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This picture of the Chicago Cubs’ Wrigley Field looks like somebody set off a tactical nuke in my old apartment on North Clarendon in Lakeview.

 
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  1. OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Bigdicknick:

    John Birch Society VINDICATED!
    , @Cagey Beast
    Truly this is Alex Jones' "I told you so" summer.
    , @JimB

    About 66% of U.S. residents receive fluoridated water. A new study finds increased levels of fluoride exposure during pregnancy were associated with declines in IQ in children
     
    Yeah, but the study subjects were Canadian, not American. And the researchers did not control for race. Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim and Caribbean immigrants live, fluoridate their water. Overwhelmingly white rural Canada gets their water from wells and aquifers, hence no added fluoride. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation.
    , @JimB

    About 66% of U.S. residents receive fluoridated water. A new study finds increased levels of fluoride exposure during pregnancy were associated with declines in IQ in children
     
    Yeah, but the study subjects were Canadian, not American. And the researchers did not control for race. Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim and Caribbean immigrants live, fluoridate their water. Overwhelmingly white rural Canada gets their water from wells and aquifers, hence no added fluoride. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation.
    , @Hypnotoad666
    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:

    https://youtu.be/iAHJCPoWCC8

    , @AnotherDad
    OPE
    , @dr kill
    Reading about people responding to this study caused me to drop 4 points. This is real click bait.
    , @Aft
    You mean: Smart fluoride independent researchers proven mostly correct


    The studies have been around for a long time:
    http://fluoridealert.org/studies/brain01/
  2. The whole picture “looks” unreal. Too many pixels?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I thought it was a photo at first, then an illustration. Now I'm back to thinking it being a photo. The color of the light reflecting off the cloud at sunset likely adds to odd hyperrealistic effect that it's makes it look fake.
  3. What the hell happened to the Torco sign?

    • Replies: @Wolf Barney
    The Torco sign in right field has been gone since 1995. A lot of changes to Wrigley Field over the years. My first game was 50 years ago, August of 1969, the year they blew the pennant. They had about an 8 game lead at the time, then folded in September as the Mets won the division and then the World Series.
  4. @newrouter
    The whole picture "looks" unreal. Too many pixels?

    I thought it was a photo at first, then an illustration. Now I’m back to thinking it being a photo. The color of the light reflecting off the cloud at sunset likely adds to odd hyperrealistic effect that it’s makes it look fake.

    • Replies: @sayless
    Sailer everyone knows you did it and don’t try to pretend otherwise.
    , @newrouter
    I don't think the photo looks fake but hyper pointillistic. Here's some pointism:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Sunday_Afternoon_on_the_Island_of_La_Grande_Jatte#/media/File:Georges_Seurat_-_A_Sunday_on_La_Grande_Jatte_--_1884_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg
  5. @Bigdicknick
    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:
    https://twitter.com/KTLA/status/1163644055978311682

    Bigdicknick:

    John Birch Society VINDICATED!

    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    In my younger days I did a research project on the flouridation issue, and it turns out that flouride was a by-product of aluminum production during WWII.

    Alcoa couldn't figure out what to do with the waste--and some bright scientist on staff came up with the "its good for your teeth" idea.

    The public relations carrots and stick team worked on the dental professional association and political carrot and sticks team went to work on the local politicians and voila--flouridation of public water supplies.

    If there were any side effects you could be certain Alcoa could care less.

    And that...is the history of flouridation--it was a kleptocratic corporate plot, not a commie one.
  6. @Steve Sailer
    I thought it was a photo at first, then an illustration. Now I'm back to thinking it being a photo. The color of the light reflecting off the cloud at sunset likely adds to odd hyperrealistic effect that it's makes it look fake.

    Sailer everyone knows you did it and don’t try to pretend otherwise.

    • LOL: Bubba, Mr McKenna
  7. @Steve Sailer
    I thought it was a photo at first, then an illustration. Now I'm back to thinking it being a photo. The color of the light reflecting off the cloud at sunset likely adds to odd hyperrealistic effect that it's makes it look fake.

