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Prof. Victoria Bissell Brown's Dad Starred in "I Was a Teenage Werewolf"
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Victoria Bissell Brown, retired Grinnell history professor and author of Washington Post op-ed “Thanks for not raping us, all you ‘good men.’ But it’s not enough,” is almost certainly the daughter of the late character actor Whit Bissell (1909-1996). Most references to him mention that one of his daughters is named “Victoria Brown” and her Facebook page says she grew up in Santa Monica.

Whit Bissell was a WASP blueblood and yachtsman, son of a prominent NYC surgeon, who went on to do many supporting roles as white male professional authority figures in sci-fi and horror movies and TV shows.

Basically, he made a nice living playing men like his father, the surgeon. For example, he was the commanding officer on the TV show The Time Tunnel, which was a favorite of mine about 50 years ago.

He had a lot of real life command presence as well, being a leader in the Screen Actors Guild and the Academy. When, late in life, he moved into the SAG old folks home in Woodland Hills, he immediately became a leader among the residents.

Here’s Professor Bissell Brown’s dad testifying as a psychiatrist in The Caine Mutiny:

Here is Whit as Mr. Lurry in the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of Star Trek:

Whit also played a mad scientist psychiatrist to Michael Landon’s teenager in I Was A Teenage Werewolf.

So maybe her hysteria is a tad histrionic?

 
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  1. A Midwest monster / Of the highest grade
    All my teachers thought / It was growing pains

  2. Don’t forget Whit Bissells’s memorable performance as Lurry the space station manager in the Star Trek Episode….”THE TROUBLE WITH KAVANAUGHS”…….Kavanaugh!!!…..Kavanaugh!!…GD KAVANAUGH EVERYWHERE!!!!

  3. I enjoyed the Time Tunnel, too. I think Bissell was also in The Manchurian Candidate .

    • Replies: @Nicholas Stix
    Whit Bissell was everywhere! His voice is more deeply etched in my memory than perhaps any other. The man worked, and he always had job offers on tap. He must have had the most organized agent in Hollywood.
  4. The Werewolf movie worked as a pretty self-explanatory metaphor of puberty (a theme not lost to the eighties improvement Teen Wolf), and this was central to the Me neration’s idea of how to deal with gratification, so there ought to be a way to splice audio from Dr Dad talking about controlling oneself in the past with the screaming Bissell of the present.
    Failing that a two-image meme with captioned excerpts contrasting the generational ideas.

  5. Since we are on the topic of evolutionary psychology….I think…..

    Jimmy Steward’s daughter is the World Expert on Lowland Male Gorilla inter-Tribal Warfare..She wrote a book about this and you can order the book from Amazon……….wow!!! this does seem relevant in 2018 doesn’t it?…….Yet they passed the 1965 Nonwhite Legal Immigrant Increase Act……I mean…who the F ordered this Act?

    • Troll: Carol
    • Replies: @anonguy

    Lowland Male Gorilla inter-Tribal Warfare
     
    That actually sounds like a way cool calvinball kind of topic.

    Maybe someone could sell the warring tribes various armaments and maybe some booze too. That could liven things up a bit, although I'm sure they don't need much help.

    There is so much interesting real stuff in this world.

    Like, with Lowland Male Gorilla inter-Tribal Warfare out there, who needs professional sports or Netflix, for that matter?

    Why isn't this a reality show?

  6. The Time Tunnel, which was a favorite of mine about 50 years ago.

    My favorite too!

    I had a crush on Dr. Ann MacGregor (Lee Meriwether).

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Impressive-- she's licensed to practice, and trademarked to boot.
  7. Someone asked if these Bissells were of the carpet sweeper clan. Only distantly– the lines diverge in the 17th century.

  8. It’s been well known that higher-educated women, living in big cities (and unmarried as Steve likes to remind us) are the biggest left-wing activists on social media.

    She is basically a hypercharged version of that, given her extra wealth. Why is this? They know of their privilege and want to somehow compensate for it. They tried to attack their own whiteness, but the left goes after them as beckys anyway.

    Being faghags worked for a while, but it is no longer cool to just be pro-gay, you have to be pro-tranny and increasingly even pro-paedophilia. So the only thing that’s left is their core mission: to demonise white men in perpetuity and shame all white women who refuse to participate in the patricide as “internalising their own oppression”.

    Of course, if some races have men which sexually harass women far more than other races (as we have seen in the streetwalking videos made popular a few years ago) or seen in rape statistics, then this must be hushed down. These women don’t care about the truth so much as getting at least a sliver of the status they so desperately yearn, and if women of their own race have to be thrown down the train tracks, so be it.

    • Replies: @Cato

    it is no longer cool to just be pro-gay, you have to be pro-tranny and increasingly even pro-paedophilia.
     
    "pro-paedophilia"? Ehh? What the heck are you talking about?
  9. Professor Brown used the name Victoria Brown throughout her academic career, at the University of Wisconsin, University of California (San Diego), and Grinnell College and when writing articles for the Los Angeles Times.

    Her “Thanks For Not Raping Us” article appears to be channeling her 1988 anger toward our “culture’s message that men can and should possess women” and men’s “lethal obsession” with possessing women.

    THE LETHAL ATTRACTION MEN, NOT WOMEN, WHO GO CRAZY OFTEN TURN VIOLENT
    Author: VICTORIA BROWN
    San Jose Mercury News (CA) February 26, 1988

    When I read of the tragic events that occurred in Sunnyvale last week — the senseless murder of seven innocent bystanders by a man obsessed with a young woman — and when I thought about the rage that must have impelled him and the fear that must have haunted her, I wondered how this story would have been handled if the sexes of the attacker and victim had been reversed.

    Women — even crazy, spurned women — don’t do that sort of thing. Men do that sort of thing. Men who go crazy, and even men who don’t go crazy but who just get real mad, frequently become violent and frequently hurt people — both the women in their lives and innocent bystanders, like children.

    Yet events like the one in Sunnyvale, which occurred because a crazy man took literally our culture’s message that men can and should possess women, are never treated as part of a larger phenomenon.

    It’s a question about violence, and the disturbingly high correlation that we see everywhere in this society between male anger — crazy or not — and violent behavior.

    We can’t create a system of laws or education that will prevent all cases of mental illness until we start taking mental illness seriously and making the connections that we must make between the images that our children see, the toys that they play with, the language that they use, the discipline that they encounter, the international relations that they learn about and the conclusions that they draw about violence and masculinity.

    They are all of a piece, and must be treated as such. We romanticize male pursuit, we validate the idea that physical beauty is a legitimate cue for such pursuit, we encourage men to regard women as possessions, and we tolerate men who use violence to get what they want. As long as we do that, we’re going to have male violence in general and male violence directed at women in particular. This is a social problem that is much more than a fatal attraction; it’s a lethal obsession, and it has to stop.

    Commentary: Victoria Brown teaches American women’s history at San Diego State University. She wrote this of the Los Angeles Times.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    How many times were these written in the history of mankind?

    Yet events like the one in Sunnyvale, which occurred because a crazy man took literally our culture’s message that men can and should possess women, are never treated as part of a larger phenomenon.

     

    The culture's message that there are only two gender is also troublesome.

    They are all of a piece, and must be treated as such. We romanticize male pursuit, we validate the idea that physical beauty is a legitimate cue for such pursuit, we encourage men to regard women as possessions, and we tolerate men who use violence to get what they want.
     
    As soon as we achieve Burqa + Complete feminist liberty inside the Burqa, Feminist Ponyland will have been achieved.

    Free Association Time Bonus: Victor Burgin’s "Possession" from 1976, UK ("What does possession mean to you? 7% of our population own 84% of our wealth")

    https://www.britishartstudies.ac.uk/issues/issue-index/issue-4/exit-theory-photography
    , @F0337
    Good find.

    We romanticize male pursuit, we validate the idea that physical beauty is a legitimate cue for such pursuit
     
    Speaking of rage....
  10. @Buzz Mohawk

    The Time Tunnel, which was a favorite of mine about 50 years ago.
     
    My favorite too!

    I had a crush on Dr. Ann MacGregor (Lee Meriwether).

    http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/161633774210-0-1/s-l1000.jpg

    Impressive– she’s licensed to practice, and trademarked to boot.

    • LOL: Buzz Mohawk
  11. You are probably right; if so, this was her mother:

    http://www.whosdatedwho.com/dating/adrienne-marden

    . . . née Mabel A. Baruch at Cleveland, Ohio.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Here’s a link to her mother’s Wikipedia page:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrienne_Marden
    , @Big Bill

    Mabel A. Baruch of Cleveland, Ohio.
     
    Ah. Yes. It all makes sense now. She comes by her Crazy (and female marital dominance) genetically.
    , @CCZ
    Actor Whit Bissell Father Of Daughter

    Los Angeles Times, January 30, 1949

    "The wife of actor Whit Bissell gave birth to a daughter, Victoria, at Good Samaritan Hospital. Mrs. Bissell is the former stage actress Adrienne Marden. They have another daughter, Kathy, age 4."

    He was an actor in "Seven Days In Mays"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=INSiiRHxHGI

    , @Name Withheld
    If that is true, her mother was in a movie about the first female President - "Kisses for My President" .. 1964. Could have been a very important thing for the young Dr. Ford, seeing that movie..
  12. So she’s a California/Hollywood/Burbank fruitcake.

    I should have guessed. The Grinnell, Iowa connection fooled me initially.

    Scientology, Jim Jones, Est, Primal Scream Therapy, Esalen, Hippies, the Haight, the Zebra Killer. You guys produce/attract more crazies per square foot than anywhere else on Earth.

    I retrieved my sister from LA in 1981 after a six year sojourn. Decades later I asked her why she left. She said, “I’d be dead if I stayed.”

  13. @D. K.
    You are probably right; if so, this was her mother:

    http://www.whosdatedwho.com/dating/adrienne-marden

    . . . née Mabel A. Baruch at Cleveland, Ohio.

    Here’s a link to her mother’s Wikipedia page:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrienne_Marden

    • Replies: @D. K.
    It mistakenly says that she was married to Whit Bissell after she was married to Wendell Holmes. She was married to Bissell from 1938 until 1954; she married Holmes in 1956, as her own Wikipedia.org entry properly notes:

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0546255/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm
  14. Tribbles! I saw the show that night, and worried. I had just moved to the USA, and I was so amazed that the US also thought about outer space and all – not that I even thought what that meant.

    After all these years (1968+) I am so ashamed that I did not know that I was PsyOpsed for the next 50 years. I feel like an idiot.

    It is really hard to get the message out to my children – they somehow get it, yet, it is not as “alarm bells ringing” as for me.

    I blame the 60’s: Viet Nam failure had the adverse affect of young people thinking govt was the sole culprit. However, the U.S. Govt and Wall St. were behind Viet Nam.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    The Viet Nam failure was that McNamara et al thought we could bomb the people of Viet Nam into submission. My data points with people from Viet Nam are few in number, but overwhelmingly positive. I ask two questions: What, exactly, did we think we could achieve, and why would we want to harm these people? I know that after having been (counter) attacked by Viet Cong, one might come to hate Viet Cong, but it was their country and they were defending it against colonists.

