hero; Cliff spent it being one—and like all heroes, he didn’t spend any time bringing attention to the fact. The beautiful teenager who keeps trying to get him to give her a ride finally succeeds, but when she tries to seduce him, she doesn’t have a chance. He spares her feelings by telling her that it’s because she doesn’t have a photo ID to prove she’s over 18, but that’s not the reason. He doesn’t need “affirmative consent.” He has a code: A man doesn’t sleep with teenagers.

    Cliff faces great danger at the Manson compound to make sure an elderly man of his slight acquaintance is safe. He doesn’t start fights, but if he gets into one, he’ll lay out the challenger. His dog loves him, he doesn’t like to see a man crying, and he’s got his passions under control. One afternoon, he climbs to Rick’s roof to fix his television antenna, a potent symbol of Rick’s failing television career, but also one more reminder of their relationship: Rick’s things are broken, and Cliff repairs them. In the bright sun, he takes off his shirt (heaven help us) and then he hears music from the house next door. It’s Tate, alone in her room. He glances over—does he see her? Maybe. But he’s not a man who climbs on roofs for a peep show, and he turns back to his work. Most of all, he’s loyal—even when Rick might not deserve that loyalty.

    We can’t have a movie like this. It affirms things the culture wants killed. If men aren’t encouraged to cry in public, where will we end up? And the bottom line is the bottom line: Audiences don’t want to see this kind of thing anymore. The audience wants the kind of movies the justice critics want. But the audience gave Once Upon a Time in Hollywood the biggest opening of Tarantino’s career. The critics may not get it, but the public does. Is Tarantino making a reactionary statement at a dangerous time? Or does the title tell the truth, that the whole thing—including those old masculine values—was always just a fairy tale, a world “that never really existed, but feels like a memory”?

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/08/tarantinos-most-transgressive-film/595309/?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=share

  231. @Steve Sailer
    I think the Mission Santa Barbara is more or less original from 1820 (the towers were rebuilt after the 1925 earthquake). Oddly, it doesn't look all that much like the classic Mission Style, which, I'm guessing, might have been more or less an invention of 1920s money, romanticism, and good taste.

    Here is the mission after some earthquake, possibly ’25:

    You can see that a lot of what is there today has been rebuilt – not just the towers but also the central pediment. Perhaps rebuilt to resemble the original but this is not the same thing as actually BEING original. Masonry buildings rarely remain standing for centuries in earthquake zones.

    • Replies: @Alden
    They’re not really masonry. They’re baked mud bricks covered with stucco. They were built between 1770 and 1820. They’ve lasted 250 to 200 years. Lots of masonry buildings in Italy lots of earthquakes lots of. thousand year old buildings still standing and being used.

    The most earthquake building in California is Mission Dolores in San Francisco. It’s long and narrow, designed by a priest who was an architect
  232. @Not Raul
    My theory about why Tate was murdered:

    She threatened to tell the police that her husband raped one of Manson’s girls; then Polanski told Manson that he needed to put out the fire before they both got burned.

    Polanski and Tate never met the Manson crew. By the summer of the murder, Manson knew his career was never going to happen. Brian Wilson has dumped him. Terry Melcher got rid of him. Manson didn’t know Melcher had moved out and the Polanski’s has rented the house. Sharon left England and arrived back in the US July 20 and the Manson’s killed her 3 weeks later. The Manson’s didn’t know the LaBianca’s whom they killed a few days later either..

    The Manson’s were never suspects at all. One of the girls was in city jail on one of their auto theft charges and talked about the killings. That led to their arrest.

    • Replies: @Alden
    The police and families asked everyone who had the slightest connection to the victims who had a quarrel with any of the victims. The Manson names-never came up. Then one of the girls talked to her cell mate while in the city jail and they were all arrested.
  233. @syonredux

    However, as much “Spanish” influence as California had, a lot of it (especially the architectural part) was really artificial and recent, just as much of “colonial” architecture in the East was fake.
     
    That's not a good comparison. Even allowing for restoration/reconstruction, the colonial "footprint" on the East Coast is far more extensive than anything that the Spanish left in CA.

    The legacy of the Spanish priests isn’t the mission buildings. It’s the orchards and vineyards they started planting as soon as they landed.

  234. @Jack D
    Here is the mission after some earthquake, possibly '25:

    https://missionsb.weebly.com/uploads/4/9/0/4/49044221/1429591013.png

    You can see that a lot of what is there today has been rebuilt - not just the towers but also the central pediment. Perhaps rebuilt to resemble the original but this is not the same thing as actually BEING original. Masonry buildings rarely remain standing for centuries in earthquake zones.

    They’re not really masonry. They’re baked mud bricks covered with stucco. They were built between 1770 and 1820. They’ve lasted 250 to 200 years. Lots of masonry buildings in Italy lots of earthquakes lots of. thousand year old buildings still standing and being used.

    The most earthquake building in California is Mission Dolores in San Francisco. It’s long and narrow, designed by a priest who was an architect

  235. Maybe I’ll go see it to show solidarity with White men, the best and the brightest and the best people with which to work.

  236. @syonredux

    However, as much “Spanish” influence as California had, a lot of it (especially the architectural part) was really artificial and recent, just as much of “colonial” architecture in the East was fake.
     
    That's not a good comparison. Even allowing for restoration/reconstruction, the colonial "footprint" on the East Coast is far more extensive than anything that the Spanish left in CA.

    Absolutely. By 1776 the 13 colonies already had well over 2 million people. California had maybe 8,000 non-Indian residents (not a typo) in 1840. One of the reasons that Mexico was willing to let California go (not that it had a choice) was that hardly any Mexicans lived there aside from a few priests and ranchers.

    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Corn
    I was once informed that not only were there only 7-8000 Spanish speakers in pre-1848 California but that there were only 75,000 Spanish speakers in all of the lands Mexico ceded in 1848. And most of them were in northern New Mexico.
  237. @Alden
    Polanski and Tate never met the Manson crew. By the summer of the murder, Manson knew his career was never going to happen. Brian Wilson has dumped him. Terry Melcher got rid of him. Manson didn’t know Melcher had moved out and the Polanski’s has rented the house. Sharon left England and arrived back in the US July 20 and the Manson’s killed her 3 weeks later. The Manson’s didn’t know the LaBianca’s whom they killed a few days later either..

    The Manson’s were never suspects at all. One of the girls was in city jail on one of their auto theft charges and talked about the killings. That led to their arrest.

    The police and families asked everyone who had the slightest connection to the victims who had a quarrel with any of the victims. The Manson names-never came up. Then one of the girls talked to her cell mate while in the city jail and they were all arrested.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    That’s suspicious.

    If the case hinges on what some girl in jail allegedly said, perhaps Manson’s people are innocent.
  238. @Steve Sailer
    I think the Mission Santa Barbara is more or less original from 1820 (the towers were rebuilt after the 1925 earthquake). Oddly, it doesn't look all that much like the classic Mission Style, which, I'm guessing, might have been more or less an invention of 1920s money, romanticism, and good taste.

