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216’s COTW suggests a more palatable term for political dissolution than “secession”:

I’ve suggested a “Bavaria” option, where state GOPs in perma-Bluestan dissolve and reform under a new name that disaffiliates with the national party except for the purposes of the Presidential election. An (admittedly corrupt) example is the “fusion” in New York.

Downstate Illinois is better off demanding a partition (don’t use the word secession due to historic context, only Subcontinentals will hate the word Partition)

If Kurds deserve self-determination, surely farmers in Illinois deserve it more.

It will be especially rhetorically effective with Biden as president. His signature foreign policy plan in the late aughts was to softly partition Iraq into three federalized states so each could function effectively on its own instead of trying to force three separate nations into a single politically unified country. It was a remarkably sensible idea and so nothing became of it.

To balance out the occasional boomer bashing that takes place here, dfordoom opens up on synthetic zoomer socialization:

But if you have 500 people following you on social media then those people are all really really close friends.

If one of the people following you on social media knows someone whose sister works with someone one of whose social media followers died of COVID then the trauma can be so intense that you may have to take stress leave from your job. If you’re a Zoomer.

Dan on the potential human capital premium Americans enjoy over non-Americans:

Regarding AE’s fear that all jobs that can be done remotely are going away, I am really not so sure and the reason why those jobs should stay here is right here on this blog:

The average IQ of an American college graduate is, say 104. That is pretty good on the global scene. If the global average is something like 85, it is going to be very hard for companies to get very far with that. Where are there giant pools of high IQ English speakers overseas who don’t already have 1st world wages? With India we’ve been scraping the cream off the top for a long time, but below that the human capital is not looking too hot.

Actually things are looking up for American workers IMO.

AE — here is something that hasn’t been talked about. Is Google going to be hiring a bunch of people in countries where the average is 85 and the smarties are at 100?

In fact “hire American” is a great excuse for Google to continue practicing the IQ discrimination they are so fond of.

A couple of initial reactions. Firstly, IQ isn’t everything. Despite what the tech executives say publicly, they want a productive workforce rather than an agitating wokeforce. That’s increasingly hard to come by domestically. Secondly, assuming India’s mean IQ to be in the low 80s and normally distributed–a questionable assumption in a country as difficult for outsiders to parse as India–there are over 30 million people in India with IQs above 110.

Perhaps Big Tech will find patriotism and start hiring American. The upshot will be that instead of strip mining India’s native talent, those 30+ million will be able to help India accelerate along its prosperous upward trajectory. It’s probably not the way to bet, but we can hope.

Jay Fink, the least stereotypically Jewish Jew one may ever come across, on the bizarrely mixed messaging coming out of the Trump campaign regarding LAW & ORDER!:

I switched from Democrat to Republican in 1990 when I heard a Dem politician criticize Republicans for wanting to build more jails than schools. As someone with an obsessive hatred towards criminals the Republicans all the sudden became very attractive to me and I have voted straight Republican ever since. Now with Republicans becoming soft on crime, supporting criminal justice reform, criticizing Kamala Harris for locking up criminals, etc. I feel I have no one to vote for.

The backdrop of the November election will be lawless civil unrest in several American cities with the Trump campaign accusing the Biden/Harris ticket of having the chops to restore order and the Biden/Harris campaign vehemently denying it. Strange times we’re living in.

Curmudgeon offers an interesting Old Left take on cops as sympathetic members of the working class:

“The old labor unions” have been warning, for close to 50 years, that off shoring their jobs is bad for the economy, as is free trade. Suddenly, they are the problem. Sure. Get your head out of your arse. The enemy is finance capitalism which is controlled by the international banking cartel. It is they, that own the politicians and get bailouts after they fuck up. Privatized profit, socialized debt. Meanwhile small business owners, the real capitalists, are being thrown under the bus daily, while corporations, with the help of the politicians they own, continue to concentrate control of the economy an the wealth it creates. You cannot defund the corporations without getting rid of the Federal Reserve and Wall Street, and probably the Chicago Futures casino.

Finally, Tulip pithily reiterates what we’ve been saying here for the last couple of years:

If you get deflation with essentially zero interest rates, the Central Bank has to implement a regime of negative interest rates. The only way to pull this off is by banning large holdings of cash (as who would buy a bond with a negative yield if you can own dollars with a positive yield).

The Fed is trapped. Raising rates will cause the entire international credit system to implode. We got a taste of this in late 2018, when the Fed finally began modestly raising rates and the markets responded by immediately taking a nose dive. The fragile state we currently exist in requires extraordinarily low rates. Because of all the debt baked into everything, if borrowing money ceases to be free, interest on the debt will send everything crashing to the ground. The only way to keep the Fed-induced market rally from stalling out in mid-air is to pump it full of even cheaper fuel. But a cash economy cannot tolerate significantly negative interest rates for an extended period of time because prudent people will literally start sticking money under their mattresses. Something has to give.

 
• Category: Culture/Society, Economics, Foreign Policy • Tags: COTW 
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  1. Nice cut by DforDoom!

    Regarding Tulip’s comment, since he mentioned it, why do you, A.E., think that that government and Big Biz will not try to eliminate cash?* Just because we are well behind China in this regard (a good thing, don’t get me wrong!) doesn’t mean there won’t be attempts to eliminate the use of cash in this country. This Kung Flu Infotainment Panic-fest, Season 1, at least, incorporated one such attempt, the hysteria about COVID germies being able to live on all sorts of surfaces for weeks, if not years. The use of cards has been encouraged, but I’m having none of it.

    .

    * See more on the advantages of cash in Peak Stupidity posts – Chipotle – no credit, no debit, and hold the E. Coli and Cash is KingPart 2 and Part 3.

  2. Re: Curmudgeon’s comment: I agree completely with the guy this time. Leaving the free trade across national borders aside, Mr. Curmudgeon is damn near a Libertarian from his take on Big Biz vs. real free enterprise Capitalism. I hope he’ll be more careful in the future.

    I don’t agree with Dan though. Yes, there are dozens of millions of more high-IQ .Indians that will be imported or import themselves. That’s not the half of the problem. It doesn’t take high-IQ .Indians to work in the hotel lobby or run a convenience store. As I related in “I went down to the crossroads … “, I’m certain that there are a a good number of illegal alien .Indians in this country too.

    Just recently, I couldn’t get on the internet for a while at a hotel run by .Indians and the guy of the same persuasion in the lobby couldn’t understand my question to him about it. It was partly about his lack of English understanding and partly about him being dull (nice but dull). He is not particularly high-IQ, and the hotel won’t run as well, but nobody cares.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Lol at


    .Indians
     
    It took me a moment, but lol.
    , @Ris_Eruwaedhiel
    @Achmed E. Newman

    A local Walmart is largely staffed with immigrants, mostly Indians and Pakistanis. It's a chore to speak to most of them because their English is at best heavily accented. We import individuals from the third world to work at Walmart because we can't find Americans? Maybe if the supply from overseas was cut off, American corporation would dig a little deeper into their pockets to pay more and hire Americans who speak English.

    I ran into a similar problem when I was looking for a new job. My resume is online and I received many phone calls and e-mails from recruiters, the majority of whom were from India and many of whom were unintelligible. In that case, I asked them to send me an e-mail because of the bad phone connection (snort). The e-mails were always legible, so their ability to write English was superior to their ability to speak it. In some cases their knowledge of US geography was limited because I was contacted about jobs hundreds and even thousands of miles away.

    Replies: @216, @mmack

  3. you could argue that because downstate is no threat to outvoting Chicagoland – that the democrats in Springfield aren’t going to be as vindictive towards them. You could end up like Massachusetts where the voters are comfortable electing republican governors every so often.

  4. But what if you don’t think Kurds deserve self-determination? 🤔

    Peace.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @Talha

    Everyone "deserves" self-determination. But only those who are eternally-vigilant and fight for it get to have self-determination.

    We Americans have become fat, happy, and dumb (okay, just fat and dumb). We deserve what's coming to us, because we elected our "leaders" and sold our country for cheaper gadgets on Amazon.com.

    The only thing sane, responsible people can do now is to preserve and protect the seedcorn until fruitful plants can grow from them again. Have children and inculcate them properly so that, one day, they - or at least their progeny - will rise again and rebuild a productive civilization.

    Replies: @LondonBob, @TomSchmidt

    , @anon
    @Talha

    It's a strange thing about the Kurds. Woodrow Wilson's "national self determination" applied to a whole lot of peoples but somehow never to the Kurdish. I have not really looked very far into it, but I suspect that back in 1919 - 1920 the Young Turks on one side and the British on the other side didn't much want to see an independent Kurdistan. Because that would yank a piece out of eastern Turkey and another piece out of northern Iraq (British controlled) to create another landlocked country sort of like Armenia. It would be just too much for the players in question to accede to. Plus if a piece of eastern Syria had been included, the French would likewise have been not happy.

    It doesn't really matter, though, because Kurdish TFR in eastern Anatolia is higher than any part of the Turkish TFR in western Turkey. Demographics will destine what it destines.

    Replies: @Talha

  5. @Talha
    But what if you don’t think Kurds deserve self-determination? 🤔

    Peace.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @anon

    Everyone “deserves” self-determination. But only those who are eternally-vigilant and fight for it get to have self-determination.

    We Americans have become fat, happy, and dumb (okay, just fat and dumb). We deserve what’s coming to us, because we elected our “leaders” and sold our country for cheaper gadgets on Amazon.com.

    The only thing sane, responsible people can do now is to preserve and protect the seedcorn until fruitful plants can grow from them again. Have children and inculcate them properly so that, one day, they – or at least their progeny – will rise again and rebuild a productive civilization.

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    @Twinkie

    Sir John Glubb would say America is in the decline phase, features of which include frivolity, decadence, a love of money instead of duty, an excessive reverence for celebrities, a reliance on cleverness without unselfishness and self-dedication, and surprisingly, the rise of “intellect” over action. Glubb also says that we can no more stop the rise and fall of civilizations than we can the change of seasons. Indeed, all we can do is ‘weather it’ by understanding it, mitigating its excesses, and, most important of all, see the long and broad view. Retaining some core areas where rebirth can happen is sensible, much like Spain was able to overcome the Moorish invasions from the northern holdouts.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    , @TomSchmidt
    @Twinkie

    We burned through all the easy hydrocarbons to allow ourselves to escape the Malthusian trap. They're gone, and they're gone forever. There remain plenty of hydrocarbons, but they require capital and tremendous skill to extract.

    Using the wealth created by exploiting fossil fuels, we have learned a lot, including how to make electricity from the sun and win, pretty efficiently. But this knowledge requires maintenance; you can see from modern universities with their publish or perish culture how incentivized anyone in them is to pass along knowledge.

    If we lose this knowledge, and collapse back to an agrarian society, we will NEVER regain it, since the materials to escape a future Malthusian trap will not exist: we burned them all.

    Teach your children well.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @The Alarmist, @Sparkon

  6. @Twinkie
    @Talha

    Everyone "deserves" self-determination. But only those who are eternally-vigilant and fight for it get to have self-determination.

    We Americans have become fat, happy, and dumb (okay, just fat and dumb). We deserve what's coming to us, because we elected our "leaders" and sold our country for cheaper gadgets on Amazon.com.

    The only thing sane, responsible people can do now is to preserve and protect the seedcorn until fruitful plants can grow from them again. Have children and inculcate them properly so that, one day, they - or at least their progeny - will rise again and rebuild a productive civilization.

    Replies: @LondonBob, @TomSchmidt

    Sir John Glubb would say America is in the decline phase, features of which include frivolity, decadence, a love of money instead of duty, an excessive reverence for celebrities, a reliance on cleverness without unselfishness and self-dedication, and surprisingly, the rise of “intellect” over action. Glubb also says that we can no more stop the rise and fall of civilizations than we can the change of seasons. Indeed, all we can do is ‘weather it’ by understanding it, mitigating its excesses, and, most important of all, see the long and broad view. Retaining some core areas where rebirth can happen is sensible, much like Spain was able to overcome the Moorish invasions from the northern holdouts.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @LondonBob

    While I tend to agree with this theme of our current whatever-you-want-to-call-it declining, I must tell you that I have observed it for half a century now. This idea of America as the crumbling Roman empire, or whichever past thing you want, was indeed prevalent when I was coming of age fifty years ago.

    Now, is fifty years enough to quash an idea as never coming to fruition?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @LondonBob

  7. The enemy is finance capitalism which is controlled by the international banking cartel

    Taking the final step however cannot be done. This industry is basically run by jews, until the jew is named and dealt with there can never be a way out of this problem.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Troll: Corvinus
  8. After you’re done partitioning Illinois, you can get to work on the Anschluß of NYC and New Jersey … New Yorkers need some Lebensraum.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @The Alarmist


    After you’re done partitioning Illinois, you can get to work on the Anschluß of NYC and New Jersey … New Yorkers need some Lebensraum.
     
    Just cut Connecticut away. Please. We want nothing to do with either one of them. Let us be Switzerland. Come to think of it, that would be appropriate. Connecticut: America's Switzerland.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    , @neutral
    @The Alarmist


    New Yorkers need some Lebensraum
     
    More like concentration camps.
  9. Napoleon’s comment of “Poles are the Negroes of Europe” rings true once again. I say keep the Posen Slavs and the Blacks together in Po-Dunk, Ill. They deserve one another.

    If those EL1B1 haplogroup studies are to be believed, any future black ethnostate should include the Poles and any of the Christianized Berbers who got resettled into Southwest Texas to fight the Comanche.

  10. @LondonBob
    @Twinkie

    Sir John Glubb would say America is in the decline phase, features of which include frivolity, decadence, a love of money instead of duty, an excessive reverence for celebrities, a reliance on cleverness without unselfishness and self-dedication, and surprisingly, the rise of “intellect” over action. Glubb also says that we can no more stop the rise and fall of civilizations than we can the change of seasons. Indeed, all we can do is ‘weather it’ by understanding it, mitigating its excesses, and, most important of all, see the long and broad view. Retaining some core areas where rebirth can happen is sensible, much like Spain was able to overcome the Moorish invasions from the northern holdouts.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    While I tend to agree with this theme of our current whatever-you-want-to-call-it declining, I must tell you that I have observed it for half a century now. This idea of America as the crumbling Roman empire, or whichever past thing you want, was indeed prevalent when I was coming of age fifty years ago.

    Now, is fifty years enough to quash an idea as never coming to fruition?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Buzz Mohawk


    This idea of America as the crumbling Roman empire, or whichever past thing you want, was indeed prevalent when I was coming of age fifty years ago.

    Now, is fifty years enough to quash an idea as never coming to fruition?
     
    The Roman Empire took centuries to collapse. There were countless crises but they kept bouncing back. They became steadily more decadent and more corrupt and more vicious and weaker but they had their army and no outside power was strong enough to deliver the fatal blow (although the Sassanid Persians gave them a few comprehensive head-kickings).

