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Self-Reported Workplace Discrimination, by Race
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Twitter is not real life:

The question is a binary one, so the residual percentages–representing vast majorities of people of every race–are those who answered they do not in any way feel discriminated against at work on account of their race or ethnicity.

Race is not merely a social construct. It’s a biological one, too, and average group differences are empirical realities, not pseudoscience. That said, the neo-liberal establishment and its Woke useful idiots make American life much more contentious, mistrustful, and anxiety-inducing than it should be.

GSS variables used: WKRACISM, YEAR(2012-2018), RACECEN1(1)(2)(3)(4-10), HISPANIC(1)(2-50)

 
• Category: Culture/Society, Ideology, Race/Ethnicity • Tags: GSS, Media Bias, Race 
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  1. “On your job” seems like imprecise, awkward language. Say you are in a dead end job, and know you won’t be promoted because of AA – maybe seen other people move up with less qualifications, or demonstrated ability. Would you feel discriminated against “on your job?” Would a lineman working on power lines feel discriminated on his job?

    I would have picked “at work”, or “in your workplace.” That said, I’m surprised the white answer is so low. I’ve heard many stories, that lead me to believe that the true number is manifestly greater than 2.6%. The public sector is greater than that, isn’t it? And they basically have discrimination against white males codified. I simply can’t believe the number. I wouldn’t be surprised if there were more militant lesbian bosses than 2.6%.

    • Replies: @Elmer's Washable School Glue

    “On your job” seems like imprecise, awkward language.
     
    It also doesn't account for those who don't have a job. You can't experience "workplace discrimination" if you don't work.

    This may be part of why blacks feel less "discriminated against on their jobs" than Asians do despite benefiting much more from the racism propaganda crusade.
    , @Wency
    Discriminated against "in your career" might capture it.

    If you feel like your job is that crappy and hostile an environment, you ought to be changing it, not crying about it. There are still plenty of options that don't require this kind of abuse. But eliminating options does restrict your career. For that matter, so does avoiding blue states, which is basically a choice I made because I couldn't see myself finding a good woman and raising children in such an environment.
    , @Cloudbuster
    The vast majority of Whites have been conditioned to not regard affirmative action and other racial quotas as discrimination against Whites.
    , @Justvisiting
    Whites don't consider it discrimination when they have to carry the load for their non-white co-workers.

    You have to ask the correct question to get the correct answer.
    , @Audacious Epigone
    I didn't mentally put this question in the same realm as a question about affirmative action or some other sort of systemic discrimination, and I suspect most people fielding the question will approach it the same way I did--ie, are you picked on, put down, etc by your boss or co-workers at work because of your race or ethnicity?

    Opposition to affirmative action is much higher than the percentages who believe they've been discriminated against, another reason why this interpretation is likely accurate.

  2. Whites are systematically disadvantaged because of official quotas and news gag orders.
    100% of whites are discriminated against, by needing higher job qualifications for hiring than Blacks.
    Yet they don’t consider themselves discriminated against, as the graphic shows.
    Coddled minorities feel discriminated against.
    It is not allowed to suggest that maybe the so called “discrimination” is due to behavior, because of lower performance, lower IQ, or higher crime. Nobody discriminates, Black SAT scores are just lower.

    Quotas and affirmative action are in reality systemic official institutionalized racism to favor “minorities”. This is defined as no racism. Anti-white racism is not racism.
    Men are so altruistic that they don’t complain about quotas for underqualified females at men’s expense.
    Whites are so pathologically altruistic, that they think it is ok that underprivileged minorities have privileges in hiring, schools, etc.

    It is not allowed to complain about anti-white racism, because that would be “racism”.

    • Agree: Joseph Doaks
  3. Feeling discriminated and actually being discriminated are two different things.

    A lot of blacks feels that universities discriminate against them when in reality they are coddled. Some Asians and downscale whites feel that they are discriminated by universities and they are more likely to be right.

    Now some interesting bits about Asians: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/report-finds-u-s-born-asian-americans-report-more-discrimination-n827506

    Immigrant Asian Americans were also much less likely to report multiple forms of individual discrimination, including violence and sexual harassment, than their counterparts born in the U.S. or Puerto Rico…

    Nearly one in five Indian Americans (17 percent) reported they or a family member had been unfairly stopped or treated by police, compared to 12 percent of Asian Americans overall and just 2 percent of Chinese Americans who said the same.

    And then there is the Asian vs. Asian angle: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/09/30/lawsuit-intels-indian-managers-discriminated-against-korea-born-american/

    Hoseong Ryu is a Korean who became a U.S. citizen in 2009, and “throughout the course of his employment, Ryu has worked in an environment with management that favors employees who are from India or are of Indian or South-Asian descent and disfavors employees who do not fall into that category,” says the California lawsuit, filed by the Alexander Krakow firm.