    The monks never left. They kept building and improving all through the 19th century. They didn’t know they were living and farming in a historical monument

    In fact they’re not really historical monuments. They’re parish churches and schools, community centers, kids sports, venues. Some in S California are big and imposing. The farther north you go the smaller and more modest.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    In fact they’re not really historical monuments. They’re parish churches and schools, community centers, kids sports, venues. Some in S California are big and imposing. The farther north you go the smaller and more modest.
     
    I thought that Mission San Francisco Solano was run by the state as a tourist attraction....
  239. @Corvinus
    "In the reality, all three groups depended on White Christian men doing the job that Jews, blacks, and Hollywood lefties couldn’t do."

    The same White Christian men who were responsible for the butchery in the first place, who then assuaged the guilt of their own by enlisting Jews, blacks, and progressives to clean up the mess they made?

    And resistance by black slaves and Jews was far more fierce than you describe. Do you revel in revisionist history?

    Lmao. Nice try, little George Soros-liar.

    Jews exploit the population and import foreign commie thugs and money to attack all non-commies in an attempt to make Germany commie. Germans respond to save their country by throwing their lot behind tough local guys promising to opposing commies violently — aka the Nazis.

    Blacks sell their captured prisoners into slavery and buy their own when they are freed from it. Still do it to this day.

    Hollywood Lefties give Manson enormous prestige and power because he gets the dumb slutty underage girls.

    So the groups create their own problems, and White Christian American goyim save them from it.

    Nice try with the lies, little David Brock bot.

    Next!

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Lmao. Nice try, little George Soros-liar...Nice try with the lies, little David Brock bot."

    Do you enjoy vigorously pressing the Ad Hominem button?

    "Jews exploit the population and import foreign commie thugs and money to attack all non-commies in an attempt to make Germany commie."

    No, the Nazis exploited the population in large part to build a European empire and get back at their enemies for the patently unfair Treaty of Versailles.

    "Blacks sell their captured prisoners into slavery and buy their own when they are freed from it."

    Assuredly there is African complicity in the European slave trade. But you do realize that African slavery and European slavery are NOT the same, right?

    http://edition.cnn.com/WORLD/9510/ghana_slavery

    "Hollywood Lefties give Manson enormous prestige and power because he gets the dumb slutty underage girls."

    One major director does not constitute "Hollywood Lefties".

    "So the groups create their own problems, and White Christian American goyim save them from it."

    With those groups being White Christians who began all of the shenanigans in the first place.
  240. Manson murders. Whole thing a False Flag. Never happened. All actors. Sharon Tate’s father – Colonel Paul Tate (US Navy – Intelligence) – Italy – Operation Gladio. Follow the white rabbit.

    QT knows it .. hence .. Once Upon a Time .. a fairy tale.

  241. @Alden
    The monks never left. They kept building and improving all through the 19th century. They didn’t know they were living and farming in a historical monument

    In fact they’re not really historical monuments. They’re parish churches and schools, community centers, kids sports, venues. Some in S California are big and imposing. The farther north you go the smaller and more modest.

    In fact they’re not really historical monuments. They’re parish churches and schools, community centers, kids sports, venues. Some in S California are big and imposing. The farther north you go the smaller and more modest.

    I thought that Mission San Francisco Solano was run by the state as a tourist attraction….

  242. @Jack D
    Absolutely. By 1776 the 13 colonies already had well over 2 million people. California had maybe 8,000 non-Indian residents (not a typo) in 1840. One of the reasons that Mexico was willing to let California go (not that it had a choice) was that hardly any Mexicans lived there aside from a few priests and ranchers.

    I was once informed that not only were there only 7-8000 Spanish speakers in pre-1848 California but that there were only 75,000 Spanish speakers in all of the lands Mexico ceded in 1848. And most of them were in northern New Mexico.

    • Replies: @JMcG
    The Mexican government wasn’t able to protect the inhabitants of what is now the southwestern US from the tender mercies of the Apaches and most especially, the Comanches. It wasn’t until Texas and then the USG got serious about eradicating the natives that those lands really became available for settlement.
  243. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    While I generally despise Quintin Tarantino movies and Leonardo Dicaprio, I love movies about Hollywood and Brad Pitt. So I'm kind of on the fence about going to see this one. It does seem to piss off all the right people though...

    I love movies about Hollywood

    How many good movies about American movie industry? I thought THE PLAYER was lame. Is SUNSET BOULEVARD the gold standard? I haven’t seen DAY OF THE LOCUST, but it’s long been forgotten. LAST TYCOON was made with big hype but fizzled. I love HAIL CAESAR. Sternberg’s LAST COMMAND is one of the best movies about the movie world. The final moments of BLAZING SADDLES are inspired. NASHVILLE is set in country music town but it’s proxy for Hollywood like Korean War in MASH was really about Vietnam. AVIATOR had ambition but barely got off the ground. TUCKER is really disguised autobio of Coppola’s struggles in Hollywood. MAP OF THE STARS is one of the most damning and depressing probing movie world psychology. MULHOLLAND DR may edge out SUNSET BLVD.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    All About Eve is quite good.Granted, it's technically about Broadway, but I think that the Hollywood proxy argument works here.
  244. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

  245. @Anonymous

    I love movies about Hollywood
     
    How many good movies about American movie industry? I thought THE PLAYER was lame. Is SUNSET BOULEVARD the gold standard? I haven't seen DAY OF THE LOCUST, but it's long been forgotten. LAST TYCOON was made with big hype but fizzled. I love HAIL CAESAR. Sternberg's LAST COMMAND is one of the best movies about the movie world. The final moments of BLAZING SADDLES are inspired. NASHVILLE is set in country music town but it's proxy for Hollywood like Korean War in MASH was really about Vietnam. AVIATOR had ambition but barely got off the ground. TUCKER is really disguised autobio of Coppola's struggles in Hollywood. MAP OF THE STARS is one of the most damning and depressing probing movie world psychology. MULHOLLAND DR may edge out SUNSET BLVD.

    All About Eve is quite good.Granted, it’s technically about Broadway, but I think that the Hollywood proxy argument works here.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    All About Eve is quite good.
     