    I don’t think the photo looks fake but hyper pointillistic. Here’s some pointism:

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    That's a whole lot more pleasing to my artistic sense than most of the material out of the Modernist school, NewRouter. At what gallery might I see more of your work?
  8. I went to see a game there with a friend in May about 15 or more seasons ago, when my friend still lived in Chicago. We must have moved seats about 4 times to try to stay in the sunshine to keep from freezing our asses. It is indeed the Windy City.

    That’s a cool picture of a maturing thunderboomer in which the high clouds coming off of it (the anvil) must have a hole in the right place for the sun to shine on the whole 20-odd thousand feet of cloud shaft (but not too high, or the bottoms wouldn’t be so dark). Telephoto lenses can do cool stuff. Or else, photoshop.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    An April baseball game in Wrigley Field can be the coldest place in the world.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    We must have moved seats about 4 times to try to stay in the sunshine to keep from freezing our asses. It is indeed the Windy City.
     
    Then don't go to any games out east. Every city on the Atlantic seaboard is windier than Chicago. Some by a lot. The nickname comes from the late-19th-century bluster of the city's boosters.

    Toronto's old Exhibition Stadium abutted Lake Ontario in right field. Only a narrow service road, with no shoulder, ran between. One kid spilled a whole bag of popcorn in the bleachers near me, and everyone in the section had to get out of there. The gulls took over.


    It was right out of Hitchcock. Except the birds, like the crowd, were white. I don't blame Dave Winfield one bit.

    https://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2013/08/02/the_dave_winfield_seagull_incident_vs_toronto_blue_jays_at_exhibition_stadium_30_years_later_an_oral_history.html



    https://media1.tenor.com/images/725446d448161d9c10bc6747ea41eae7/tenor.gif?itemid=11839420
    , @Dieter Kief
    Beautiful!


    Looks like an anvil type of cloud developing.
    It's true that telephoto-lenses can do cool stuff, but only when used (I particularly don't use them very often, and when, then only the rather smallish 85 mm, hardly 100mm). This foto is taken with a wide-angle lens (cf. the tapering of the people in the foreground).

    Except for that, I don't much like it when natural phenomena (and natural beauty) is being mixed up with horror. But then: The picture is really beautiful, and Steve Sailer posted it, so, my Christian heart already is back in his mildly morning mood (a slight lie, ok). The world is beautiful! - Especially - - - - Eight Miles High!, - Achmed!

  9. @Achmed E. Newman
    I went to see a game there with a friend in May about 15 or more seasons ago, when my friend still lived in Chicago. We must have moved seats about 4 times to try to stay in the sunshine to keep from freezing our asses. It is indeed the Windy City.

    That's a cool picture of a maturing thunderboomer in which the high clouds coming off of it (the anvil) must have a hole in the right place for the sun to shine on the whole 20-odd thousand feet of cloud shaft (but not too high, or the bottoms wouldn't be so dark). Telephoto lenses can do cool stuff. Or else, photoshop.

    An April baseball game in Wrigley Field can be the coldest place in the world.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    That's why we went in May. ;-}
    , @EdwardM
    Closely followed by a July night game at the old Candlestick Park in San Francisco. The new location is not much better.
  10. @Steve Sailer
    An April baseball game in Wrigley Field can be the coldest place in the world.

    That’s why we went in May. ;-}

  11. Going to be there on Thursday…Wrigley Field…. not your old apartment!

  12. You shoulda bought your building back then.
    I marvel at the success of the Cubs. I recall,as a yoot,watching the Cubs play on a cool,drizzly day,in the 1960s,before a “crowd” of 77 people. Brickhouse and Lloyd Pettit,the best hockey announcer of all time,ably provided play by play.
    The pic is fake,innit?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I marvel at the success of the Cubs. I recall,as a yoot,watching the Cubs play on a cool,drizzly day,in the 1960s,before a “crowd” of 77 people.
     
    Must have been an exhibition, or batting practice. The lowest official attendance ever at Wrigley, according to Andy Pafko's biography, was his major league debut in 1943: 342.

    SABR confirms this:

    https://sabr.org/research/andy-pafko-darling-1945-cubs

    Perhaps you were at the one in 1966 with an attendance of 530:

    https://www.bleedcubbieblue.com/2016/9/22/13015498/cubs-attendance-530-september-1966


    Of course, these are only official figures. Maybe they're grossly inflated!