    The U.S. is likely to follow the same pattern. It will become gradually more totalitarian, more corrupt, more decadent, more infantile, more vicious. The population will become more alienated, more atomised, more miserable, more angry and confused, more aimless, more degenerate, more hysterical, more emotionally immature.

    And the U.S. will become steadily more aggressive. As things slide slowly downhill the U.S. will be more and more inclined to resort to war to prop things up. Eventually some outside power will be strong enough to smash the whole rotting edifice or, more likely, the U.S. will bungle and bluster and bully its way into a nuclear war.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    , @LondonBob
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There is a lot of ruin in a nation but I think folks who thought things were bad in the sixties would be shocked at how bad things are now. I guess many of those predicting doom were looking in to the future, that future has now arrived.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

  11. @The Alarmist
    After you’re done partitioning Illinois, you can get to work on the Anschluß of NYC and New Jersey ... New Yorkers need some Lebensraum.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @neutral

    After you’re done partitioning Illinois, you can get to work on the Anschluß of NYC and New Jersey … New Yorkers need some Lebensraum.

    Just cut Connecticut away. Please. We want nothing to do with either one of them. Let us be Switzerland. Come to think of it, that would be appropriate. Connecticut: America’s Switzerland.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    @Buzz Mohawk

    If Switzerland had a large number of dimwitted violent Africans, no mountains, and enormous widespread poverty amid great wealth.

  12. @The Alarmist
    After you’re done partitioning Illinois, you can get to work on the Anschluß of NYC and New Jersey ... New Yorkers need some Lebensraum.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @neutral

    New Yorkers need some Lebensraum

    More like concentration camps.

    • Troll: Corvinus
  13. Oh, Ill-annoy is just the beginning (and add Gary to Chiraq while you’re at it).  Cut away most of California to make the state of Jefferson.  Re-segment Oregon and Washington into Pacifica and Cascadia.  Split Detoilet away from Michigan.

    Voila, six guaranteed conservative Senate seats right there.  And let those states regulate (and ban if they like) migration from the leftard areas.  Make the people who voted for the mess they created live in it.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    @Mr. Rational

    Split Detoilet away from Michigan.

    See if you can pay Canada to take it.

  14. Working below the API requires very little intelligence. For example, in some english cities and towns to become a taxi driver you need very good knowledge of local streets to pass a difficult licensing examination. To work as an uber driver you just need to follow the instructions of the GPS; you don’t even need to know english or basic arithmetic to give change.
    That goes for most jobs. A large part of China’s industrial success in the 80’s and the 90’s was due to germans figuring out how to make industrial machinery that didn’t need an educated workforce to operate them. In fact they could be used by illiterate people. Now things are even easier due to touchscreens.
    Software is infinitely scalable. Uber API is made by a few thousand techies and can direct millions of drivers around the world. Uber doesn’t need their drivers to be smart, on the contrary, smart people can figure out the con. They need people who are poor, agreeable and have high conscientiousness.

    • Replies: @botazefa
    @SIMP simp

    Uber drivers need to be at least average intelligence or they will have too many accidents. James Thompson summarizes it here on Unz https://www.unz.com/jthompson/the-7-tribes-of-intellect/

    I realize you were just using Uber as an example. I just thought you presented a great opportunity to plug Dr. Thompson's work here. He specifically mentions motor vehicle accidents in his 7 Tribes of Intellect primer that is linked above.

    , @Twinkie
    @SIMP simp


    germans figuring out how to make industrial machinery that didn’t need an educated workforce to operate them
     
    Yes, and educated and technically-capable GERMANS make and service that machinery.

    iPhones and iPads may allow idiots to use easy apps and, yes, it doesn't take many "techies" to program apps, but someone needs to make and service the machinery that builds the iPhones and iPads if not the actual products.

    There is always going to be a need for a trained and technically-proficient workforce in a society that relies on sophisticated machinery. You can't make the cloud do everything.

    Replies: @SIMP simp

  15. If Chicago did not exist in Illinois…Illinois would be strong Republican.

    In general large cities are destructive to the state they are in.

    • Replies: @mmack
    @Realist

    Oh, perhaps in 2000 you would be correct. Now you would be wrong.

    To paraphrase Winston Churchill “From Lake and McHenry counties in the North through Kane, DuPage, and Will to the South a Blue Curtain has descended on the Collar Counties of Illinois.” Cut Cook County and Chicago from Illinois and you still have those counties turning Blue and voting Democratic as conservatives like my parents and my family retire and move, die, or sell and move for lower taxes and cost of living. Diversity and ¡Vibrancy! move in and argue for the “Gibs Me Dat” with the Indians and Chinese moving in to take the High Tech jobs.

    The rot spreads into Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties in Indiana, aka “The Region”.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

  16. If Illinois is partitioned what happens to State of Illinois obligations, such as bonds & pensions?

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    @A123


    If Illinois is partitioned what happens to State of Illinois obligations, such as bonds & pensions?
     
    It’s called an exit tax, and it would be worth it to get away from Chicago.
    , @mmack
    @A123

    You and I pay for it SUCKER, I mean citizen.

  17. Sorry to go OT, this is just an odd phenomenon I’ve started to notice, and I wonder if anyone else notices it too, and has any opinions or analysis of it.

    First off, you need to know that physically, I look like Whitey McWhitenheimer; my friends used to joke that I looked like an East German secret police officer who dressed like a Russian hit man.

    The place I live, like many American cities, is full of corner shops and convenience stores staffed by comically Third World immigrants, who speeeek weeth pinched foreign Andy Kaufman accents, and still wear ludicrous foreigner outfits: turbans, robes, preposterous beards, constant hostile angry thousand-yard stares and glares. They’re usually very terse and abrupt and sort of secretly full of seething contempt in their commercial dealings.

    But lately these same store clerks, still wearing their foreign non-assimilated goofy outfits, suddenly address me in cheerful familiar American accents, in a very friendly tone, with a lot of casual bonhomie. And it seems so comfortable to them that it appears genuine, not a posture. Only a year ago, a trip to the corner shop involved a terse encounter of “That eeeeez one dolla forty five. Derka derka Mohammad jihad.” Now, I get “Hey, what’s up, brutha? How’s life treating ya?” It doesn’t seem feigned.

    What’s weird is the rapidness of the shift. It might just be a natural absorption process, but it’s so abrupt that it seems to coincide with all the BLM madness. I wonder if there’s some sort of subtle coalition-building going on, that is zipping past over my head.

    Anybody have a view of this?

    • Replies: @Wyatt
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I've noticed the dark fellows in my life are starting to move away from the dems and towards Trump. They're polite jerks, but they're not stupid. They obviously don't have white privilege and the media has been so shit at signaling that these non-whites are left out of the conversation. Therefore, they're watching the stories unfold without being told what to think and they see a bunch of dumb white socialists and blacks burning and looting. Even some meh IQ Saudi or Indian knows that traditional whites are responsible for making a functional civilization that the Africans want to destroy. Asians with well developed pre-frontal cortices?

    https://twitter.com/ZoomerClips/status/1267682087261233157

    I was actually told by an old Mexican lady how Univision has no filter and they show everything (((American))) media won't. If anything, the non-whites are more aware of the shit going on for reasons such as this and it turns out they don't like blacks or socialism either XD

    Replies: @botazefa

    , @Mr. Rational
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I have no experience with this myself, but it's easy to see what it means:

    Trumpslide 2020!

    , @Anonymous
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I've noticed it in some people.

    There are the "smart" dark people and the "dumb" dark people.

    A larger % of Hindus, as well as upper echelon Arabs and Pakistanis, are becoming more friendly. Even some blacks are.

    On the other end the dumb dark people - the majority of arabs and blacks - are becoming more and more hostile and threatening. Acting extremely savage and stupid. 2nd gen immigrants are more likely to fall in this group than the first.

    I also detect a slight shift from right wing whites, towards more kinship with a friendly hindu and moving away from Karen or screeching white liberals.

    There does appear to be some kind of shift/division going on. But nobody really knows.

  18. @Twinkie
    @Talha

    Everyone "deserves" self-determination. But only those who are eternally-vigilant and fight for it get to have self-determination.

    We Americans have become fat, happy, and dumb (okay, just fat and dumb). We deserve what's coming to us, because we elected our "leaders" and sold our country for cheaper gadgets on Amazon.com.

    The only thing sane, responsible people can do now is to preserve and protect the seedcorn until fruitful plants can grow from them again. Have children and inculcate them properly so that, one day, they - or at least their progeny - will rise again and rebuild a productive civilization.

    Replies: @LondonBob, @TomSchmidt

    We burned through all the easy hydrocarbons to allow ourselves to escape the Malthusian trap. They’re gone, and they’re gone forever. There remain plenty of hydrocarbons, but they require capital and tremendous skill to extract.

    Using the wealth created by exploiting fossil fuels, we have learned a lot, including how to make electricity from the sun and win, pretty efficiently. But this knowledge requires maintenance; you can see from modern universities with their publish or perish culture how incentivized anyone in them is to pass along knowledge.

    If we lose this knowledge, and collapse back to an agrarian society, we will NEVER regain it, since the materials to escape a future Malthusian trap will not exist: we burned them all.

    Teach your children well.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @TomSchmidt

    I just want to say three words to you: thorium-based nuclear power.

    And yes, a hyphenated word counts as one.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    , @The Alarmist
    @TomSchmidt


    If we lose this knowledge, and collapse back to an agrarian society, we will NEVER regain it, since the materials to escape a future Malthusian trap will not exist: we burned them all.
     
    Your children will give you the answer programmed into them at school: We can use solar, wind, and hydropower. Well, maybe, maybe not. These are the same kids who think electricity for their iToys shows up magically at the outlet.
    , @Sparkon
    @TomSchmidt


    We burned through all the easy hydrocarbons to allow ourselves to escape the Malthusian trap. They’re gone, and they’re gone forever. There remain plenty of hydrocarbons, but they require capital and tremendous skill to extract.
     
    This is complete nonsense. Almost every country in the world has proven coal reserves. By some estimates, there is enough coal to last for several centuries.

    Coal reserves are available in almost every country worldwide, with recoverable reserves in around 70 countries. The biggest reserves are in the USA, Russia, China, Australia, and India.

    There are an estimated 1.1 trillion tonnes of proven coal reserves worldwide. This means that there is enough coal to last us around 150 years at current rates of production. In contrast, proven oil and gas reserves are equivalent to around 50 and 52 years at current production levels.
     
    https://www.worldcoal.org/coal/where-coal-found

    Don't teach your children nonsense.
  19. @TomSchmidt
    @Twinkie

    We burned through all the easy hydrocarbons to allow ourselves to escape the Malthusian trap. They're gone, and they're gone forever. There remain plenty of hydrocarbons, but they require capital and tremendous skill to extract.

    Using the wealth created by exploiting fossil fuels, we have learned a lot, including how to make electricity from the sun and win, pretty efficiently. But this knowledge requires maintenance; you can see from modern universities with their publish or perish culture how incentivized anyone in them is to pass along knowledge.

    If we lose this knowledge, and collapse back to an agrarian society, we will NEVER regain it, since the materials to escape a future Malthusian trap will not exist: we burned them all.

    Teach your children well.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @The Alarmist, @Sparkon

    I just want to say three words to you: thorium-based nuclear power.

    And yes, a hyphenated word counts as one.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    @Buzz Mohawk

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thorium-based_nuclear_power

    I don't see any working ones producing commerical power in there. Though IEEE tells me there are smaller, modular nukes that don't face the problem of Fukushima meltdown on the way, though not thorium based.

    The other thing that oil provided to us, for a while, was exponentially-growing supplies of power, as we climbed the S-curve of production. That exponential growth offset the exponentially-growing claim on real assets represented by fiat currency loans with interest. Once the S-curve of production went linear, and then logarithmic in growth, we could no longer pay off interest with hydrocarbons.

    Now, it's possible we COULD get exponentially-growing nuclear power and use that growth to offset the exponentially-growing claims of fiat currency. But we don't have thorium power now, and we aren't learning how to grow it exponentially. If we don't get that going, and soon, then the processes of entropy in our civilization will consume more and more of the available energy; the unpayable debt will strangle more people and prevent more births of unaffordable children.

  20. I suspect a lot of people would be way happier if we allowed every county to reshuffle which state it is part of so long as things remain contiguous. But we’ll never do that (Most of Oregon, Washington and northern CA would probably amalgamate into a Greater Idaho). States dominated by blue urban areas will never let their captive deep red counties secede and join a red state.

  21. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Sorry to go OT, this is just an odd phenomenon I've started to notice, and I wonder if anyone else notices it too, and has any opinions or analysis of it.

    First off, you need to know that physically, I look like Whitey McWhitenheimer; my friends used to joke that I looked like an East German secret police officer who dressed like a Russian hit man.

    The place I live, like many American cities, is full of corner shops and convenience stores staffed by comically Third World immigrants, who speeeek weeth pinched foreign Andy Kaufman accents, and still wear ludicrous foreigner outfits: turbans, robes, preposterous beards, constant hostile angry thousand-yard stares and glares. They're usually very terse and abrupt and sort of secretly full of seething contempt in their commercial dealings.

    But lately these same store clerks, still wearing their foreign non-assimilated goofy outfits, suddenly address me in cheerful familiar American accents, in a very friendly tone, with a lot of casual bonhomie. And it seems so comfortable to them that it appears genuine, not a posture. Only a year ago, a trip to the corner shop involved a terse encounter of "That eeeeez one dolla forty five. Derka derka Mohammad jihad." Now, I get "Hey, what's up, brutha? How's life treating ya?" It doesn't seem feigned.

    What's weird is the rapidness of the shift. It might just be a natural absorption process, but it's so abrupt that it seems to coincide with all the BLM madness. I wonder if there's some sort of subtle coalition-building going on, that is zipping past over my head.

    Anybody have a view of this?

    Replies: @Wyatt, @Mr. Rational, @Anonymous

    I’ve noticed the dark fellows in my life are starting to move away from the dems and towards Trump. They’re polite jerks, but they’re not stupid. They obviously don’t have white privilege and the media has been so shit at signaling that these non-whites are left out of the conversation. Therefore, they’re watching the stories unfold without being told what to think and they see a bunch of dumb white socialists and blacks burning and looting. Even some meh IQ Saudi or Indian knows that traditional whites are responsible for making a functional civilization that the Africans want to destroy. Asians with well developed pre-frontal cortices?

    https://twitter.com/ZoomerClips/status/1267682087261233157

    I was actually told by an old Mexican lady how Univision has no filter and they show everything (((American))) media won’t. If anything, the non-whites are more aware of the shit going on for reasons such as this and it turns out they don’t like blacks or socialism either XD

    • Replies: @botazefa
    @Wyatt

    Well... that looter looks to be a very young white male.

  22. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Sorry to go OT, this is just an odd phenomenon I've started to notice, and I wonder if anyone else notices it too, and has any opinions or analysis of it.

    First off, you need to know that physically, I look like Whitey McWhitenheimer; my friends used to joke that I looked like an East German secret police officer who dressed like a Russian hit man.