    • Agree: Mark G.
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    I'm a programmer by profession. Indian nepotism in Silicon Valley, and in the US tech industry in general, is deeply common knowledge. You can talk to anybody in the industry, regardless of race. They'll all say the same thing: once they make into positions of relative power, usually middle management, look out if you don't have an inside connection. It's not uncommon to see Indian managers just hire relatives. And if HR 1044 passes through the Senate, we're going to get swamped. Even other immigrants are not fans of the bill once they become aware of it because they know if the quota on India gets removed, they get swamped by sheer numbers.

    (I think one factor that needs to be stressed is that the guy with the MBA typically has very good verbal and social skills. The guy busy doing Haskell or math problems for fun typically does not. As usual, these are generalizations, blah blah blah... but Indian immigrants tend to have the verbal and communication skills prized not just in tech, but by our "clerisy" in general. East Asian immigrants don't. Eastern European immigrants don't. And the specific type of US born kid who ends up with them-mostly, though not always, white or Asian, nearly entirely male-*definitely* doesn't. In a culture that values shine over substance and BS artistry over production, guess who wins? Rule by lawyers or MBAs: really quite a toss up as to who causes more damage.)

    Re, the Ryu lawsuit: it's not necessarily entirely about race. Another ill-kept secret in the tech industry is that employers really, really don't like it when their potential employees grow older, get married and become fathers. Ryu was his mid-40s and a married father: those would have been strikes against him, even if he was Indian instead of Korean. Still, not entirely isn't equivalent to not being a factor at all. The moment the management claimed that a Korean of all people didn't work as hard should have set off every BS siren out there... talk about chutzpah.

  4. In the work environment, you have to get along or lose your job. The more capable you are, the more likely your prospects will improve. I suggest those who said they felt discriminated are more likely to be in academia, or Government jobs, or media. However when promotion is calling or redundancies are coming, then your ethnic and genders count. It may count by a feather, but that gets you or loses you the promotion or the job security.

  5. Harry Kim is still an Ensign to this day. If that’s not discrimination, I don’t know what is.

    • LOL: Twinkie
    • Replies: @Twinkie
    Yeah, but isn’t Sulu an admiral or something? Or is that a victory for homosexuals, not Asians?
  6. @Blinky Bill
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/9a/Garrett_Wang_as_Harry_Kim.jpg/220px-Garrett_Wang_as_Harry_Kim.jpg

    Harry Kim is still an Ensign to this day. If that's not discrimination, I don't know what is.

    Yeah, but isn’t Sulu an admiral or something? Or is that a victory for homosexuals, not Asians?

    • LOL: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Rich
    I believe Sulu is a Rear Admiral.
  7. @Twinkie
    Feeling discriminated and actually being discriminated are two different things.

    A lot of blacks feels that universities discriminate against them when in reality they are coddled. Some Asians and downscale whites feel that they are discriminated by universities and they are more likely to be right.

    Now some interesting bits about Asians: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/report-finds-u-s-born-asian-americans-report-more-discrimination-n827506

    Immigrant Asian Americans were also much less likely to report multiple forms of individual discrimination, including violence and sexual harassment, than their counterparts born in the U.S. or Puerto Rico...

    Nearly one in five Indian Americans (17 percent) reported they or a family member had been unfairly stopped or treated by police, compared to 12 percent of Asian Americans overall and just 2 percent of Chinese Americans who said the same.
     
    And then there is the Asian vs. Asian angle: https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/09/30/lawsuit-intels-indian-managers-discriminated-against-korea-born-american/

    Hoseong Ryu is a Korean who became a U.S. citizen in 2009, and “throughout the course of his employment, Ryu has worked in an environment with management that favors employees who are from India or are of Indian or South-Asian descent and disfavors employees who do not fall into that category,” says the California lawsuit, filed by the Alexander Krakow firm.
     

    I’m a programmer by profession. Indian nepotism in Silicon Valley, and in the US tech industry in general, is deeply common knowledge. You can talk to anybody in the industry, regardless of race. They’ll all say the same thing: once they make into positions of relative power, usually middle management, look out if you don’t have an inside connection. It’s not uncommon to see Indian managers just hire relatives. And if HR 1044 passes through the Senate, we’re going to get swamped. Even other immigrants are not fans of the bill once they become aware of it because they know if the quota on India gets removed, they get swamped by sheer numbers.

    (I think one factor that needs to be stressed is that the guy with the MBA typically has very good verbal and social skills. The guy busy doing Haskell or math problems for fun typically does not. As usual, these are generalizations, blah blah blah… but Indian immigrants tend to have the verbal and communication skills prized not just in tech, but by our “clerisy” in general. East Asian immigrants don’t. Eastern European immigrants don’t. And the specific type of US born kid who ends up with them-mostly, though not always, white or Asian, nearly entirely male-*definitely* doesn’t. In a culture that values shine over substance and BS artistry over production, guess who wins? Rule by lawyers or MBAs: really quite a toss up as to who causes more damage.)

    Re, the Ryu lawsuit: it’s not necessarily entirely about race. Another ill-kept secret in the tech industry is that employers really, really don’t like it when their potential employees grow older, get married and become fathers. Ryu was his mid-40s and a married father: those would have been strikes against him, even if he was Indian instead of Korean. Still, not entirely isn’t equivalent to not being a factor at all. The moment the management claimed that a Korean of all people didn’t work as hard should have set off every BS siren out there… talk about chutzpah.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    talk about chutzpah.
     
