The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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A leading microbiologist gives the opposite view of virologist Marc Wathelet whose approach to controlling the virus I have posted on this website. Both scientists make a lot of sense. As I understand them, Dr. Wathelet’s recommendations stem from the West’s unpreparedness. The lack of masks, tests, hospital capacity, and ventilators, together with the high... Read More
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For days, for weeks, the media have been dominated by the spread of the corona virus. Almost every hour new numbers on infections and deceased are published. There are also reports of political reactions and the economic consequences. What was previously considered impossible is now decided: there are travel restrictions, borders are locked, people are... Read More
When I left Hanoi on February 28th, its streets were still choked with traffic, most restaurants and cafes were packed, and there were only a few minor signs of the pandemic threat. There were more facemasks, especially on waiters and shopkeepers. At some dumpy pho joint, I spotted a sign requesting customers to not smoke,... Read More
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In Singapore, you can be jailed for half a year for failing to keep “social distance.” The same offense in New York will only get you fined for up to $500, although an 86-year-old woman has just been killed when she got too close to someone at a Brooklyn hospital. Out of masks, Tennessee doctors... Read More
A mixed bag. This morning we sallied forth to stock up on the essentials of life in time of plague, such as throat sanitizer--Wild Turkey serves well. In the liquor store, employees wore face masks. At Walmart there was a hand-sanitizer squirter that all had to use before entering, and the PA system exhorted us... Read More
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In these Corona times, I often listen to Monty Python’s Always Look on the Bright Side of Life. This black cloud has a silver lining. With the virus roaming outside, teenagers deign to spend more time with their parents; wives are at home cooking dinners instead of hanging out with gorgeous strangers in posh cafés;... Read More
Outrageous events are avalanching, so any analysis risks becoming immediately obsolete, and even quaintly so. Just two weeks ago was the good old days. Remember when you could perform extraordinary tasks like loafing in a bar just to shoot the shit, walking down the street unperturbed or saying to a diner waitress, “Over easy, please,”... Read More
“I have delivered food parcels to four families this morning,” says Paula Spencer, who runs the community centre in Thanington, a deprived district on the outskirts of Canterbury. Two of the families had called for help because they had symptoms of the coronavirus, and two simply needed food to eat. There are no signs of... Read More
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As a chicken chomping, coke snorting species, we have three main foes. 1) Beasts more ferocious than us, such as tigers, lions and, well, just about all other animals, since we’re such wimps. 2) Living organisms we can’t even see, such as viruses. 3) Other men, of course, since man is clearly man’s most lethal... Read More
Gypsies in France, 1980s. Credit: Wikimedia Commons
The EU interviewed 8,000 Gypsies, the results will shock you!
I for one am fascinated by Gypsies. I find it remarkable that a people, hailing from the dregs of medieval Indian society, could cross the whole Middle East, arrive in eastern Europe, and maintain their identity among other peoples for 1500 years. The Gypsies did this, furthermore, without maintaining their own sovereign state or religion,... Read More
Incheon, 2020
Perhaps I have really bad body odor, but these days, I mostly eat and drink alone, sitting in completely empty restaurants and cafes, like right now. This casual yet elegant joint is called Ottchill. It has solidly built wooden chairs padded with homey cushions. The two baristas are young, attractive and courteous, and they’re here... Read More
A World No Longer in Supply
The road, little trafficked, ran past the college post office, past my grandfather’s house, and through a stretch of woods to Lanc’s store. Then it wound off through wooded Virginia countryside. Hampden-Sydney was one of the small Southern colleges founded well before modern times--1776 for Hampden-Sydney--offering liberal arts schooling of remarkably good academic quality. Many... Read More
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What a wonderful enchanted life we boomers have had! Living was easy, accommodation plentiful and inexpensive, salaries were high, girls willing. The world was offered to us like a heap of pearl oysters on the silver tray. We could travel, change our countries and jobs as we like, we could fight for justice and mercy... Read More
Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture, 2020
Of course, borders are sexual, at least for men, for you’re about to enter a normally forbidden territory. This buildup, anxiety and euphoria is lessened if the border is a mere formality, or if you have a strong (and stiff enough) passport. For women, border crossers can promise adventure, for they may deliver you to... Read More
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A Pre-Enstupidation View
It was 1953 in the white newly prosperous suburbs of Arlington, Virginia, just outside the Yankee Capital. I was eight, having been born, like so many of my small compatriots, nine months and fifteen minutes after our fathers got home from the war. These men, my father anyway, had spent years in the Pacific, being... Read More