    The trouble with Tribble was that they were born pregnant.
  15. What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000946/

    Star Trek
    The Outer Limits
    I Was a Teenage Werewolf
    I Was a Teenage Frankenstein
    Creature From the Black Lagoon
    Lone Ranger
    Rawhide
    Magnificent Seven
    The Rifleman
    Bonanza
    Have Gun Will Travel
    Perry Mason
    Walking Tall
    Dukes of Hazard
    Hogan’s Heroes
    Soylent Green

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Great shows, serious PsyOps. Not until 2006 did I realize how Psy-Opsed I was. PsyOpsers knew how to assuage the generations, especially the kids. It is so creepy when I think about it. You have to tear apart the messages to know what i mean.

    THE WORST PART: YOU WERE A KID!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?
     
    Who cares? He fathered an enemy of humanity.

    Maybe you are an absent father, or maybe you are an unskilled father, or maybe you are just a stupid father, but this fellow produced a monster. The first three types of father deserve our opprobrium. Whit Bissell deserves our contempt.
    , @Pincher Martin

    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?
     
    I'd certainly rather listen to his stories than to those of his daughter's.
    , @BenKenobi
    Is imdb open edit?

    An interested party might create a page for Mz BB for her work of fiction "Thanks For Not Raping Us" -- It may even stay up for a few hours!

    , @ROBERT MORGAN
    He appeared at a sci-fi convention in the late 70s and I got his autograph! Nice guy- unfortunately, his mind was a bit hazy by that time so the audience didn't get to hear any great stories about his career. The surprising thing about him was that he was very diminutive, considering how convincing he was playing authority figures.
    , @Jack D
    Fairly typical resume for a good character actor of that era. A few starring roles in B movies, but mostly a lot of 1 episode guest shots on TV series. On some of the long running Western series, they have him back every year or 2 or even more than once a season, playing a different character each time - 3 episodes back he was the mayor who got shot but in this episode he is the railroad executive who gets shot - say didn't I see that guy before? Never a big star but I'm sure he made a living from his craft. The kind of guy that when you see him you immediately recognize that you've seen him before but you couldn't necessarily name him. The casting directors knew his name and he was a frequently dialed # in their rolodex.

    He was good at playing respected authority figures - doctors, military brass, ministers. Today they'd get a black guy to play these parts.

    It wouldn't surprise me if he had very little contact with his daughter after he divorced her mom.

  16. @D. K.
    You are probably right; if so, this was her mother:

    http://www.whosdatedwho.com/dating/adrienne-marden

    . . . née Mabel A. Baruch at Cleveland, Ohio.

    Mabel A. Baruch of Cleveland, Ohio.

    Ah. Yes. It all makes sense now. She comes by her Crazy (and female marital dominance) genetically.

  17. Most boomers will recognize Whit Bissell’s face.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    Bissell was what was known in our house as an ”0h, THAT guy”- as you say, a familiar face to most boomers.
  18. Chicken Soup for the Movie Buff’s Soul. Thanks for the Time Tunnel reference. So much TV before I was born, I’m never gonna see it all.

  19. @D. K.
    You are probably right; if so, this was her mother:

    http://www.whosdatedwho.com/dating/adrienne-marden

    . . . née Mabel A. Baruch at Cleveland, Ohio.

    Actor Whit Bissell Father Of Daughter

    Los Angeles Times, January 30, 1949

    “The wife of actor Whit Bissell gave birth to a daughter, Victoria, at Good Samaritan Hospital. Mrs. Bissell is the former stage actress Adrienne Marden. They have another daughter, Kathy, age 4.”

    He was an actor in “Seven Days In Mays”

    • Replies: @Anonym
    I saw 7 days in May while going through my "movies involving nuclear weapons" kick. Martin Balsam is the other guy less recognizable than Douglas in that scene. He was also in Tora Tora Tora (and did an excellent job). I tried to find the carrier takeoff scene to no avail, but that scene is one of the great scenes in movie history. The scope, the sound, everything coming together for that one attack. No wonder this movie was such a hit in Japan - all the scenes filmed by the Japanese director are perfect IMO. The US side was damn good too.

    The whole movie is great and well worth watching. I have a penchant for realistic movies, be they sci-fi, war, spy, conspiracy, and no doubt other movie genres such as business. Tora Tora Tora certainly holds a very worthy place in the realistic war movie category. There are few WW2 movies on a par with it IMO.
  20. @D. K.
    You are probably right; if so, this was her mother:

    http://www.whosdatedwho.com/dating/adrienne-marden

    . . . née Mabel A. Baruch at Cleveland, Ohio.

    If that is true, her mother was in a movie about the first female President – “Kisses for My President” .. 1964. Could have been a very important thing for the young Dr. Ford, seeing that movie..

    • Replies: @Name Withheld
    Adrienne Marden was also in a movie about the Supreme Court. "For the Love of Mary" - 1948
  21. @Clifford Brown
    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000946/

    Star Trek
    The Outer Limits
    I Was a Teenage Werewolf
    I Was a Teenage Frankenstein
    Creature From the Black Lagoon
    Lone Ranger
    Rawhide
    Magnificent Seven
    The Rifleman
    Bonanza
    Have Gun Will Travel
    Perry Mason
    Walking Tall
    Dukes of Hazard
    Hogan's Heroes
    Soylent Green

    Great shows, serious PsyOps. Not until 2006 did I realize how Psy-Opsed I was. PsyOpsers knew how to assuage the generations, especially the kids. It is so creepy when I think about it. You have to tear apart the messages to know what i mean.

    THE WORST PART: YOU WERE A KID!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  22. @Clifford Brown
    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000946/

    Star Trek
    The Outer Limits
    I Was a Teenage Werewolf
    I Was a Teenage Frankenstein
    Creature From the Black Lagoon
    Lone Ranger
    Rawhide
    Magnificent Seven
    The Rifleman
    Bonanza
    Have Gun Will Travel
    Perry Mason
    Walking Tall
    Dukes of Hazard
    Hogan's Heroes
    Soylent Green

    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    Who cares? He fathered an enemy of humanity.

    Maybe you are an absent father, or maybe you are an unskilled father, or maybe you are just a stupid father, but this fellow produced a monster. The first three types of father deserve our opprobrium. Whit Bissell deserves our contempt.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    You read this column and still don't know there are occasionally really random genetic disasters?
    , @Jack D
    In that case he probably deserves both because he was an absent father.

    He marries her mom when they are both in their 20s and then trades mom in on a new model when he is still in his prime, she is still a little girl and mom is about to hit the wall. Mom trains daughter to hate men. She (mostly) makes an exception for her cucky mild mannered husband who is nothing like dad, but she still hates men in general and every once in a while her rage spill over onto her husband. He has learned to ignore it.
  23. @Clifford Brown
    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000946/

    Star Trek
    The Outer Limits
    I Was a Teenage Werewolf
    I Was a Teenage Frankenstein
    Creature From the Black Lagoon
    Lone Ranger
    Rawhide
    Magnificent Seven
    The Rifleman
    Bonanza
    Have Gun Will Travel
    Perry Mason
    Walking Tall
    Dukes of Hazard
    Hogan's Heroes
    Soylent Green

    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    I’d certainly rather listen to his stories than to those of his daughter’s.

    • Agree: F0337
    • Replies: @F0337

    Can you imagine the stories this guy had?
     
    He Lived Large when America Herself was Great. H/T in the extreme.

    I wasn't alive then. But if I could choose any point in time....

  24. @Name Withheld
    If that is true, her mother was in a movie about the first female President - "Kisses for My President" .. 1964. Could have been a very important thing for the young Dr. Ford, seeing that movie..

    Adrienne Marden was also in a movie about the Supreme Court. “For the Love of Mary” – 1948

  25. @Clifford Brown
    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000946/

    Star Trek
    The Outer Limits
    I Was a Teenage Werewolf
    I Was a Teenage Frankenstein
    Creature From the Black Lagoon
    Lone Ranger
    Rawhide
    Magnificent Seven
    The Rifleman
    Bonanza
    Have Gun Will Travel
    Perry Mason
    Walking Tall
    Dukes of Hazard
    Hogan's Heroes
    Soylent Green

    Is imdb open edit?

    An interested party might create a page for Mz BB for her work of fiction “Thanks For Not Raping Us” — It may even stay up for a few hours!

  26. @Clifford Brown
    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000946/

    Star Trek
    The Outer Limits
    I Was a Teenage Werewolf
    I Was a Teenage Frankenstein
    Creature From the Black Lagoon
    Lone Ranger
    Rawhide
    Magnificent Seven
    The Rifleman
    Bonanza
    Have Gun Will Travel
    Perry Mason
    Walking Tall
    Dukes of Hazard
    Hogan's Heroes
    Soylent Green

    He appeared at a sci-fi convention in the late 70s and I got his autograph! Nice guy- unfortunately, his mind was a bit hazy by that time so the audience didn’t get to hear any great stories about his career. The surprising thing about him was that he was very diminutive, considering how convincing he was playing authority figures.

  27. Bones: Jim, I’ve figured it out. All we have to do is quit feeding them. If we quit feeding them, they stop breeding.

    • Replies: @bomag

    Bones: Jim, I’ve figured it out. All we have to do is quit feeding them.
     
    Indeed. Back in the day, such things were known. Wasn't it Buckley who suggested a good strategy was to, "feed them, but not too well."
    , @Brutusale
    It was in the book.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flat_cat
  28. Michael Landon was a bed wetter. Could this be, somehow,related to Victoria’s rage? I don’t know…

  29. KNOCK THEM DOWN
    KNOCK ALL THE LITTLE CHILDREN DOWN
    AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA


    One of the replies: he obviously imagined that the kid’s dad would be watching her.

  30. OT, but a subject that does come up on this blog. Recall the visa lotto and how most people are completely unaware of this part of the 1990 Immigration Act. Well here is an episode of the tv show Wings from January 1992. They managed to work in the new visa lottery in the story. It goes to show that this act was known to people back when it came out. They just never really put up much of a fuss. Too bad for us today.

    Here is the point in the clip where the discussion begins.

    • Replies: @Glaivester
    Yes, but we were being shown that it would be used to help hard-working Italians get to stay in the country.
  31. Goes to show that folk wisdom about daughters marrying their fathers is dead wrong.

  32. Whit Bissell was a WASP blueblood and yachtsman who came out to Hollywood in his 40s

    So maybe her hysteria is a tad histrionic?

    • Replies: @Kylie
    Omg, major Archer fan here!

    Love the reference, thanks.
  33. @Pincher Martin

    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?
     
    I'd certainly rather listen to his stories than to those of his daughter's.

    Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    He Lived Large when America Herself was Great. H/T in the extreme.

    I wasn’t alive then. But if I could choose any point in time….

  34. I yelled at my husband last night. Not pick-up-your-socks yell. Not how-could-you-ignore-that-red-light yell. This was real yelling. This was 30 minutes of from-the-gut yelling.

    Woman lets out agonizing screams as Trump is sworn in

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Woman lets out agonizing screams as Trump is sworn in
     
    Demons let out agonizing screams and starts flying about wildly as Trump is sworn in and as Gorsuch is sworn is and Kavanaugh is sworn in.
  35. @CCZ
    Professor Brown used the name Victoria Brown throughout her academic career, at the University of Wisconsin, University of California (San Diego), and Grinnell College and when writing articles for the Los Angeles Times.

    Her "Thanks For Not Raping Us" article appears to be channeling her 1988 anger toward our "culture's message that men can and should possess women" and men's "lethal obsession" with possessing women.