    Some peoples specialize in that - they are our current and future overlords.
    , @XYZ (no Mr.)
    I've worked for three smallish (500 million to 1 billion annual revenue) companies in Silicon Valley that started out with no (or very small) overseas engineering offices, and honest to goodness American born vice presidents of engineering.

    In each company, shortly after the American retired and was replaced by an Indian vice president of engineering, lay offs and heavy off shoring to India occurred. (In one case, a small Chinese development office was closed and the positions rehired in India. So I can't call these actions anti-American, just pro-Indian.)

    And the new hires were diverse only in the anti-white sense. In one company we had a suite of 20 new hires, and all of them were Indian. That is near impossible by chance, and I quit that company shortly afterwards due to being disgusted.
  8. As Songbird noted and NF discussed wrt the computer-tech jobs in California (though, it’s not just there), white people don’t seem to be perturbed. That’s because the the question is about “… on your job”. If it were about “getting your job” or “getting a job”, and then the number ought to be MUCH higher, especially for white men.

    OTOH, are white men so inured to the treatment they’ve been getting for 1/2 a century that they just take if for granted that they get discriminated against and don’t think about it much?

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    *Shrugs*. If you are good enough and develop a niche with experience, then you can still call the shots more than you can in most places, because coding is objective: you can either do it or you can't. (Strangely enough, the SJWs themselves don't seem to be interested in learning how to code: they tend to crowd into the "tech evangelical" role.) If you are interviewing to do PDE simulations for some bank or are doing hardcore GPU optimizations, you aren't competing with some Javascript code-wallah fresh off the boat. It is freshman American developers out of college that are going to get hit very hard by HR 1044.

    As an aside, I've got a few things that I could plausibly use for "diversity" points, unlike most people here-not race/gender tier stuff, but they are there, and they can be used in my favor. I don't want to, for both practical reasons (those kinds of company cultures are not where I want to be) and because of the embryonic personal code I'm developing.

    >OTOH, are white men so inured to the treatment they’ve been getting for 1/2 a century that they just take if for granted that they get discriminated against and don’t think about it much?

    You can play the complain game, or you can get so good that all the bastards can do is grit their teeth. I know which one is more satisfying in the end.

  9. @Achmed E. Newman
    As Songbird noted and NF discussed wrt the computer-tech jobs in California (though, it's not just there), white people don't seem to be perturbed. That's because the the question is about "... on your job". If it were about "getting your job" or "getting a job", and then the number ought to be MUCH higher, especially for white men.

    OTOH, are white men so inured to the treatment they've been getting for 1/2 a century that they just take if for granted that they get discriminated against and don't think about it much?

    *Shrugs*. If you are good enough and develop a niche with experience, then you can still call the shots more than you can in most places, because coding is objective: you can either do it or you can’t. (Strangely enough, the SJWs themselves don’t seem to be interested in learning how to code: they tend to crowd into the “tech evangelical” role.) If you are interviewing to do PDE simulations for some bank or are doing hardcore GPU optimizations, you aren’t competing with some Javascript code-wallah fresh off the boat. It is freshman American developers out of college that are going to get hit very hard by HR 1044.

    As an aside, I’ve got a few things that I could plausibly use for “diversity” points, unlike most people here-not race/gender tier stuff, but they are there, and they can be used in my favor. I don’t want to, for both practical reasons (those kinds of company cultures are not where I want to be) and because of the embryonic personal code I’m developing.

    >OTOH, are white men so inured to the treatment they’ve been getting for 1/2 a century that they just take if for granted that they get discriminated against and don’t think about it much?

    You can play the complain game, or you can get so good that all the bastards can do is grit their teeth. I know which one is more satisfying in the end.

    • Disagree: Cloudbuster
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I'm not a programmer, by trade anyway. (I've crunched plenty of numbers as an engineer - actual engineer, not computer guy). You can boast all you want about your mad development skills or what have you. That doesn't, *shrug*, change the fact that white men have been discriminated against in all of the corporate world for 1/2 a century. It's great you are doing well, NF, but I'm sure not all CS/IT graduates are capable of the high-level stuff, and there are not nearly enough of those positions for all the reasonably-capable white kids out of school.

    I'm not complaining for myself, as I'm already way past that stuff, and I got into an area where it's hard to discriminate against white people, for reasons. Not everyone can do that. It's gonna get even harder as so many computer-tech companies, especially the Big-Biz Orwellian ones get enough infiltration of H-1B indentured servants or former I.D.s who practice nepotism (of their tribes, at least) up the wazoo. You mention as much right here, so why do you need this holier-than-thou bit?