    It is. A big disappointment is Taviani Brothers' paean to D. W. Griffith. I wonder if the Tavianis were the first truly successful brother duo as film-makers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWSgkY9J4bA

    CRADLE WILL ROCK is about theater than movies, and it sucked. ME AND ORSON WELLES by Linklater was much better. Maybe the best movie about theater is TOPSY TURVY. HUGO got something right about many artists in Hollywood. They must engineer entertainment but have a secret dream to do something artistic and personal. It's like the boy handles clocks but nurses a secret dream with a robot that transcends time, merges past and future. The movie itself is like retro-sci-fi. But Scorsese didn't have the magic(that Spielberg has) to make the fantastic material come to life. Kael surmised that Peckinpah's treatment of KILLER ELITE is really about his troubles with movie producers and executives. Everyone betrays everyone in Hollywood, and you have to play the game. Coppola and Scorsese's gangster movies are shaded with problems artists must struggle with in Jewish-ruled Hollywood. There is some of this in Depalma's CARLITO'S WAY as well. The fantasy of using muscle to finally strike back at the guy pulling the strings. Mamet's MAIN AND STREET gives us a Judeo-centric view of how small-town goyim are regarded by L.A. urbanites. I wonder if Robert Towne really had Hollywood in mind when he wrote CHINATOWN, but Polanski really finished that work with his own perversity that went beyond even Hollywood norms. The bullied who likes to bully even more. SINIGIN' IN THE RAIN can't be taken seriously as commentary, but it's probably the most entertaining movie-about-movies. ED WOOD and LIVING IN OBLIVION are about movie-making at the margins and endearing for that reason.
  246. Anonymous[108] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux
    All About Eve is quite good.Granted, it's technically about Broadway, but I think that the Hollywood proxy argument works here.

    All About Eve is quite good.

    It is. A big disappointment is Taviani Brothers’ paean to D. W. Griffith. I wonder if the Tavianis were the first truly successful brother duo as film-makers.

    CRADLE WILL ROCK is about theater than movies, and it sucked. ME AND ORSON WELLES by Linklater was much better. Maybe the best movie about theater is TOPSY TURVY. HUGO got something right about many artists in Hollywood. They must engineer entertainment but have a secret dream to do something artistic and personal. It’s like the boy handles clocks but nurses a secret dream with a robot that transcends time, merges past and future. The movie itself is like retro-sci-fi. But Scorsese didn’t have the magic(that Spielberg has) to make the fantastic material come to life. Kael surmised that Peckinpah’s treatment of KILLER ELITE is really about his troubles with movie producers and executives. Everyone betrays everyone in Hollywood, and you have to play the game. Coppola and Scorsese’s gangster movies are shaded with problems artists must struggle with in Jewish-ruled Hollywood. There is some of this in Depalma’s CARLITO’S WAY as well. The fantasy of using muscle to finally strike back at the guy pulling the strings. Mamet’s MAIN AND STREET gives us a Judeo-centric view of how small-town goyim are regarded by L.A. urbanites. I wonder if Robert Towne really had Hollywood in mind when he wrote CHINATOWN, but Polanski really finished that work with his own perversity that went beyond even Hollywood norms. The bullied who likes to bully even more. SINIGIN’ IN THE RAIN can’t be taken seriously as commentary, but it’s probably the most entertaining movie-about-movies. ED WOOD and LIVING IN OBLIVION are about movie-making at the margins and endearing for that reason.

  247. @Corn
    I was once informed that not only were there only 7-8000 Spanish speakers in pre-1848 California but that there were only 75,000 Spanish speakers in all of the lands Mexico ceded in 1848. And most of them were in northern New Mexico.

    The Mexican government wasn’t able to protect the inhabitants of what is now the southwestern US from the tender mercies of the Apaches and most especially, the Comanches. It wasn’t until Texas and then the USG got serious about eradicating the natives that those lands really became available for settlement.

  248. Christina Sommers on Once Upon A Time In Hollywood:

    I have avoided his films because of the violence. But this film is about truth and beauty. Plus, every scene is a work of art—the sounds, the composition, the acting, the cars. Endlessly fun to watch.And the ending is cathartic— a gift to those of us who lived through that time.

  249. @Dieter Kief
    I've read quite a bit of Eric Hoffer and do like his proud (may I say: Work-based /bodily) self-consciousness a lot. So - your idea was spot on.

    That Eric Hoffer had such precious insights as the one cited by Steve Sailer - who today wrote, that he too has become a tad more body-oriented - this might be no coincidence), is in no way accidental.

    I made 20 fantastic kilometers on the bike today - after having met a Bronesse of B., - who was in terrific shape (think of Romy Schneider). She lacked mental presence though. I then left the city on my bike and spotted three kinds of dragonflies in the woods and an overwhelmingly beautiful red Milan, gliding over me in perfectly clear summer evening light, the bird's feathers bursting of reds and oranges and browns. A Peregrine waiting on a little power-line in the distance. Wild doves in the trees at the border of the Bodman woods.

    “she lacked mental presence though”

    What did she do – fall off her bike?

    And, since you were skirting the Bodman woods, I am assuming that she was of that family?

    The site (in German) about the Bodmans and their forests is very amusing (the introductory bits at least), and could almost have been written by you.

  250. @Alden
    The police and families asked everyone who had the slightest connection to the victims who had a quarrel with any of the victims. The Manson names-never came up. Then one of the girls talked to her cell mate while in the city jail and they were all arrested.

    That’s suspicious.

    If the case hinges on what some girl in jail allegedly said, perhaps Manson’s people are innocent.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    I've got some property in Brooklyn that might interest you....
  251. @njguy73
    Yeah, and he did game shows because he needed the prize money.

    He took them very, very seriously.

    You gotta go back to Wolf of Wall Street for that

    You should go back to Wolf of Wall Street for that. FIFY.

    WWS is a pretty good movie, but kinda long. Di Caprio is a strange looking guy but he has the rare ability to disappear into his roles.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Wolf of Wall Street goes on for an extra hour because DiCaprio and Scorsese had Malaysian giga-embezzler Jho Low on the hook for as much money as they could dream up to spend on their movie.
  252. @Kronos
    “My guess is that well-indoctrinated young people will find Once puzzling, if not unsettling. Why, they wonder, are the heroes white men? Why don’t they at least have the basic decency to feel ashamed of their whiteness?”

    I’m insulted, there’s been plenty of backlash from the young against SJW themed films. Especially when they’re defiling a dearly loved film brand. The female-ghostbusters film was harshly criticized and unprofitable. The upcoming black female “James Bond” is going to be a flop. (Does Hollywood do this to kill two birds with one stone? Prove their virtue signaling while making up the loss as a tax deduction?)


    https://youtu.be/7dOevLbdmyI


    At least we have the Kingsman series.


    https://youtu.be/e82JHkkPw54

    Kingsman blows dead dogs. I can’t believe Colin Firth was so desperate for $$ that he did not one, but two, of these POS.

  253. @Twinkie

    Real life stuntman on the set of The Green Hornet and professional wrestler, Gene LeBell, has both praised Lee’s skill and dedication to martial arts and tweaked Lee’s most fanatic fans by telling how he once made Lee squeal like an angry piglet by lifting him off the ground and taunting him to try and punch or kick his way out.
     
    Gene LeBell was a noted Judo practitioner and cross-trained with Bruce Lee. He taught Lee Judo and wrestling and Lee taught him punching and kicking. LeBell was also in one of the earliest "MMA" fights in U.S. history against boxer Milo Savage.

    https://youtu.be/nIBo4Y3JTfU

    A much more interesting story is what he did to Steven Seagal.

    A much more interesting story is what he did to Steven Seagal.

    What did he do to Seagal?

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    What did he do to Seagal?
     