    THE LETHAL ATTRACTION MEN, NOT WOMEN, WHO GO CRAZY OFTEN TURN VIOLENT
    Author: VICTORIA BROWN
    San Jose Mercury News (CA) February 26, 1988

    When I read of the tragic events that occurred in Sunnyvale last week -- the senseless murder of seven innocent bystanders by a man obsessed with a young woman -- and when I thought about the rage that must have impelled him and the fear that must have haunted her, I wondered how this story would have been handled if the sexes of the attacker and victim had been reversed.

    Women -- even crazy, spurned women -- don't do that sort of thing. Men do that sort of thing. Men who go crazy, and even men who don't go crazy but who just get real mad, frequently become violent and frequently hurt people -- both the women in their lives and innocent bystanders, like children.

    Yet events like the one in Sunnyvale, which occurred because a crazy man took literally our culture's message that men can and should possess women, are never treated as part of a larger phenomenon.

    It's a question about violence, and the disturbingly high correlation that we see everywhere in this society between male anger -- crazy or not -- and violent behavior.

    We can't create a system of laws or education that will prevent all cases of mental illness until we start taking mental illness seriously and making the connections that we must make between the images that our children see, the toys that they play with, the language that they use, the discipline that they encounter, the international relations that they learn about and the conclusions that they draw about violence and masculinity.

    They are all of a piece, and must be treated as such. We romanticize male pursuit, we validate the idea that physical beauty is a legitimate cue for such pursuit, we encourage men to regard women as possessions, and we tolerate men who use violence to get what they want. As long as we do that, we're going to have male violence in general and male violence directed at women in particular. This is a social problem that is much more than a fatal attraction; it's a lethal obsession, and it has to stop.

    Commentary: Victoria Brown teaches American women's history at San Diego State University. She wrote this of the Los Angeles Times.
     

    How many times were these written in the history of mankind?

    Yet events like the one in Sunnyvale, which occurred because a crazy man took literally our culture’s message that men can and should possess women, are never treated as part of a larger phenomenon.

    The culture’s message that there are only two gender is also troublesome.

    They are all of a piece, and must be treated as such. We romanticize male pursuit, we validate the idea that physical beauty is a legitimate cue for such pursuit, we encourage men to regard women as possessions, and we tolerate men who use violence to get what they want.

    As soon as we achieve Burqa + Complete feminist liberty inside the Burqa, Feminist Ponyland will have been achieved.

    Free Association Time Bonus: Victor Burgin’s “Possession” from 1976, UK (“What does possession mean to you? 7% of our population own 84% of our wealth”)

    https://www.britishartstudies.ac.uk/issues/issue-index/issue-4/exit-theory-photography

  36. @CCZ
    Professor Brown used the name Victoria Brown throughout her academic career, at the University of Wisconsin, University of California (San Diego), and Grinnell College and when writing articles for the Los Angeles Times.

    Her "Thanks For Not Raping Us" article appears to be channeling her 1988 anger toward our "culture's message that men can and should possess women" and men's "lethal obsession" with possessing women.

    THE LETHAL ATTRACTION MEN, NOT WOMEN, WHO GO CRAZY OFTEN TURN VIOLENT
    Author: VICTORIA BROWN
    San Jose Mercury News (CA) February 26, 1988

    When I read of the tragic events that occurred in Sunnyvale last week -- the senseless murder of seven innocent bystanders by a man obsessed with a young woman -- and when I thought about the rage that must have impelled him and the fear that must have haunted her, I wondered how this story would have been handled if the sexes of the attacker and victim had been reversed.

    Women -- even crazy, spurned women -- don't do that sort of thing. Men do that sort of thing. Men who go crazy, and even men who don't go crazy but who just get real mad, frequently become violent and frequently hurt people -- both the women in their lives and innocent bystanders, like children.

    Yet events like the one in Sunnyvale, which occurred because a crazy man took literally our culture's message that men can and should possess women, are never treated as part of a larger phenomenon.

    It's a question about violence, and the disturbingly high correlation that we see everywhere in this society between male anger -- crazy or not -- and violent behavior.

    We can't create a system of laws or education that will prevent all cases of mental illness until we start taking mental illness seriously and making the connections that we must make between the images that our children see, the toys that they play with, the language that they use, the discipline that they encounter, the international relations that they learn about and the conclusions that they draw about violence and masculinity.

    They are all of a piece, and must be treated as such. We romanticize male pursuit, we validate the idea that physical beauty is a legitimate cue for such pursuit, we encourage men to regard women as possessions, and we tolerate men who use violence to get what they want. As long as we do that, we're going to have male violence in general and male violence directed at women in particular. This is a social problem that is much more than a fatal attraction; it's a lethal obsession, and it has to stop.

    Commentary: Victoria Brown teaches American women's history at San Diego State University. She wrote this of the Los Angeles Times.
     

    Good find.

    We romanticize male pursuit, we validate the idea that physical beauty is a legitimate cue for such pursuit

    Speaking of rage….

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    yes, she's enraged.

    But, the fact remains that many men DO want to possess women to a degree that they go crazy with jealousy and rage and then act it out violently. Theodore Dalrymple has talked about this repeatedly. He says that the desire for exclusive sexual possession is what lies behind so much domestic violence. Not that these men will be faithful themselves, just that they don't want their woman to look at or talk to another man.

    My sister had a relationship like this once. Her boyfriend was so jealous that he insisted that she not even talk to male classmates. She told the guys in her study group not to call her anymore. Of course, this all ended very badly. Very badly.

    Male pursuit is a wonderful and very dangerous phenomenon. While feminism won't do anything to help, don't pretend that Brown doesn't have a point.
  37. I’m finding these New England “WASP” types to be borderline freak shows. From the Puritans, to the alcohol prohibition zealots, to the fashionable socialists in the early 20th century, down to the modern social justice warriors.

    Seems that real America was more centered in Virginia in the early days. The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they’ve always had a more European attitude toward things.

    • Replies: @Flip
    And their cousins in England killed King Charles I.
    , @S. Anonyia
    It’s not a European attitude...they were rejects and freakshows and troublemakers back in Europe too. The only modern Europeans with any passing similarities to our nutty Puritans are the Swedes. Even the British and Germans are more laidback.

    Also don’t forget all their weird utopian experiments back in the late 1800s. But that might fall under fashionable socialism.

    I’ve been saying for years on this blog that the American spirit started in Virginia. It’s a shame we have a holiday (Thanksgiving) dedicated to the Puritan wackos. Not coincidental that was added to the calendar after the civil war.
    , @Jack D
    Her WASP dad took off when she was 6 and she was raised by her mom (maiden name Baruch, which is usually Jewish) so I wouldn't put all the blame on the WASPs. Like most of the rest of messed up modern elite America, she is a WASP-Jewish co-production.
    , @G. Poulin
    I'm from New England, but I hate the WASP with a white-hot passion. I hate their religion. I hate their philosophy. I hate their art, their architecture, their poetry, their politics, their stone-cold hearts and their ugly women. If I could go back in time thru the Time Tunnel, I would sink the goddam Mayflower in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean without a second's hesitation. Good-bye, assholes !
    , @Charles Pewitt
    The evil WASP/JEW ruling class of the American Empire must be dislodged from power.

    Victoria Bissell Brown must be relocated to sub-Saharan Africa.

    Victoria Bissell Brown can scream all she wants in sub-Saharan Africa. Hopefully, her screaming at her husband in the African jungle will gain the attention of one of those creatures out of a Tarzan movie.

    Munch, munch.
    , @Buster Keaton’s Stunt Double

    The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they’ve always had a more European attitude toward things.
     
    There was no love lost between “Puritans” and “Europeans.” In fact, the former moved to the New World in large part because the latter hated their guts.
    , @Brutusale
    The ones with brains and initiative left for greener, more open pastures. See Tom Wolfe's writing about Josiah Grinnell in Hooking Up.
  38. James Wilton Brown, Professor Brown’s husband of 49 years, is apparently a mild-mannered college administrator. A California marriage record lists their marriage on June 21, 1969 in Los Angeles, when he was 22 and she was 20 (Registration 70-25969 / 58889). Federal Election Commission individual contribution records from 2008 through 2012 show husband James and wife Victoria at the same Iowa City street address and list her as a history professor and him as a college administrator. Newspaper articles in 1994 note a high school daughter Elizabeth Cady Brown (no doubt in honor of nationally know women’s rights advocate Elizabeth Cady Stanton). Mr. and Mrs. Brown currently reside in Haverford (near Swarthmore College) and she is a very active member of the Haverford Democratic Organization, currently organizing for a “Blue Wave.”

    See her at a January 26, 2018 protest:

    https://www.timesherald.com/news/morning-briefing-meehan-drops-re-election-bid-amid-scandal-the/article_26ebb3cd-acad-51b4-bd58-a498f6b080c2.html

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Haverford is around 10 miles from Swarthmore College so not exactly near. Much closer is, of course, Haverford College (and the Merion Golf Club). Her section of the township is mostly older (1920s) homes on relatively small lots but it's a nice leafy suburb.
    , @Mr. Anon

    James Wilton Brown, Professor Brown’s husband of 49 years, is apparently a mild-mannered college administrator.
     
    That would explain his complete lack of any spine. He belongs to an invertibrate species - college administrator.
  39. Her stepbrother is this guy?

    “C’mon. Get Happy!”

    http://www.cmongethappy.com/interviews/bf/

  40. The Time Tunnel! Although a TV show (1966-67) with rubbish implausible scripting in its ‘adventures in history’ (where we learned that everyone in ancient Greece etc spoke English) – the cheesy writing part of why it was cancelled –

    The tunnel itself was the coolest sci-fi thing on TV, ever. Here is a 96-second clip from the initial episode, the magnificent first ever trip through time. Background is that US gov with a cranky Senator are about to cancel funding, and so the young project leader takes the personal risk to show the tunnel works, even tho not all is ready yet. Glorious with the visuals and sound effects –

    • Replies: @Ziel
    They spent a lot of money on the pilot and it showed in the effects. The opening where the car descends into an opening in the road is really cool. But once the series started the budgets ere no longer there for any high quality production, including writing apparently.
    , @J.Ross
    The Avengers (another show with iffy budget but stellar writing) had a time travel episode, with, of all people, Horace Rumpole's head of chambers as the bad guy. They called the bluff of how easy it would be to effect "time travel" with planning and costumes, provided the subject is first softened up with a much cheaper time tunnel, which worked like a psychedelic take on a carnival funhouse floor.
    , @JMcG
    George Lucas is apparently a fan. That’s definitely where Luke and Darth Vader fought.
  41. @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?
     
    Who cares? He fathered an enemy of humanity.

    Maybe you are an absent father, or maybe you are an unskilled father, or maybe you are just a stupid father, but this fellow produced a monster. The first three types of father deserve our opprobrium. Whit Bissell deserves our contempt.

    You read this column and still don’t know there are occasionally really random genetic disasters?

    • Replies: @Buster Keaton’s Stunt Double
    Or that leftists spend huge amounts of time and money attempting to indoctrinate children against their parents’ values?
  42. I know Bissell best from Westerns, where he often seemed to get cast as the solemn pillar of the community who eventually turns on the hero due to self-interest or cowardice and fails to support him when the chips are down; he does this to Robert Ryan in The Proud Ones (prompting an unforgettable outburst from Ryan: “If I was a member of this town council, I wouldn’t be able to look in a mirror without vomiting!”), to Chuck Connors a couple of times on the Rifleman, and to Fred McMurray in At Gunpoint–although in that last one old Whit pulls himself together and comes through in the end. In short, one of his specialties was playing Jeff Flake before there was a Jeff Flake.

