The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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They’re here! No, not the pod people from Invasion of the Body Snatchers. We’re not being colonized by giant alien fruit. I’m afraid it is a little more serious than that. People’s minds are being taken over by a much more destructive and less otherworldly force … a force that transforms them overnight into aggressively... Read More
Belgrade, 2020
Pandemic, lockdowns, riots, disappeared jobs, collapsed businesses, empty fridges, closed borders, weird explosions and, just now, Beirutshima, so 2020 is already a horror show, but wait, it’s actually a mousy prelude to the endlessly crashing cymbals, just ahead. Many more ambulances will howl down streets. The empire will only exit with a bang. Meanwhile, all... Read More
Tens of thousands of Germans marched through Berlin on Saturday, proclaiming a “Day of Freedom” and demanding an end to government-mandated face masks and “social distancing.” The UK and Netherlands also saw large protests against their governments’ tyrannical actions in response to the coronavirus outbreak. According to media accounts, the Berlin protesters held signs reading... Read More
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Paolo Roberto, 50, a native of Sweden (his father was an Italian), had made a name for himself: a well-known boxer, he had his own TV show, he appeared in many programmes; Swedish girls loved to dance with him in Dancing with the Stars; he also had a profitable business: he imported Italian olive oil... Read More
Belgrade, 2020
I’ve moved to a new neighborhood. Choryang-dong was instructive, delicious and hospitable, but like visas, passion or time itself, everything winds down. Thanks to the coronavirus, I felt a bit trapped there, so I’ve inched over to Hadžipopovac. Entering South Korea on February 28th, I thought there was a good chance I wouldn’t be able... Read More
Earlier: MEMO FROM MIDDLE AMERICA: Woke Southern Baptist Bureaucrats Move To Crush Local Church Rebels. Rebels Fight Back. As an evangelical Christian I respect my Southern Baptist brothers and sisters in Christ and the good work they do. I hate to see them led astray, above all by their own treacherous leadership. My advice: Free... Read More
The Horror, the Horror
In the predawn coolness of five a.m., we made coffee, put the dogs in the CRV, and set out along the deserted carretera to Chapala, a few miles away, where we walk the beasts. The night was dark and empty as an anchorman's mind and a drizzle splattered across the windshield. Fulu Miziki poured from... Read More
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Piece by piece
First they came for the toilet paper and kitchen towels, then they came for flour and now they are taking your coins. Yes, the American public sitting out the COVID-19 virus is now having to deal with what is referred as a "small change shortage." caused apparently by hoarding. Coffee shops and other retail outlets... Read More
Due to the lack of official ethnic statistics in France, it’s quite difficult to precisely gauge demographic developments. Among newborns, our best proxy up to now has been the testing for sickle-cell disease, a procedure largely limited to populations susceptible to this illness, that is to say those from the Middle East, Africa, India, and... Read More
We already know that Americans have, and treasure, a great many freedoms, but it is not widely known that the freedom of (white) Americans to kill blacks with impunity is actually just a subset of a greater freedom - the freedom of religion. It is this essential connection between God and killing that permits an... Read More
In most parts of Northern nations like Canada or Russia, we have one word for snow: "snow". If we want to be really precise, we will distinguish between dry snow and wet snow because wet snow is heavy and shoveling it from your driveway is one of the more popular methods of inviting a heart... Read More
The relentless advance of coronavirus terror has been broken. Recalcitrant Serbs rebelled against their President when he ordered them back under house arrest. After two days of street battles with dozens of policemen hospitalised, the sturdy protesters won; the authorities surrendered and gave up their plans to lock Belgrade down. Shops, pubs and restaurants in... Read More
Why is the media so fixated on Sweden's coronavirus policy? What difference does it make? Sweden settled on a policy that they thought was both sustainable and would save as many lives as possible. They weren't trying to 'show anyone up' or 'prove how smart they were'. They simply took a more traditionalist approach that... Read More
In the America—and the West—we are experiencing an iconoclastic movement, when Marxists proudly proclaim their hope to destroy not only sites of cultural heritage but also churches. As Guy Birchall wrote on an op-ed on RT.com: A leading activist’s remarks that all “statues, murals, and stained glass windows of white Jesus, and his European mother”... Read More
Statues of Sun Yat-Sen, Churchill, Lincoln and Plato in Singapore, 2015
At the start of French Revolution, Bertrand Barère declared, “The revolutions of a barbarous people destroy all monuments, and the very trace of the arts seems to be effaced. The revolutions of an enlightened people conserve the fine arts, and embellish them […]” Soon after, though, thousands of French statues were wrecked, and many heads... Read More
We are living in kooky times. The European Parliament has voted a pro-BLM resolution affirming a wide array of victimarian concepts (“structural racism,” intersectionality, “racialized persons,” and the very francophone “Afrophobia”). Yesterday’s kooky left-wing meme is tomorrow’s law of the land. The EU lawmakers cite the fact that: Apparently none of the 400+ elected officials... Read More
Philadelphia, 2011