    BTW, for Sincerity.net, I wrote my previous comment before yours, so sorry if it sounds like repetition. I agree with your comment. You also seem to be coming around. Come here to gather clicks for the site, stay for the interesting discussion. (I know the feeling.)
    , @Cloudbuster
    Throwing your less-talented fellow Whites under the bus ("they shoulda learned to code better") is how you lose your country.
  10. @nebulafox
    *Shrugs*. If you are good enough and develop a niche with experience, then you can still call the shots more than you can in most places, because coding is objective: you can either do it or you can't. (Strangely enough, the SJWs themselves don't seem to be interested in learning how to code: they tend to crowd into the "tech evangelical" role.) If you are interviewing to do PDE simulations for some bank or are doing hardcore GPU optimizations, you aren't competing with some Javascript code-wallah fresh off the boat. It is freshman American developers out of college that are going to get hit very hard by HR 1044.

    As an aside, I've got a few things that I could plausibly use for "diversity" points, unlike most people here-not race/gender tier stuff, but they are there, and they can be used in my favor. I don't want to, for both practical reasons (those kinds of company cultures are not where I want to be) and because of the embryonic personal code I'm developing.

    >OTOH, are white men so inured to the treatment they’ve been getting for 1/2 a century that they just take if for granted that they get discriminated against and don’t think about it much?

    You can play the complain game, or you can get so good that all the bastards can do is grit their teeth. I know which one is more satisfying in the end.

    I’m not a programmer, by trade anyway. (I’ve crunched plenty of numbers as an engineer – actual engineer, not computer guy). You can boast all you want about your mad development skills or what have you. That doesn’t, *shrug*, change the fact that white men have been discriminated against in all of the corporate world for 1/2 a century. It’s great you are doing well, NF, but I’m sure not all CS/IT graduates are capable of the high-level stuff, and there are not nearly enough of those positions for all the reasonably-capable white kids out of school.

    I’m not complaining for myself, as I’m already way past that stuff, and I got into an area where it’s hard to discriminate against white people, for reasons. Not everyone can do that. It’s gonna get even harder as so many computer-tech companies, especially the Big-Biz Orwellian ones get enough infiltration of H-1B indentured servants or former I.D.s who practice nepotism (of their tribes, at least) up the wazoo. You mention as much right here, so why do you need this holier-than-thou bit?

    BTW, for Sincerity.net, I wrote my previous comment before yours, so sorry if it sounds like repetition. I agree with your comment. You also seem to be coming around. Come here to gather clicks for the site, stay for the interesting discussion. (I know the feeling.)

    • Agree: SINCERITY.net, MBlanc46
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    > You can boast all you want about your mad development skills or what have you.

    I don't have "mad development skills". I know people who do, in fields you can't just dump off to an H1-B visa. They aren't struggling, regardless of race.

    > It’s great you are doing well, NF.

    I'm surviving. Considering the self-destructive decisions I made in life until recently, I probably don't deserve what I have. That's not self-pity, that's objective reality. And for all the problems the US has, if I were born in a different society, I wouldn't have stood a chance: I'm living in one of those different societies right now.

    > but I’m sure not all CS/IT graduates are capable of the high-level stuff, and there are not nearly enough of those positions for all the reasonably-capable white kids out of school.

    No, I completely, 100% agree: that's why I think HR 1044 is such a bad idea. I'm just saying there is a route out for people who can handle the material (it takes an above average IQ, but not an insanely so one) and are willing to put in the work of mastering it, and they won't give a damn about your race. They can't, anyway, given the applicant pool. It is tricky if you are coming from outside the pipeline in other ways, though, the higher you go: the issue isn't the interview itself, because you can't really fake your mathematical knowledge, but securing one in the first place.

    > You mention as much right here, so why do you need this holier-than-thou bit?

    Because I don't want to play their game, in reverse or otherwise. They can't make me, and I'm trying to become a stronger, better man. I'm not a victim, and I have no desire to be one.

    Etiam si omnes, ego non.

  11. @Achmed E. Newman
    I'm not a programmer, by trade anyway. (I've crunched plenty of numbers as an engineer - actual engineer, not computer guy). You can boast all you want about your mad development skills or what have you. That doesn't, *shrug*, change the fact that white men have been discriminated against in all of the corporate world for 1/2 a century. It's great you are doing well, NF, but I'm sure not all CS/IT graduates are capable of the high-level stuff, and there are not nearly enough of those positions for all the reasonably-capable white kids out of school.

    I'm not complaining for myself, as I'm already way past that stuff, and I got into an area where it's hard to discriminate against white people, for reasons. Not everyone can do that. It's gonna get even harder as so many computer-tech companies, especially the Big-Biz Orwellian ones get enough infiltration of H-1B indentured servants or former I.D.s who practice nepotism (of their tribes, at least) up the wazoo. You mention as much right here, so why do you need this holier-than-thou bit?

    BTW, for Sincerity.net, I wrote my previous comment before yours, so sorry if it sounds like repetition. I agree with your comment. You also seem to be coming around. Come here to gather clicks for the site, stay for the interesting discussion. (I know the feeling.)

    > You can boast all you want about your mad development skills or what have you.

    I don’t have “mad development skills”. I know people who do, in fields you can’t just dump off to an H1-B visa. They aren’t struggling, regardless of race.