  43. @Brabantian
    The Time Tunnel! Although a TV show (1966-67) with rubbish implausible scripting in its 'adventures in history' (where we learned that everyone in ancient Greece etc spoke English) - the cheesy writing part of why it was cancelled -

    The tunnel itself was the coolest sci-fi thing on TV, ever. Here is a 96-second clip from the initial episode, the magnificent first ever trip through time. Background is that US gov with a cranky Senator are about to cancel funding, and so the young project leader takes the personal risk to show the tunnel works, even tho not all is ready yet. Glorious with the visuals and sound effects -
    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2bmp

    They spent a lot of money on the pilot and it showed in the effects. The opening where the car descends into an opening in the road is really cool. But once the series started the budgets ere no longer there for any high quality production, including writing apparently.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    The writing is key - if you look at the Star Trek TV shows from the same era, the sets are really cheesy. The costumes, the props, the effects - they are all crude - like something for a high school play. (They knew that you would watch these shows on a blurry 23" TV and so any fine details would be a waste of $ anyway.) America was a poorer country then and they didn't have millions of $ to spend on each episode. But, the writing on some of the episodes was pretty good, so they hold up despite the lack of production values.
  44. In another case of odd coincidences, Whit Bissell also played one of the four scientist friends of the Time Traveller in the original circa 1960 movie “The Time Machine”. A much better movie than the remake of 150-20 years ago.
    In the DVD set of “The Time Tunnel” they interviewed surviving cast members, and it’s obvious that Bissell had confused moments. It will happen to most of us if we live long enough.

    I’ve always enjoyed his work.

    His daughter’s, not so much.

    R.I.P. Whit Bissell.

  45. @RichardTaylor
    I'm finding these New England "WASP" types to be borderline freak shows. From the Puritans, to the alcohol prohibition zealots, to the fashionable socialists in the early 20th century, down to the modern social justice warriors.

    Seems that real America was more centered in Virginia in the early days. The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they've always had a more European attitude toward things.

    And their cousins in England killed King Charles I.

  46. @Dwright
    Most boomers will recognize Whit Bissell’s face.

    Bissell was what was known in our house as an ”0h, THAT guy”- as you say, a familiar face to most boomers.

  47. @Not Raul
    Bones: Jim, I’ve figured it out. All we have to do is quit feeding them. If we quit feeding them, they stop breeding.

    Bones: Jim, I’ve figured it out. All we have to do is quit feeding them.

    Indeed. Back in the day, such things were known. Wasn’t it Buckley who suggested a good strategy was to, “feed them, but not too well.”

  48. @RichardTaylor
    I'm finding these New England "WASP" types to be borderline freak shows. From the Puritans, to the alcohol prohibition zealots, to the fashionable socialists in the early 20th century, down to the modern social justice warriors.

    Seems that real America was more centered in Virginia in the early days. The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they've always had a more European attitude toward things.

    It’s not a European attitude…they were rejects and freakshows and troublemakers back in Europe too. The only modern Europeans with any passing similarities to our nutty Puritans are the Swedes. Even the British and Germans are more laidback.

    Also don’t forget all their weird utopian experiments back in the late 1800s. But that might fall under fashionable socialism.

    I’ve been saying for years on this blog that the American spirit started in Virginia. It’s a shame we have a holiday (Thanksgiving) dedicated to the Puritan wackos. Not coincidental that was added to the calendar after the civil war.

  49. @Anonymous
    Here’s a link to her mother’s Wikipedia page:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrienne_Marden

    It mistakenly says that she was married to Whit Bissell after she was married to Wendell Holmes. She was married to Bissell from 1938 until 1954; she married Holmes in 1956, as her own Wikipedia.org entry properly notes:

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0546255/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm

    • Replies: @Jack D
    This explain a lot - daddy took off when she was 6 so she is still angry with men 60+ years later.
  50. MCMLXVI…I remember repeating those letters over and over as a five year-old, the year we got our first TV. I had no idea what they meant, but I saw them every Friday before my two favorite shows, “Batman” and “Time Tunnel”. That was about the last good year of the American Mid 20th Century Epoch.

  51. @Ziel
    They spent a lot of money on the pilot and it showed in the effects. The opening where the car descends into an opening in the road is really cool. But once the series started the budgets ere no longer there for any high quality production, including writing apparently.

    The writing is key – if you look at the Star Trek TV shows from the same era, the sets are really cheesy. The costumes, the props, the effects – they are all crude – like something for a high school play. (They knew that you would watch these shows on a blurry 23″ TV and so any fine details would be a waste of $ anyway.) America was a poorer country then and they didn’t have millions of $ to spend on each episode. But, the writing on some of the episodes was pretty good, so they hold up despite the lack of production values.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    I had once read that Star Trek (the original series) was a pretty costly show to produce; the sets, props, special effects - cheesy as they seem now - were expensive for the time. That was one of the reasons the Network execs finally cancelled it. Possibly some of that was just that the sets took up real-estate that couldn't otherwise be used. A set for a doctor's office or police station can be used in any number of TV shows. But Star Trek sets could mostly only be used for Star Trek.
    , @Kylie
    Even as a kid, I thought "Star Trek" was risibly schlocky, the writing included. Those papier-mâché boulders, the way the actors would toss themselves around to imitate being hurdled, the inclusion of Majel Barrett (even before I knew of her love connection with Gene Roddenberry).

    It was fun to watch it with my sister, a die-hard fan, and make fun of it.

    This doesn't include the wonderful episode written by Harlan Ellison, "The City on the Edge of Forever". That was just marvelous.
  52. We arrived here through an abundance of idleness and abundance of bread.

  53. @D. K.
    It mistakenly says that she was married to Whit Bissell after she was married to Wendell Holmes. She was married to Bissell from 1938 until 1954; she married Holmes in 1956, as her own Wikipedia.org entry properly notes:

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0546255/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm

    This explain a lot – daddy took off when she was 6 so she is still angry with men 60+ years later.

  54. Since we are on the topic of Hollywood weirdo children….this one is really in the freaking yuk category…..Tatum O’Neil use to date the old farting hairy bulldyke Rosie O’Donnell….I think this to be one of the most disgusting Hollywood tabloid stories I have ever read……

  55. @RichardTaylor
    I'm finding these New England "WASP" types to be borderline freak shows. From the Puritans, to the alcohol prohibition zealots, to the fashionable socialists in the early 20th century, down to the modern social justice warriors.

    Seems that real America was more centered in Virginia in the early days. The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they've always had a more European attitude toward things.

    Her WASP dad took off when she was 6 and she was raised by her mom (maiden name Baruch, which is usually Jewish) so I wouldn’t put all the blame on the WASPs. Like most of the rest of messed up modern elite America, she is a WASP-Jewish co-production.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  56. @CCZ
    James Wilton Brown, Professor Brown's husband of 49 years, is apparently a mild-mannered college administrator. A California marriage record lists their marriage on June 21, 1969 in Los Angeles, when he was 22 and she was 20 (Registration 70-25969 / 58889). Federal Election Commission individual contribution records from 2008 through 2012 show husband James and wife Victoria at the same Iowa City street address and list her as a history professor and him as a college administrator. Newspaper articles in 1994 note a high school daughter Elizabeth Cady Brown (no doubt in honor of nationally know women's rights advocate Elizabeth Cady Stanton). Mr. and Mrs. Brown currently reside in Haverford (near Swarthmore College) and she is a very active member of the Haverford Democratic Organization, currently organizing for a “Blue Wave.”

    See her at a January 26, 2018 protest:

    https://www.timesherald.com/news/morning-briefing-meehan-drops-re-election-bid-amid-scandal-the/article_26ebb3cd-acad-51b4-bd58-a498f6b080c2.html

    Haverford is around 10 miles from Swarthmore College so not exactly near. Much closer is, of course, Haverford College (and the Merion Golf Club). Her section of the township is mostly older (1920s) homes on relatively small lots but it’s a nice leafy suburb.

    • Replies: @D. K.
    My (Jewish) brother-in-law graduated from the Haverford School, before heading off to Harvard College:

    https://www.haverford.org
  57. Jimmy Stewart’s daughter Kelley Stewart-Harcourt….Cambridge University Professor of Anthropology…..her book:Gorilla Society:Conflict And Cooperation…..

  58. @Clifford Brown
    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000946/

    Star Trek
    The Outer Limits
    I Was a Teenage Werewolf
    I Was a Teenage Frankenstein
    Creature From the Black Lagoon
    Lone Ranger
    Rawhide
    Magnificent Seven
    The Rifleman
    Bonanza
    Have Gun Will Travel
    Perry Mason
    Walking Tall
    Dukes of Hazard
    Hogan's Heroes
    Soylent Green

    Fairly typical resume for a good character actor of that era. A few starring roles in B movies, but mostly a lot of 1 episode guest shots on TV series. On some of the long running Western series, they have him back every year or 2 or even more than once a season, playing a different character each time – 3 episodes back he was the mayor who got shot but in this episode he is the railroad executive who gets shot – say didn’t I see that guy before? Never a big star but I’m sure he made a living from his craft. The kind of guy that when you see him you immediately recognize that you’ve seen him before but you couldn’t necessarily name him. The casting directors knew his name and he was a frequently dialed # in their rolodex.

    He was good at playing respected authority figures – doctors, military brass, ministers. Today they’d get a black guy to play these parts.

    It wouldn’t surprise me if he had very little contact with his daughter after he divorced her mom.

  59. @Jack D
    Haverford is around 10 miles from Swarthmore College so not exactly near. Much closer is, of course, Haverford College (and the Merion Golf Club). Her section of the township is mostly older (1920s) homes on relatively small lots but it's a nice leafy suburb.

    My (Jewish) brother-in-law graduated from the Haverford School, before heading off to Harvard College:

    https://www.haverford.org

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Haverford School (K-12 boys prep day school) was once upon a time affiliated with the college but got spun off over a century ago and nowadays the only thing they share is the name.

    Among its most famous alumni is Jennifer Finney Boylan, which is strange because it's a boy's school. But she was James in her Haverford School days.
  60. @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    What a career! Can you imagine the stories this guy had?
     
    Who cares? He fathered an enemy of humanity.

    Maybe you are an absent father, or maybe you are an unskilled father, or maybe you are just a stupid father, but this fellow produced a monster. The first three types of father deserve our opprobrium. Whit Bissell deserves our contempt.

    In that case he probably deserves both because he was an absent father.

    He marries her mom when they are both in their 20s and then trades mom in on a new model when he is still in his prime, she is still a little girl and mom is about to hit the wall. Mom trains daughter to hate men. She (mostly) makes an exception for her cucky mild mannered husband who is nothing like dad, but she still hates men in general and every once in a while her rage spill over onto her husband. He has learned to ignore it.

    • Replies: @Flip
    Your assessment sounds likely.
    , @Thea
    I think you are right. Who didn’t know someone with a bitter divorcée for a mom growing up?
    , @CCZ
    "The personal is political" was a frequently heard feminist rallying cry, especially during the late 1960s and 1970s. The exact origin of the phrase is unknown and sometimes debated. Many second-wave feminists used the phrase "the personal is political" or its underlying meaning in their writing, speeches, consciousness-raising, and other activities.