A guy with who once pointed a gun at the belly of a woman during an armed robbery was actually “a gentle giant,” according to ABC News. It quotes one of his buddies, “Anybody who knows him will tell you he’s not confrontational.” At George Floyd’s funeral, the mayor of Minneapolis, Richard Frey, knelt by... Read More
Felix Giordano at Friendly Lounge in Philadelphia, 2016
On June 4th, Common Dreams’ lead story is titled, “‘This Isn’t Going Away’: Defying Curfews and Police Brutality in Relentless Push for Justice, Uprising Over Killing of George Floyd Keeps Growing.” The same day, I received a mass email from Jee Leong Koh, a Singaporean poet living in Harlem. In an 800-word statement about the... Read More
Cops in DC
I have lived in the United States for a total of 24 years and I have witnessed many crises over this long period, but what is taking place today is truly unique and much more serious than any previous crisis I can recall. And to explain my point, I would like to begin by saying... Read More
Why is the media so preoccupied with Sweden? And why is the media so determined to prove that Sweden's approach to the coronavirus is wrong? Are we supposed to believe that the same MSM that promoted every bloody coup, intervention and war for the last 30 years has suddenly become a selfless advocate for elderly... Read More
On April 29th, an American friend wrote from Spain, where he’d lived for 20 years, “The government announced new (legal) abilities to track and monitor people’s telephones. My youngest [son] asked if we could go to the U.S. if Spain moves towards communism. I didn’t know how to respond! Frightening where this could go.” I... Read More
Busan on May 23rd, 2020
Although the compulsion to travel is universal, nearly all of it is only done virtually, and I’m not just talking about the internet, of course, but reading books, looking at photos, telling and hearing stories, or just thinking. We can’t stand to be confined to one miserable or paradisal spot while knowing everything else is... Read More
Coming to South Korea on a 90-day tourist visa, I never thought I would need to renew it, but thanks to the coronavirus, I had to, just last week. Encountering bureaucracy anywhere is usually stressful, but thankfully, the process here was quick and straightforward. Koreans know how to be efficient. Buses and trains always run... Read More
From the moment I was born, I’ve wanted to write a 20,000-word tribute to Barbra Streisand, but this is not it, unfortunately. I’m still not ready. Instead, I want to talk about how we routinely distort, embellish or simply erase much the past, so what’s preserved and presented is not so embarrassing. It’s a universal... Read More
Busan on May 6th, 2020
Five months into the coronavirus crisis, there is no consensus about anything. When this virus was mostly limited to China, I tried to get as close as possible, so for two weeks, I stayed in Lao Cai, Vietnam. Nearly each day, I walked along the Red River to look into Yunnan, and what I saw... Read More
With the world becoming so stupid, by design, there is no mind or focus left to pay attention to any of the arts, so beauty is increasingly perverted and language sickens, by design. Numbed by nonstop media sewage, just about every man is divorced from his own thoughts even, so of course he can barely... Read More
In South Korea, you can still get on buses and trains, or just wander around for miles at your leisure, so yesterday, I was in Gimhae. Like all Korean cities, it unashamedly flaunts nondescript, skyscraping condos and sterile, soulless churches that surely prove there is no God, for there’s no way he would tolerate so... Read More
Pohang, South Korea, 2020
There are coronavirus cases in at least 185 countries, with none reported in North Korea. As Western Europe’s infection rate slows, Turkey’s and Russia’s accelerate. Africa’s death toll remains a remarkably low 1,136, but reliable statistics are impossible to get anywhere, not just in Africa. Coronavirus deaths may be wrongly attributed or simply uncounted. In... Read More
Yeosu, South Korea on April 7th, 2020
My freshman year in college, I had an English teacher, Stanley Ward, who said, “All writing is about sex or death,” which drew laughs from us idiots, for it sounded like a joke, but if you consider how everything falls within the continuum between the generation of life and its negation, then of course Mr.... Read More
The Truth and its Consequences
"You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years, because they didn't wear a veil," Mattis said. "You know guys like that ain't got no manhood left anyway. So it's a hell of a lot of fun to shoot 'em." The first rule of human thought is that everything is... Read More
All our lives, our sadism is masterfully jerked by movies and newscasts, so we’re giddy at the sight of other people being blown up or swept away by giant waves, anything, really, as long as it’s not us being napalmed or nuked. This coronavirus crisis is so disappointing, however, for there’s not much to see.... Read More
This is the third installment of Coronavirus Missives, a series in which I survey people in various countries about this emergency. Though I believe there is a global health crisis, most of my respondents think it’s just a giant hoax to enable increasingly totalitarian governments to shackle, cripple or even murder them. None of them... Read More
A leading microbiologist gives the opposite view of virologist Marc Wathelet whose approach to controlling the virus I have posted on this website. Both scientists make a lot of sense. As I understand them, Dr. Wathelet’s recommendations stem from the West’s unpreparedness. The lack of masks, tests, hospital capacity, and ventilators, together with the high... Read More
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For days, for weeks, the media have been dominated by the spread of the corona virus. Almost every hour new numbers on infections and deceased are published. There are also reports of political reactions and the economic consequences. What was previously considered impossible is now decided: there are travel restrictions, borders are locked, people are... Read More
Hanoi\