  13. An April baseball game in Wrigley Field can be the coldest place in the world

    Not since the Metrodome came down.

  14. @Bigdicknick
    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:
    https://twitter.com/KTLA/status/1163644055978311682

    Truly this is Alex Jones’ “I told you so” summer.

    • Agree: bomag, GermanReader2
  15. Did you live in one of Epstein’s buildings?

  16. I don’t think the photo looks fake but hyper pointillistic. Here’s some pointism

    That’s in Chicago, too. Not what’s portrayed, but the actual canvas itself.

    A few steps away from this:

  17. 1988 is when the lights were installed. Is that why you left?

    Before my first– only– visit to Wrigley, I thought it was the best ballpark in the world. That weekend I learned instead that it wasn’t even the best ballpark in Chicago. They saved the wrong one!

    Better than a mushroom cloud beyond right field would be an extinct volcano, as at Les Murakami Baseball Stadium:

    This is a nice print of Rockwood Field in Birmingham, the oldest park in baseball:


    It’s well-preserved, even though the Barons moved to a new park years ago.

    Besides Rickwood, the one I want to visit before my last out is the 1924-vintage Koshien Stadium, home of the Hanshin Tigers, whose fans are kind of like the Cubs, Red Sox, and Brooklyn Dodgers’ all rolled into one. The rest of Japanese baseball appears to have moved indoors.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Do I want to know what those balloons are supposed to be?
  18. @Will
    What the hell happened to the Torco sign?

    The Torco sign in right field has been gone since 1995. A lot of changes to Wrigley Field over the years. My first game was 50 years ago, August of 1969, the year they blew the pennant. They had about an 8 game lead at the time, then folded in September as the Mets won the division and then the World Series.

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    I think Pritzker owned it. He took out the toilets,though so Dear Leader and the Mrs had to run to a nearby gas station.
  19. @Bigdicknick
    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:
    https://twitter.com/KTLA/status/1163644055978311682

    About 66% of U.S. residents receive fluoridated water. A new study finds increased levels of fluoride exposure during pregnancy were associated with declines in IQ in children

    Yeah, but the study subjects were Canadian, not American. And the researchers did not control for race. Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim and Caribbean immigrants live, fluoridate their water. Overwhelmingly white rural Canada gets their water from wells and aquifers, hence no added fluoride. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation.

    • Replies: @Hans
    “The prevalence of dental caries in a population is not inversely related to the concentration of fluoride in enamel, and a higher concentration of enamel fluoride is not necessarily more efficacious in preventing dental caries.” SOURCE: CDC. 2001. Recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. Mortality and Morbidity Weekly Review 50(RR14):1-42.

    The Fluoride Deception: An Interview with Christopher Bryson - https://youtu.be/Ly_QP4rGczo

    Dr. Griffin Cole: FDA Should Ban All Fluoride Supplements - https://youtu.be/TYiiErZF-NM

    http://fluoridealert.org/

    , @BengaliCanadianDude

    Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim
     
    Errr....not so sure about that one, chief.

    I grew up in a Muslim household( but not Muslim anymore), and had friends who were Muslim. I don't ever recall that happening. In fact, that might even be a bit of a euphemism. It didn't happen. Full stop.
  20. @Wolf Barney
    The Torco sign in right field has been gone since 1995. A lot of changes to Wrigley Field over the years. My first game was 50 years ago, August of 1969, the year they blew the pennant. They had about an 8 game lead at the time, then folded in September as the Mets won the division and then the World Series.

    I think Pritzker owned it. He took out the toilets,though so Dear Leader and the Mrs had to run to a nearby gas station.

  21. @Bigdicknick
    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:
    https://twitter.com/KTLA/status/1163644055978311682

    About 66% of U.S. residents receive fluoridated water. A new study finds increased levels of fluoride exposure during pregnancy were associated with declines in IQ in children

    Yeah, but the study subjects were Canadian, not American. And the researchers did not control for race. Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim and Caribbean immigrants live, fluoridate their water. Overwhelmingly white rural Canada gets their water from wells and aquifers, hence no added fluoride. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    Fluoridation IS a communist plot! Or at least it's an example of Thomas Sowell's wisdom:" There are no solutions, only tradeoffs".
    , @J.Ross
    So the Swiss are just trying to save money?
  22. Gee, they would take out the folks in the bleachers.