    The place I live, like many American cities, is full of corner shops and convenience stores staffed by comically Third World immigrants, who speeeek weeth pinched foreign Andy Kaufman accents, and still wear ludicrous foreigner outfits: turbans, robes, preposterous beards, constant hostile angry thousand-yard stares and glares. They're usually very terse and abrupt and sort of secretly full of seething contempt in their commercial dealings.

    But lately these same store clerks, still wearing their foreign non-assimilated goofy outfits, suddenly address me in cheerful familiar American accents, in a very friendly tone, with a lot of casual bonhomie. And it seems so comfortable to them that it appears genuine, not a posture. Only a year ago, a trip to the corner shop involved a terse encounter of "That eeeeez one dolla forty five. Derka derka Mohammad jihad." Now, I get "Hey, what's up, brutha? How's life treating ya?" It doesn't seem feigned.

    What's weird is the rapidness of the shift. It might just be a natural absorption process, but it's so abrupt that it seems to coincide with all the BLM madness. I wonder if there's some sort of subtle coalition-building going on, that is zipping past over my head.

    Anybody have a view of this?

    Replies: @Wyatt, @Mr. Rational, @Anonymous

    I have no experience with this myself, but it’s easy to see what it means:

    Trumpslide 2020!

  23. @A123
    If Illinois is partitioned what happens to State of Illinois obligations, such as bonds & pensions?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @mmack

    If Illinois is partitioned what happens to State of Illinois obligations, such as bonds & pensions?

    It’s called an exit tax, and it would be worth it to get away from Chicago.

  24. @TomSchmidt
    @Twinkie

    We burned through all the easy hydrocarbons to allow ourselves to escape the Malthusian trap. They're gone, and they're gone forever. There remain plenty of hydrocarbons, but they require capital and tremendous skill to extract.

    Using the wealth created by exploiting fossil fuels, we have learned a lot, including how to make electricity from the sun and win, pretty efficiently. But this knowledge requires maintenance; you can see from modern universities with their publish or perish culture how incentivized anyone in them is to pass along knowledge.

    If we lose this knowledge, and collapse back to an agrarian society, we will NEVER regain it, since the materials to escape a future Malthusian trap will not exist: we burned them all.

    Teach your children well.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @The Alarmist, @Sparkon

    If we lose this knowledge, and collapse back to an agrarian society, we will NEVER regain it, since the materials to escape a future Malthusian trap will not exist: we burned them all.

    Your children will give you the answer programmed into them at school: We can use solar, wind, and hydropower. Well, maybe, maybe not. These are the same kids who think electricity for their iToys shows up magically at the outlet.

  25. Mr. Epigone says:

    The Fed is trapped. Raising rates will cause the entire international credit system to implode. We got a taste of this in late 2018, when the Fed finally began modestly raising rates and the markets responded by immediately taking a nose dive. The fragile state we currently exist in requires extraordinarily low rates. Because of all the debt baked into everything, if borrowing money ceases to be free, interest on the debt will send everything crashing to the ground. The only way to keep the Fed-induced market rally from stalling out in mid-air is to pump it full of even cheaper fuel. But a cash economy cannot tolerate significantly negative interest rates for an extended period of time because prudent people will literally start sticking money under their mattresses. Something has to give.

    I say:

    The privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank isn’t trapped; they’re the only game in town that can electronically conjure up trillions of dollars to create the tech bubble awhile back and then worm their way into the real estate bubble by keeping the federal funds rate low low low swing low sweet monetary extremism chariot coming forth to carry me home and to bubble me home and then bail out AIG so AIG could bail out Goldman Sachs and now the Fed has created a massive asset bubble in stocks and bonds and real estate and hey kids plug into the fact that the greedy White slobs born before 1965 have drank your milkshake and your beer and your whiskey and your cold clear water and they have left you high and dry and the media they control will only let you talk about global warming or global cooling or global climate change and Black Lives Matter and the nutcake baby boomer Bruce Jenner who think’s he’s a woman. Baby Boomer Bruce Jenner is just lucky that Baby Boomer Jebby Bush is more loco than Bruce because Jebby thinks he’s a Hispanic or Latino because Jebby loves guacamole so much.

    The privately-controlled Federal Reserve Bank has created three frigging asset bubbles in 25 years and the Fed ain’t done yet because this asset bubble tower of babel horseshit we got going on now is the one that topples the JEW/WASP ruling class of the American Empire.

    Teddy Coward Boy Cruz — a well-known Goldman Sachs hubby — is attacking Modern Monetary Theory and that Markey guy from Massachusetts when that sonofabitch puke Teddy Cruz’s wife has benefited like a bastard from all the loot that the Fed has conjured up out of thin air. Teddy Cruz has a wife who is a Goldman Sachs banker — I don’t care if she ain’t there no more, once a Goldman Sachs banker, always a Goldman Sachs banker — and she is the type of banker who has given regular White Core Americans trouble all their lives, and Teddy says to leave all the regular Americans out in the rain and snow because Teddy says it is just fine to bail out American International Group so AIG could bail out Goldman Sachs but it ain’t fine at all if some nice Christian women wants to have lots of babies and stay home and raise them and if that nice Christian gal had a Universal Basic Income she could do it.

    Teddy Cruz is evil and immoral and Teddy Cruz is in bed with a GOLDMAN SACHS BANKER and Teddy Cruz is a piss poor debater who I would rhetorically crush in a 4 hour debate on immigration, taxes, foreign policy, monetary policy, American national identity, UBI, MMT, and any other damn thing.

    Vote for Charles Pewitt as a write-in candidate for president of the USA on November 3.

    Vote for Pewitt and get ten thousand dollars a month with your very own Pewitt Conjured Loot Portion(PCLP).

    The Pewitt Conjured Loot Portion(PCLP) will pay each American who has all blood ancestry born in colonial America or the USA before 1924 a cool ten thousand dollars a month. The US Treasury and the Federal Reserve Bank shall work together to conjure up the cash out of thin air, just like the ruling class is doing now.

    The Republican Party Is Evil And Immoral And It must Be Destroyed On November 3

    Do Not Vote For Any Republican Party Puke Politician

  26. The JEW/WASP ruling class of the American Empire is in the last ditch ideologically and monetarily and they have gone for broke with the woke racism nonsense and the massive electronic conjuring up of trillions of dollars and when the spell breaks and the American boobs come to their senses — somewhat, boobs are boobs — there will be blood as the saying goes.

    RACISM ACCUSATIONS and MONETARY EXTREMISM are the fat lady singing at the end of the American Empire.

    I want Maine and some chunks of New Hampshire and the command and control of the nuclear and conventional forces of what’s left of the US military when the American Empire collapses, you fellows can fight over the rest.

  27. This Fed Chairman guy Jerome Powell is in bed with BLACKROCK big time.

  28. If states broke up, and some of the new states were whiter, the Feds would target the new, whiter states for diversity. They would fly in Somalis and Nigerians. That’s what they’re doing now, in states like Maine, New Hampshire, and Minnesota.

    Not to mention, the better economic conditions created by more responsible government would draw nonwhites like a magnet.

    • Agree: Alden, Usura
    • Replies: @216
    @songbird

    The business class supports refugee importation for the cheap labor it provides. The typical conservative doesn't yet understand that refugees are a "tax" caused by our military adventurism.

    Perhaps in theory, Red States could put onerous restrictions on welfare which would discourage some migrants. But its unlikely they will do what left-green Vermont did, and making suburban development illegal for all intents and purposes.

    Replies: @anon

  29. “Jay Fink, the least stereotypically Jewish Jew one may ever come across”.

    My thoughts and opinions are so different from typical Jews that I actually wondered if I really am genetically Jewish. I know there are some Jewish Republicans but they are usually the neocon type, which I oppose as much as Democrats. Plus I don’t look like a stereotypical Jew as I have blue eyes and light features.

    It probably sounds like I am self-hating but I’m not. Other than their liberalism, I have a generally high opinion of Jews. So anyway I ordered a genetic test and I was somewhat surprised that I am indeed 99% Ashkenazi (and 1% undefined European).

    • Replies: @SFG
    @Jay Fink

    I'm pretty stereotypical (worrier, bookish, cheap), just not in my politics.

    I think a lot of it came from growing up in NYC during the Koch/Dinkins era. I knew what criminals looked like, and was angry they wouldn't do anything about it. Then Rudy Giuliani came in and cleaned up the city (I know, it was really Bratton), and things got visibly better. Dude was my hero as a teenager. (The years have not been kind.) I basically learned that liberals were ineffectual and/or dishonest.

    That and my dad buying the Bell Curve during my early teens. ;)

    Also my folks were a mixed marriage, so I didn't grow up hating Christians.

  30. @Mr. Rational
    Oh, Ill-annoy is just the beginning (and add Gary to Chiraq while you're at it).  Cut away most of California to make the state of Jefferson.  Re-segment Oregon and Washington into Pacifica and Cascadia.  Split Detoilet away from Michigan.

    Voila, six guaranteed conservative Senate seats right there.  And let those states regulate (and ban if they like) migration from the leftard areas.  Make the people who voted for the mess they created live in it.

    Replies: @Cloudbuster

    Split Detoilet away from Michigan.

    See if you can pay Canada to take it.

  31. anon[618] • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t understand the Bavarian option. Most services are already provided at the local level, as they are across the country, no? Does Chicago represent a fiscal drain at the state level? I suspect it’s the other way around. Unless the goal is to escape some sort of state development plan, I don’t see the value add.

  32. @SIMP simp
    Working below the API requires very little intelligence. For example, in some english cities and towns to become a taxi driver you need very good knowledge of local streets to pass a difficult licensing examination. To work as an uber driver you just need to follow the instructions of the GPS; you don't even need to know english or basic arithmetic to give change.
    That goes for most jobs. A large part of China's industrial success in the 80's and the 90's was due to germans figuring out how to make industrial machinery that didn't need an educated workforce to operate them. In fact they could be used by illiterate people. Now things are even easier due to touchscreens.
    Software is infinitely scalable. Uber API is made by a few thousand techies and can direct millions of drivers around the world. Uber doesn't need their drivers to be smart, on the contrary, smart people can figure out the con. They need people who are poor, agreeable and have high conscientiousness.

    Replies: @botazefa, @Twinkie

    Uber drivers need to be at least average intelligence or they will have too many accidents. James Thompson summarizes it here on Unz https://www.unz.com/jthompson/the-7-tribes-of-intellect/

    I realize you were just using Uber as an example. I just thought you presented a great opportunity to plug Dr. Thompson’s work here. He specifically mentions motor vehicle accidents in his 7 Tribes of Intellect primer that is linked above.

  33. @Wyatt
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I've noticed the dark fellows in my life are starting to move away from the dems and towards Trump. They're polite jerks, but they're not stupid. They obviously don't have white privilege and the media has been so shit at signaling that these non-whites are left out of the conversation. Therefore, they're watching the stories unfold without being told what to think and they see a bunch of dumb white socialists and blacks burning and looting. Even some meh IQ Saudi or Indian knows that traditional whites are responsible for making a functional civilization that the Africans want to destroy. Asians with well developed pre-frontal cortices?

    https://twitter.com/ZoomerClips/status/1267682087261233157

    I was actually told by an old Mexican lady how Univision has no filter and they show everything (((American))) media won't. If anything, the non-whites are more aware of the shit going on for reasons such as this and it turns out they don't like blacks or socialism either XD

    Replies: @botazefa

    Well… that looter looks to be a very young white male.

  34. Anonymous[395] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Sorry to go OT, this is just an odd phenomenon I've started to notice, and I wonder if anyone else notices it too, and has any opinions or analysis of it.

    First off, you need to know that physically, I look like Whitey McWhitenheimer; my friends used to joke that I looked like an East German secret police officer who dressed like a Russian hit man.

    The place I live, like many American cities, is full of corner shops and convenience stores staffed by comically Third World immigrants, who speeeek weeth pinched foreign Andy Kaufman accents, and still wear ludicrous foreigner outfits: turbans, robes, preposterous beards, constant hostile angry thousand-yard stares and glares. They're usually very terse and abrupt and sort of secretly full of seething contempt in their commercial dealings.

    But lately these same store clerks, still wearing their foreign non-assimilated goofy outfits, suddenly address me in cheerful familiar American accents, in a very friendly tone, with a lot of casual bonhomie. And it seems so comfortable to them that it appears genuine, not a posture. Only a year ago, a trip to the corner shop involved a terse encounter of "That eeeeez one dolla forty five. Derka derka Mohammad jihad." Now, I get "Hey, what's up, brutha? How's life treating ya?" It doesn't seem feigned.

    What's weird is the rapidness of the shift. It might just be a natural absorption process, but it's so abrupt that it seems to coincide with all the BLM madness. I wonder if there's some sort of subtle coalition-building going on, that is zipping past over my head.

    Anybody have a view of this?

    Replies: @Wyatt, @Mr. Rational, @Anonymous

    I’ve noticed it in some people.

    There are the “smart” dark people and the “dumb” dark people.

    A larger % of Hindus, as well as upper echelon Arabs and Pakistanis, are becoming more friendly. Even some blacks are.

    On the other end the dumb dark people – the majority of arabs and blacks – are becoming more and more hostile and threatening. Acting extremely savage and stupid. 2nd gen immigrants are more likely to fall in this group than the first.

    I also detect a slight shift from right wing whites, towards more kinship with a friendly hindu and moving away from Karen or screeching white liberals.

    There does appear to be some kind of shift/division going on. But nobody really knows.

  35. anon[174] • Disclaimer says:
    @Talha
    But what if you don’t think Kurds deserve self-determination? 🤔

    Peace.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @anon

    It’s a strange thing about the Kurds. Woodrow Wilson’s “national self determination” applied to a whole lot of peoples but somehow never to the Kurdish. I have not really looked very far into it, but I suspect that back in 1919 – 1920 the Young Turks on one side and the British on the other side didn’t much want to see an independent Kurdistan. Because that would yank a piece out of eastern Turkey and another piece out of northern Iraq (British controlled) to create another landlocked country sort of like Armenia. It would be just too much for the players in question to accede to. Plus if a piece of eastern Syria had been included, the French would likewise have been not happy.

    It doesn’t really matter, though, because Kurdish TFR in eastern Anatolia is higher than any part of the Turkish TFR in western Turkey. Demographics will destine what it destines.

    • Replies: @Talha
    @anon

    Why have your own country when you can take over Turkey?

    Peace.

  36. @Achmed E. Newman
    Re: Curmudgeon's comment: I agree completely with the guy this time. Leaving the free trade across national borders aside, Mr. Curmudgeon is damn near a Libertarian from his take on Big Biz vs. real free enterprise Capitalism. I hope he'll be more careful in the future.

    I don't agree with Dan though. Yes, there are dozens of millions of more high-IQ .Indians that will be imported or import themselves. That's not the half of the problem. It doesn't take high-IQ .Indians to work in the hotel lobby or run a convenience store. As I related in "I went down to the crossroads ... ", I'm certain that there are a a good number of illegal alien .Indians in this country too.