    The story goes that Seagal roughed up a lot of stuntmen by throwing them around without regard to their safety. LeBell complained to Seagal and told him it was unfair to be rough to men who couldn't be rough back to the star. Seagal then proceeded to belittle them and LeBell and that LeBell could try to choke him, but Seagal could escape any choke and dared LeBell to try.

    LeBell started to carotid-choke him with a Hadaka-Jime and Seagal immediately started to grab LeBell's groin, at which point LeBell got peeved and said, "Are we doing this for real?" Upon hearing "Yes" from Seagal, LeBell strangled him instantly for real and put Seagal to sleep and the latter went unconscious and relieved himself.

    Seagal then woke up and fired everyone on the set.

    This floated around quite a bit in martial arts circles, but has been confirmed since then by several people (including those on the set).
  254. @Not Raul
    That’s suspicious.

    If the case hinges on what some girl in jail allegedly said, perhaps Manson’s people are innocent.

    I’ve got some property in Brooklyn that might interest you….

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    Thanks; but I won’t buy at the top of the market.
  255. @Buzz Mohawk
    If you haven't been to Monticello, you should go, and not just for the architecture.

    http://www.tabulousdesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/monticello_14.jpg

    http://s3.amazonaws.com/virginiablog/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/16115710/CN09021905X_12.jpg

    https://monticello-www.s3.amazonaws.com/files/old/uploaded-content-images/writing-reading-arrangment.png

    Charlottesville just voted to stop celebrating Thomas Jefferson’s birthday so razing Monticello is probably next on their to do list.

    Monticello is a spectacular place in one of the prettiest parts of the Old Dominion. Oddly, it was a Jew who saved it in the 1800s after it had fallen into disrepair.

  256. @JMcG
    I don’t think he actually laid a hand on any of them, mostly they were kids of the local gentry and there would have been an outcry. I think he left the gun behind so it wouldn’t get used.
    They didn’t come back though.

    A good beating will get your attention. The cops used to do that to the local bad guys if they got out of line. Take them down to the station house and tune them up. Can’t do that anymore because of “muh civil rights” and the fact that most of bad guys are POCs.

  257. @Dieter Kief
    I've read quite a bit of Eric Hoffer and do like his proud (may I say: Work-based /bodily) self-consciousness a lot. So - your idea was spot on.

    That Eric Hoffer had such precious insights as the one cited by Steve Sailer - who today wrote, that he too has become a tad more body-oriented - this might be no coincidence), is in no way accidental.

    I made 20 fantastic kilometers on the bike today - after having met a Bronesse of B., - who was in terrific shape (think of Romy Schneider). She lacked mental presence though. I then left the city on my bike and spotted three kinds of dragonflies in the woods and an overwhelmingly beautiful red Milan, gliding over me in perfectly clear summer evening light, the bird's feathers bursting of reds and oranges and browns. A Peregrine waiting on a little power-line in the distance. Wild doves in the trees at the border of the Bodman woods.

    Sounds like good weed.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Oh, thanks!

    Good weed sounds like one imaginary hand clapping, doesn't it?
  258. @R.G. Camara
    Lmao. Nice try, little George Soros-liar.

    Jews exploit the population and import foreign commie thugs and money to attack all non-commies in an attempt to make Germany commie. Germans respond to save their country by throwing their lot behind tough local guys promising to opposing commies violently -- aka the Nazis.

    Blacks sell their captured prisoners into slavery and buy their own when they are freed from it. Still do it to this day.

    Hollywood Lefties give Manson enormous prestige and power because he gets the dumb slutty underage girls.

    So the groups create their own problems, and White Christian American goyim save them from it.

    Nice try with the lies, little David Brock bot.

    Next!

    “Lmao. Nice try, little George Soros-liar…Nice try with the lies, little David Brock bot.”

    Do you enjoy vigorously pressing the Ad Hominem button?

    “Jews exploit the population and import foreign commie thugs and money to attack all non-commies in an attempt to make Germany commie.”

    No, the Nazis exploited the population in large part to build a European empire and get back at their enemies for the patently unfair Treaty of Versailles.

    “Blacks sell their captured prisoners into slavery and buy their own when they are freed from it.”

    Assuredly there is African complicity in the European slave trade. But you do realize that African slavery and European slavery are NOT the same, right?

    http://edition.cnn.com/WORLD/9510/ghana_slavery

    “Hollywood Lefties give Manson enormous prestige and power because he gets the dumb slutty underage girls.”

    One major director does not constitute “Hollywood Lefties”.

    “So the groups create their own problems, and White Christian American goyim save them from it.”

    With those groups being White Christians who began all of the shenanigans in the first place.

  259. If you are wondering how a movie that “celebrates whiteness’ can get made in Hollywood these days, by a white male director no less, well then think about who it is that dispenses the Wokemon points. Early in the film, Al Pacino’s character explains to Leo’s Rick and to us, the audience, that screen entertainment has a critical “meta” component. Looking at the movie from this standpoint, we witness a washed up actor revive his career by threatening and abusing an 8 year old girl on camera. He then travels to Rome (of all places), then returns, and offers a burnt sacrifice. The gates are then opened to him, and he ascends to a higher plane to meet the earth mother and her attendants. The camera drifts overhead, and odd music plays, which only served to remind me of Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby, in particular the scene where the camera leaves the room as the Deal with the Devil is made.

    All of the scenes involving the child actress are very creepy, and the child is of course very mature and very consensual. Steve is rightly concerned about the “Who? Whom?” degradation of our national discourse, but that can’t prevent us from paying attention to the “Huh? What?” questions that are just as common.

    • Replies: @Ace9
    FYI: https://www.indiewire.com/2019/07/once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood-10-year-old-child-julia-butters-1202161562/

    ANDAWAYWEGO
    JULY 29, 2019 2:01 PM
    The film’s poster gives some idea of what this scene would’ve been – a phone call between Trudi and Rick. It shows her on the phone, holding a teddy bear while wearing a Sock It To Me shirt.
    , @syonredux
    https://www.thoughtco.com/thmb/xV5N4tEijNcZs5C7b7AVtJrG35M=/1280x853/filters:fill(auto,1)/Der_Daemon_Baphomet-589630855f9b5874ee38bf6d.jpg
  260. @Ace9
    If you are wondering how a movie that "celebrates whiteness' can get made in Hollywood these days, by a white male director no less, well then think about who it is that dispenses the Wokemon points. Early in the film, Al Pacino's character explains to Leo's Rick and to us, the audience, that screen entertainment has a critical "meta" component. Looking at the movie from this standpoint, we witness a washed up actor revive his career by threatening and abusing an 8 year old girl on camera. He then travels to Rome (of all places), then returns, and offers a burnt sacrifice. The gates are then opened to him, and he ascends to a higher plane to meet the earth mother and her attendants. The camera drifts overhead, and odd music plays, which only served to remind me of Polanski's Rosemary's Baby, in particular the scene where the camera leaves the room as the Deal with the Devil is made.