A Crisis of Faith While Netflix certainly produces programs of questionable artistic merit (although I do look forward to seeing The Two Popes), one series that from the standpoint of using historical events as an inspiration to create compelling theater—and frequently brilliant theater—is playwright Peter Morgan’s The Crown. While co-produced by Sony’s Columbia studios, the... Read More
Dien Bien Phu, 2020
Nothing is equal to anything else. In 1904, Jack London traveled from Korea to China. As soon as he crossed the border, he saw what he thought was a much more energetic, resourceful and resilient civilization, Gushing at length over the Chinese, London concludes, “The Korean is the perfect type of inefficiency—of utter worthlessness. The... Read More
The Nazi Leader’s Critique of the European Union
In his unpublished Second Book on foreign policy, Adolf Hitler offers the following critique of Count Richard von Coudenhove-Kalergi’s Pan-European Movement, which argued for the peaceful unification of Europe. Kalergi is very much a precursor to the post-1945 effort to integrate the Old Continent, culminating in the European Union. Hitler raises essentially two objections: The... Read More
So now I’ve been to the Plain of Jars. Among places, it has among the most evocative of names. It sounds so plain, yet so poetic, because we simply don’t associate any plain, or meadow, with jars, and we’re not talking about Mason ones here, but stone, and huge, with the largest ten feet tall... Read More
The City’s Socialist-Communist Government Is at a Loss as to Why
Le Monde has an interesting article on Parisian social housing policy which is quite indicative of how quaint official French thinking is on immigration-gentrification-segregation-inequality-cum-terrorism: Following the terrorist attacks of January 2015, the President of the Republic, François Hollande, gathered several interministerial committees, announced a series of measures in to promote social cohesion, and managed to... Read More
Savannakhet, 2020
The first white I met in Laos was a man of about 50. He was hunched over on a couch in the shabby lobby of a mini hotel, by the Savannakhet bus station. Not a big tourist attraction, the city does have an elegant Catholic church and dinosaur bones in a museum. When I addressed... Read More
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After the article on the Great Replacement in Belgium, I present you the following translation of an article by Polémia on the situation in Switzerland. The Swiss situation is unique, if only because of the country’s objective excellence and exceptional quality of life, and the extraordinary practice of direct democracy. Thus we have the rather... Read More
Vientiane, 2020
I’m in Vientiane, a sleeping beauty just starting to wake up. I’m typing this at Spirit House, because it’s quiet. Three tables away sit two middle-aged monks. Checking their smartphones, they’re just chilling. Puffing a cigarette, one flashes his purple nipple episodically. In his cage, a crested bird whistles, while others, flying freely, chirp. The... Read More
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Washington at Yuletide
Just got back to Guadalajara and environs after two weeks of Christmas in Washington. Good times were had, old friends seen, but it was not altogether a delight. Going back to America every nine months or a year is like watching something decay in time-lapse photography. It can be a shock. Arriving in the Virginia... Read More
noble Black lawyer prosecutes an evil White sex-beast, who receives 33 life-sentences for his cowardly and despicable crimes against eleven innocent women and children. What a potent and effective way to smash the vile racist stereotype that Blacks are prone to violence and rape! And what a heart-warming symbol of Brave New Britain, where non-Whites... Read More
From 10AM to 11PM, Hoi An’s old town is choked with tourists, so just get there just after sunrise if you want to admire its architecture, and it is magnificent. How did this slice of old Vietnam survive? During the Vietnam War, Hoi An was the administrative center for the entire province, so it was... Read More
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It’s always good to get up at dawn to walk around, for you’ll see a less guarded, composed and worn out version of humanity. They’ll still have the rest of the day to blunder, lapse, commit a crime or jump off a bridge. Passing a Nha Trang park, I spot middle aged broads dancing the... Read More
Nha Trang, 2019
Last month, I frowned on those who are drawn to the vagabond, rootless lifestyle, who think it is ideal to move from hotel room to hotel room. Guess what? I’ve joined them. Life is goofy that way. After my mother-in-law threatened to stab me more than ten times, I left Saigon and stayed in Vung... Read More
Vung Tau, 2019
I’m renting a hotel room in Vung Tau for $130 a month. For just $22 more, I could have had an air conditioner, but I don’t need it. Even the electric fan is often turned off. I have a TV, which I don’t watch. I’ve always preferred silence. I’m two minutes away from Mulberry Beach,... Read More
Allentown, 2012
My writing on society and politics has made me quite a few friends, some I’ve been able to visit on their home turf, from Scranton to Burgazada, to Leipzig. Others have come to me. In July of 2018, just before I left the US for good, I had a few beers with Bill, who drove... Read More
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In 2017, Chuck Orloski’s 27-year marriage collapsed. Chased from his home and broke, he had to take refuge at Lighthouse, a Scranton group home run by a blind, 54-year-old nun, Lindy Morelli. That Thanksgiving, I took a four-hour bus ride from Philly to stay five days with my friend, Chuck, at the Lighthouse. The rolling... Read More
The View from the Malecón
Lake Chapala at sunrise. It never looks the same twice. Though it is late in the season and should be chill, we do not seem to be having winter this year. The golondrinas, swallows, seem confused and have not migrated as early as they usually do. This year they sat in their thousands, three inches... Read More