    Just recently, I couldn't get on the internet for a while at a hotel run by .Indians and the guy of the same persuasion in the lobby couldn't understand my question to him about it. It was partly about his lack of English understanding and partly about him being dull (nice but dull). He is not particularly high-IQ, and the hotel won't run as well, but nobody cares.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Ris_Eruwaedhiel

    Lol at

    .Indians

    It took me a moment, but lol.

  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    Re: Curmudgeon's comment: I agree completely with the guy this time. Leaving the free trade across national borders aside, Mr. Curmudgeon is damn near a Libertarian from his take on Big Biz vs. real free enterprise Capitalism. I hope he'll be more careful in the future.

    I don't agree with Dan though. Yes, there are dozens of millions of more high-IQ .Indians that will be imported or import themselves. That's not the half of the problem. It doesn't take high-IQ .Indians to work in the hotel lobby or run a convenience store. As I related in "I went down to the crossroads ... ", I'm certain that there are a a good number of illegal alien .Indians in this country too.

    Just recently, I couldn't get on the internet for a while at a hotel run by .Indians and the guy of the same persuasion in the lobby couldn't understand my question to him about it. It was partly about his lack of English understanding and partly about him being dull (nice but dull). He is not particularly high-IQ, and the hotel won't run as well, but nobody cares.

    Replies: @Almost Missouri, @Ris_Eruwaedhiel

    A local Walmart is largely staffed with immigrants, mostly Indians and Pakistanis. It’s a chore to speak to most of them because their English is at best heavily accented. We import individuals from the third world to work at Walmart because we can’t find Americans? Maybe if the supply from overseas was cut off, American corporation would dig a little deeper into their pockets to pay more and hire Americans who speak English.

    I ran into a similar problem when I was looking for a new job. My resume is online and I received many phone calls and e-mails from recruiters, the majority of whom were from India and many of whom were unintelligible. In that case, I asked them to send me an e-mail because of the bad phone connection (snort). The e-mails were always legible, so their ability to write English was superior to their ability to speak it. In some cases their knowledge of US geography was limited because I was contacted about jobs hundreds and even thousands of miles away.

    • Replies: @216
    @Ris_Eruwaedhiel

    In many cases, Asians have lower absenteeism and lower drug usage rates than Americans of the other three main racial groups. Immigrants, other than perhaps Somalis, are also less likely to agitate for a labor union.

    https://time.com/3211845/equal-opportunity-racial-realism/

    As date and anecdote show, working class whites (outside of the Upper Midwest/Utah) are subject to several social pathologies that make them less desirable to employers.

    It's imperative that we get a moratorium on immigration, but Americans also need to be morally shamed into behaving better.

    , @mmack
    @Ris_Eruwaedhiel

    Had de same ting happen to me dankyouveddymuch! You can help me fill dis job, yes? Dank you sir.

  38. @songbird
    If states broke up, and some of the new states were whiter, the Feds would target the new, whiter states for diversity. They would fly in Somalis and Nigerians. That's what they're doing now, in states like Maine, New Hampshire, and Minnesota.

    Not to mention, the better economic conditions created by more responsible government would draw nonwhites like a magnet.

    Replies: @216

    The business class supports refugee importation for the cheap labor it provides. The typical conservative doesn’t yet understand that refugees are a “tax” caused by our military adventurism.

    Perhaps in theory, Red States could put onerous restrictions on welfare which would discourage some migrants. But its unlikely they will do what left-green Vermont did, and making suburban development illegal for all intents and purposes.

    • Replies: @anon
    @216

    The business class supports refugee importation for the cheap labor it provides.

    The billionaire class likes that too, plus the near-guaranteed votes for D candidates, especially those funded by Soros.

    The typical conservative doesn’t yet understand that refugees are a “tax” caused by our military adventurism.

    The typical Main Street conservative is totally ignored by the GOPe except at fundraising time.

    A majority of all Party members supports much lower immigration. Both wings of the Party ignore the little people. That is how we got Trump and why he is so hated by the elites.

  39. @Ris_Eruwaedhiel
    @Achmed E. Newman

    A local Walmart is largely staffed with immigrants, mostly Indians and Pakistanis. It's a chore to speak to most of them because their English is at best heavily accented. We import individuals from the third world to work at Walmart because we can't find Americans? Maybe if the supply from overseas was cut off, American corporation would dig a little deeper into their pockets to pay more and hire Americans who speak English.

    I ran into a similar problem when I was looking for a new job. My resume is online and I received many phone calls and e-mails from recruiters, the majority of whom were from India and many of whom were unintelligible. In that case, I asked them to send me an e-mail because of the bad phone connection (snort). The e-mails were always legible, so their ability to write English was superior to their ability to speak it. In some cases their knowledge of US geography was limited because I was contacted about jobs hundreds and even thousands of miles away.

    Replies: @216, @mmack

    In many cases, Asians have lower absenteeism and lower drug usage rates than Americans of the other three main racial groups. Immigrants, other than perhaps Somalis, are also less likely to agitate for a labor union.

    https://time.com/3211845/equal-opportunity-racial-realism/

    As date and anecdote show, working class whites (outside of the Upper Midwest/Utah) are subject to several social pathologies that make them less desirable to employers.

    It’s imperative that we get a moratorium on immigration, but Americans also need to be morally shamed into behaving better.

  40. anon[236] • Disclaimer says:
    @216
    @songbird

    The business class supports refugee importation for the cheap labor it provides. The typical conservative doesn't yet understand that refugees are a "tax" caused by our military adventurism.

    Perhaps in theory, Red States could put onerous restrictions on welfare which would discourage some migrants. But its unlikely they will do what left-green Vermont did, and making suburban development illegal for all intents and purposes.

    Replies: @anon

    The business class supports refugee importation for the cheap labor it provides.

    The billionaire class likes that too, plus the near-guaranteed votes for D candidates, especially those funded by Soros.

    The typical conservative doesn’t yet understand that refugees are a “tax” caused by our military adventurism.

    The typical Main Street conservative is totally ignored by the GOPe except at fundraising time.

    A majority of all Party members supports much lower immigration. Both wings of the Party ignore the little people. That is how we got Trump and why he is so hated by the elites.

  41. @Realist
    If Chicago did not exist in Illinois...Illinois would be strong Republican.

    In general large cities are destructive to the state they are in.

    Replies: @mmack

    Oh, perhaps in 2000 you would be correct. Now you would be wrong.

    To paraphrase Winston Churchill “From Lake and McHenry counties in the North through Kane, DuPage, and Will to the South a Blue Curtain has descended on the Collar Counties of Illinois.” Cut Cook County and Chicago from Illinois and you still have those counties turning Blue and voting Democratic as conservatives like my parents and my family retire and move, die, or sell and move for lower taxes and cost of living. Diversity and ¡Vibrancy! move in and argue for the “Gibs Me Dat” with the Indians and Chinese moving in to take the High Tech jobs.

    The rot spreads into Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties in Indiana, aka “The Region”.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    @mmack

    I was born and reared in DuPage County. In my youth, it advertised itself as the most Republican county in the country. Now it has a Dem representative in Congress. Sad.

  42. @Ris_Eruwaedhiel
    @Achmed E. Newman

    A local Walmart is largely staffed with immigrants, mostly Indians and Pakistanis. It's a chore to speak to most of them because their English is at best heavily accented. We import individuals from the third world to work at Walmart because we can't find Americans? Maybe if the supply from overseas was cut off, American corporation would dig a little deeper into their pockets to pay more and hire Americans who speak English.

    I ran into a similar problem when I was looking for a new job. My resume is online and I received many phone calls and e-mails from recruiters, the majority of whom were from India and many of whom were unintelligible. In that case, I asked them to send me an e-mail because of the bad phone connection (snort). The e-mails were always legible, so their ability to write English was superior to their ability to speak it. In some cases their knowledge of US geography was limited because I was contacted about jobs hundreds and even thousands of miles away.

    Replies: @216, @mmack

    Had de same ting happen to me dankyouveddymuch! You can help me fill dis job, yes? Dank you sir.

  43. @A123
    If Illinois is partitioned what happens to State of Illinois obligations, such as bonds & pensions?

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @The Alarmist, @mmack

    You and I pay for it SUCKER, I mean citizen.

  44. @Buzz Mohawk
    @LondonBob

    While I tend to agree with this theme of our current whatever-you-want-to-call-it declining, I must tell you that I have observed it for half a century now. This idea of America as the crumbling Roman empire, or whichever past thing you want, was indeed prevalent when I was coming of age fifty years ago.

    Now, is fifty years enough to quash an idea as never coming to fruition?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @LondonBob

    This idea of America as the crumbling Roman empire, or whichever past thing you want, was indeed prevalent when I was coming of age fifty years ago.

    Now, is fifty years enough to quash an idea as never coming to fruition?

    The Roman Empire took centuries to collapse. There were countless crises but they kept bouncing back. They became steadily more decadent and more corrupt and more vicious and weaker but they had their army and no outside power was strong enough to deliver the fatal blow (although the Sassanid Persians gave them a few comprehensive head-kickings).

    The U.S. is likely to follow the same pattern. It will become gradually more totalitarian, more corrupt, more decadent, more infantile, more vicious. The population will become more alienated, more atomised, more miserable, more angry and confused, more aimless, more degenerate, more hysterical, more emotionally immature.

    And the U.S. will become steadily more aggressive. As things slide slowly downhill the U.S. will be more and more inclined to resort to war to prop things up. Eventually some outside power will be strong enough to smash the whole rotting edifice or, more likely, the U.S. will bungle and bluster and bully its way into a nuclear war.

    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @nebulafox
    @dfordoom

    > They became steadily more decadent and more corrupt and more vicious and weaker but they had their army and no outside power was strong enough to deliver the fatal blow

    I'm not sure about decadence and weakness: if anything, Rome grew a lot more conservative during the 3rd Century when, in many ways, classical Rome as we think of it ended, and Rome did have genuine periods of recovery along with the decline. It was the coherent, centralized bureaucracy that ensured the survival of the Roman state.

    Nobody could have possibly predicted the combination of factors that led to the Arab conquests, which is, IMO, where classical antiquity really ends. What saved the Byzantine state from collapse then when they lost 2/3rds of their territory and 3/4ths of their wealth was that the governmental bureaucracy kept functioning behind Constantinople's impenetrable walls, albeit they underwent a complete cultural and structural overhaul to survive. The Sassanids make a good comparison point: when the Arabs overran Mesopotamia and headed toward the ancestral Iranian heartland, local power brokers began to cut deals with the Arabs because the central government could no longer command loyalty. It's also crucial to note that both big powers were suffering from the demographic fallout of bubonic plague on top of war. The pandemics hit the Arabs less hard because rats don't like the sparsely populated desert. Again: not much to do with Gibbonian morality arguments.

    (It's not hard to see why the Qu'ran sounds so apocalyptic: these were *not* fun times. Considering the world's end at hand was a logical response to the realities of the early 7th Century. I'm more amazed that the Roman state survived on the Bosporus in any form than looking at why classical antiquity fell.)

    > It will become gradually more totalitarian, more corrupt, more decadent, more infantile, more vicious.

    I think the wannabe micromanagerial totalitarians are going to push too far eventually. The only question is how much damage they do before they get there. And an outside power directly attacking American soil is pretty much the only way I can see the possibility of instant societal cohesion. I don't think America's rivals would be that stupid.

    I'm much more concerned about softer stuff. What if China decides to court alienated white scientists with promises of research with no self-criticism sessions? They've already been getting the haigui back in droves for the last decade as China ceased to be an unpleasant place to be, what if they decide to actively court American talent? We've traditionally been the ones to profit from brain drains, not the other way around.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Charles Pewitt

  45. @anon
    @Talha

    It's a strange thing about the Kurds. Woodrow Wilson's "national self determination" applied to a whole lot of peoples but somehow never to the Kurdish. I have not really looked very far into it, but I suspect that back in 1919 - 1920 the Young Turks on one side and the British on the other side didn't much want to see an independent Kurdistan. Because that would yank a piece out of eastern Turkey and another piece out of northern Iraq (British controlled) to create another landlocked country sort of like Armenia. It would be just too much for the players in question to accede to. Plus if a piece of eastern Syria had been included, the French would likewise have been not happy.

    It doesn't really matter, though, because Kurdish TFR in eastern Anatolia is higher than any part of the Turkish TFR in western Turkey. Demographics will destine what it destines.

    Replies: @Talha

    Why have your own country when you can take over Turkey?

    Peace.

  46. Definitely partition Illinois. I’d wind up in Blueistan anyway, because because I live in Cook County, but the parts of the state that are really Indiana and Kentucky should be free.

  47. @mmack
    @Realist

    Oh, perhaps in 2000 you would be correct. Now you would be wrong.

    To paraphrase Winston Churchill “From Lake and McHenry counties in the North through Kane, DuPage, and Will to the South a Blue Curtain has descended on the Collar Counties of Illinois.” Cut Cook County and Chicago from Illinois and you still have those counties turning Blue and voting Democratic as conservatives like my parents and my family retire and move, die, or sell and move for lower taxes and cost of living. Diversity and ¡Vibrancy! move in and argue for the “Gibs Me Dat” with the Indians and Chinese moving in to take the High Tech jobs.

    The rot spreads into Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties in Indiana, aka “The Region”.

    Replies: @MBlanc46

    I was born and reared in DuPage County. In my youth, it advertised itself as the most Republican county in the country. Now it has a Dem representative in Congress. Sad.

  48. @Buzz Mohawk
    @The Alarmist


    After you’re done partitioning Illinois, you can get to work on the Anschluß of NYC and New Jersey … New Yorkers need some Lebensraum.
     
    Just cut Connecticut away. Please. We want nothing to do with either one of them. Let us be Switzerland. Come to think of it, that would be appropriate. Connecticut: America's Switzerland.

    Replies: @RadicalCenter

    If Switzerland had a large number of dimwitted violent Africans, no mountains, and enormous widespread poverty amid great wealth.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
  49. AE, you have been right all along. We need to have a peaceful partition.* Otherwise it will be a destructive war.

    I suppose there is a third possibility – we – non-leftists – all take it lying down and accept our fate as determined by our moral “superiors.”

    *But what would a peacefully-partitioned United States look like?

  50. @SIMP simp
    Working below the API requires very little intelligence. For example, in some english cities and towns to become a taxi driver you need very good knowledge of local streets to pass a difficult licensing examination. To work as an uber driver you just need to follow the instructions of the GPS; you don't even need to know english or basic arithmetic to give change.
    That goes for most jobs. A large part of China's industrial success in the 80's and the 90's was due to germans figuring out how to make industrial machinery that didn't need an educated workforce to operate them. In fact they could be used by illiterate people. Now things are even easier due to touchscreens.
    Software is infinitely scalable. Uber API is made by a few thousand techies and can direct millions of drivers around the world. Uber doesn't need their drivers to be smart, on the contrary, smart people can figure out the con. They need people who are poor, agreeable and have high conscientiousness.