    > It’s great you are doing well, NF.

    I’m surviving. Considering the self-destructive decisions I made in life until recently, I probably don’t deserve what I have. That’s not self-pity, that’s objective reality. And for all the problems the US has, if I were born in a different society, I wouldn’t have stood a chance: I’m living in one of those different societies right now.

    > but I’m sure not all CS/IT graduates are capable of the high-level stuff, and there are not nearly enough of those positions for all the reasonably-capable white kids out of school.

    No, I completely, 100% agree: that’s why I think HR 1044 is such a bad idea. I’m just saying there is a route out for people who can handle the material (it takes an above average IQ, but not an insanely so one) and are willing to put in the work of mastering it, and they won’t give a damn about your race. They can’t, anyway, given the applicant pool. It is tricky if you are coming from outside the pipeline in other ways, though, the higher you go: the issue isn’t the interview itself, because you can’t really fake your mathematical knowledge, but securing one in the first place.

    > You mention as much right here, so why do you need this holier-than-thou bit?

    Because I don’t want to play their game, in reverse or otherwise. They can’t make me, and I’m trying to become a stronger, better man. I’m not a victim, and I have no desire to be one.

    Etiam si omnes, ego non.

    • Replies: @SFG
    You could make an argument for playing the cards, getting in, and attacking the discriminatory system from within. Not sure if this is a personally good option for you given your skillset; it isn't for me given mine.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    OK, fair enough.
    , @Johann Ricke

    And for all the problems the US has, if I were born in a different society, I wouldn’t have stood a chance: I’m living in one of those different societies right now.
     
    Given that your host country limits the negative influences available to its youth in fairly draconian ways, I seriously doubt that.
  12. Most people in IT probably work longer than is most optimally efficient.

  13. @songbird
    "On your job" seems like imprecise, awkward language. Say you are in a dead end job, and know you won't be promoted because of AA - maybe seen other people move up with less qualifications, or demonstrated ability. Would you feel discriminated against "on your job?" Would a lineman working on power lines feel discriminated on his job?

    I would have picked "at work", or "in your workplace." That said, I'm surprised the white answer is so low. I've heard many stories, that lead me to believe that the true number is manifestly greater than 2.6%. The public sector is greater than that, isn't it? And they basically have discrimination against white males codified. I simply can't believe the number. I wouldn't be surprised if there were more militant lesbian bosses than 2.6%.

    “On your job” seems like imprecise, awkward language.

    It also doesn’t account for those who don’t have a job. You can’t experience “workplace discrimination” if you don’t work.

    This may be part of why blacks feel less “discriminated against on their jobs” than Asians do despite benefiting much more from the racism propaganda crusade.

  14. @nebulafox
    > You can boast all you want about your mad development skills or what have you.

    I don't have "mad development skills". I know people who do, in fields you can't just dump off to an H1-B visa. They aren't struggling, regardless of race.

    > It’s great you are doing well, NF.

    I'm surviving. Considering the self-destructive decisions I made in life until recently, I probably don't deserve what I have. That's not self-pity, that's objective reality. And for all the problems the US has, if I were born in a different society, I wouldn't have stood a chance: I'm living in one of those different societies right now.

    > but I’m sure not all CS/IT graduates are capable of the high-level stuff, and there are not nearly enough of those positions for all the reasonably-capable white kids out of school.

    No, I completely, 100% agree: that's why I think HR 1044 is such a bad idea. I'm just saying there is a route out for people who can handle the material (it takes an above average IQ, but not an insanely so one) and are willing to put in the work of mastering it, and they won't give a damn about your race. They can't, anyway, given the applicant pool. It is tricky if you are coming from outside the pipeline in other ways, though, the higher you go: the issue isn't the interview itself, because you can't really fake your mathematical knowledge, but securing one in the first place.

    > You mention as much right here, so why do you need this holier-than-thou bit?

    Because I don't want to play their game, in reverse or otherwise. They can't make me, and I'm trying to become a stronger, better man. I'm not a victim, and I have no desire to be one.

    Etiam si omnes, ego non.

    You could make an argument for playing the cards, getting in, and attacking the discriminatory system from within. Not sure if this is a personally good option for you given your skillset; it isn’t for me given mine.

  15. @nebulafox
    > You can boast all you want about your mad development skills or what have you.

    I don't have "mad development skills". I know people who do, in fields you can't just dump off to an H1-B visa. They aren't struggling, regardless of race.

    > It’s great you are doing well, NF.

    I'm surviving. Considering the self-destructive decisions I made in life until recently, I probably don't deserve what I have. That's not self-pity, that's objective reality. And for all the problems the US has, if I were born in a different society, I wouldn't have stood a chance: I'm living in one of those different societies right now.

    > but I’m sure not all CS/IT graduates are capable of the high-level stuff, and there are not nearly enough of those positions for all the reasonably-capable white kids out of school.