  23. @JimB

    About 66% of U.S. residents receive fluoridated water. A new study finds increased levels of fluoride exposure during pregnancy were associated with declines in IQ in children
     
    Yeah, but the study subjects were Canadian, not American. And the researchers did not control for race. Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim and Caribbean immigrants live, fluoridate their water. Overwhelmingly white rural Canada gets their water from wells and aquifers, hence no added fluoride. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation.

    Fluoridation IS a communist plot! Or at least it’s an example of Thomas Sowell’s wisdom:” There are no solutions, only tradeoffs”.

  24. @Father O'Hara
    You shoulda bought your building back then.
    I marvel at the success of the Cubs. I recall,as a yoot,watching the Cubs play on a cool,drizzly day,in the 1960s,before a "crowd" of 77 people. Brickhouse and Lloyd Pettit,the best hockey announcer of all time,ably provided play by play.
    The pic is fake,innit?

    I marvel at the success of the Cubs. I recall,as a yoot,watching the Cubs play on a cool,drizzly day,in the 1960s,before a “crowd” of 77 people.

    Must have been an exhibition, or batting practice. The lowest official attendance ever at Wrigley, according to Andy Pafko’s biography, was his major league debut in 1943: 342.

    SABR confirms this:

    https://sabr.org/research/andy-pafko-darling-1945-cubs

    Perhaps you were at the one in 1966 with an attendance of 530:

    https://www.bleedcubbieblue.com/2016/9/22/13015498/cubs-attendance-530-september-1966

    Of course, these are only official figures. Maybe they’re grossly inflated!

    • Replies: @Doc Dynamo
    It's well known that many Cubs fans are not people.
  25. @Achmed E. Newman
    I went to see a game there with a friend in May about 15 or more seasons ago, when my friend still lived in Chicago. We must have moved seats about 4 times to try to stay in the sunshine to keep from freezing our asses. It is indeed the Windy City.

    That's a cool picture of a maturing thunderboomer in which the high clouds coming off of it (the anvil) must have a hole in the right place for the sun to shine on the whole 20-odd thousand feet of cloud shaft (but not too high, or the bottoms wouldn't be so dark). Telephoto lenses can do cool stuff. Or else, photoshop.

    We must have moved seats about 4 times to try to stay in the sunshine to keep from freezing our asses. It is indeed the Windy City.

    Then don’t go to any games out east. Every city on the Atlantic seaboard is windier than Chicago. Some by a lot. The nickname comes from the late-19th-century bluster of the city’s boosters.

    Toronto’s old Exhibition Stadium abutted Lake Ontario in right field. Only a narrow service road, with no shoulder, ran between. One kid spilled a whole bag of popcorn in the bleachers near me, and everyone in the section had to get out of there. The gulls took over.

    It was right out of Hitchcock. Except the birds, like the crowd, were white. I don’t blame Dave Winfield one bit.

    https://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2013/08/02/the_dave_winfield_seagull_incident_vs_toronto_blue_jays_at_exhibition_stadium_30_years_later_an_oral_history.html

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Then don’t go to any games out east. Every city on the Atlantic seaboard is windier than Chicago.
     
    What??? Most of baseball season is during the summer, and almost all of the East, unless you are 5 miles from the coast, gets only very light wind in the summer. The wind picks up for thunderstorms, and that's the only time you can feel that nice cool air coming down from 10,000 ft or higher and the wind with it.

    Chicago gets the wind generated from a cycle of the air over land being warmer, rising, and letting the cooler air from over the lake come blowing in to replace it. This is a really localized effect, same as with the sea breezes at the coast, but that effect only goes for a few miles. Atlanta is waaaay inland, Philly is too (yes I know it's on a wide section of the Delaware), maybe Boston and Baltimore get some wind.

    At the ruins of Shea Stadium, now called "Citi Field" the wind's not the problem. You just can't hear shit every minute and a half, when a plane climbs out off Giardia. It's much better now, however, than when they were 727s and 737-100/200s... well unless you LIKE airplanes!
  26. @Bigdicknick
    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:
    https://twitter.com/KTLA/status/1163644055978311682

    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:

  27. @Bigdicknick
    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:
    https://twitter.com/KTLA/status/1163644055978311682

    OPE

  28. I recently found myself watching a half dozen movies starring Ben Affleck, due to my marital proximity to a lovely cis-woman who deserves much more reciprocal devotion than a few mere hours of subpar melodrama.