    Replies: @botazefa, @Twinkie

    germans figuring out how to make industrial machinery that didn’t need an educated workforce to operate them

    Yes, and educated and technically-capable GERMANS make and service that machinery.

    iPhones and iPads may allow idiots to use easy apps and, yes, it doesn’t take many “techies” to program apps, but someone needs to make and service the machinery that builds the iPhones and iPads if not the actual products.

    There is always going to be a need for a trained and technically-proficient workforce in a society that relies on sophisticated machinery. You can’t make the cloud do everything.

    • Replies: @SIMP simp
    @Twinkie

    Sure, but the ratio of smart/stupid that you need now is different from what it was in the old factories.

  51. @dfordoom
    @Buzz Mohawk


    This idea of America as the crumbling Roman empire, or whichever past thing you want, was indeed prevalent when I was coming of age fifty years ago.

    Now, is fifty years enough to quash an idea as never coming to fruition?
     
    The Roman Empire took centuries to collapse. There were countless crises but they kept bouncing back. They became steadily more decadent and more corrupt and more vicious and weaker but they had their army and no outside power was strong enough to deliver the fatal blow (although the Sassanid Persians gave them a few comprehensive head-kickings).

    The U.S. is likely to follow the same pattern. It will become gradually more totalitarian, more corrupt, more decadent, more infantile, more vicious. The population will become more alienated, more atomised, more miserable, more angry and confused, more aimless, more degenerate, more hysterical, more emotionally immature.

    And the U.S. will become steadily more aggressive. As things slide slowly downhill the U.S. will be more and more inclined to resort to war to prop things up. Eventually some outside power will be strong enough to smash the whole rotting edifice or, more likely, the U.S. will bungle and bluster and bully its way into a nuclear war.

    Replies: @nebulafox

    > They became steadily more decadent and more corrupt and more vicious and weaker but they had their army and no outside power was strong enough to deliver the fatal blow

    I’m not sure about decadence and weakness: if anything, Rome grew a lot more conservative during the 3rd Century when, in many ways, classical Rome as we think of it ended, and Rome did have genuine periods of recovery along with the decline. It was the coherent, centralized bureaucracy that ensured the survival of the Roman state.

    Nobody could have possibly predicted the combination of factors that led to the Arab conquests, which is, IMO, where classical antiquity really ends. What saved the Byzantine state from collapse then when they lost 2/3rds of their territory and 3/4ths of their wealth was that the governmental bureaucracy kept functioning behind Constantinople’s impenetrable walls, albeit they underwent a complete cultural and structural overhaul to survive. The Sassanids make a good comparison point: when the Arabs overran Mesopotamia and headed toward the ancestral Iranian heartland, local power brokers began to cut deals with the Arabs because the central government could no longer command loyalty. It’s also crucial to note that both big powers were suffering from the demographic fallout of bubonic plague on top of war. The pandemics hit the Arabs less hard because rats don’t like the sparsely populated desert. Again: not much to do with Gibbonian morality arguments.

    (It’s not hard to see why the Qu’ran sounds so apocalyptic: these were *not* fun times. Considering the world’s end at hand was a logical response to the realities of the early 7th Century. I’m more amazed that the Roman state survived on the Bosporus in any form than looking at why classical antiquity fell.)

    > It will become gradually more totalitarian, more corrupt, more decadent, more infantile, more vicious.

    I think the wannabe micromanagerial totalitarians are going to push too far eventually. The only question is how much damage they do before they get there. And an outside power directly attacking American soil is pretty much the only way I can see the possibility of instant societal cohesion. I don’t think America’s rivals would be that stupid.

    I’m much more concerned about softer stuff. What if China decides to court alienated white scientists with promises of research with no self-criticism sessions? They’ve already been getting the haigui back in droves for the last decade as China ceased to be an unpleasant place to be, what if they decide to actively court American talent? We’ve traditionally been the ones to profit from brain drains, not the other way around.

    • Agree: SIMP simp
    • Thanks: Buzz Mohawk
    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @nebulafox

    Singapore vs. Brazil? Which would you choose? ;)

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @nebulafox

    , @Charles Pewitt
    @nebulafox

    Mr. Nebulafox says:

    I’m much more concerned about softer stuff. What if China decides to court alienated white scientists with promises of research with no self-criticism sessions? They’ve already been getting the haigui back in droves for the last decade as China ceased to be an unpleasant place to be, what if they decide to actively court American talent? We’ve traditionally been the ones to profit from brain drains, not the other way around.

    I say:

    The FBI nudged a bit towards the New York Times and the New York Times wrote about a guy from Harvard who was getting big smack from the Chinese Communist Party for this or that but they distracted me away from that vital information by telling me the Harvard guy was a champion giant pumpkin grower who could grow some big ass pumpkins for sure. Like a largemouth bass drawn towards a Jitterbug lure, I got pulled in by the pumpkin angle.

    Why be interested in Jewish Harvard guys with big brains and potentially dangerous knowledge about very scary stuff when I can think of all the delicious pumpkin pies the guy could make with those giant pumpkins even though somebody said the giant ones ain't so so grand to eat or bake with.

    All this set-up about the Chinese Communist Party to say don't vote for the evil and immoral Republican Party because the evil and immoral Republican Party is stuffed to the rafters with guys like Mitch McConnell who have crawled into bed with the Chinese Communist Party because McConnell married a woman who has direct and clear ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

    DO NOT VOTE FOR THE TREASONOUS REPUBLICAN PARTY ON NOVEMBER 3

    Mitch McConnell also voted for Ronald Reagan's 1986 AMNESTY for illegal alien invaders. I think McConnell was in the US House at the time, but I ain't googling it.

    The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate and Mitch McConnell have crawled into bed with the Chinese Communist Party and the Democrat Party and the Clinton Organized Crime Syndicate have also flopped into globalizer collusion with the Chinese Communist Party.

    Who is this frigging "we" that has profited from the importation of high IQ foreigners into the USA?

    Some guys got brains and money and no damn sense of patriotism or love of country and they talk about this "we" crap when they mean "my" and they ain't got no appeal to those of us trying to advance the interests of the historic American nation and every White Core American regardless of whether or not they have seen their personal wealth balloon out to gigantic size by globalization and asset bubbles and monetary extremism and the importation of cheap labor and the like.

    I don't mean to be overly contentious, Mr. Nebulafox, but a little bit of populist fury and irascibility will be needed to fend off the donor-controlled whores such as Teddy "Goldman Sachs Hubby" Cruz after Trump and the Republican Party get electorally wiped out on November 3.

    Whites Without College Degrees want fiery retaliatory rhetoric and they don't want to hear no political leader suggesting that any and all financial gains made by greedy upper middle class Whites and greedy plutocrat Whites because of globalization and the mass importation of foreigners has been good for this so-called "we" person.

    Government workers like to talk about how "we" are the ones to represent the USA when they are only functionaries of the government and their actions oftentimes are highly detrimental to the safety and security and sovereignty of the USA.

    Teddy Cruz and Tommy Cotton and Josh Hawley and Marco Rubio and the other Republican Party donor whores are weak cowards who will fold in a debate and I can't wait till after November 3.

    Replies: @Charles Pewitt

  52. @nebulafox
    @dfordoom

    > They became steadily more decadent and more corrupt and more vicious and weaker but they had their army and no outside power was strong enough to deliver the fatal blow

    I'm not sure about decadence and weakness: if anything, Rome grew a lot more conservative during the 3rd Century when, in many ways, classical Rome as we think of it ended, and Rome did have genuine periods of recovery along with the decline. It was the coherent, centralized bureaucracy that ensured the survival of the Roman state.

    Nobody could have possibly predicted the combination of factors that led to the Arab conquests, which is, IMO, where classical antiquity really ends. What saved the Byzantine state from collapse then when they lost 2/3rds of their territory and 3/4ths of their wealth was that the governmental bureaucracy kept functioning behind Constantinople's impenetrable walls, albeit they underwent a complete cultural and structural overhaul to survive. The Sassanids make a good comparison point: when the Arabs overran Mesopotamia and headed toward the ancestral Iranian heartland, local power brokers began to cut deals with the Arabs because the central government could no longer command loyalty. It's also crucial to note that both big powers were suffering from the demographic fallout of bubonic plague on top of war. The pandemics hit the Arabs less hard because rats don't like the sparsely populated desert. Again: not much to do with Gibbonian morality arguments.

    (It's not hard to see why the Qu'ran sounds so apocalyptic: these were *not* fun times. Considering the world's end at hand was a logical response to the realities of the early 7th Century. I'm more amazed that the Roman state survived on the Bosporus in any form than looking at why classical antiquity fell.)

    > It will become gradually more totalitarian, more corrupt, more decadent, more infantile, more vicious.

    I think the wannabe micromanagerial totalitarians are going to push too far eventually. The only question is how much damage they do before they get there. And an outside power directly attacking American soil is pretty much the only way I can see the possibility of instant societal cohesion. I don't think America's rivals would be that stupid.

    I'm much more concerned about softer stuff. What if China decides to court alienated white scientists with promises of research with no self-criticism sessions? They've already been getting the haigui back in droves for the last decade as China ceased to be an unpleasant place to be, what if they decide to actively court American talent? We've traditionally been the ones to profit from brain drains, not the other way around.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Charles Pewitt

    Singapore vs. Brazil? Which would you choose? 😉

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    Brazil for the chicks, obviously. I'll gladly put up with a bit of favela chaos, for the hot Brazilian chicks. Plus, Brazilians tend to be funny.

    Priorities, dude, priorities.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Twinkie

    , @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    I chose nothing. Much brighter, hard-working, better men are another story.

    Unfortunately, I know my own breed well enough to understand that emotional ties of national loyalty doesn't come naturally unless bred in childhood by the society around them and their parents so that it is accepted for granted as "the rules". I also know they like to talk too much.

    (The problem is that the United States under Kamala Harris is going to attempt ham-handed Chinese social control methods for anybody without any pull within the mandarinate, but far more ineptly and inconsistently. So, it'll be the worst of both worlds: a more self-destructive version of micromangerial petty authoritarianism of the PRC and all the structural dysfunction and incompetence of Brazil. Complete, of course, with Brazil's socioeconomic structure.)

    >You are going to wish for the good old days of Detroit.

    The touristy pacified favelas in Zona Sul are safer than anywhere in Detroit with the possible exception of downtown/midtown, and that's a pretty recent development. That's not saying much, but that is still something embarrassing.

    The ones up north... yeah, better comparison.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  53. @Twinkie
    @SIMP simp


    germans figuring out how to make industrial machinery that didn’t need an educated workforce to operate them
     
    Yes, and educated and technically-capable GERMANS make and service that machinery.

    iPhones and iPads may allow idiots to use easy apps and, yes, it doesn't take many "techies" to program apps, but someone needs to make and service the machinery that builds the iPhones and iPads if not the actual products.

    There is always going to be a need for a trained and technically-proficient workforce in a society that relies on sophisticated machinery. You can't make the cloud do everything.

    Replies: @SIMP simp

    Sure, but the ratio of smart/stupid that you need now is different from what it was in the old factories.

    • Agree: Twinkie
  54. @Twinkie
    @nebulafox

    Singapore vs. Brazil? Which would you choose? ;)

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @nebulafox

    Brazil for the chicks, obviously. I’ll gladly put up with a bit of favela chaos, for the hot Brazilian chicks. Plus, Brazilians tend to be funny.

    Priorities, dude, priorities.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Best Bikini Butts in the World. I understand they even have different categories and styles of derrières, depending on what part of the country the girls come from. It's like the Brazilian version of Indian subcontinental family tribes and castes, only it's girls' butts.

    , @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    I’ll gladly put up with a bit of favela chaos
     
    You are going to wish for the good old days of Detroit.

    Priorities, dude, priorities.
     
    I’m married with children.

    Brazil for the chicks, obviously.
     
    Brazilian girls are highly overrated in looks. In the north, you see a lot of obese black girls and, even in the south, ones who look like Gisele Bündchen are rare. And they are pretty promiscuous, as anyone who has had Brazilian au pairs can attest (as soon as the work hours are over, they are known to hit the meat markets).

    By the way, I wasn’t comparing actual Singapore with Brazil. I was referring to the choice posited by Nebulafox - a richer, more orderly (if authoritarian) China vs. Brazil North that the U.S. might become.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  55. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    Brazil for the chicks, obviously. I'll gladly put up with a bit of favela chaos, for the hot Brazilian chicks. Plus, Brazilians tend to be funny.

    Priorities, dude, priorities.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Twinkie

    Best Bikini Butts in the World. I understand they even have different categories and styles of derrières, depending on what part of the country the girls come from. It’s like the Brazilian version of Indian subcontinental family tribes and castes, only it’s girls’ butts.

  56. @Buzz Mohawk
    @LondonBob

    While I tend to agree with this theme of our current whatever-you-want-to-call-it declining, I must tell you that I have observed it for half a century now. This idea of America as the crumbling Roman empire, or whichever past thing you want, was indeed prevalent when I was coming of age fifty years ago.

    Now, is fifty years enough to quash an idea as never coming to fruition?

    Replies: @dfordoom, @LondonBob

    There is a lot of ruin in a nation but I think folks who thought things were bad in the sixties would be shocked at how bad things are now. I guess many of those predicting doom were looking in to the future, that future has now arrived.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    @LondonBob

    Yes, Bob, I think you are right. Salutations from across the pond, my friend.

  57. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    Brazil for the chicks, obviously. I'll gladly put up with a bit of favela chaos, for the hot Brazilian chicks. Plus, Brazilians tend to be funny.

    Priorities, dude, priorities.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @Twinkie

    I’ll gladly put up with a bit of favela chaos

    You are going to wish for the good old days of Detroit.

    Priorities, dude, priorities.

    I’m married with children.

    Brazil for the chicks, obviously.

    Brazilian girls are highly overrated in looks. In the north, you see a lot of obese black girls and, even in the south, ones who look like Gisele Bündchen are rare. And they are pretty promiscuous, as anyone who has had Brazilian au pairs can attest (as soon as the work hours are over, they are known to hit the meat markets).

    By the way, I wasn’t comparing actual Singapore with Brazil. I was referring to the choice posited by Nebulafox – a richer, more orderly (if authoritarian) China vs. Brazil North that the U.S. might become.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    Yes I know, you were being more sensible, and I'm quite sure that your view is more astute. I was just having a laugh.

    The thing is, all the Brazilians I know are the hot chicks and the kooky intellectuals (who really are very funny), and a few hot chicks who are also intellectuals; and I'm lucky enough that I don't have to put up with the favela nonsense (although I have a terrifying story about an old friend who did -- it's so disturbing, I've never been quite sure why he hasn't written a novel about it, a guaranteed best-seller).

    I'm sure that in the aggregate you're right, but for some of us, the Internet is just a form of entertainment and not a debate at the Oxford Union.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  58. @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    I’ll gladly put up with a bit of favela chaos
     
    You are going to wish for the good old days of Detroit.