    No, I completely, 100% agree: that's why I think HR 1044 is such a bad idea. I'm just saying there is a route out for people who can handle the material (it takes an above average IQ, but not an insanely so one) and are willing to put in the work of mastering it, and they won't give a damn about your race. They can't, anyway, given the applicant pool. It is tricky if you are coming from outside the pipeline in other ways, though, the higher you go: the issue isn't the interview itself, because you can't really fake your mathematical knowledge, but securing one in the first place.

    > You mention as much right here, so why do you need this holier-than-thou bit?

    Because I don't want to play their game, in reverse or otherwise. They can't make me, and I'm trying to become a stronger, better man. I'm not a victim, and I have no desire to be one.

    Etiam si omnes, ego non.

    OK, fair enough.

  16. @songbird
    "On your job" seems like imprecise, awkward language. Say you are in a dead end job, and know you won't be promoted because of AA - maybe seen other people move up with less qualifications, or demonstrated ability. Would you feel discriminated against "on your job?" Would a lineman working on power lines feel discriminated on his job?

    I would have picked "at work", or "in your workplace." That said, I'm surprised the white answer is so low. I've heard many stories, that lead me to believe that the true number is manifestly greater than 2.6%. The public sector is greater than that, isn't it? And they basically have discrimination against white males codified. I simply can't believe the number. I wouldn't be surprised if there were more militant lesbian bosses than 2.6%.

    Discriminated against “in your career” might capture it.

    If you feel like your job is that crappy and hostile an environment, you ought to be changing it, not crying about it. There are still plenty of options that don’t require this kind of abuse. But eliminating options does restrict your career. For that matter, so does avoiding blue states, which is basically a choice I made because I couldn’t see myself finding a good woman and raising children in such an environment.

  17. @songbird
    "On your job" seems like imprecise, awkward language. Say you are in a dead end job, and know you won't be promoted because of AA - maybe seen other people move up with less qualifications, or demonstrated ability. Would you feel discriminated against "on your job?" Would a lineman working on power lines feel discriminated on his job?

    I would have picked "at work", or "in your workplace." That said, I'm surprised the white answer is so low. I've heard many stories, that lead me to believe that the true number is manifestly greater than 2.6%. The public sector is greater than that, isn't it? And they basically have discrimination against white males codified. I simply can't believe the number. I wouldn't be surprised if there were more militant lesbian bosses than 2.6%.

    The vast majority of Whites have been conditioned to not regard affirmative action and other racial quotas as discrimination against Whites.

  18. @nebulafox
    *Shrugs*. If you are good enough and develop a niche with experience, then you can still call the shots more than you can in most places, because coding is objective: you can either do it or you can't. (Strangely enough, the SJWs themselves don't seem to be interested in learning how to code: they tend to crowd into the "tech evangelical" role.) If you are interviewing to do PDE simulations for some bank or are doing hardcore GPU optimizations, you aren't competing with some Javascript code-wallah fresh off the boat. It is freshman American developers out of college that are going to get hit very hard by HR 1044.

    As an aside, I've got a few things that I could plausibly use for "diversity" points, unlike most people here-not race/gender tier stuff, but they are there, and they can be used in my favor. I don't want to, for both practical reasons (those kinds of company cultures are not where I want to be) and because of the embryonic personal code I'm developing.

    >OTOH, are white men so inured to the treatment they’ve been getting for 1/2 a century that they just take if for granted that they get discriminated against and don’t think about it much?

    You can play the complain game, or you can get so good that all the bastards can do is grit their teeth. I know which one is more satisfying in the end.

    Throwing your less-talented fellow Whites under the bus (“they shoulda learned to code better”) is how you lose your country.

  19. Speaking of race, all the data from RUnzie Baby’s ‘Hispanic Crime Series’ was up to 2010. His core thesis, which is that the Hispanic community, particularly in California, was much more foreign-born, younger, and more male-heavy than the white population, and thus this is the reason for a high unadjusted rate of crime. Hence, he believed that by 2020 these factors would normalize that Hispanic crime (at least in Mexican-heavy parts of the country) would reveal itself to be just 1.2x that of whites.

    As it is now 2020, it is time for an update from RUnzie Baby. He should discuss whether he was right or not.

    Don’t hold your breath….

  20. @nebulafox
    I'm a programmer by profession. Indian nepotism in Silicon Valley, and in the US tech industry in general, is deeply common knowledge. You can talk to anybody in the industry, regardless of race. They'll all say the same thing: once they make into positions of relative power, usually middle management, look out if you don't have an inside connection. It's not uncommon to see Indian managers just hire relatives. And if HR 1044 passes through the Senate, we're going to get swamped. Even other immigrants are not fans of the bill once they become aware of it because they know if the quota on India gets removed, they get swamped by sheer numbers.

    (I think one factor that needs to be stressed is that the guy with the MBA typically has very good verbal and social skills. The guy busy doing Haskell or math problems for fun typically does not. As usual, these are generalizations, blah blah blah... but Indian immigrants tend to have the verbal and communication skills prized not just in tech, but by our "clerisy" in general. East Asian immigrants don't. Eastern European immigrants don't. And the specific type of US born kid who ends up with them-mostly, though not always, white or Asian, nearly entirely male-*definitely* doesn't. In a culture that values shine over substance and BS artistry over production, guess who wins? Rule by lawyers or MBAs: really quite a toss up as to who causes more damage.)