    In “The Sum of All Fears” in which dear Ben plays the perennial role of a CIA desk jockey analyst become hero, the city of Baltimore is destroyed by a nuclear bomb placed by euro-neo-nazis in a totally illogical scheme to entice the US and and Russia to destroy the Earth, thus enabling the Fourth Reich to preside over the post-Apocalypse.

    As the mushroom cloud ascended over Baltimore, I thought, “meh…”

    • Agree: Alden
  29. @Achmed E. Newman
    I went to see a game there with a friend in May about 15 or more seasons ago, when my friend still lived in Chicago. We must have moved seats about 4 times to try to stay in the sunshine to keep from freezing our asses. It is indeed the Windy City.

    That's a cool picture of a maturing thunderboomer in which the high clouds coming off of it (the anvil) must have a hole in the right place for the sun to shine on the whole 20-odd thousand feet of cloud shaft (but not too high, or the bottoms wouldn't be so dark). Telephoto lenses can do cool stuff. Or else, photoshop.

    Beautiful!

    Looks like an anvil type of cloud developing.
    It’s true that telephoto-lenses can do cool stuff, but only when used (I particularly don’t use them very often, and when, then only the rather smallish 85 mm, hardly 100mm). This foto is taken with a wide-angle lens (cf. the tapering of the people in the foreground).

    Except for that, I don’t much like it when natural phenomena (and natural beauty) is being mixed up with horror. But then: The picture is really beautiful, and Steve Sailer posted it, so, my Christian heart already is back in his mildly morning mood (a slight lie, ok). The world is beautiful! – Especially – – – – Eight Miles High!, – Achmed!

  30. Meanwhile, at RT:

    First they came for the bots: US academics make case for 1984-style silencing of any dissent

    Social media platforms must expand their definitions of “coordinated inauthentic behavior” beyond the usual bots-and-trolls model to include conversations about topics harmful to the state if they hope to curb the spread of disinformation on their platforms, a trio of University of Washington researchers insist in a paper released ahead of the 2019 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work. To help in this quest, the researchers have redefined “disinformation” to include truths arranged to serve a purpose.

    I’m sure such papers have been eased out of academia’s orifices before.

    Going to the source (wasn’t Starbird in a Star Wars installment?)

    Disinformation as Collaborative Work: Surfacing the Participatory Nature of Strategic Information Operations

    KATE STARBIRD, Human Centered Design & Engineering, University of Washington
    AHMER ARIF, Human Centered Design & Engineering,University of Washington
    TOM WILSON, Human Centered Design & Engineering,University of Washington

    In this paper, we argue that strategic information operations (e.g. disinformation, political propaganda, and other forms of online manipulation) are a critical concern for CSCW researchers, and that the CSCW community can provide vital insight into understanding how these operations function—by examining them as collaborative “work” within online crowds. First, we provide needed definitions and a framework for conceptualizing strategic information operations, highlighting related literatures and noting historical context. Next, we examine three case studies of online information operations using a sociotechnical lens that draws on CSCW theories and methods to account for the mutual shaping of technology, social structure, and human action. Through this lens, we contribute a more nuanced understanding of these operations (beyond “bots” and “trolls”) and highlight a persistent challenge for researchers, platform designers, and policymakers—distinguishing between orchestrated, explicitly coordinated, information operations and the emergent, organic behaviors of an online crowd

    Good idea but the tech-marketing-cum-SJ-warriorship jargon gives me nausea.

    Best passage which reveals sudden existentialist dread:

    Crucially, we have observed that our own backgrounds and positions make it difficult to problematize certain aspects of information operations. For instance, when the information operations in our case studies amplified messages laden with progressive values (shared by members of our research team), we found ourselves wrestling with creeping doubt and skepticism about our interpretations of these operations as problematic — or as operations at all. We noticed these dissonances are intersectional [what does that even mean?]. For example, messages that critique evidence using anti-imperialist or anti-positivist frames generated considerable tensions for those of us from decolonized countries and who are invested in the view that knowledge is situated and socially constructed [why are you people even writing a paper?]. Surfacing these tensions helped us be generative and intimate in our research (because it reduces the distance between us and our “subjects”). These tensions sensitized us to how disinformation operations can effectively sow doubt and create confusion—not just in imaginary Others [big O notation], but ourselves.