    Priorities, dude, priorities.
     
    I’m married with children.

    Brazil for the chicks, obviously.
     
    Brazilian girls are highly overrated in looks. In the north, you see a lot of obese black girls and, even in the south, ones who look like Gisele Bündchen are rare. And they are pretty promiscuous, as anyone who has had Brazilian au pairs can attest (as soon as the work hours are over, they are known to hit the meat markets).

    By the way, I wasn’t comparing actual Singapore with Brazil. I was referring to the choice posited by Nebulafox - a richer, more orderly (if authoritarian) China vs. Brazil North that the U.S. might become.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Yes I know, you were being more sensible, and I’m quite sure that your view is more astute. I was just having a laugh.

    The thing is, all the Brazilians I know are the hot chicks and the kooky intellectuals (who really are very funny), and a few hot chicks who are also intellectuals; and I’m lucky enough that I don’t have to put up with the favela nonsense (although I have a terrifying story about an old friend who did — it’s so disturbing, I’ve never been quite sure why he hasn’t written a novel about it, a guaranteed best-seller).

    I’m sure that in the aggregate you’re right, but for some of us, the Internet is just a form of entertainment and not a debate at the Oxford Union.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    all the Brazilians I know
     
    How many Brazilians do you know?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  59. @LondonBob
    @Buzz Mohawk

    There is a lot of ruin in a nation but I think folks who thought things were bad in the sixties would be shocked at how bad things are now. I guess many of those predicting doom were looking in to the future, that future has now arrived.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Yes, Bob, I think you are right. Salutations from across the pond, my friend.

  60. @Twinkie
    @nebulafox

    Singapore vs. Brazil? Which would you choose? ;)

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @nebulafox

    I chose nothing. Much brighter, hard-working, better men are another story.

    Unfortunately, I know my own breed well enough to understand that emotional ties of national loyalty doesn’t come naturally unless bred in childhood by the society around them and their parents so that it is accepted for granted as “the rules”. I also know they like to talk too much.

    (The problem is that the United States under Kamala Harris is going to attempt ham-handed Chinese social control methods for anybody without any pull within the mandarinate, but far more ineptly and inconsistently. So, it’ll be the worst of both worlds: a more self-destructive version of micromangerial petty authoritarianism of the PRC and all the structural dysfunction and incompetence of Brazil. Complete, of course, with Brazil’s socioeconomic structure.)

    >You are going to wish for the good old days of Detroit.

    The touristy pacified favelas in Zona Sul are safer than anywhere in Detroit with the possible exception of downtown/midtown, and that’s a pretty recent development. That’s not saying much, but that is still something embarrassing.

    The ones up north… yeah, better comparison.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @nebulafox


    my own breed
     
    What breed is that?
  61. @Buzz Mohawk
    @TomSchmidt

    I just want to say three words to you: thorium-based nuclear power.

    And yes, a hyphenated word counts as one.

    Replies: @TomSchmidt

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thorium-based_nuclear_power

    I don’t see any working ones producing commerical power in there. Though IEEE tells me there are smaller, modular nukes that don’t face the problem of Fukushima meltdown on the way, though not thorium based.

    The other thing that oil provided to us, for a while, was exponentially-growing supplies of power, as we climbed the S-curve of production. That exponential growth offset the exponentially-growing claim on real assets represented by fiat currency loans with interest. Once the S-curve of production went linear, and then logarithmic in growth, we could no longer pay off interest with hydrocarbons.

    Now, it’s possible we COULD get exponentially-growing nuclear power and use that growth to offset the exponentially-growing claims of fiat currency. But we don’t have thorium power now, and we aren’t learning how to grow it exponentially. If we don’t get that going, and soon, then the processes of entropy in our civilization will consume more and more of the available energy; the unpayable debt will strangle more people and prevent more births of unaffordable children.

  62. @nebulafox
    @dfordoom

    > They became steadily more decadent and more corrupt and more vicious and weaker but they had their army and no outside power was strong enough to deliver the fatal blow

    I'm not sure about decadence and weakness: if anything, Rome grew a lot more conservative during the 3rd Century when, in many ways, classical Rome as we think of it ended, and Rome did have genuine periods of recovery along with the decline. It was the coherent, centralized bureaucracy that ensured the survival of the Roman state.

    Nobody could have possibly predicted the combination of factors that led to the Arab conquests, which is, IMO, where classical antiquity really ends. What saved the Byzantine state from collapse then when they lost 2/3rds of their territory and 3/4ths of their wealth was that the governmental bureaucracy kept functioning behind Constantinople's impenetrable walls, albeit they underwent a complete cultural and structural overhaul to survive. The Sassanids make a good comparison point: when the Arabs overran Mesopotamia and headed toward the ancestral Iranian heartland, local power brokers began to cut deals with the Arabs because the central government could no longer command loyalty. It's also crucial to note that both big powers were suffering from the demographic fallout of bubonic plague on top of war. The pandemics hit the Arabs less hard because rats don't like the sparsely populated desert. Again: not much to do with Gibbonian morality arguments.

    (It's not hard to see why the Qu'ran sounds so apocalyptic: these were *not* fun times. Considering the world's end at hand was a logical response to the realities of the early 7th Century. I'm more amazed that the Roman state survived on the Bosporus in any form than looking at why classical antiquity fell.)

    > It will become gradually more totalitarian, more corrupt, more decadent, more infantile, more vicious.

    I think the wannabe micromanagerial totalitarians are going to push too far eventually. The only question is how much damage they do before they get there. And an outside power directly attacking American soil is pretty much the only way I can see the possibility of instant societal cohesion. I don't think America's rivals would be that stupid.

    I'm much more concerned about softer stuff. What if China decides to court alienated white scientists with promises of research with no self-criticism sessions? They've already been getting the haigui back in droves for the last decade as China ceased to be an unpleasant place to be, what if they decide to actively court American talent? We've traditionally been the ones to profit from brain drains, not the other way around.

    Replies: @Twinkie, @Charles Pewitt

    Mr. Nebulafox says:

    I’m much more concerned about softer stuff. What if China decides to court alienated white scientists with promises of research with no self-criticism sessions? They’ve already been getting the haigui back in droves for the last decade as China ceased to be an unpleasant place to be, what if they decide to actively court American talent? We’ve traditionally been the ones to profit from brain drains, not the other way around.

    I say:

    The FBI nudged a bit towards the New York Times and the New York Times wrote about a guy from Harvard who was getting big smack from the Chinese Communist Party for this or that but they distracted me away from that vital information by telling me the Harvard guy was a champion giant pumpkin grower who could grow some big ass pumpkins for sure. Like a largemouth bass drawn towards a Jitterbug lure, I got pulled in by the pumpkin angle.

    Why be interested in Jewish Harvard guys with big brains and potentially dangerous knowledge about very scary stuff when I can think of all the delicious pumpkin pies the guy could make with those giant pumpkins even though somebody said the giant ones ain’t so so grand to eat or bake with.

    All this set-up about the Chinese Communist Party to say don’t vote for the evil and immoral Republican Party because the evil and immoral Republican Party is stuffed to the rafters with guys like Mitch McConnell who have crawled into bed with the Chinese Communist Party because McConnell married a woman who has direct and clear ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

    DO NOT VOTE FOR THE TREASONOUS REPUBLICAN PARTY ON NOVEMBER 3

    Mitch McConnell also voted for Ronald Reagan’s 1986 AMNESTY for illegal alien invaders. I think McConnell was in the US House at the time, but I ain’t googling it.

    The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate and Mitch McConnell have crawled into bed with the Chinese Communist Party and the Democrat Party and the Clinton Organized Crime Syndicate have also flopped into globalizer collusion with the Chinese Communist Party.

    Who is this frigging “we” that has profited from the importation of high IQ foreigners into the USA?

    Some guys got brains and money and no damn sense of patriotism or love of country and they talk about this “we” crap when they mean “my” and they ain’t got no appeal to those of us trying to advance the interests of the historic American nation and every White Core American regardless of whether or not they have seen their personal wealth balloon out to gigantic size by globalization and asset bubbles and monetary extremism and the importation of cheap labor and the like.

    I don’t mean to be overly contentious, Mr. Nebulafox, but a little bit of populist fury and irascibility will be needed to fend off the donor-controlled whores such as Teddy “Goldman Sachs Hubby” Cruz after Trump and the Republican Party get electorally wiped out on November 3.

    Whites Without College Degrees want fiery retaliatory rhetoric and they don’t want to hear no political leader suggesting that any and all financial gains made by greedy upper middle class Whites and greedy plutocrat Whites because of globalization and the mass importation of foreigners has been good for this so-called “we” person.

    Government workers like to talk about how “we” are the ones to represent the USA when they are only functionaries of the government and their actions oftentimes are highly detrimental to the safety and security and sovereignty of the USA.

    Teddy Cruz and Tommy Cotton and Josh Hawley and Marco Rubio and the other Republican Party donor whores are weak cowards who will fold in a debate and I can’t wait till after November 3.

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    @Charles Pewitt

    The FBI nudged a bit towards the New York Times and the New York Times wrote about a guy from Harvard who was getting big smack from the Chinese Communist Party for this or that but they distracted me away from that vital information by telling me the Harvard guy was a champion giant pumpkin grower who could grow some big ass pumpkins for sure. Like a largemouth bass drawn towards a Jitterbug lure, I got pulled in by the pumpkin angle.

    I should've written big SMACKERS instead of big smack.

    This rotting and corrupt American Empire has provided people with the grotesue gumption to give the pleasant and simple word smack more unpleasant connotations -- besides money or dollars -- than you can shake a graphite fishing pole ugly stick at.

  63. @Charles Pewitt
    @nebulafox

    Mr. Nebulafox says:

    I’m much more concerned about softer stuff. What if China decides to court alienated white scientists with promises of research with no self-criticism sessions? They’ve already been getting the haigui back in droves for the last decade as China ceased to be an unpleasant place to be, what if they decide to actively court American talent? We’ve traditionally been the ones to profit from brain drains, not the other way around.

    I say:

    The FBI nudged a bit towards the New York Times and the New York Times wrote about a guy from Harvard who was getting big smack from the Chinese Communist Party for this or that but they distracted me away from that vital information by telling me the Harvard guy was a champion giant pumpkin grower who could grow some big ass pumpkins for sure. Like a largemouth bass drawn towards a Jitterbug lure, I got pulled in by the pumpkin angle.

    Why be interested in Jewish Harvard guys with big brains and potentially dangerous knowledge about very scary stuff when I can think of all the delicious pumpkin pies the guy could make with those giant pumpkins even though somebody said the giant ones ain't so so grand to eat or bake with.

    All this set-up about the Chinese Communist Party to say don't vote for the evil and immoral Republican Party because the evil and immoral Republican Party is stuffed to the rafters with guys like Mitch McConnell who have crawled into bed with the Chinese Communist Party because McConnell married a woman who has direct and clear ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

    DO NOT VOTE FOR THE TREASONOUS REPUBLICAN PARTY ON NOVEMBER 3

    Mitch McConnell also voted for Ronald Reagan's 1986 AMNESTY for illegal alien invaders. I think McConnell was in the US House at the time, but I ain't googling it.

    The Bush Organized Crime Syndicate and Mitch McConnell have crawled into bed with the Chinese Communist Party and the Democrat Party and the Clinton Organized Crime Syndicate have also flopped into globalizer collusion with the Chinese Communist Party.

    Who is this frigging "we" that has profited from the importation of high IQ foreigners into the USA?

    Some guys got brains and money and no damn sense of patriotism or love of country and they talk about this "we" crap when they mean "my" and they ain't got no appeal to those of us trying to advance the interests of the historic American nation and every White Core American regardless of whether or not they have seen their personal wealth balloon out to gigantic size by globalization and asset bubbles and monetary extremism and the importation of cheap labor and the like.

    I don't mean to be overly contentious, Mr. Nebulafox, but a little bit of populist fury and irascibility will be needed to fend off the donor-controlled whores such as Teddy "Goldman Sachs Hubby" Cruz after Trump and the Republican Party get electorally wiped out on November 3.

    Whites Without College Degrees want fiery retaliatory rhetoric and they don't want to hear no political leader suggesting that any and all financial gains made by greedy upper middle class Whites and greedy plutocrat Whites because of globalization and the mass importation of foreigners has been good for this so-called "we" person.

    Government workers like to talk about how "we" are the ones to represent the USA when they are only functionaries of the government and their actions oftentimes are highly detrimental to the safety and security and sovereignty of the USA.

    Teddy Cruz and Tommy Cotton and Josh Hawley and Marco Rubio and the other Republican Party donor whores are weak cowards who will fold in a debate and I can't wait till after November 3.

    Replies: @Charles Pewitt

    The FBI nudged a bit towards the New York Times and the New York Times wrote about a guy from Harvard who was getting big smack from the Chinese Communist Party for this or that but they distracted me away from that vital information by telling me the Harvard guy was a champion giant pumpkin grower who could grow some big ass pumpkins for sure. Like a largemouth bass drawn towards a Jitterbug lure, I got pulled in by the pumpkin angle.

    I should’ve written big SMACKERS instead of big smack.

    This rotting and corrupt American Empire has provided people with the grotesue gumption to give the pleasant and simple word smack more unpleasant connotations — besides money or dollars — than you can shake a graphite fishing pole ugly stick at.

  64. @nebulafox
    @Twinkie

    I chose nothing. Much brighter, hard-working, better men are another story.

    Unfortunately, I know my own breed well enough to understand that emotional ties of national loyalty doesn't come naturally unless bred in childhood by the society around them and their parents so that it is accepted for granted as "the rules". I also know they like to talk too much.

    (The problem is that the United States under Kamala Harris is going to attempt ham-handed Chinese social control methods for anybody without any pull within the mandarinate, but far more ineptly and inconsistently. So, it'll be the worst of both worlds: a more self-destructive version of micromangerial petty authoritarianism of the PRC and all the structural dysfunction and incompetence of Brazil. Complete, of course, with Brazil's socioeconomic structure.)

    >You are going to wish for the good old days of Detroit.

    The touristy pacified favelas in Zona Sul are safer than anywhere in Detroit with the possible exception of downtown/midtown, and that's a pretty recent development. That's not saying much, but that is still something embarrassing.

    The ones up north... yeah, better comparison.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    my own breed

    What breed is that?

  65. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    Yes I know, you were being more sensible, and I'm quite sure that your view is more astute. I was just having a laugh.

    The thing is, all the Brazilians I know are the hot chicks and the kooky intellectuals (who really are very funny), and a few hot chicks who are also intellectuals; and I'm lucky enough that I don't have to put up with the favela nonsense (although I have a terrifying story about an old friend who did -- it's so disturbing, I've never been quite sure why he hasn't written a novel about it, a guaranteed best-seller).

    I'm sure that in the aggregate you're right, but for some of us, the Internet is just a form of entertainment and not a debate at the Oxford Union.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    all the Brazilians I know

    How many Brazilians do you know?