    Re, the Ryu lawsuit: it's not necessarily entirely about race. Another ill-kept secret in the tech industry is that employers really, really don't like it when their potential employees grow older, get married and become fathers. Ryu was his mid-40s and a married father: those would have been strikes against him, even if he was Indian instead of Korean. Still, not entirely isn't equivalent to not being a factor at all. The moment the management claimed that a Korean of all people didn't work as hard should have set off every BS siren out there... talk about chutzpah.

    talk about chutzpah.

    Some peoples specialize in that – they are our current and future overlords.

  21. @Twinkie
    Yeah, but isn’t Sulu an admiral or something? Or is that a victory for homosexuals, not Asians?

    I believe Sulu is a Rear Admiral.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  22. @nebulafox
    I'm a programmer by profession. Indian nepotism in Silicon Valley, and in the US tech industry in general, is deeply common knowledge. You can talk to anybody in the industry, regardless of race. They'll all say the same thing: once they make into positions of relative power, usually middle management, look out if you don't have an inside connection. It's not uncommon to see Indian managers just hire relatives. And if HR 1044 passes through the Senate, we're going to get swamped. Even other immigrants are not fans of the bill once they become aware of it because they know if the quota on India gets removed, they get swamped by sheer numbers.

    (I think one factor that needs to be stressed is that the guy with the MBA typically has very good verbal and social skills. The guy busy doing Haskell or math problems for fun typically does not. As usual, these are generalizations, blah blah blah... but Indian immigrants tend to have the verbal and communication skills prized not just in tech, but by our "clerisy" in general. East Asian immigrants don't. Eastern European immigrants don't. And the specific type of US born kid who ends up with them-mostly, though not always, white or Asian, nearly entirely male-*definitely* doesn't. In a culture that values shine over substance and BS artistry over production, guess who wins? Rule by lawyers or MBAs: really quite a toss up as to who causes more damage.)

    Re, the Ryu lawsuit: it's not necessarily entirely about race. Another ill-kept secret in the tech industry is that employers really, really don't like it when their potential employees grow older, get married and become fathers. Ryu was his mid-40s and a married father: those would have been strikes against him, even if he was Indian instead of Korean. Still, not entirely isn't equivalent to not being a factor at all. The moment the management claimed that a Korean of all people didn't work as hard should have set off every BS siren out there... talk about chutzpah.

    I’ve worked for three smallish (500 million to 1 billion annual revenue) companies in Silicon Valley that started out with no (or very small) overseas engineering offices, and honest to goodness American born vice presidents of engineering.

    In each company, shortly after the American retired and was replaced by an Indian vice president of engineering, lay offs and heavy off shoring to India occurred. (In one case, a small Chinese development office was closed and the positions rehired in India. So I can’t call these actions anti-American, just pro-Indian.)

    And the new hires were diverse only in the anti-white sense. In one company we had a suite of 20 new hires, and all of them were Indian. That is near impossible by chance, and I quit that company shortly afterwards due to being disgusted.

    • Replies: @Tusk
    I know of companies here in Australia that are 90% staffed by Indians, despite being 3% of the population. Obviously this is discrimination since that makeup is extremely unlikely but yet it somehow gets a pass, yet Whites are subject to lawfare when their comapnies makeup isn't to the demographics.
  23. @songbird
    "On your job" seems like imprecise, awkward language. Say you are in a dead end job, and know you won't be promoted because of AA - maybe seen other people move up with less qualifications, or demonstrated ability. Would you feel discriminated against "on your job?" Would a lineman working on power lines feel discriminated on his job?

    I would have picked "at work", or "in your workplace." That said, I'm surprised the white answer is so low. I've heard many stories, that lead me to believe that the true number is manifestly greater than 2.6%. The public sector is greater than that, isn't it? And they basically have discrimination against white males codified. I simply can't believe the number. I wouldn't be surprised if there were more militant lesbian bosses than 2.6%.

    Whites don’t consider it discrimination when they have to carry the load for their non-white co-workers.

    You have to ask the correct question to get the correct answer.

    • Agree: Tusk
  24. @XYZ (no Mr.)
    I've worked for three smallish (500 million to 1 billion annual revenue) companies in Silicon Valley that started out with no (or very small) overseas engineering offices, and honest to goodness American born vice presidents of engineering.

    In each company, shortly after the American retired and was replaced by an Indian vice president of engineering, lay offs and heavy off shoring to India occurred. (In one case, a small Chinese development office was closed and the positions rehired in India. So I can't call these actions anti-American, just pro-Indian.)

    And the new hires were diverse only in the anti-white sense. In one company we had a suite of 20 new hires, and all of them were Indian. That is near impossible by chance, and I quit that company shortly afterwards due to being disgusted.