    All of the scenes involving the child actress are very creepy, and the child is of course very mature and very consensual. Steve is rightly concerned about the "Who? Whom?" degradation of our national discourse, but that can't prevent us from paying attention to the "Huh? What?" questions that are just as common.

    FYI: https://www.indiewire.com/2019/07/once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood-10-year-old-child-julia-butters-1202161562/

    ANDAWAYWEGO
    JULY 29, 2019 2:01 PM
    The film’s poster gives some idea of what this scene would’ve been – a phone call between Trudi and Rick. It shows her on the phone, holding a teddy bear while wearing a Sock It To Me shirt.

  261. @syonredux

    It’s worse than the Ship of Theseus because presumably in the Ship, every time a timber rotted they immediately replaced it with an identical timber.
     
    Can anything truly be identical ?

    Whereas in these houses various alterations were made and then put back decades or centuries later based upon (sometimes) little more than guesswork. It would be as if the Ship of Theseus was converted from a warship to a garbage scow and then back again 100 years later.
     
    There's guesswork....and then there's educated guesswork.....

    At any rate, one can offer some guidelines....


    Structures that have survived more-or-less intact to the present day:

    Westover, King's Chapel


    Structures that have been heavily modified/restored:

    Powel House

    Structures that have been entirely re-built:

    Governor's Palace, Williamsburg

    Can anything truly be identical ?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identical_particles

    Identical particles, also called indistinguishable or indiscernible particles, are particles that cannot be distinguished from one another, even in principle.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    particles, particles, particles.....
  262. Steve, did you ever watch Dreamland with David Duchovony? There were some ridiculous aspects, and I’m personally not sure how the cop with a black wife would have worked. Would SFPD have hired or kept him on?

  263. @J1234
    Tarantino sees a market for white oriented movies and capitalizes on it. I don't suspect any deeper motives than that. Maybe a "reverse Dolemite" white-sploitation strategy? Admittedly, however, I haven't seen this film and don't intend to. I haven't seen many Tarantino movies, but the ones I've seen indicate that he has a great reverence for crap. It seems to me he tries to elevate (generally) crappy old movie genres to a higher level, and probably succeeds, which isn't that great of an accomplishment, IMO.

    Whatever this movie is, we will probably see more white-sploitation films in the future. It's a manifestation of our diminished status. I just don't want to be one of the idiots in the audience shouting, "Yeah! yeah!" (either literally or figuratively) like the blacks did at Dolemite. BTW, sounds like there's a Dolemite remake coming out, so QT isn't the only one with a reverence for crap.

    The essentially white movie I'm waiting for is Midway. I'm just wondering how many heroic black Navy cooks will be in it.

    Agreed. I saw some other movie trailer where some evil “globalists” we stealing middle americans and putting them in a Hunger Games type environment. Very, very clear pandering to white middle americans. I say fuck ’em and I’m sticking a huge middle finger to Hollywood still, no matter what they put out.

    It’s hard to say if it’s degrading, though, or if Hollywood simply realized that they’re losing a ton of money by making films that white males are not interested in.

    Also, I suspect that non-white audiences much prefer to see kickass white males, than wimpy white cucks with some strong women of colour. After all, how many brown people are there in Latin cinema? They’re all white.

  264. @Clyde

    OT: It has now become a problem that the Swedish populace are wearing bullet proof vests; in Malmö, certain youths are even walking about wearing them openly. What to do? Why, make them illegal to wear for others than police and similar personnel!
     
    How about their awful imitations of black American's rap music. All rap sucks but the rap that Muslims and blacks in Europe produce is the worst. Monkeys and orangutans in the zoo make more sense.

    link to some muslim and black rappers from Europe?

    i actually pity most young people who listen to rap. it’s the only mainstream option nowadays. but it’s just negroid garbage.

  265. @MEH 0910

    Can anything truly be identical ?
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identical_particles

    Identical particles, also called indistinguishable or indiscernible particles, are particles that cannot be distinguished from one another, even in principle.
     

    particles, particles, particles…..

  266. @Ace9
    If you are wondering how a movie that "celebrates whiteness' can get made in Hollywood these days, by a white male director no less, well then think about who it is that dispenses the Wokemon points. Early in the film, Al Pacino's character explains to Leo's Rick and to us, the audience, that screen entertainment has a critical "meta" component. Looking at the movie from this standpoint, we witness a washed up actor revive his career by threatening and abusing an 8 year old girl on camera. He then travels to Rome (of all places), then returns, and offers a burnt sacrifice. The gates are then opened to him, and he ascends to a higher plane to meet the earth mother and her attendants. The camera drifts overhead, and odd music plays, which only served to remind me of Polanski's Rosemary's Baby, in particular the scene where the camera leaves the room as the Deal with the Devil is made.

    All of the scenes involving the child actress are very creepy, and the child is of course very mature and very consensual. Steve is rightly concerned about the "Who? Whom?" degradation of our national discourse, but that can't prevent us from paying attention to the "Huh? What?" questions that are just as common.

  267. @Jim Don Bob

    You gotta go back to Wolf of Wall Street for that
     
    You should go back to Wolf of Wall Street for that. FIFY.

    WWS is a pretty good movie, but kinda long. Di Caprio is a strange looking guy but he has the rare ability to disappear into his roles.

    Wolf of Wall Street goes on for an extra hour because DiCaprio and Scorsese had Malaysian giga-embezzler Jho Low on the hook for as much money as they could dream up to spend on their movie.

  268. @Thirdeye
    You must have missed the part about Richard Brody of the NYT denouncing the "ridiculously white movie." So now portraying Hollywood demographics as they were in 1969, instead of as some version of how the woke volk wants to recreate them, makes Tarantino some sort of white supremacist.

    Interesting thing about the Helter Skelter idea was that Manson intended it to start a race war, which was supposed to make him some sort of world leader. It was a more overtly psycho version of ideas about race and revolution that had currency among the New Left at that time. Essentially, blacks were seen as the cannon fodder who would spark the revolution that would deliver power to the New Left. Once the New Lefties put revolution on hold so they could pursue their careers, a watered-down version of that idea arose. Playing off of anti-white racial animosity has provided a nice career path for woke volk in academia, media, bureaucracy, and electoral politics.

    “You must have missed the part about Richard Brody of the NYT denouncing the “ridiculously white movie.”

    Actually, I read that New Yorker piece, and it is no different than Mr. Sailer’s review–a political statement rather than a social dissection of a film. Both are grandstanding for their own ends.

    “Why should it be any less comic…”

    Sailer’s irony is comical.

    “So now portraying Hollywood demographics as they were in 1969, instead of as some version of how the woke volk wants to recreate them, makes Tarantino some sort of white supremacist.”

    White normies who go to the film are going to be entertained, rather than contemplating if Taratino is a “white supremacist”, is “woke”, is immersed with “white guilt”, or is doing the bidding of the Alt Right. He makes films. People go to watch his movies and escape from the realities of their life and of society. Both authors are trying to make the film an existential battle between ideologies.