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    "How many Brazilians do you know?"

    Quite a lot, over the years; but, Latin American intellectuals, more broadly speaking, many of whom shift around throughout that world, so it was mostly Brazilians, Argentines, Chileans and Mexicans of the high-caste DF type, many of whom consider themselves all-of-the-above, the way a Dutch-Irish-Franco-Italian mongrel might just say "European." And a bunch of very friendly, educated, articulate Brazilian strippers. The best kind of strippers in the world. I'm not the least bit Hispanic myself (unless you count the Celtiberian Milesians as Spanisrds, which I do); I was a Borges specialista, and for a time I inhabited a kind of enchanted world similar to Bolano's "The Savage Detectives," or some bizarre fantasy out of Garcia Lorca.

    But for all that, I never properly learned to speak Spanish or Portuguese. Which is too bad, they're marvelous; I sort of know those languages in a kind of bad, amateurish Lego/IKEA sideways capacity, I can kinda-sorta read them, but I can't speak or understand them with any sort of competence.

    Replies: @Twinkie

  66. @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    all the Brazilians I know
     
    How many Brazilians do you know?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “How many Brazilians do you know?”

    Quite a lot, over the years; but, Latin American intellectuals, more broadly speaking, many of whom shift around throughout that world, so it was mostly Brazilians, Argentines, Chileans and Mexicans of the high-caste DF type, many of whom consider themselves all-of-the-above, the way a Dutch-Irish-Franco-Italian mongrel might just say “European.” And a bunch of very friendly, educated, articulate Brazilian strippers. The best kind of strippers in the world. I’m not the least bit Hispanic myself (unless you count the Celtiberian Milesians as Spanisrds, which I do); I was a Borges specialista, and for a time I inhabited a kind of enchanted world similar to Bolano’s “The Savage Detectives,” or some bizarre fantasy out of Garcia Lorca.

    But for all that, I never properly learned to speak Spanish or Portuguese. Which is too bad, they’re marvelous; I sort of know those languages in a kind of bad, amateurish Lego/IKEA sideways capacity, I can kinda-sorta read them, but I can’t speak or understand them with any sort of competence.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    Quite a lot
     
    I don't know how many that is.

    Portuguese
     
    To me, Brazilian Portuguese sounds like Spanish being spoken by a French person (without the harshness of Castilian Spanish). I think it's a pretty language.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @The Germ Theory of Disease

  67. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    "How many Brazilians do you know?"

    Quite a lot, over the years; but, Latin American intellectuals, more broadly speaking, many of whom shift around throughout that world, so it was mostly Brazilians, Argentines, Chileans and Mexicans of the high-caste DF type, many of whom consider themselves all-of-the-above, the way a Dutch-Irish-Franco-Italian mongrel might just say "European." And a bunch of very friendly, educated, articulate Brazilian strippers. The best kind of strippers in the world. I'm not the least bit Hispanic myself (unless you count the Celtiberian Milesians as Spanisrds, which I do); I was a Borges specialista, and for a time I inhabited a kind of enchanted world similar to Bolano's "The Savage Detectives," or some bizarre fantasy out of Garcia Lorca.

    But for all that, I never properly learned to speak Spanish or Portuguese. Which is too bad, they're marvelous; I sort of know those languages in a kind of bad, amateurish Lego/IKEA sideways capacity, I can kinda-sorta read them, but I can't speak or understand them with any sort of competence.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Quite a lot

    I don’t know how many that is.

    Portuguese

    To me, Brazilian Portuguese sounds like Spanish being spoken by a French person (without the harshness of Castilian Spanish). I think it’s a pretty language.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    "I don't know how many that is."

    There is a surprisingly large number of things you don't know.

    If you begin the project of trying to tabulate what you don't know, you'll be a very busy man for the rest of your life. (This is of course true about all of us, but since you were silly enough to bring it up...)

    Also, just out of old-style Brooklyn orneriness... why on earth do you care how many Brazilians I know?

    Replies: @Twinkie

    , @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    "I don't know how many that is."

    Well, it's a shame you at least didn't get to know all the Brazilian strippers I knew. They were a hoot, they were very smart and friendly, and they constantly invited me back to their after-parties. Thankfully I was wise enough to never try and date any of them or hit on them; they were just sharp, grand, good company. And smarter than most of the law students in my circle.

  68. @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    Quite a lot
     
    I don't know how many that is.

    Portuguese
     
    To me, Brazilian Portuguese sounds like Spanish being spoken by a French person (without the harshness of Castilian Spanish). I think it's a pretty language.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “I don’t know how many that is.”

    There is a surprisingly large number of things you don’t know.

    If you begin the project of trying to tabulate what you don’t know, you’ll be a very busy man for the rest of your life. (This is of course true about all of us, but since you were silly enough to bring it up…)

    Also, just out of old-style Brooklyn orneriness… why on earth do you care how many Brazilians I know?

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I am having a conversation with you. You wrote that "all the Brazilians I know are the hot chicks and the kooky intellectuals." That struck me as an unusual statement, so I wanted to know to what number you were referring when you wrote "all the Brazilians [you] know."

    I was curious about your "sampling size," if you will. It was no more than that.

    Obviously, you don't have to tell me. In that case, just tell me you don't want to tell me. There is no need for multiple comments/paragraphs in response or writing oddly derisive statements such as "There is a surprisingly large number of things you don’t know" and "since you were silly enough to bring it up."

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  69. @Jay Fink
    "Jay Fink, the least stereotypically Jewish Jew one may ever come across".

    My thoughts and opinions are so different from typical Jews that I actually wondered if I really am genetically Jewish. I know there are some Jewish Republicans but they are usually the neocon type, which I oppose as much as Democrats. Plus I don't look like a stereotypical Jew as I have blue eyes and light features.

    It probably sounds like I am self-hating but I'm not. Other than their liberalism, I have a generally high opinion of Jews. So anyway I ordered a genetic test and I was somewhat surprised that I am indeed 99% Ashkenazi (and 1% undefined European).

    Replies: @SFG

    I’m pretty stereotypical (worrier, bookish, cheap), just not in my politics.

    I think a lot of it came from growing up in NYC during the Koch/Dinkins era. I knew what criminals looked like, and was angry they wouldn’t do anything about it. Then Rudy Giuliani came in and cleaned up the city (I know, it was really Bratton), and things got visibly better. Dude was my hero as a teenager. (The years have not been kind.) I basically learned that liberals were ineffectual and/or dishonest.

    That and my dad buying the Bell Curve during my early teens. 😉

    Also my folks were a mixed marriage, so I didn’t grow up hating Christians.

  70. @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    Quite a lot
     
    I don't know how many that is.

    Portuguese
     
    To me, Brazilian Portuguese sounds like Spanish being spoken by a French person (without the harshness of Castilian Spanish). I think it's a pretty language.

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease, @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “I don’t know how many that is.”

    Well, it’s a shame you at least didn’t get to know all the Brazilian strippers I knew. They were a hoot, they were very smart and friendly, and they constantly invited me back to their after-parties. Thankfully I was wise enough to never try and date any of them or hit on them; they were just sharp, grand, good company. And smarter than most of the law students in my circle.

  71. What you need is straight up fiscal stimulus, as in Yang money. Printing money doesn’t work. Printing money and putting it into the hands of under-shirted beer-suckers to spend on smokes and lottery tickets is what its gonna take to make America Great Again.

    If Trump had any sense (I know–big if), in July he should have gotten the chuckleheads in Congress to pass temporary Yang bucks–$1200 a month to all adult American citizens until 2021. He’d be 66 to 33 in the polls by now. How could the Democrats oppose it? What could Biden do, promise $2400?

    But the deficits. . . no idiot, successful governments and successful businesses don’t pay off their debts, they grow and then take on more debt and refinance the old debt. But inflation. . . well, certainly at some point but we are in a severe recession right now. A little inflation would be a good thing, it would give the Central Bank something useful to do for a change.

    The money that did get sloshed into the economy in the stimulus got used by a lot of consumers to pay off consumer debts and invest in car repairs and other economically useful things. The focus needs to be reducing the level of private, especially consumer, debt. If the Fed wants to do something useful, instead of buying frickin’ junk bonds, buy all the student loans from the lenders and then write them off or change the lending terms so they don’t extract so much blood.

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    @Tulip

    If the Fed wants to do something useful, instead of buying frickin’ junk bonds, buy all the student loans from the lenders and then write them off or change the lending terms so they don’t extract so much blood.

    I say:

    I got close to this bit about the student loans and the Fed and I tied it into the mortgage-backed securities bullshit that the Fed got neck deep in to save the bacon of all those banker wanker bastards a while back.

    I wrote this in 2014 about student loans and the Fed:


    NH Sen. Jeanne Shaheen is currently crushing the aspirations of the young by chaining a student loan millstone around their necks.

     


    Shaheen is a multi-millionaire who lives in a demographically traditional New Hampshire town. Sometimes, Shaheen scoots out to billionaires' homes to grab more cash for herself. She recently headed out to San Francisco, and not to do a Labor Day weekend show. Shaheen was at the San Francisco home of billionaire Tom Steyer, in an effort to gather more money.

     


    Shaheen likes to play the concerned politician when it comes to talking about the economy-crunching calamity of student loan debt. Shaheen knows that the average student loan debt load for New Hampshire students is $33,000.

     


    Shaheen knows that total U.S. student loan debt is now over $1 trillion dollars. Shaheen has eyes to see just like you and me. Everybody aware of financial basics could see that when student loan debt passed auto loans and credit card debt, the resulting economy of the U.S. would be in bad shape for the future. Affordable family formation is being crowded out by young people having such massive student loan debt burdens.

     


    Shaheen has nothing but micro-solutions to the student loan debt bomb about to detonate in the U.S. Shaheen is not dumb, she can see the student loan demographic dilemma just as well as any Pew Research Center egghead.

     


    Shaheen likes to pal around with Goldman Sachs billionaire "global warming" enthusiast Tom Steyer. Shaheen can also be found canoodling with new Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Janet Yellen.

     


    Billionaires currently have too much power in the U.S. Fed boss Yellen has the power to conjure dollars out of thin air. Somethings got to give in regard to student loan debt burdens.

     


    Shaheen should tell her new gal pal Yellen to purchase the $1 trillion dollar plus outstanding student loan debt. The Federal Reserve Bank has already stacked up $4 or $5 trillion dollars worth of toxic paper from its member banks.

     


    There was no market for the toxic sludge mortgage backed securities the Federal Reserve Bank has recently acquired. The Fed made the market. There has been, of course, more of a market for the U.S. Treasury securities(bonds) that the Fed has purchased, claiming the conjured loot helped the financing of various assets -- stocks, bonds, real estate. Most honest onlookers would say the Fed just re-inflated previously collapsed asset bubbles.

     


    Shaheen has done nothing of real import to stop student loan debt from imploding the economy of New Hampshire and the U.S. Shaheen knows that Tom Steyer's old stomping grounds at Goldman Sachs would have been financially obliterated if the Goldman Sachs counter-party AIG was not bailed out by the Federal Reserve Bank. When the Fed handed out all the conjured-up, printed-up loot to AIG, it was really to bail out all the plutocrat scoundrels at Goldman Sachs.

     


    Shaheen is a crafty, canny politician. Shaheen might be considered a political leader if she offered more than ineffectual political boilerplate to the student loan demographic disaster hitting New Hampshire and the U.S.

     

    https://patch.com/new-hampshire/concord-nh/shaheen-crucifies-young-on-a-cross-of-student-loan-debt

    Tweet from 2014:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/529700084540121089?s=20
  72. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    "I don't know how many that is."

    There is a surprisingly large number of things you don't know.

    If you begin the project of trying to tabulate what you don't know, you'll be a very busy man for the rest of your life. (This is of course true about all of us, but since you were silly enough to bring it up...)

    Also, just out of old-style Brooklyn orneriness... why on earth do you care how many Brazilians I know?

    Replies: @Twinkie

    I am having a conversation with you. You wrote that “all the Brazilians I know are the hot chicks and the kooky intellectuals.” That struck me as an unusual statement, so I wanted to know to what number you were referring when you wrote “all the Brazilians [you] know.”

    I was curious about your “sampling size,” if you will. It was no more than that.

    Obviously, you don’t have to tell me. In that case, just tell me you don’t want to tell me. There is no need for multiple comments/paragraphs in response or writing oddly derisive statements such as “There is a surprisingly large number of things you don’t know” and “since you were silly enough to bring it up.”

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    OK that's fair. I always respect someone who returns to the grounding value of conversation as conversation. So much of the Internet is a bizarre shouting match and screaming festival, it is good to be reminded of the pleasures and importance of civil discourse.

    But I did try to explain: my acquaintance with Brazilians comes in two parts: Latin American literary intellectuals, and also for some odd inexplicable reason, this weird little social circle of very hot, very smart and charming Brazilian strippers who invited me into their personal lives, but not their romantic or sexual lives. We were sort of mutual "talking dogs" to one another: they were extremely sexy foreign chicks who were surprised that a nerd like me was fascinating company, and I was surprised that a bunch of Latin sex goddesses were actually among the smartest people I knew.

    As to real numbers, since you asked, that's a blur. It was an earlier weirder part of my life, people were constantly coming and going, I'll say, Fewer than a hundred, and more than a dozen.

    "It's like a locomotive on the march,
    The season of distress and clarity.
    But no more fountains and no more rain,
    And the stores stay open terribly late."
    -- Frank O'Hara

    Replies: @Twinkie

  73. @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    I am having a conversation with you. You wrote that "all the Brazilians I know are the hot chicks and the kooky intellectuals." That struck me as an unusual statement, so I wanted to know to what number you were referring when you wrote "all the Brazilians [you] know."

    I was curious about your "sampling size," if you will. It was no more than that.

    Obviously, you don't have to tell me. In that case, just tell me you don't want to tell me. There is no need for multiple comments/paragraphs in response or writing oddly derisive statements such as "There is a surprisingly large number of things you don’t know" and "since you were silly enough to bring it up."

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    OK that’s fair. I always respect someone who returns to the grounding value of conversation as conversation. So much of the Internet is a bizarre shouting match and screaming festival, it is good to be reminded of the pleasures and importance of civil discourse.

    But I did try to explain: my acquaintance with Brazilians comes in two parts: Latin American literary intellectuals, and also for some odd inexplicable reason, this weird little social circle of very hot, very smart and charming Brazilian strippers who invited me into their personal lives, but not their romantic or sexual lives. We were sort of mutual “talking dogs” to one another: they were extremely sexy foreign chicks who were surprised that a nerd like me was fascinating company, and I was surprised that a bunch of Latin sex goddesses were actually among the smartest people I knew.

    As to real numbers, since you asked, that’s a blur. It was an earlier weirder part of my life, people were constantly coming and going, I’ll say, Fewer than a hundred, and more than a dozen.