    Source: Linda Napikoski is a former writer for ThoughtCo [web site] who contributed articles on feminism, with a focus on the feminist movements of the 1960s and 1970s. She has examined women's literature, feminism, and the legal issues surrounding gender in academic settings and through "real world" activism.

    Looks like Professor Brown agrees with the motto and fits the profile, perhaps despite herself marrying at age 20.
  61. The Star Trek clip also features William Schallert, who, in one of his hundreds of roles, portrayed the father of Patty Lane, and the uncle of Cathy Lane, the “identical cousins” of The Patty Duke Show.

  62. @istevefan
    OT, but a subject that does come up on this blog. Recall the visa lotto and how most people are completely unaware of this part of the 1990 Immigration Act. Well here is an episode of the tv show Wings from January 1992. They managed to work in the new visa lottery in the story. It goes to show that this act was known to people back when it came out. They just never really put up much of a fuss. Too bad for us today.

    Here is the point in the clip where the discussion begins.

    Yes, but we were being shown that it would be used to help hard-working Italians get to stay in the country.

  63. The personal is political; the historical is histrionic.

  64. @Lagertha
    Tribbles! I saw the show that night, and worried. I had just moved to the USA, and I was so amazed that the US also thought about outer space and all - not that I even thought what that meant.

    After all these years (1968+) I am so ashamed that I did not know that I was PsyOpsed for the next 50 years. I feel like an idiot.

    It is really hard to get the message out to my children - they somehow get it, yet, it is not as "alarm bells ringing" as for me.

    I blame the 60's: Viet Nam failure had the adverse affect of young people thinking govt was the sole culprit. However, the U.S. Govt and Wall St. were behind Viet Nam.

    The Viet Nam failure was that McNamara et al thought we could bomb the people of Viet Nam into submission. My data points with people from Viet Nam are few in number, but overwhelmingly positive. I ask two questions: What, exactly, did we think we could achieve, and why would we want to harm these people? I know that after having been (counter) attacked by Viet Cong, one might come to hate Viet Cong, but it was their country and they were defending it against colonists.

    The trouble with Tribble was that they were born pregnant.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Tribbles pregnant...great idea...you illuminated some other angles. Thank you.
    , @gunner29

    The Viet Nam failure was that McNamara et al thought we could bomb the people of Viet Nam into submission.
     
    There was a couple of whiz kids in the Pentagon that thought carpet bombing a turd world shithole would get Uncle Ho to give up and go back up north. This was instead of sending a million troops to occupy S.Vietnam and kick the NVA out. Not much to bomb in a twsh, so of course it didn't work.

    Also there was the whole WWIII cloud hanging over the deal; LBJ was certain if he went to far, too fast, that's what he would get.

    What, exactly, did we think we could achieve, and why would we want to harm these people? I know that after having been (counter) attacked by Viet Cong, one might come to hate Viet Cong, but it was their country and they were defending it against colonists
     
    .

    We get the commies out of SVN, so the catholics and Buddhists could cut each others throats. That was going to be the ultimate result had we succeeded in booting the commies.

    It was a civil war, just like Korea, Iraq/Kuwait, and Afghanistan. We always seem to pick the loser side to support.
  65. @Jack D
    The writing is key - if you look at the Star Trek TV shows from the same era, the sets are really cheesy. The costumes, the props, the effects - they are all crude - like something for a high school play. (They knew that you would watch these shows on a blurry 23" TV and so any fine details would be a waste of $ anyway.) America was a poorer country then and they didn't have millions of $ to spend on each episode. But, the writing on some of the episodes was pretty good, so they hold up despite the lack of production values.

    I had once read that Star Trek (the original series) was a pretty costly show to produce; the sets, props, special effects – cheesy as they seem now – were expensive for the time. That was one of the reasons the Network execs finally cancelled it. Possibly some of that was just that the sets took up real-estate that couldn’t otherwise be used. A set for a doctor’s office or police station can be used in any number of TV shows. But Star Trek sets could mostly only be used for Star Trek.

  66. @CCZ
    James Wilton Brown, Professor Brown's husband of 49 years, is apparently a mild-mannered college administrator. A California marriage record lists their marriage on June 21, 1969 in Los Angeles, when he was 22 and she was 20 (Registration 70-25969 / 58889). Federal Election Commission individual contribution records from 2008 through 2012 show husband James and wife Victoria at the same Iowa City street address and list her as a history professor and him as a college administrator. Newspaper articles in 1994 note a high school daughter Elizabeth Cady Brown (no doubt in honor of nationally know women's rights advocate Elizabeth Cady Stanton). Mr. and Mrs. Brown currently reside in Haverford (near Swarthmore College) and she is a very active member of the Haverford Democratic Organization, currently organizing for a “Blue Wave.”

    See her at a January 26, 2018 protest:

    https://www.timesherald.com/news/morning-briefing-meehan-drops-re-election-bid-amid-scandal-the/article_26ebb3cd-acad-51b4-bd58-a498f6b080c2.html

    James Wilton Brown, Professor Brown’s husband of 49 years, is apparently a mild-mannered college administrator.

    That would explain his complete lack of any spine. He belongs to an invertibrate species – college administrator.

  67. Histrionic is a good description of this shrieky harridan

  68. One of Bissel’s co-stars in The Trouble with Tribbles was William Schallert – another one of those ubiquitous character actors you see and say “Oh, that guy, wasn’t he also in…….”

    • Replies: @I, Libertine
    You describe exactly the thought process that resulted in comment #62.
  69. The Nietschian analysis of Professor Brown would be that she wants power. Lots of it. And imagines herself as a White female Ghandi, or Martin Luther King Jr, leading the oppressed non-Whites and White women to POWER. Against the eternal enemy: White men who (supposedly) have power.

    That’s the dream of Hillary. The dream of Elizabeth Warren. POWER. The flip side of the Dances With Wolves / Avatar / Little Big Man movies where the marginal White dude marries the Indian/Alien princess and fights his own people to become Chief Heap Big Big Shot.

    What? Women don’t want power? Of course they do and everyone from Shakespeare onwards has recognized Lady McBeth. Prof. Brown is just the feminist variant, instead of her husband as a figurehead (or in European monarchy, a minor son the Queen was acting as Regent) she imagines a popular uprising of everyone not a White male with herself as a major power figure.

    I would flip things around — the Professor wants REAL POWER that her absentee dad portrayed in various movies and TV shows. Her method is to galvanize everyone not a Straight White male and herd us all into camps in some massive uprising like the movies about Ghandi and King she saw on TV.

    She is and is not a threat. Her capacity to organize even a bake sale would be in question, however her will to power normalizes by expressing openly her desires encourages others with more ability and powerful positions.

  70. @RichardTaylor
    I'm finding these New England "WASP" types to be borderline freak shows. From the Puritans, to the alcohol prohibition zealots, to the fashionable socialists in the early 20th century, down to the modern social justice warriors.

    Seems that real America was more centered in Virginia in the early days. The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they've always had a more European attitude toward things.

    I’m from New England, but I hate the WASP with a white-hot passion. I hate their religion. I hate their philosophy. I hate their art, their architecture, their poetry, their politics, their stone-cold hearts and their ugly women. If I could go back in time thru the Time Tunnel, I would sink the goddam Mayflower in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean without a second’s hesitation. Good-bye, assholes !

  71. @CCZ
    Actor Whit Bissell Father Of Daughter

    Los Angeles Times, January 30, 1949

    "The wife of actor Whit Bissell gave birth to a daughter, Victoria, at Good Samaritan Hospital. Mrs. Bissell is the former stage actress Adrienne Marden. They have another daughter, Kathy, age 4."

    He was an actor in "Seven Days In Mays"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=INSiiRHxHGI

    I saw 7 days in May while going through my “movies involving nuclear weapons” kick. Martin Balsam is the other guy less recognizable than Douglas in that scene. He was also in Tora Tora Tora (and did an excellent job). I tried to find the carrier takeoff scene to no avail, but that scene is one of the great scenes in movie history. The scope, the sound, everything coming together for that one attack. No wonder this movie was such a hit in Japan – all the scenes filmed by the Japanese director are perfect IMO. The US side was damn good too.

    The whole movie is great and well worth watching. I have a penchant for realistic movies, be they sci-fi, war, spy, conspiracy, and no doubt other movie genres such as business. Tora Tora Tora certainly holds a very worthy place in the realistic war movie category. There are few WW2 movies on a par with it IMO.

  72. @War for Blair Mountain
    Since we are on the topic of evolutionary psychology....I think.....

    Jimmy Steward’s daughter is the World Expert on Lowland Male Gorilla inter-Tribal Warfare..She wrote a book about this and you can order the book from Amazon..........wow!!! this does seem relevant in 2018 doesn’t it?.......Yet they passed the 1965 Nonwhite Legal Immigrant Increase Act......I mean...who the F ordered this Act?

    Lowland Male Gorilla inter-Tribal Warfare

    That actually sounds like a way cool calvinball kind of topic.

    Maybe someone could sell the warring tribes various armaments and maybe some booze too. That could liven things up a bit, although I’m sure they don’t need much help.

    There is so much interesting real stuff in this world.

    Like, with Lowland Male Gorilla inter-Tribal Warfare out there, who needs professional sports or Netflix, for that matter?

    Why isn’t this a reality show?

  73. @F0337

    Whit Bissell was a WASP blueblood and yachtsman who came out to Hollywood in his 40s
     
    https://i.pinimg.com/236x/a1/e5/7c/a1e57cf014fc2ab487a60635bedb2781--buy-sand-book-jacket.jpg

    So maybe her hysteria is a tad histrionic?
     

    Omg, major Archer fan here!

    Love the reference, thanks.

  74. Brown’s daddy was actor Whit Bissell.
    If that don’t ring a bell, perhaps this’ll:
    He played Gov’nor Santini
    In the film Soylent Green. He
    choked on Edward G. Robinson’s gristle.

    • LOL: Nicholas Stix
  75. @Jack D
    The writing is key - if you look at the Star Trek TV shows from the same era, the sets are really cheesy. The costumes, the props, the effects - they are all crude - like something for a high school play. (They knew that you would watch these shows on a blurry 23" TV and so any fine details would be a waste of $ anyway.) America was a poorer country then and they didn't have millions of $ to spend on each episode. But, the writing on some of the episodes was pretty good, so they hold up despite the lack of production values.

    Even as a kid, I thought “Star Trek” was risibly schlocky, the writing included. Those papier-mâché boulders, the way the actors would toss themselves around to imitate being hurdled, the inclusion of Majel Barrett (even before I knew of her love connection with Gene Roddenberry).

    It was fun to watch it with my sister, a die-hard fan, and make fun of it.

    This doesn’t include the wonderful episode written by Harlan Ellison, “The City on the Edge of Forever”. That was just marvelous.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Majel Barrett had a certain Monroesque quality, although to be fair like almost all the rest of the ST:TOS cast she had little real acting ability. (Doohan was an accomplished accent specialist, and DeForest Kelley had done reasonable if not stellar work playing bad guys in westerns, but for the most part they were, to be blunt, terrible actors. They call Liza Minnelli "William Shatner with a vagina" for good reason: both are unbelievably bad at the sine qua non of acting, which is the ability to portray someone besides one's self on stage or film.)


    One of the saddest aspects of the death of Marilyn Monroe at the time it happened to me is that it's impossible to imagine any woman physically filling out the TOS female Star trek uniform any better. She would have been a magnificent guest star.