    “Follow the links and you will find statistics on dramatically increased murder rates in St Louis, Baltimore, and Chicago following BLM riots. Pandering to the Great Awokening had serious real-world consequences.”

    Correlation does not equal causation. Mr. Sailer made a specific argument–one of Taratino’s films likely contributed to the Great Awokening–without a shred of specific evidence directly linking his work to that “event”. Since you seem interested in coming to his defense, why don’t you offer a particular argument?

  269. • Replies: @Anonymous
    Oddly enough, Tarantula's movie about a broken-down actor has two hot stars. In a way, the second act of the broken-down or forgotten actor has been Tarantula's obsession in actual practice of casting..

    Keitel had bit parts, some interesting, but he was mostly treading water and never lived up to his full potential until RESERVOIR, soon followed by BAD LIEUTENANT(which I loathe). RESERVOIR also made great use of Laurence Tierney, unknown to most people, even cinephiles. TRUE ROMANCE, though directed by Tony Scott, gave Walken his best role ever. Another talent wasted in so many forgettable roles after DEER HUNTER. And we know what Tarantula did for Pamela Greer, Travolta, Daryl Hannah, David Carradine, etc. Also, as much as I hate PULP FICTION, it gave Jackson his first role in which he demonstrated what he's really capable of. Full acting chops on display. It's the role that made turned him from a bit player to a big star.

    Whereas most actors could either choose serious or light roles, Tarantin0 gave them cool roles that proved iconic. It was pop, it was hip; it wasn't serious-serious but worth taking seriously because, at its best, it was brilliantly conceived and eloquently written, like the preacher for the dark forces. The scene with Hopper and Walken in TRUE ROMANCE(mostly dumb movie conventionally directed by Scott) really stands out. Like Kubrick's THE KILLING, it's not serious art but stuff of serious talent. And those are the most relished roles, ones that are fun and lively but also grabs attention.
    Serious roles tend to be heavy, rigid, and/or earnest. Light roles tend to be thin and fluffy. Tarantula created some characters of the 'light' genre but with such force or ingenuity that made them worthy of something like 'art house' attention.

    Tarantula may have a thing for washed out actors because of his hunger as a wanna-be-director. As a nobody who wanted to somebody, perhaps he felt a certain rapport with men/women who were once a somebody but became a nobody. As for Sharon Tate, she could have been somebody in movies but was cut short. She has to brought back as a ghost. Though Bruce Lee is mocked in HOLLYWOOD, his life was also cut short. Had he lived and fallen out of favor, it's possible Tarantula would have offered him a role in one of his movies. He too is brought back as a ghost.

    Because movie-making has been so expensive, difficult, stressful, maddening, and destructive(with all the seductions and temptations), so many directors and actors failed to live up to their full potential. This is true of Welles and Peckinpah, and there are many others. So, the Film Generation(of which Tarantula is the tail end) romanticized about their gods and heroes, wondering 'what if' scenarios.
    In some cases, they were able to bring back actors who'd been written off by the studio. Brando's grand return with THE GODFATHER is the most famous example. (Coppola and Lucas also made Kurosawa's last act possible.) Peckinpah and Holden both made a comeback with THE WILD BUNCH. In away, all of Tarantula's movies are in the spirit of Alt-Hollywood.
  270. Sharon Tate became Patti Tate ..

    http://mileswmathis.com/tate.pdf

    Ron (Unz) should add this to American Pravda.

  271. @Jim Don Bob
    Sounds like good weed.

    Oh, thanks!

    Good weed sounds like one imaginary hand clapping, doesn’t it?

  272. https://cinapse.co/once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood-invites-you-to-hang-out-in-quentin-tarantinos-head-9a57391e98da

    The specifics of the title of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood have become a subject of much debate over the past few weeks. Is the title Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood? Is it Once Upon a time in…Hollywood? Is the ellipsis even necessary? Now, this debate wasn’t half of the shitstorm that was the Angry Scorsese Discourse and the Tarantino Rankings Discourse, but the varying forms of the title in different pieces of marketing perplexed a lot of us: in the end, why are there two variations on the title? Thankfully, the movie (which I’ll just refer to without the ellipsis) offers a conclusive answer — it’s both. But before we get there, we need to look back at just what the filmmaker was evoking with these two variations in the first place. And look, I know you didn’t click on a review of the new Tarantino movie just for the whole thing to be about the title, but bear with me — I got this.

    In 1968, Italian Western filmmaker Sergio Leone, a clear inspiration on basically everything Tarantino’s ever done, released Once Upon a Time in the West, a beautiful western that many consider his masterpiece. Cinema has seen this title turn into something of a genre in its own right, defining films epic in scale and length that frequently attempt cap off a popular genre with an ode to the movies that came before. From Leone’s own gangster-themed follow-up Once Upon a Time in America to Robert Rodriguez’ Once Upon a Time in Mexico, the title evokes Leone’s seminal Western while offering an air of gravitas to the movie itself. Tarantino’s latest, itself a film about the industry, goes all in on the meta-commentary, and uses the title to bolster those themes. By placing the ellipsis just before the word “Hollywood,” “Once Upon a Time in…Hollywood” draws attention to the way Tarantino plays with film history in the movie itself.

    ******
    On the other side of the title’s meaning, “Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood” draws attention to the fairytale nature of the film, as he inserts two fictional characters into a much-studied piece of cinematic, and American, history.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/JonathanLea14/status/1157040044047134720
    , @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/nytimesarts/status/1155178767582670849
    , @Anonymous
    What's that? Taranmudic Studies?
  273. @MEH 0910
    https://cinapse.co/once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood-invites-you-to-hang-out-in-quentin-tarantinos-head-9a57391e98da

    The specifics of the title of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood have become a subject of much debate over the past few weeks. Is the title Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood? Is it Once Upon a time in…Hollywood? Is the ellipsis even necessary? Now, this debate wasn’t half of the shitstorm that was the Angry Scorsese Discourse and the Tarantino Rankings Discourse, but the varying forms of the title in different pieces of marketing perplexed a lot of us: in the end, why are there two variations on the title? Thankfully, the movie (which I’ll just refer to without the ellipsis) offers a conclusive answer — it’s both. But before we get there, we need to look back at just what the filmmaker was evoking with these two variations in the first place. And look, I know you didn’t click on a review of the new Tarantino movie just for the whole thing to be about the title, but bear with me — I got this.

    In 1968, Italian Western filmmaker Sergio Leone, a clear inspiration on basically everything Tarantino’s ever done, released Once Upon a Time in the West, a beautiful western that many consider his masterpiece. Cinema has seen this title turn into something of a genre in its own right, defining films epic in scale and length that frequently attempt cap off a popular genre with an ode to the movies that came before. From Leone’s own gangster-themed follow-up Once Upon a Time in America to Robert Rodriguez’ Once Upon a Time in Mexico, the title evokes Leone’s seminal Western while offering an air of gravitas to the movie itself. Tarantino’s latest, itself a film about the industry, goes all in on the meta-commentary, and uses the title to bolster those themes. By placing the ellipsis just before the word “Hollywood,” “Once Upon a Time in…Hollywood” draws attention to the way Tarantino plays with film history in the movie itself.