    “It’s like a locomotive on the march,
    The season of distress and clarity.
    But no more fountains and no more rain,
    And the stores stay open terribly late.”
    — Frank O’Hara

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    So much of the Internet is a bizarre shouting match and screaming festival
     
    Don't I know it. I recently had something like that with another commenter on Unz (and he was someone whose views I respected and whose comments I sought out to read previously).

    As to real numbers, since you asked, that’s a blur... Fewer than a hundred, and more than a dozen.
     
    Okay, thanks for clarifying.

    Latin American literary intellectuals, and... very hot, very smart and charming Brazilian strippers
     
    When you read that back to yourself, I am sure you would agree that sounds very extraordinary to your internet interlocutor.

    I was surprised that a bunch of Latin sex goddesses were actually among the smartest people I knew.
     
    Do you mean smart as in charming and delightful or intelligent in the conventional sense ("rocket scientist")?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

  74. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    OK that's fair. I always respect someone who returns to the grounding value of conversation as conversation. So much of the Internet is a bizarre shouting match and screaming festival, it is good to be reminded of the pleasures and importance of civil discourse.

    But I did try to explain: my acquaintance with Brazilians comes in two parts: Latin American literary intellectuals, and also for some odd inexplicable reason, this weird little social circle of very hot, very smart and charming Brazilian strippers who invited me into their personal lives, but not their romantic or sexual lives. We were sort of mutual "talking dogs" to one another: they were extremely sexy foreign chicks who were surprised that a nerd like me was fascinating company, and I was surprised that a bunch of Latin sex goddesses were actually among the smartest people I knew.

    As to real numbers, since you asked, that's a blur. It was an earlier weirder part of my life, people were constantly coming and going, I'll say, Fewer than a hundred, and more than a dozen.

    "It's like a locomotive on the march,
    The season of distress and clarity.
    But no more fountains and no more rain,
    And the stores stay open terribly late."
    -- Frank O'Hara

    Replies: @Twinkie

    So much of the Internet is a bizarre shouting match and screaming festival

    Don’t I know it. I recently had something like that with another commenter on Unz (and he was someone whose views I respected and whose comments I sought out to read previously).

    As to real numbers, since you asked, that’s a blur… Fewer than a hundred, and more than a dozen.

    Okay, thanks for clarifying.

    Latin American literary intellectuals, and… very hot, very smart and charming Brazilian strippers

    When you read that back to yourself, I am sure you would agree that sounds very extraordinary to your internet interlocutor.

    I was surprised that a bunch of Latin sex goddesses were actually among the smartest people I knew.

    Do you mean smart as in charming and delightful or intelligent in the conventional sense (“rocket scientist”)?

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    @Twinkie

    Apparently for that earlier longer comment I forgot to hit "reply" to you, so look for it because now it will technically be available to you in your timeline, otherwise it might be invisible. Cheerio.

  75. If you’re interested, I’ll try to give you the full explanation. I admit it does take a bit of explaining.

    When I was a young student at Super Prestigious University, at one point I studied with Carlos Fuentes, the ostensibly great Mexican novelist and critic. I’ll just be polite and leave it at “ostensibly.” But this put me into contact with a circle of Latin American writers and critics, some of them Brazilian, some Chilean, some Mexican etc, but they had a kind of pan-Latin consciousness and sensibility that I was to some extent sympatico with — not their dopey socialist leanings, but their conception of a different sort of style of consciousness of the Americas than what we had in the terrifying colossus of Los Estados Unidos.

    Put it this way — I’m a gringo and I don’t even speak Spanish, but I could say far more interesting things about Cesar Vallejo and Garcia Lorca than they could, and they were duly impressed, and so they let me join their gang. It was a very mutually enriching interaction, I have to say.

    Flash forward to years later: for kooky business reasons, I was sitting in an expensive “gentlemen’s club”, a fancy strip joint with good food and a minimum of tackiness. I was approached by a super-fine Brazilian stripper who I couldn’t resist, and while she did a few dances for me, we got into a deep conversation, in the course of which she got very impressed by how much I knew about Latin American literature, which she was a sophisticated student of. She invited me to an after-party when the club closed, and this private party consisted almost entirely of the community of ex-pat Brazilian strippers who worked in different clubs throughout the city, and I was one of the only men there. It was a perfectly civil affair, nothing raunchy, but all the foxy highly educated Brazilian strippers soon got interested that the nerdy white guy was so insightful about their culture. So suddenly I had a ton of Brazilian stripper friends. None of them wanted to date me, not their type, but they invited me into their social world. They were intellectuals and ex-pats who were just working in clubs for money, because it paid better than being a grad student. It was a fun time in my life that didn’t last for long, and I’d like to brag that I banged a bunch of them but that didn’t happen, I had a steady girlfriend at the time, and I wasn’t their type. But they were fun to hang around with.

    tl;dr — because I used to know Carlos Fuentes, I got to know very hot, smart Brazilian ex-pat girls who worked in dance clubs, and who were a real delight to hang around with, although none of them slept with me.

    Sort of only mildly intriguing, eh.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Thanks for the story.

  76. @Twinkie
    @The Germ Theory of Disease


    So much of the Internet is a bizarre shouting match and screaming festival
     
    Don't I know it. I recently had something like that with another commenter on Unz (and he was someone whose views I respected and whose comments I sought out to read previously).

    As to real numbers, since you asked, that’s a blur... Fewer than a hundred, and more than a dozen.
     
    Okay, thanks for clarifying.

    Latin American literary intellectuals, and... very hot, very smart and charming Brazilian strippers
     
    When you read that back to yourself, I am sure you would agree that sounds very extraordinary to your internet interlocutor.

    I was surprised that a bunch of Latin sex goddesses were actually among the smartest people I knew.
     
    Do you mean smart as in charming and delightful or intelligent in the conventional sense ("rocket scientist")?

    Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Apparently for that earlier longer comment I forgot to hit “reply” to you, so look for it because now it will technically be available to you in your timeline, otherwise it might be invisible. Cheerio.

  77. @The Germ Theory of Disease
    If you're interested, I'll try to give you the full explanation. I admit it does take a bit of explaining.

    When I was a young student at Super Prestigious University, at one point I studied with Carlos Fuentes, the ostensibly great Mexican novelist and critic. I'll just be polite and leave it at "ostensibly." But this put me into contact with a circle of Latin American writers and critics, some of them Brazilian, some Chilean, some Mexican etc, but they had a kind of pan-Latin consciousness and sensibility that I was to some extent sympatico with -- not their dopey socialist leanings, but their conception of a different sort of style of consciousness of the Americas than what we had in the terrifying colossus of Los Estados Unidos.

    Put it this way -- I'm a gringo and I don't even speak Spanish, but I could say far more interesting things about Cesar Vallejo and Garcia Lorca than they could, and they were duly impressed, and so they let me join their gang. It was a very mutually enriching interaction, I have to say.

    Flash forward to years later: for kooky business reasons, I was sitting in an expensive "gentlemen's club", a fancy strip joint with good food and a minimum of tackiness. I was approached by a super-fine Brazilian stripper who I couldn't resist, and while she did a few dances for me, we got into a deep conversation, in the course of which she got very impressed by how much I knew about Latin American literature, which she was a sophisticated student of. She invited me to an after-party when the club closed, and this private party consisted almost entirely of the community of ex-pat Brazilian strippers who worked in different clubs throughout the city, and I was one of the only men there. It was a perfectly civil affair, nothing raunchy, but all the foxy highly educated Brazilian strippers soon got interested that the nerdy white guy was so insightful about their culture. So suddenly I had a ton of Brazilian stripper friends. None of them wanted to date me, not their type, but they invited me into their social world. They were intellectuals and ex-pats who were just working in clubs for money, because it paid better than being a grad student. It was a fun time in my life that didn't last for long, and I'd like to brag that I banged a bunch of them but that didn't happen, I had a steady girlfriend at the time, and I wasn't their type. But they were fun to hang around with.

    tl;dr -- because I used to know Carlos Fuentes, I got to know very hot, smart Brazilian ex-pat girls who worked in dance clubs, and who were a real delight to hang around with, although none of them slept with me.

    Sort of only mildly intriguing, eh.

    Replies: @Twinkie

    Thanks for the story.

  78. anonymous[266] • Disclaimer says:

    A couple of initial reactions. Firstly, IQ isn’t everything. Despite what the tech executives say publicly, they want a productive workforce rather than an agitating wokeforce. That’s increasingly hard to come by domestically. Secondly, assuming India’s mean IQ to be in the low 80s and normally distributed–a questionable assumption in a country as difficult for outsiders to parse as India–there are over 30 million people in India with IQs above 110.

    India’s great success story is its IT outsourcing sector which employs 4 million people. Despite many years of predictions that rising wages will doom growth, the industry has maintained rapid growth from $50 billion in exports to $150 billion in the next few years. But I can’t think of anything else in India that is a similar success story of large scale.

  79. @Tulip
    What you need is straight up fiscal stimulus, as in Yang money. Printing money doesn't work. Printing money and putting it into the hands of under-shirted beer-suckers to spend on smokes and lottery tickets is what its gonna take to make America Great Again.

    If Trump had any sense (I know--big if), in July he should have gotten the chuckleheads in Congress to pass temporary Yang bucks--$1200 a month to all adult American citizens until 2021. He'd be 66 to 33 in the polls by now. How could the Democrats oppose it? What could Biden do, promise $2400?

    But the deficits. . . no idiot, successful governments and successful businesses don't pay off their debts, they grow and then take on more debt and refinance the old debt. But inflation. . . well, certainly at some point but we are in a severe recession right now. A little inflation would be a good thing, it would give the Central Bank something useful to do for a change.

    The money that did get sloshed into the economy in the stimulus got used by a lot of consumers to pay off consumer debts and invest in car repairs and other economically useful things. The focus needs to be reducing the level of private, especially consumer, debt. If the Fed wants to do something useful, instead of buying frickin' junk bonds, buy all the student loans from the lenders and then write them off or change the lending terms so they don't extract so much blood.

    Replies: @Charles Pewitt

    If the Fed wants to do something useful, instead of buying frickin’ junk bonds, buy all the student loans from the lenders and then write them off or change the lending terms so they don’t extract so much blood.

    I say:

    I got close to this bit about the student loans and the Fed and I tied it into the mortgage-backed securities bullshit that the Fed got neck deep in to save the bacon of all those banker wanker bastards a while back.

    I wrote this in 2014 about student loans and the Fed:

    NH Sen. Jeanne Shaheen is currently crushing the aspirations of the young by chaining a student loan millstone around their necks.

    Shaheen is a multi-millionaire who lives in a demographically traditional New Hampshire town. Sometimes, Shaheen scoots out to billionaires’ homes to grab more cash for herself. She recently headed out to San Francisco, and not to do a Labor Day weekend show. Shaheen was at the San Francisco home of billionaire Tom Steyer, in an effort to gather more money.

    Shaheen likes to play the concerned politician when it comes to talking about the economy-crunching calamity of student loan debt. Shaheen knows that the average student loan debt load for New Hampshire students is $33,000.

    Shaheen knows that total U.S. student loan debt is now over $1 trillion dollars. Shaheen has eyes to see just like you and me. Everybody aware of financial basics could see that when student loan debt passed auto loans and credit card debt, the resulting economy of the U.S. would be in bad shape for the future. Affordable family formation is being crowded out by young people having such massive student loan debt burdens.

    Shaheen has nothing but micro-solutions to the student loan debt bomb about to detonate in the U.S. Shaheen is not dumb, she can see the student loan demographic dilemma just as well as any Pew Research Center egghead.

    Shaheen likes to pal around with Goldman Sachs billionaire “global warming” enthusiast Tom Steyer. Shaheen can also be found canoodling with new Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Janet Yellen.

    Billionaires currently have too much power in the U.S. Fed boss Yellen has the power to conjure dollars out of thin air. Somethings got to give in regard to student loan debt burdens.

    Shaheen should tell her new gal pal Yellen to purchase the $1 trillion dollar plus outstanding student loan debt. The Federal Reserve Bank has already stacked up $4 or $5 trillion dollars worth of toxic paper from its member banks.

    There was no market for the toxic sludge mortgage backed securities the Federal Reserve Bank has recently acquired. The Fed made the market. There has been, of course, more of a market for the U.S. Treasury securities(bonds) that the Fed has purchased, claiming the conjured loot helped the financing of various assets — stocks, bonds, real estate. Most honest onlookers would say the Fed just re-inflated previously collapsed asset bubbles.

    Shaheen has done nothing of real import to stop student loan debt from imploding the economy of New Hampshire and the U.S. Shaheen knows that Tom Steyer’s old stomping grounds at Goldman Sachs would have been financially obliterated if the Goldman Sachs counter-party AIG was not bailed out by the Federal Reserve Bank. When the Fed handed out all the conjured-up, printed-up loot to AIG, it was really to bail out all the plutocrat scoundrels at Goldman Sachs.

    Shaheen is a crafty, canny politician. Shaheen might be considered a political leader if she offered more than ineffectual political boilerplate to the student loan demographic disaster hitting New Hampshire and the U.S.

    https://patch.com/new-hampshire/concord-nh/shaheen-crucifies-young-on-a-cross-of-student-loan-debt

    Tweet from 2014:

  80. Partition Illinois?

    Partition Debt Repayment Obligations

    Sovereign Debt Secessionism

    Debt Jubilee

    Electronically Conjured Up Cash For You And Me

    Take The Hundreds Of Trillions Of Dollars Of Unfunded Liabilities Of All Levels Of Government And Partition Them To Hell!

  81. @TomSchmidt
    @Twinkie

    We burned through all the easy hydrocarbons to allow ourselves to escape the Malthusian trap. They're gone, and they're gone forever. There remain plenty of hydrocarbons, but they require capital and tremendous skill to extract.

    Using the wealth created by exploiting fossil fuels, we have learned a lot, including how to make electricity from the sun and win, pretty efficiently. But this knowledge requires maintenance; you can see from modern universities with their publish or perish culture how incentivized anyone in them is to pass along knowledge.

    If we lose this knowledge, and collapse back to an agrarian society, we will NEVER regain it, since the materials to escape a future Malthusian trap will not exist: we burned them all.

    Teach your children well.

    Replies: @Buzz Mohawk, @The Alarmist, @Sparkon

    We burned through all the easy hydrocarbons to allow ourselves to escape the Malthusian trap. They’re gone, and they’re gone forever. There remain plenty of hydrocarbons, but they require capital and tremendous skill to extract.

    This is complete nonsense. Almost every country in the world has proven coal reserves. By some estimates, there is enough coal to last for several centuries.

    Coal reserves are available in almost every country worldwide, with recoverable reserves in around 70 countries. The biggest reserves are in the USA, Russia, China, Australia, and India.

    There are an estimated 1.1 trillion tonnes of proven coal reserves worldwide. This means that there is enough coal to last us around 150 years at current rates of production. In contrast, proven oil and gas reserves are equivalent to around 50 and 52 years at current production levels.

    https://www.worldcoal.org/coal/where-coal-found

    Don’t teach your children nonsense.

    • Agree: iffen

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