  76. @D. K.
    My (Jewish) brother-in-law graduated from the Haverford School, before heading off to Harvard College:

    https://www.haverford.org

    Haverford School (K-12 boys prep day school) was once upon a time affiliated with the college but got spun off over a century ago and nowadays the only thing they share is the name.

    Among its most famous alumni is Jennifer Finney Boylan, which is strange because it’s a boy’s school. But she was James in her Haverford School days.

    • Replies: @Flip
    Haverford, Swarthmore, and Bryn Mawr are historically Quaker colleges. Not sure if the Quakers are politically leftist these days. They were very financially successful in the United Kingdom.
  77. @Brabantian
    The Time Tunnel! Although a TV show (1966-67) with rubbish implausible scripting in its 'adventures in history' (where we learned that everyone in ancient Greece etc spoke English) - the cheesy writing part of why it was cancelled -

    The tunnel itself was the coolest sci-fi thing on TV, ever. Here is a 96-second clip from the initial episode, the magnificent first ever trip through time. Background is that US gov with a cranky Senator are about to cancel funding, and so the young project leader takes the personal risk to show the tunnel works, even tho not all is ready yet. Glorious with the visuals and sound effects -
    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2bmp

    The Avengers (another show with iffy budget but stellar writing) had a time travel episode, with, of all people, Horace Rumpole’s head of chambers as the bad guy. They called the bluff of how easy it would be to effect “time travel” with planning and costumes, provided the subject is first softened up with a much cheaper time tunnel, which worked like a psychedelic take on a carnival funhouse floor.

  78. @Hippopotamusdrome


    I yelled at my husband last night. Not pick-up-your-socks yell. Not how-could-you-ignore-that-red-light yell. This was real yelling. This was 30 minutes of from-the-gut yelling.

     

    Woman lets out agonizing screams as Trump is sworn in

    Woman lets out agonizing screams as Trump is sworn in

    Demons let out agonizing screams and starts flying about wildly as Trump is sworn in and as Gorsuch is sworn is and Kavanaugh is sworn in.

  79. @RichardTaylor
    I'm finding these New England "WASP" types to be borderline freak shows. From the Puritans, to the alcohol prohibition zealots, to the fashionable socialists in the early 20th century, down to the modern social justice warriors.

    Seems that real America was more centered in Virginia in the early days. The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they've always had a more European attitude toward things.

    The evil WASP/JEW ruling class of the American Empire must be dislodged from power.

    Victoria Bissell Brown must be relocated to sub-Saharan Africa.

    Victoria Bissell Brown can scream all she wants in sub-Saharan Africa. Hopefully, her screaming at her husband in the African jungle will gain the attention of one of those creatures out of a Tarzan movie.

    Munch, munch.

  80. @F0337
    Good find.

    We romanticize male pursuit, we validate the idea that physical beauty is a legitimate cue for such pursuit
     
    Speaking of rage....

    yes, she’s enraged.

    But, the fact remains that many men DO want to possess women to a degree that they go crazy with jealousy and rage and then act it out violently. Theodore Dalrymple has talked about this repeatedly. He says that the desire for exclusive sexual possession is what lies behind so much domestic violence. Not that these men will be faithful themselves, just that they don’t want their woman to look at or talk to another man.

    My sister had a relationship like this once. Her boyfriend was so jealous that he insisted that she not even talk to male classmates. She told the guys in her study group not to call her anymore. Of course, this all ended very badly. Very badly.

    Male pursuit is a wonderful and very dangerous phenomenon. While feminism won’t do anything to help, don’t pretend that Brown doesn’t have a point.

  81. So her Dad was a charming component of legacy America… a society that was not the Pleasantville Hellscape that (((Hollywood))) presented to my generation when we were children (in my case I was a tiny Anglo* immigrantº learning about this country by two degrees of separation, temporal and cultural) but, more probably, 1950s America was a reasonably nice place for Anglo Gentiles to live, at least compared to any of the major American cities in 2018. Her father may as well have played the father in Bye Bye Birdie: Prof. Bissell Brown is demonstrably one of us, more or less. She’s become deranged because our women are wonderfully compassionate– WHEN they stay in their lane.

    The problem is that our enemies have realized that having the best Moms of any race is a liability if those Moms can be convinced they ought to care about electoral politics.

    The naturalization act of 1790 was your first slip. Abolition of property-holding requirements between 1792 and 1856 were the second. Women’s Suffrage was the banana peel, and down went your nation like a doleful Buster Keaton, wondering what happened all the way to the pavement.

    Most of us, men, women, white, black, Jewish, we were never cut out to hold political opinions. Democracy divides and undermines.

    You gave your power away for free: https://www.jimgoad.net/pdf/violence/lets.pdf


    *Ireland is part of the Anglosphere yeah? …Gents?
    ºI self-deported, though; ah sure lookit

  82. @Redneck farmer
    You read this column and still don't know there are occasionally really random genetic disasters?

    Or that leftists spend huge amounts of time and money attempting to indoctrinate children against their parents’ values?

  83. @RichardTaylor
    I'm finding these New England "WASP" types to be borderline freak shows. From the Puritans, to the alcohol prohibition zealots, to the fashionable socialists in the early 20th century, down to the modern social justice warriors.

    Seems that real America was more centered in Virginia in the early days. The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they've always had a more European attitude toward things.

    The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they’ve always had a more European attitude toward things.

    There was no love lost between “Puritans” and “Europeans.” In fact, the former moved to the New World in large part because the latter hated their guts.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    There was no love lost between “Puritans” and “Europeans.” In fact, the former moved to the New World in large part because the latter hated their guts.
     
    But I wonder if that was a fundamental difference in worldview between the Puritans and Europeans? They both agreed that everyone in society had to obey their ideology. The Puritans weren’t looking for freedom of religion. Not at all.

    They both believe in a priestly class that the lower classes are supposed to look up to as opposed to a more populist worldview.
  84. @Jack D
    Haverford School (K-12 boys prep day school) was once upon a time affiliated with the college but got spun off over a century ago and nowadays the only thing they share is the name.

    Among its most famous alumni is Jennifer Finney Boylan, which is strange because it's a boy's school. But she was James in her Haverford School days.

    Haverford, Swarthmore, and Bryn Mawr are historically Quaker colleges. Not sure if the Quakers are politically leftist these days. They were very financially successful in the United Kingdom.

    • Replies: @Benjaminl
    I went to a graduation at one of those colleges about ten years ago.

    It was very, very Woke.
  85. @Jack D
    In that case he probably deserves both because he was an absent father.

    He marries her mom when they are both in their 20s and then trades mom in on a new model when he is still in his prime, she is still a little girl and mom is about to hit the wall. Mom trains daughter to hate men. She (mostly) makes an exception for her cucky mild mannered husband who is nothing like dad, but she still hates men in general and every once in a while her rage spill over onto her husband. He has learned to ignore it.

    Your assessment sounds likely.

  86. @Brabantian
    The Time Tunnel! Although a TV show (1966-67) with rubbish implausible scripting in its 'adventures in history' (where we learned that everyone in ancient Greece etc spoke English) - the cheesy writing part of why it was cancelled -

    The tunnel itself was the coolest sci-fi thing on TV, ever. Here is a 96-second clip from the initial episode, the magnificent first ever trip through time. Background is that US gov with a cranky Senator are about to cancel funding, and so the young project leader takes the personal risk to show the tunnel works, even tho not all is ready yet. Glorious with the visuals and sound effects -
    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2bmp

    George Lucas is apparently a fan. That’s definitely where Luke and Darth Vader fought.

  87. Kenneth MacDonald was also in that scene from the Caine Mutiny as one of the court martial board members. He was in a lot of Three Stooges shorts.

  88. Anon[327] • Disclaimer says:

    I suspect this prof’s main issue is retirement. For someone with hystronic personality disorder, no more audience of rapt students to listen to her to her bloviating by the hour is utter agony. Now she’s a nobody, doing dishes and cooking and laundry like an ordinary person and brooding over the loss of all that status and worshipful attention. So she resorts to screaming at her husband to get attention from him, and she’s coming up with all sorts of fake excuses to justify her rotten behavior towards her spouse.

    He’s probably finding out how much he dislikes the ‘twice as much spouse and half as much money’ syndrome, and I’m willing to bet they’re locked in a vicious circle of him ducking and dodging her all he can while she keeps on escalating her hysterical rages to yet another level in response. Her taking to the media to complain is just one more step in the process.

  89. I recently saw the 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers with Donald Sutherland and Brooke Adams. I was amazed how similar the pod people were to modern progressives in crowd situations. When they realize you aren’t one of them, they point at you and emit a high pitched shriek which is the signal for everyone in the vicinity to chase you down and kill you. That liberals are all extraterrestrial invaders works about as well as the hypothesis that they are all having a nervous breakdown.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    The 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a great movie. Karen Allen was a complete babe then.
  90. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kylie
    Even as a kid, I thought "Star Trek" was risibly schlocky, the writing included. Those papier-mâché boulders, the way the actors would toss themselves around to imitate being hurdled, the inclusion of Majel Barrett (even before I knew of her love connection with Gene Roddenberry).

    It was fun to watch it with my sister, a die-hard fan, and make fun of it.

    This doesn't include the wonderful episode written by Harlan Ellison, "The City on the Edge of Forever". That was just marvelous.

    Majel Barrett had a certain Monroesque quality, although to be fair like almost all the rest of the ST:TOS cast she had little real acting ability. (Doohan was an accomplished accent specialist, and DeForest Kelley had done reasonable if not stellar work playing bad guys in westerns, but for the most part they were, to be blunt, terrible actors. They call Liza Minnelli “William Shatner with a vagina” for good reason: both are unbelievably bad at the sine qua non of acting, which is the ability to portray someone besides one’s self on stage or film.)

    One of the saddest aspects of the death of Marilyn Monroe at the time it happened to me is that it’s impossible to imagine any woman physically filling out the TOS female Star trek uniform any better. She would have been a magnificent guest star.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    I never got Marilyn Monroe. I didn't think she was that hot physically and her ditz persona turned me off.

    Sophia Loren is another matter altogether.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/IF0AAOSwGzhaD5of/s-l300.jpg
    , @Reg Cæsar

    ... although to be fair like almost all the rest of the ST:TOS cast she had little real acting ability.
     
    Sydney J Harris once wrote that he wasn't impressed by those actors, like John Wayne, who could only play one role, ie, themselves. He was on the edge about whether to include Katherine Hepburn among them.

    But that seems to have always been the rule in Hollywood. Everyone was a character actor. Streepish chameleons were the rare exception.
  91. @Jack D
    In that case he probably deserves both because he was an absent father.

    He marries her mom when they are both in their 20s and then trades mom in on a new model when he is still in his prime, she is still a little girl and mom is about to hit the wall. Mom trains daughter to hate men. She (mostly) makes an exception for her cucky mild mannered husband who is nothing like dad, but she still hates men in general and every once in a while her rage spill over onto her husband. He has learned to ignore it.

    I think you are right. Who didn’t know someone with a bitter divorcée for a mom growing up?

  92. @JimB
    I recently saw the 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers with Donald Sutherland and Brooke Adams. I was amazed how similar the pod people were to modern progressives in crowd situations. When they realize you aren’t one of them, they point at you and emit a high pitched shriek which is the signal for everyone in the vicinity to chase you down and kill you. That liberals are all extraterrestrial invaders works about as well as the hypothesis that they are all having a nervous breakdown.