    ******
    On the other side of the title’s meaning, “Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood” draws attention to the fairytale nature of the film, as he inserts two fictional characters into a much-studied piece of cinematic, and American, history.
     

  274. @MEH 0910
    https://cinapse.co/once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood-invites-you-to-hang-out-in-quentin-tarantinos-head-9a57391e98da

    The specifics of the title of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood have become a subject of much debate over the past few weeks. Is the title Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood? Is it Once Upon a time in…Hollywood? Is the ellipsis even necessary? Now, this debate wasn’t half of the shitstorm that was the Angry Scorsese Discourse and the Tarantino Rankings Discourse, but the varying forms of the title in different pieces of marketing perplexed a lot of us: in the end, why are there two variations on the title? Thankfully, the movie (which I’ll just refer to without the ellipsis) offers a conclusive answer — it’s both. But before we get there, we need to look back at just what the filmmaker was evoking with these two variations in the first place. And look, I know you didn’t click on a review of the new Tarantino movie just for the whole thing to be about the title, but bear with me — I got this.

    In 1968, Italian Western filmmaker Sergio Leone, a clear inspiration on basically everything Tarantino’s ever done, released Once Upon a Time in the West, a beautiful western that many consider his masterpiece. Cinema has seen this title turn into something of a genre in its own right, defining films epic in scale and length that frequently attempt cap off a popular genre with an ode to the movies that came before. From Leone’s own gangster-themed follow-up Once Upon a Time in America to Robert Rodriguez’ Once Upon a Time in Mexico, the title evokes Leone’s seminal Western while offering an air of gravitas to the movie itself. Tarantino’s latest, itself a film about the industry, goes all in on the meta-commentary, and uses the title to bolster those themes. By placing the ellipsis just before the word “Hollywood,” “Once Upon a Time in…Hollywood” draws attention to the way Tarantino plays with film history in the movie itself.

    ******
    On the other side of the title’s meaning, “Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood” draws attention to the fairytale nature of the film, as he inserts two fictional characters into a much-studied piece of cinematic, and American, history.
     

  275. @Jim Don Bob

    A much more interesting story is what he did to Steven Seagal.
     
    What did he do to Seagal?

    What did he do to Seagal?

    The story goes that Seagal roughed up a lot of stuntmen by throwing them around without regard to their safety. LeBell complained to Seagal and told him it was unfair to be rough to men who couldn’t be rough back to the star. Seagal then proceeded to belittle them and LeBell and that LeBell could try to choke him, but Seagal could escape any choke and dared LeBell to try.

    LeBell started to carotid-choke him with a Hadaka-Jime and Seagal immediately started to grab LeBell’s groin, at which point LeBell got peeved and said, “Are we doing this for real?” Upon hearing “Yes” from Seagal, LeBell strangled him instantly for real and put Seagal to sleep and the latter went unconscious and relieved himself.

    Seagal then woke up and fired everyone on the set.

    This floated around quite a bit in martial arts circles, but has been confirmed since then by several people (including those on the set).

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Seagal always struck me as a jerk, even in his movies. Great story, thanks.
  276. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/PureCinemaPod/status/1146504162303074304

    https://twitter.com/newbeverly/status/1154970784399417344

    Oddly enough, Tarantula’s movie about a broken-down actor has two hot stars. In a way, the second act of the broken-down or forgotten actor has been Tarantula’s obsession in actual practice of casting..

    Keitel had bit parts, some interesting, but he was mostly treading water and never lived up to his full potential until RESERVOIR, soon followed by BAD LIEUTENANT(which I loathe). RESERVOIR also made great use of Laurence Tierney, unknown to most people, even cinephiles. TRUE ROMANCE, though directed by Tony Scott, gave Walken his best role ever. Another talent wasted in so many forgettable roles after DEER HUNTER. And we know what Tarantula did for Pamela Greer, Travolta, Daryl Hannah, David Carradine, etc. Also, as much as I hate PULP FICTION, it gave Jackson his first role in which he demonstrated what he’s really capable of. Full acting chops on display. It’s the role that made turned him from a bit player to a big star.

    Whereas most actors could either choose serious or light roles, Tarantin0 gave them cool roles that proved iconic. It was pop, it was hip; it wasn’t serious-serious but worth taking seriously because, at its best, it was brilliantly conceived and eloquently written, like the preacher for the dark forces. The scene with Hopper and Walken in TRUE ROMANCE(mostly dumb movie conventionally directed by Scott) really stands out. Like Kubrick’s THE KILLING, it’s not serious art but stuff of serious talent. And those are the most relished roles, ones that are fun and lively but also grabs attention.
    Serious roles tend to be heavy, rigid, and/or earnest. Light roles tend to be thin and fluffy. Tarantula created some characters of the ‘light’ genre but with such force or ingenuity that made them worthy of something like ‘art house’ attention.

    Tarantula may have a thing for washed out actors because of his hunger as a wanna-be-director. As a nobody who wanted to somebody, perhaps he felt a certain rapport with men/women who were once a somebody but became a nobody. As for Sharon Tate, she could have been somebody in movies but was cut short. She has to brought back as a ghost. Though Bruce Lee is mocked in HOLLYWOOD, his life was also cut short. Had he lived and fallen out of favor, it’s possible Tarantula would have offered him a role in one of his movies. He too is brought back as a ghost.

    Because movie-making has been so expensive, difficult, stressful, maddening, and destructive(with all the seductions and temptations), so many directors and actors failed to live up to their full potential. This is true of Welles and Peckinpah, and there are many others. So, the Film Generation(of which Tarantula is the tail end) romanticized about their gods and heroes, wondering ‘what if’ scenarios.
    In some cases, they were able to bring back actors who’d been written off by the studio. Brando’s grand return with THE GODFATHER is the most famous example. (Coppola and Lucas also made Kurosawa’s last act possible.) Peckinpah and Holden both made a comeback with THE WILD BUNCH. In away, all of Tarantula’s movies are in the spirit of Alt-Hollywood.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    T. brought Robert Forster back in Jackie Brown.
  277. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @MEH 0910
    https://cinapse.co/once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood-invites-you-to-hang-out-in-quentin-tarantinos-head-9a57391e98da

    The specifics of the title of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood have become a subject of much debate over the past few weeks. Is the title Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood? Is it Once Upon a time in…Hollywood? Is the ellipsis even necessary? Now, this debate wasn’t half of the shitstorm that was the Angry Scorsese Discourse and the Tarantino Rankings Discourse, but the varying forms of the title in different pieces of marketing perplexed a lot of us: in the end, why are there two variations on the title? Thankfully, the movie (which I’ll just refer to without the ellipsis) offers a conclusive answer — it’s both. But before we get there, we need to look back at just what the filmmaker was evoking with these two variations in the first place. And look, I know you didn’t click on a review of the new Tarantino movie just for the whole thing to be about the title, but bear with me — I got this.