When I left Hanoi on February 28th, its streets were still choked with traffic, most restaurants and cafes were packed, and there were only a few minor signs of the pandemic threat. There were more facemasks, especially on waiters and shopkeepers. At some dumpy pho joint, I spotted a sign requesting customers to not smoke,... Read More
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In Singapore, you can be jailed for half a year for failing to keep “social distance.” The same offense in New York will only get you fined for up to $500, although an 86-year-old woman has just been killed when she got too close to someone at a Brooklyn hospital. Out of masks, Tennessee doctors... Read More
A mixed bag. This morning we sallied forth to stock up on the essentials of life in time of plague, such as throat sanitizer--Wild Turkey serves well. In the liquor store, employees wore face masks. At Walmart there was a hand-sanitizer squirter that all had to use before entering, and the PA system exhorted us... Read More
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In these Corona times, I often listen to Monty Python’s Always Look on the Bright Side of Life. This black cloud has a silver lining. With the virus roaming outside, teenagers deign to spend more time with their parents; wives are at home cooking dinners instead of hanging out with gorgeous strangers in posh cafés;... Read More
Outrageous events are avalanching, so any analysis risks becoming immediately obsolete, and even quaintly so. Just two weeks ago was the good old days. Remember when you could perform extraordinary tasks like loafing in a bar just to shoot the shit, walking down the street unperturbed or saying to a diner waitress, “Over easy, please,”... Read More
“I have delivered food parcels to four families this morning,” says Paula Spencer, who runs the community centre in Thanington, a deprived district on the outskirts of Canterbury. Two of the families had called for help because they had symptoms of the coronavirus, and two simply needed food to eat. There are no signs of... Read More
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As a chicken chomping, coke snorting species, we have three main foes. 1) Beasts more ferocious than us, such as tigers, lions and, well, just about all other animals, since we’re such wimps. 2) Living organisms we can’t even see, such as viruses. 3) Other men, of course, since man is clearly man’s most lethal... Read More
Gypsies in France, 1980s. Credit: Wikimedia Commons
The EU interviewed 8,000 Gypsies, the results will shock you!
I for one am fascinated by Gypsies. I find it remarkable that a people, hailing from the dregs of medieval Indian society, could cross the whole Middle East, arrive in eastern Europe, and maintain their identity among other peoples for 1500 years. The Gypsies did this, furthermore, without maintaining their own sovereign state or religion,... Read More
Incheon, 2020
Perhaps I have really bad body odor, but these days, I mostly eat and drink alone, sitting in completely empty restaurants and cafes, like right now. This casual yet elegant joint is called Ottchill. It has solidly built wooden chairs padded with homey cushions. The two baristas are young, attractive and courteous, and they’re here... Read More
A World No Longer in Supply
The road, little trafficked, ran past the college post office, past my grandfather’s house, and through a stretch of woods to Lanc’s store. Then it wound off through wooded Virginia countryside. Hampden-Sydney was one of the small Southern colleges founded well before modern times--1776 for Hampden-Sydney--offering liberal arts schooling of remarkably good academic quality. Many... Read More
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What a wonderful enchanted life we boomers have had! Living was easy, accommodation plentiful and inexpensive, salaries were high, girls willing. The world was offered to us like a heap of pearl oysters on the silver tray. We could travel, change our countries and jobs as we like, we could fight for justice and mercy... Read More
Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture, 2020
Of course, borders are sexual, at least for men, for you’re about to enter a normally forbidden territory. This buildup, anxiety and euphoria is lessened if the border is a mere formality, or if you have a strong (and stiff enough) passport. For women, border crossers can promise adventure, for they may deliver you to... Read More
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A Pre-Enstupidation View
It was 1953 in the white newly prosperous suburbs of Arlington, Virginia, just outside the Yankee Capital. I was eight, having been born, like so many of my small compatriots, nine months and fifteen minutes after our fathers got home from the war. These men, my father anyway, had spent years in the Pacific, being... Read More
A Crisis of Faith While Netflix certainly produces programs of questionable artistic merit (although I do look forward to seeing The Two Popes), one series that from the standpoint of using historical events as an inspiration to create compelling theater—and frequently brilliant theater—is playwright Peter Morgan’s The Crown. While co-produced by Sony’s Columbia studios, the... Read More
Dien Bien Phu, 2020
Nothing is equal to anything else. In 1904, Jack London traveled from Korea to China. As soon as he crossed the border, he saw what he thought was a much more energetic, resourceful and resilient civilization, Gushing at length over the Chinese, London concludes, “The Korean is the perfect type of inefficiency—of utter worthlessness. The... Read More
The Nazi Leader’s Critique of the European Union
In his unpublished Second Book on foreign policy, Adolf Hitler offers the following critique of Count Richard von Coudenhove-Kalergi’s Pan-European Movement, which argued for the peaceful unification of Europe. Kalergi is very much a precursor to the post-1945 effort to integrate the Old Continent, culminating in the European Union. Hitler raises essentially two objections: The... Read More