    The 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a great movie. Karen Allen was a complete babe then.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a great movie. Karen Allen was a complete babe then.
     
    She was. And she wasn't in that movie.
    , @duncsbaby
    Brooke Adams was in Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Funnily enough I remember reading a Rolling Stone article from the early 80's where they talked about Brooke always being mistaken for Karen Allen. Both of them were babes & pretty good actresses. Brooke has been married to Tony Shalhoub for many years now. Tony played Antonio Scarpacci on Wings, referred to in an earlier comment about visa lottery.
  93. @Anonymous
    Majel Barrett had a certain Monroesque quality, although to be fair like almost all the rest of the ST:TOS cast she had little real acting ability. (Doohan was an accomplished accent specialist, and DeForest Kelley had done reasonable if not stellar work playing bad guys in westerns, but for the most part they were, to be blunt, terrible actors. They call Liza Minnelli "William Shatner with a vagina" for good reason: both are unbelievably bad at the sine qua non of acting, which is the ability to portray someone besides one's self on stage or film.)


    One of the saddest aspects of the death of Marilyn Monroe at the time it happened to me is that it's impossible to imagine any woman physically filling out the TOS female Star trek uniform any better. She would have been a magnificent guest star.

    I never got Marilyn Monroe. I didn’t think she was that hot physically and her ditz persona turned me off.

    Sophia Loren is another matter altogether.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    One of the great long term beauties, Loren's severe Italian accent limited her Hollywood career pretty badly. Lollabrigida also had an accent but hers was more "generic European" sounding whereas with Loren you knew you were dealing with a native Italian, much like with Bardot she could be nothing but French.

    Monroe to me had the perfect female body shape, as did the admittedly lesser actress Barbara Eden. Both shared the same stand-in, a plain faced woman named Evelyn Moriarty.
    , @Brutusale
    Not to denigrate Marilyn or Goddess Sophia in any way, but this actress did a great job of filling out the uniform. Alas, her divorce also gave us Obama.

    https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fimages2.fanpop.com%2Fimage%2Fphotos%2F10600000%2FSeven-of-Nine-seven-of-nine-10677661-1200-1500.jpg&f=1
    , @I, Libertine
    Her rival Gina Lollabrigida gave Loren a run for her money during their days in the italian cinema, although Sophia surpassed her when they came to America. Sophia had the advantage of being seven years younger.
  94. Majel Barrett had a certain Monroesque quality…

    Her father was killed in the line of duty:

    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14808478/william-r-hudec

    https://www.odmp.org/officer/6792-patrolman-william-hudec

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I didn't know this. Very sad.

    Ironically given her father's death, Majel Barrett Roddenberry voiced the automated commands used for rail warning systems:

    Railroad voicework

    The Southern Pacific Railroad used her voice talent contained inside Harmon Electronics (of Grain Valley, MO) track-side defect detector devices, used in various locations west of the Mississippi River. When a defect is identified on the passing train, the system responds with her recorded voice announcing the defect location information to the train crew over the radio. In railroad forums and railroad radio monitoring groups, she was and is still referred to as the "SP Lady". However, with the implementation of newer hotbox detector technology, finding her voice today on working detectors is very rare. The hotbox detectors that had her voice installed in them were not upgradeable to the newer digital signaling requirements, and finding parts for them was problematic. Today, her voice is found on smaller regional railroads, usually only at dragging equipment locations, such as in California at milepost 24.6 on the Metrolink Lancaster line (under the I-5 and I-210 interchange in Sylmar), and in Oregon on the Portland & Western at milepost 746.5, near Lake Oswego. These voiced detectors remain because the lines were once owned by Southern Pacific, and because only two unchanging recorded messages are used, compared to the dynamic changing library used in hotbox detectors. The only major railroad that still uses her voice today is Union Pacific.[15]
     

    As an aside, I worked at Harmon in Grain Valley once, after it had been bought out by GE. I also worked at the GE (now Synchrony) call center on 67th street putting in installed paging and security wiring in the old Monkey Wards building and then as a temp years later doing CS work. A very enlightening, if poor paying, experience.
  95. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buster Keaton’s Stunt Double

    The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they’ve always had a more European attitude toward things.
     
    There was no love lost between “Puritans” and “Europeans.” In fact, the former moved to the New World in large part because the latter hated their guts.

    There was no love lost between “Puritans” and “Europeans.” In fact, the former moved to the New World in large part because the latter hated their guts.

    But I wonder if that was a fundamental difference in worldview between the Puritans and Europeans? They both agreed that everyone in society had to obey their ideology. The Puritans weren’t looking for freedom of religion. Not at all.

    They both believe in a priestly class that the lower classes are supposed to look up to as opposed to a more populist worldview.

    • Replies: @Buster Keaton’s Stunt Double

    But I wonder if that was a fundamental difference in worldview between the Puritans and Europeans? They both agreed that everyone in society had to obey their ideology. The Puritans weren’t looking for freedom of religion. Not at all.

    They both believe in a priestly class that the lower classes are supposed to look up to as opposed to a more populist worldview.
     
    Recent American history (most pertinently the example of the Supreme Court) seems to suggest that those who do not have a “priestly class” to help ensure “that everyone in society ha[s] to obey their ideology” will eventually be ruled by those that do.
  96. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    I never got Marilyn Monroe. I didn't think she was that hot physically and her ditz persona turned me off.

    Sophia Loren is another matter altogether.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/IF0AAOSwGzhaD5of/s-l300.jpg

    One of the great long term beauties, Loren’s severe Italian accent limited her Hollywood career pretty badly. Lollabrigida also had an accent but hers was more “generic European” sounding whereas with Loren you knew you were dealing with a native Italian, much like with Bardot she could be nothing but French.

    Monroe to me had the perfect female body shape, as did the admittedly lesser actress Barbara Eden. Both shared the same stand-in, a plain faced woman named Evelyn Moriarty.

    • Replies: @Truth

    Monroe to me had the perfect female body shape, as did the admittedly lesser actress Barbara Eden.
     
    (Cough...cough.)
  97. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Majel Barrett had a certain Monroesque quality...
     
    Her father was killed in the line of duty:

    https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14808478/william-r-hudec

    https://www.odmp.org/officer/6792-patrolman-william-hudec

    I didn’t know this. Very sad.

    Ironically given her father’s death, Majel Barrett Roddenberry voiced the automated commands used for rail warning systems:

    Railroad voicework

    The Southern Pacific Railroad used her voice talent contained inside Harmon Electronics (of Grain Valley, MO) track-side defect detector devices, used in various locations west of the Mississippi River. When a defect is identified on the passing train, the system responds with her recorded voice announcing the defect location information to the train crew over the radio. In railroad forums and railroad radio monitoring groups, she was and is still referred to as the “SP Lady”. However, with the implementation of newer hotbox detector technology, finding her voice today on working detectors is very rare. The hotbox detectors that had her voice installed in them were not upgradeable to the newer digital signaling requirements, and finding parts for them was problematic. Today, her voice is found on smaller regional railroads, usually only at dragging equipment locations, such as in California at milepost 24.6 on the Metrolink Lancaster line (under the I-5 and I-210 interchange in Sylmar), and in Oregon on the Portland & Western at milepost 746.5, near Lake Oswego. These voiced detectors remain because the lines were once owned by Southern Pacific, and because only two unchanging recorded messages are used, compared to the dynamic changing library used in hotbox detectors. The only major railroad that still uses her voice today is Union Pacific.[15]

    As an aside, I worked at Harmon in Grain Valley once, after it had been bought out by GE. I also worked at the GE (now Synchrony) call center on 67th street putting in installed paging and security wiring in the old Monkey Wards building and then as a temp years later doing CS work. A very enlightening, if poor paying, experience.

  98. @Flip
    Haverford, Swarthmore, and Bryn Mawr are historically Quaker colleges. Not sure if the Quakers are politically leftist these days. They were very financially successful in the United Kingdom.

    I went to a graduation at one of those colleges about ten years ago.

    It was very, very Woke.

  99. anonymous[414] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve been saying for years on this blog that the American spirit started in Virginia. It’s a shame we have a holiday (Thanksgiving) dedicated to the Puritan wackos. Not coincidental that was added to the calendar after the civil war.

    Excellent point. It was embarrassing to the Union leaders to keep recognizing the first English settlement in America was Jamestown – in Virginia!

    So, they misrepresented history and started saying Plymouth Rock was the first, and started pushing the “first” Thanksgiving mythology to rally the country around a New England genesis.

  100. @Ganderson
    I enjoyed the Time Tunnel, too. I think Bissell was also in The Manchurian Candidate .

    Whit Bissell was everywhere! His voice is more deeply etched in my memory than perhaps any other. The man worked, and he always had job offers on tap. He must have had the most organized agent in Hollywood.

  101. @Jack D
    In that case he probably deserves both because he was an absent father.

    He marries her mom when they are both in their 20s and then trades mom in on a new model when he is still in his prime, she is still a little girl and mom is about to hit the wall. Mom trains daughter to hate men. She (mostly) makes an exception for her cucky mild mannered husband who is nothing like dad, but she still hates men in general and every once in a while her rage spill over onto her husband. He has learned to ignore it.

    “The personal is political” was a frequently heard feminist rallying cry, especially during the late 1960s and 1970s. The exact origin of the phrase is unknown and sometimes debated. Many second-wave feminists used the phrase “the personal is political” or its underlying meaning in their writing, speeches, consciousness-raising, and other activities.

    Source: Linda Napikoski is a former writer for ThoughtCo [web site] who contributed articles on feminism, with a focus on the feminist movements of the 1960s and 1970s. She has examined women’s literature, feminism, and the legal issues surrounding gender in academic settings and through “real world” activism.

    Looks like Professor Brown agrees with the motto and fits the profile, perhaps despite herself marrying at age 20.

  102. @Anonymous

    There was no love lost between “Puritans” and “Europeans.” In fact, the former moved to the New World in large part because the latter hated their guts.
     
    But I wonder if that was a fundamental difference in worldview between the Puritans and Europeans? They both agreed that everyone in society had to obey their ideology. The Puritans weren’t looking for freedom of religion. Not at all.

    They both believe in a priestly class that the lower classes are supposed to look up to as opposed to a more populist worldview.

    But I wonder if that was a fundamental difference in worldview between the Puritans and Europeans? They both agreed that everyone in society had to obey their ideology. The Puritans weren’t looking for freedom of religion. Not at all.

    They both believe in a priestly class that the lower classes are supposed to look up to as opposed to a more populist worldview.

    Recent American history (most pertinently the example of the Supreme Court) seems to suggest that those who do not have a “priestly class” to help ensure “that everyone in society ha[s] to obey their ideology” will eventually be ruled by those that do.

  103. @Jim Don Bob
    The 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a great movie. Karen Allen was a complete babe then.

    The 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a great movie. Karen Allen was a complete babe then.

    She was. And she wasn’t in that movie.

  104. @Mr. Anon
    One of Bissel's co-stars in The Trouble with Tribbles was William Schallert - another one of those ubiquitous character actors you see and say "Oh, that guy, wasn't he also in......."

    You describe exactly the thought process that resulted in comment #62.

  105. @Not Raul
    Bones: Jim, I’ve figured it out. All we have to do is quit feeding them. If we quit feeding them, they stop breeding.
  106. @RichardTaylor
    I'm finding these New England "WASP" types to be borderline freak shows. From the Puritans, to the alcohol prohibition zealots, to the fashionable socialists in the early 20th century, down to the modern social justice warriors.