    In 1968, Italian Western filmmaker Sergio Leone, a clear inspiration on basically everything Tarantino’s ever done, released Once Upon a Time in the West, a beautiful western that many consider his masterpiece. Cinema has seen this title turn into something of a genre in its own right, defining films epic in scale and length that frequently attempt cap off a popular genre with an ode to the movies that came before. From Leone’s own gangster-themed follow-up Once Upon a Time in America to Robert Rodriguez’ Once Upon a Time in Mexico, the title evokes Leone’s seminal Western while offering an air of gravitas to the movie itself. Tarantino’s latest, itself a film about the industry, goes all in on the meta-commentary, and uses the title to bolster those themes. By placing the ellipsis just before the word “Hollywood,” “Once Upon a Time in…Hollywood” draws attention to the way Tarantino plays with film history in the movie itself.

    ******
    On the other side of the title’s meaning, “Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood” draws attention to the fairytale nature of the film, as he inserts two fictional characters into a much-studied piece of cinematic, and American, history.
     

    What’s that? Taranmudic Studies?

  278. @Anonymous
    Oddly enough, Tarantula's movie about a broken-down actor has two hot stars. In a way, the second act of the broken-down or forgotten actor has been Tarantula's obsession in actual practice of casting..

    Keitel had bit parts, some interesting, but he was mostly treading water and never lived up to his full potential until RESERVOIR, soon followed by BAD LIEUTENANT(which I loathe). RESERVOIR also made great use of Laurence Tierney, unknown to most people, even cinephiles. TRUE ROMANCE, though directed by Tony Scott, gave Walken his best role ever. Another talent wasted in so many forgettable roles after DEER HUNTER. And we know what Tarantula did for Pamela Greer, Travolta, Daryl Hannah, David Carradine, etc. Also, as much as I hate PULP FICTION, it gave Jackson his first role in which he demonstrated what he's really capable of. Full acting chops on display. It's the role that made turned him from a bit player to a big star.

    Whereas most actors could either choose serious or light roles, Tarantin0 gave them cool roles that proved iconic. It was pop, it was hip; it wasn't serious-serious but worth taking seriously because, at its best, it was brilliantly conceived and eloquently written, like the preacher for the dark forces. The scene with Hopper and Walken in TRUE ROMANCE(mostly dumb movie conventionally directed by Scott) really stands out. Like Kubrick's THE KILLING, it's not serious art but stuff of serious talent. And those are the most relished roles, ones that are fun and lively but also grabs attention.
    Serious roles tend to be heavy, rigid, and/or earnest. Light roles tend to be thin and fluffy. Tarantula created some characters of the 'light' genre but with such force or ingenuity that made them worthy of something like 'art house' attention.

    Tarantula may have a thing for washed out actors because of his hunger as a wanna-be-director. As a nobody who wanted to somebody, perhaps he felt a certain rapport with men/women who were once a somebody but became a nobody. As for Sharon Tate, she could have been somebody in movies but was cut short. She has to brought back as a ghost. Though Bruce Lee is mocked in HOLLYWOOD, his life was also cut short. Had he lived and fallen out of favor, it's possible Tarantula would have offered him a role in one of his movies. He too is brought back as a ghost.

    Because movie-making has been so expensive, difficult, stressful, maddening, and destructive(with all the seductions and temptations), so many directors and actors failed to live up to their full potential. This is true of Welles and Peckinpah, and there are many others. So, the Film Generation(of which Tarantula is the tail end) romanticized about their gods and heroes, wondering 'what if' scenarios.
    In some cases, they were able to bring back actors who'd been written off by the studio. Brando's grand return with THE GODFATHER is the most famous example. (Coppola and Lucas also made Kurosawa's last act possible.) Peckinpah and Holden both made a comeback with THE WILD BUNCH. In away, all of Tarantula's movies are in the spirit of Alt-Hollywood.

    T. brought Robert Forster back in Jackie Brown.

  279. @Twinkie

    What did he do to Seagal?
     
    The story goes that Seagal roughed up a lot of stuntmen by throwing them around without regard to their safety. LeBell complained to Seagal and told him it was unfair to be rough to men who couldn't be rough back to the star. Seagal then proceeded to belittle them and LeBell and that LeBell could try to choke him, but Seagal could escape any choke and dared LeBell to try.

    LeBell started to carotid-choke him with a Hadaka-Jime and Seagal immediately started to grab LeBell's groin, at which point LeBell got peeved and said, "Are we doing this for real?" Upon hearing "Yes" from Seagal, LeBell strangled him instantly for real and put Seagal to sleep and the latter went unconscious and relieved himself.

    Seagal then woke up and fired everyone on the set.

    This floated around quite a bit in martial arts circles, but has been confirmed since then by several people (including those on the set).

    Seagal always struck me as a jerk, even in his movies. Great story, thanks.

  280. @Buzz Mohawk

    "... like much of the entertainment industry, had been sleeping with Phillips’ wife Michelle."
     
    Who wouldn't have?

    https://pics.wikifeet.com/Michelle-Phillips-Feet-518345.jpg
    Look, bare feet!

    Whores really don’t like being called whores.
     
    The best ones will just shrug it off and say, "yeah, so what?" and (rightly) accuse you of having a double standard. After the breakup you will discover that you contracted something minor and common that nevertheless requires antibiotics.

    Whoa.

  281. @J.Ross
    A sad reason for a SoCal resident to have a pool was illustrated in Portugal last year: you can hide from a fire you failed to evacuate from in there.

    So long as the water doesn’t boil.

    Sometimes it does.

  282. @syonredux
    I've got some property in Brooklyn that might interest you....

    Thanks; but I won’t buy at the top of the market.

  283. Saw this and enjoyed Tarantino’s six-degrees alt-history plotting as a substitute for his usual autistic dialogue, which irritates me. The new Mrs. Tarantino must have a good sense of humor about this “No Stag Party for Old Hollywood” fantasia. In the movie, the three different wives are shrews, Margot Robbie’s Sharon Tate is purely a symbol for Tarantino’s own innocence, Dakota Fanning’s “Squeaky” Fromme is basically Satan as Sex, and Damon Herriman’s Charles Manson suggests an empty figurehead, echoed in Mike Moh’s Bruce Lee and Leo DiCaprio’s Manson-costumed saloon villain TV role. I didn’t really buy Brad Pitt as the perfect dad/brother/wing-man Tarantino never had, but Leo DiCaprio is touching playing what could be Tarantino’s forgiving symbolic portrayal of his actual absentee father, a struggling actor. Tarantino’s mom may be the only Bride who doesn’t scare him, but perhaps he no longer wants to Kill Bill. That’ll be 5 cents, please.

  284. Oh, yeah, and there’s a scene in which Damian Lewis’s Steve McQueen laments that Mrs. Sharon Tate Polanski’s romantic tastes are too pedophilic to include him. It has nothing to do with the plot. Except for everything?

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