    I know of companies here in Australia that are 90% staffed by Indians, despite being 3% of the population. Obviously this is discrimination since that makeup is extremely unlikely but yet it somehow gets a pass, yet Whites are subject to lawfare when their comapnies makeup isn’t to the demographics.

    • Replies: @LoutishAngloQuebecker
    And still, whites believe the bullshit from indians.

    My last boss said: I don't mean to say mean things, or be rayciss, but the people always fucking up are of a certain persuasion, you know, perhaps from the South East Asian backgrounds, or Indians and haha I'm not being racist, please sir don't tell anyone I said this. (in fewer words)

    What he meant: yeah, the Pakis fucking suck at their jobs, and to make things worse they're also assholes.

    Yet the thought never crosses his mind that maybe he should *fire* these useless idiots, nor does he make any pattern recognition connections, between Indians and shitty work, and shittier attitudes. It's just this flickering thought that he sweeps aside as racism.

    95% of whites are severely mentally ill when it comes to race denialism.
  25. @songbird
    "On your job" seems like imprecise, awkward language. Say you are in a dead end job, and know you won't be promoted because of AA - maybe seen other people move up with less qualifications, or demonstrated ability. Would you feel discriminated against "on your job?" Would a lineman working on power lines feel discriminated on his job?

    I would have picked "at work", or "in your workplace." That said, I'm surprised the white answer is so low. I've heard many stories, that lead me to believe that the true number is manifestly greater than 2.6%. The public sector is greater than that, isn't it? And they basically have discrimination against white males codified. I simply can't believe the number. I wouldn't be surprised if there were more militant lesbian bosses than 2.6%.

    I didn’t mentally put this question in the same realm as a question about affirmative action or some other sort of systemic discrimination, and I suspect most people fielding the question will approach it the same way I did–ie, are you picked on, put down, etc by your boss or co-workers at work because of your race or ethnicity?

    Opposition to affirmative action is much higher than the percentages who believe they’ve been discriminated against, another reason why this interpretation is likely accurate.

  26. @Tusk
    I know of companies here in Australia that are 90% staffed by Indians, despite being 3% of the population. Obviously this is discrimination since that makeup is extremely unlikely but yet it somehow gets a pass, yet Whites are subject to lawfare when their comapnies makeup isn't to the demographics.

    And still, whites believe the bullshit from indians.

    My last boss said: I don’t mean to say mean things, or be rayciss, but the people always fucking up are of a certain persuasion, you know, perhaps from the South East Asian backgrounds, or Indians and haha I’m not being racist, please sir don’t tell anyone I said this. (in fewer words)

    What he meant: yeah, the Pakis fucking suck at their jobs, and to make things worse they’re also assholes.

    Yet the thought never crosses his mind that maybe he should *fire* these useless idiots, nor does he make any pattern recognition connections, between Indians and shitty work, and shittier attitudes. It’s just this flickering thought that he sweeps aside as racism.

    95% of whites are severely mentally ill when it comes to race denialism.

  27. It’s crimestop. They have the facts right in front of them and understand it, but can’t act on it because the capacity to think about it properly has been removed. It’s a total indoctrination of the people.

  28. @nebulafox
    > You can boast all you want about your mad development skills or what have you.

    I don't have "mad development skills". I know people who do, in fields you can't just dump off to an H1-B visa. They aren't struggling, regardless of race.

    > It’s great you are doing well, NF.

    I'm surviving. Considering the self-destructive decisions I made in life until recently, I probably don't deserve what I have. That's not self-pity, that's objective reality. And for all the problems the US has, if I were born in a different society, I wouldn't have stood a chance: I'm living in one of those different societies right now.

    > but I’m sure not all CS/IT graduates are capable of the high-level stuff, and there are not nearly enough of those positions for all the reasonably-capable white kids out of school.

    No, I completely, 100% agree: that's why I think HR 1044 is such a bad idea. I'm just saying there is a route out for people who can handle the material (it takes an above average IQ, but not an insanely so one) and are willing to put in the work of mastering it, and they won't give a damn about your race. They can't, anyway, given the applicant pool. It is tricky if you are coming from outside the pipeline in other ways, though, the higher you go: the issue isn't the interview itself, because you can't really fake your mathematical knowledge, but securing one in the first place.

    > You mention as much right here, so why do you need this holier-than-thou bit?

    Because I don't want to play their game, in reverse or otherwise. They can't make me, and I'm trying to become a stronger, better man. I'm not a victim, and I have no desire to be one.

    Etiam si omnes, ego non.

    And for all the problems the US has, if I were born in a different society, I wouldn’t have stood a chance: I’m living in one of those different societies right now.

    Given that your host country limits the negative influences available to its youth in fairly draconian ways, I seriously doubt that.

  29. No multiracial empire has ever functioned well enough to survive.

    Amerika is not any different.

    It is already bankrupt. Morally and financially.

    When the system falls, the Asians will flee.

    The minorities will scatter and wait vainly for relief.

    The whites will survive, and rebuild.

    So it is, and will be.

    This polyglot of dueling ethnicities is NOT a functional society.

    • Agree: Bardon Kaldian

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