    Seems that real America was more centered in Virginia in the early days. The Puritan New England types have always hated the rest of us and they've always had a more European attitude toward things.

    The ones with brains and initiative left for greener, more open pastures. See Tom Wolfe’s writing about Josiah Grinnell in Hooking Up.

  107. @Jim Don Bob
    I never got Marilyn Monroe. I didn't think she was that hot physically and her ditz persona turned me off.

    Sophia Loren is another matter altogether.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/IF0AAOSwGzhaD5of/s-l300.jpg

    Not to denigrate Marilyn or Goddess Sophia in any way, but this actress did a great job of filling out the uniform. Alas, her divorce also gave us Obama.

    https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2Fimages2.fanpop.com%2Fimage%2Fphotos%2F10600000%2FSeven-of-Nine-seven-of-nine-10677661-1200-1500.jpg&f=1

  108. @Jim Don Bob
    I never got Marilyn Monroe. I didn't think she was that hot physically and her ditz persona turned me off.

    Sophia Loren is another matter altogether.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/IF0AAOSwGzhaD5of/s-l300.jpg

    Her rival Gina Lollabrigida gave Loren a run for her money during their days in the italian cinema, although Sophia surpassed her when they came to America. Sophia had the advantage of being seven years younger.

    • Replies: @Marty
    Claudia Cardinale better looking than either.
  109. I think you mean Victor Bissel Brown.

  110. @Anonymous
    One of the great long term beauties, Loren's severe Italian accent limited her Hollywood career pretty badly. Lollabrigida also had an accent but hers was more "generic European" sounding whereas with Loren you knew you were dealing with a native Italian, much like with Bardot she could be nothing but French.

    Monroe to me had the perfect female body shape, as did the admittedly lesser actress Barbara Eden. Both shared the same stand-in, a plain faced woman named Evelyn Moriarty.

    Monroe to me had the perfect female body shape, as did the admittedly lesser actress Barbara Eden.

    (Cough…cough.)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Are you saying either of them weren't female?? They fooled a hell of a lot of people if that's the case.

    As far as Eden not being that great an actress, her film career ended early for a reason. The small screen suited her better and episodic TV allowed her to stay in her range nicely.
  111. @I, Libertine
    Her rival Gina Lollabrigida gave Loren a run for her money during their days in the italian cinema, although Sophia surpassed her when they came to America. Sophia had the advantage of being seven years younger.

    Claudia Cardinale better looking than either.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Any one of the three could eat crackers in my bed.

    As could Daniella Bianchi of 007 fame:

    http://www.james-bond.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/daniela-bianchi.jpg
  112. @Anonymous
    Majel Barrett had a certain Monroesque quality, although to be fair like almost all the rest of the ST:TOS cast she had little real acting ability. (Doohan was an accomplished accent specialist, and DeForest Kelley had done reasonable if not stellar work playing bad guys in westerns, but for the most part they were, to be blunt, terrible actors. They call Liza Minnelli "William Shatner with a vagina" for good reason: both are unbelievably bad at the sine qua non of acting, which is the ability to portray someone besides one's self on stage or film.)


    One of the saddest aspects of the death of Marilyn Monroe at the time it happened to me is that it's impossible to imagine any woman physically filling out the TOS female Star trek uniform any better. She would have been a magnificent guest star.

    … although to be fair like almost all the rest of the ST:TOS cast she had little real acting ability.

    Sydney J Harris once wrote that he wasn’t impressed by those actors, like John Wayne, who could only play one role, ie, themselves. He was on the edge about whether to include Katherine Hepburn among them.

    But that seems to have always been the rule in Hollywood. Everyone was a character actor. Streepish chameleons were the rare exception.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    And yet you can always tell it’s Streep though. Bale looks like he’s trying to hit your ideal. Also Theron.
  113. In William Friedkin’s cinematic revelation To Live And Die In LA, the counterfeiting sequence from which film belongs in a museum, where does the $50,000 come from? I thought Thomas had a phone book in the briefcase. Was that actually the money in a particular envelope?

  114. @Reg Cæsar

    ... although to be fair like almost all the rest of the ST:TOS cast she had little real acting ability.
     
    Sydney J Harris once wrote that he wasn't impressed by those actors, like John Wayne, who could only play one role, ie, themselves. He was on the edge about whether to include Katherine Hepburn among them.

    But that seems to have always been the rule in Hollywood. Everyone was a character actor. Streepish chameleons were the rare exception.

    And yet you can always tell it’s Streep though. Bale looks like he’s trying to hit your ideal. Also Theron.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Bale disappears into his roles. So does Tom Hardy, and DiCaprio to a lesser extent.
  115. @Desiderius
    And yet you can always tell it’s Streep though. Bale looks like he’s trying to hit your ideal. Also Theron.

    Bale disappears into his roles. So does Tom Hardy, and DiCaprio to a lesser extent.

  116. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Truth

    Monroe to me had the perfect female body shape, as did the admittedly lesser actress Barbara Eden.
     
    (Cough...cough.)

    Are you saying either of them weren’t female?? They fooled a hell of a lot of people if that’s the case.

    As far as Eden not being that great an actress, her film career ended early for a reason. The small screen suited her better and episodic TV allowed her to stay in her range nicely.

  117. I don’t think anybody has mentioned that Bissell was in the opening and closing scenes added to the original Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

  118. @Marty
    Claudia Cardinale better looking than either.

    Any one of the three could eat crackers in my bed.

    As could Daniella Bianchi of 007 fame:

  119. @Thulean Friend
    It's been well known that higher-educated women, living in big cities (and unmarried as Steve likes to remind us) are the biggest left-wing activists on social media.

    She is basically a hypercharged version of that, given her extra wealth. Why is this? They know of their privilege and want to somehow compensate for it. They tried to attack their own whiteness, but the left goes after them as beckys anyway.

    Being faghags worked for a while, but it is no longer cool to just be pro-gay, you have to be pro-tranny and increasingly even pro-paedophilia. So the only thing that's left is their core mission: to demonise white men in perpetuity and shame all white women who refuse to participate in the patricide as "internalising their own oppression".


    Of course, if some races have men which sexually harass women far more than other races (as we have seen in the streetwalking videos made popular a few years ago) or seen in rape statistics, then this must be hushed down. These women don't care about the truth so much as getting at least a sliver of the status they so desperately yearn, and if women of their own race have to be thrown down the train tracks, so be it.

    it is no longer cool to just be pro-gay, you have to be pro-tranny and increasingly even pro-paedophilia.

    “pro-paedophilia”? Ehh? What the heck are you talking about?

  120. @James Speaks
    The Viet Nam failure was that McNamara et al thought we could bomb the people of Viet Nam into submission. My data points with people from Viet Nam are few in number, but overwhelmingly positive. I ask two questions: What, exactly, did we think we could achieve, and why would we want to harm these people? I know that after having been (counter) attacked by Viet Cong, one might come to hate Viet Cong, but it was their country and they were defending it against colonists.

    The trouble with Tribble was that they were born pregnant.

    Tribbles pregnant…great idea…you illuminated some other angles. Thank you.

  121. @Jim Don Bob
    The 1978 version of Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a great movie. Karen Allen was a complete babe then.

    Brooke Adams was in Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Funnily enough I remember reading a Rolling Stone article from the early 80’s where they talked about Brooke always being mistaken for Karen Allen. Both of them were babes & pretty good actresses. Brooke has been married to Tony Shalhoub for many years now. Tony played Antonio Scarpacci on Wings, referred to in an earlier comment about visa lottery.

  122. @James Speaks
    The Viet Nam failure was that McNamara et al thought we could bomb the people of Viet Nam into submission. My data points with people from Viet Nam are few in number, but overwhelmingly positive. I ask two questions: What, exactly, did we think we could achieve, and why would we want to harm these people? I know that after having been (counter) attacked by Viet Cong, one might come to hate Viet Cong, but it was their country and they were defending it against colonists.

    The trouble with Tribble was that they were born pregnant.

    The Viet Nam failure was that McNamara et al thought we could bomb the people of Viet Nam into submission.

    There was a couple of whiz kids in the Pentagon that thought carpet bombing a turd world shithole would get Uncle Ho to give up and go back up north. This was instead of sending a million troops to occupy S.Vietnam and kick the NVA out. Not much to bomb in a twsh, so of course it didn’t work.

    Also there was the whole WWIII cloud hanging over the deal; LBJ was certain if he went to far, too fast, that’s what he would get.

    What, exactly, did we think we could achieve, and why would we want to harm these people? I know that after having been (counter) attacked by Viet Cong, one might come to hate Viet Cong, but it was their country and they were defending it against colonists

    .

    We get the commies out of SVN, so the catholics and Buddhists could cut each others throats. That was going to be the ultimate result had we succeeded in booting the commies.

    It was a civil war, just like Korea, Iraq/Kuwait, and Afghanistan. We always seem to pick the loser side to support.

    • Replies: @Anon

    We always seem to pick the loser side to support.
     
    The US has a general idea that to side with us is a sort of self-betrayal. So we always go in despising our friends and admiring our enemies. Not great for morale. Then we have the idea when we're actually present that we're going to show these benighted people the American Way and they're going to stop doing it wrong, the way they keep doing. That's not such a great idea either. Like the IPKF going in to show those poor ignorant Ceylonese the Indian Way of getting along-- it doesn't work.

    But we don't always back losers; take Pinochet, for a random instance. It helped that we weren't too heavily in evidence in that case.
  123. Whit played the govt man in Hud, came out to tell them it’s hoof and mouth and they got to shoot the herd.

    That was a great scene with the cowboys pumping lead, and then the govt guys in their Gorton’s fisherman rain gear pouring on the quick lime.

    And never did we see one dead critter; it was all in your imagination.

  124. Anon[649] • Disclaimer says:
    @gunner29

    The Viet Nam failure was that McNamara et al thought we could bomb the people of Viet Nam into submission.
     
    There was a couple of whiz kids in the Pentagon that thought carpet bombing a turd world shithole would get Uncle Ho to give up and go back up north. This was instead of sending a million troops to occupy S.Vietnam and kick the NVA out. Not much to bomb in a twsh, so of course it didn't work.

    Also there was the whole WWIII cloud hanging over the deal; LBJ was certain if he went to far, too fast, that's what he would get.

    What, exactly, did we think we could achieve, and why would we want to harm these people? I know that after having been (counter) attacked by Viet Cong, one might come to hate Viet Cong, but it was their country and they were defending it against colonists
     
    .

    We get the commies out of SVN, so the catholics and Buddhists could cut each others throats. That was going to be the ultimate result had we succeeded in booting the commies.

    It was a civil war, just like Korea, Iraq/Kuwait, and Afghanistan. We always seem to pick the loser side to support.

    We always seem to pick the loser side to support.

    The US has a general idea that to side with us is a sort of self-betrayal. So we always go in despising our friends and admiring our enemies. Not great for morale. Then we have the idea when we’re actually present that we’re going to show these benighted people the American Way and they’re going to stop doing it wrong, the way they keep doing. That’s not such a great idea either. Like the IPKF going in to show those poor ignorant Ceylonese the Indian Way of getting along– it doesn’t work.

    But we don’t always back losers; take Pinochet, for a random instance. It helped that we weren’t too heavily in evidence in that case.

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