Scientific fraud—falsifying scientific data or manipulating the scientific evaluation process—has become a serious problem. At best, it is a threat to public confidence in science. At worst, if the fraud is not revealed, then public policy could be shaped by bogus data. This problem is universal. But there are distinct national patterns. In particular, fraud... Read More
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I just spent a week in Macau and Hong Kong, the West’s last two possessions in Asia. There, I heard an Indian joke from Filipino writer Charlson Ong, “You Brits think you can just come and take our chicken biryani and chicken tandoori? No, we’re coming with you!” A great irony of colonialism is that... Read More
Increasingly, social science is dominated by Leftist ideologues who use the remaining respect that academia still has among the public to inculcate students and public alike with their equalitarian dogmas. But there are honorable exceptions. One of these: Peter Turchin, a Russian who is professor of Evolutionary Biology at the University of Connecticut. Turchin, who... Read More
Vung Tau, 2019
In Saigon, I can easily go a week without seeing any white person, but today, I ran across two white Mormons on bicycles, with one having this paper sign on his backpack, “TIẾNG ANH MIỄN PHÍ” [“FREE ENGLISH LANGUAGE”]. I also passed a young white man pulling a suitcase down the street, his face showing... Read More
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Why You Should Stay the Hell Away From the American Military
Some advice: Don't get shot in the face. I don't care what your friends tell you, it isn't a good idea. Further, avoid corneal transplants if you can. If you find a coupon for one, in a box of Cracker Jacks maybe, toss it. Transplants are miserable things. Unless you really need one. What am... Read More
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The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is opening up to the world. It used to be absolutely impossible to get a visa to enter, unless you were a religious pilgrim (therefore officially a Muslim), NATO military personnel, or a businessman or woman, invited by a local company or by the Saudi government. Even if you secured... Read More
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• Monday, September 9th: Leaving New York. We fly Air China from New York to Peking, a single 13½-hour flight. There is no way an economy-class flight that long can be enjoyable, but Air China don't do anything to make it wor
Credit: Wikimedia Commons
“I am sad that I was not able to make Europeans love Europe”
The retiring president of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, has been unusually outspoken during his last weeks in office. He recently had a long interview with the Belgian newspaper L’Écho in which he discussed his actions and frustrations as head of the European Union. Juncker has since 2014 presided over the Greek crisis, the migrant... Read More
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First, the good news. Yesterday, I spotted a new Wife Cafe, not three miles from me. Who says Vietnamese hicks aren’t innovative? With this marvelous idea, lonely bachelors the world over can stop ogling and whacking compulsively, and with their next morning joe, choose a black, white, cream or cappuccino life mate. Eternal happiness, understanding,... Read More
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There is a dearth of writing about work, its variety, tedium and grind. This is understandable, since most writers have devoted much of their time to writing and reading, and not painting houses, cleaning toilets, washing dishes, planting crops or performing mind numbingly monotonous tasks on an assembly line, etc. This blind spot or ignorance... Read More
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How long have you lived overseas? First I solo’d my yacht across the Pacific, then settled in the Philippines. It is close to 20 years ago now.   What made you decide to leave North America? Canada: It is cold, with lots of rain, and the sun never gets high in the sky. US: After... Read More
I like Pachelbel's Canon in D. Sure it's overplayed, but I like it, so I was stirred to action after hearing Prof. Greenberg pass some mildly snarky comments about it in one of his lectures. The precise action I was stirred to was, I used the Canon for sign-off music in my August 23rd podcast.... Read More
San Jose, 2013
Last month in Saigon, I hung out with my friend of 40-years, Giang. We were freshmen together at Andrew Hill High School in San Jose, then I had to move to Virginia to escape my psychotic stepmother. A screaming machine, she’s still daily enraged, I’m sure. A horrible marriage will do that. In the late... Read More
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My last three years in high school, I was in Northern Virginia. I hung out at Springfield Mall and Wakefield Recreation Center. Though I had lame handles and an erratic shot, I still managed to get into pickup games, and each time I hoisted up a brick, my buddy, Kelvin Nash, would holler, “Riceman!” I... Read More
Philadelphia, 2011
Voting or protesting, Americans don’t just achieve nothing, they lend legitimacy to their criminal government, for it can declare to the rest of the world, “See, we are a democracy! Our citizens do vote, and they can even protest!” It’s an obvious point I’ve made repeatedly, though clearly into the void, but in my last... Read More
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Most of the towns in Đắk Lắk I have never heard of until I’m in them. A few days ago, I was in Yang Reh, which has just 4,100 people, and founded only in 2002. Coming in, I spotted a tiny, dark woman of unclear ethnicity, pushing a junk bicycle that had assorted bags dangling... Read More