    Oh God. “Are you sure this operation is problematic? … Could we be the disinformation campaign?” (sweats)

    Anyway, here is a graph. I’m not sure I can make sense of it through the legend only.

    unz.com prominent!

  31. Looks like someone used the “N-Bomb” to open up some territory for gentrification. I guess some people just can’t wait to destroy all those public housing projects.

  32. @Steve Sailer
    An April baseball game in Wrigley Field can be the coldest place in the world.

    Closely followed by a July night game at the old Candlestick Park in San Francisco. The new location is not much better.

    • Agree: Paleo Liberal
  33. @Reg Cæsar

    We must have moved seats about 4 times to try to stay in the sunshine to keep from freezing our asses. It is indeed the Windy City.
     
    Then don't go to any games out east. Every city on the Atlantic seaboard is windier than Chicago. Some by a lot. The nickname comes from the late-19th-century bluster of the city's boosters.

    Toronto's old Exhibition Stadium abutted Lake Ontario in right field. Only a narrow service road, with no shoulder, ran between. One kid spilled a whole bag of popcorn in the bleachers near me, and everyone in the section had to get out of there. The gulls took over.


    It was right out of Hitchcock. Except the birds, like the crowd, were white. I don't blame Dave Winfield one bit.

    https://www.thestar.com/news/insight/2013/08/02/the_dave_winfield_seagull_incident_vs_toronto_blue_jays_at_exhibition_stadium_30_years_later_an_oral_history.html



    https://media1.tenor.com/images/725446d448161d9c10bc6747ea41eae7/tenor.gif?itemid=11839420

    Then don’t go to any games out east. Every city on the Atlantic seaboard is windier than Chicago.

    What??? Most of baseball season is during the summer, and almost all of the East, unless you are 5 miles from the coast, gets only very light wind in the summer. The wind picks up for thunderstorms, and that’s the only time you can feel that nice cool air coming down from 10,000 ft or higher and the wind with it.

    Chicago gets the wind generated from a cycle of the air over land being warmer, rising, and letting the cooler air from over the lake come blowing in to replace it. This is a really localized effect, same as with the sea breezes at the coast, but that effect only goes for a few miles. Atlanta is waaaay inland, Philly is too (yes I know it’s on a wide section of the Delaware), maybe Boston and Baltimore get some wind.

    At the ruins of Shea Stadium, now called “Citi Field” the wind’s not the problem. You just can’t hear shit every minute and a half, when a plane climbs out off Giardia. It’s much better now, however, than when they were 727s and 737-100/200s… well unless you LIKE airplanes!

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Come to Fenway Park in April or October. Bring your woolies.

    FYI, Boston is the windiest major city in America, as anyone who has spent time on Commonwealth Avenue during the winter can attest.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2015/10/28/windiest-city-usa-jackson-chicago/74744454/

  34. @Bigdicknick
    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:
    https://twitter.com/KTLA/status/1163644055978311682

    Reading about people responding to this study caused me to drop 4 points. This is real click bait.

  35. @Bigdicknick
    OT: Crazy fluoride conspiracists possibly partly correct:
    https://twitter.com/KTLA/status/1163644055978311682

    You mean: Smart fluoride independent researchers proven mostly correct

    The studies have been around for a long time:
    http://fluoridealert.org/studies/brain01/

  36. @newrouter
    I don't think the photo looks fake but hyper pointillistic. Here's some pointism:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Sunday_Afternoon_on_the_Island_of_La_Grande_Jatte#/media/File:Georges_Seurat_-_A_Sunday_on_La_Grande_Jatte_--_1884_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

    That’s a whole lot more pleasing to my artistic sense than most of the material out of the Modernist school, NewRouter. At what gallery might I see more of your work?

  37. @Reg Cæsar
    1988 is when the lights were installed. Is that why you left?

    Before my first-- only-- visit to Wrigley, I thought it was the best ballpark in the world. That weekend I learned instead that it wasn't even the best ballpark in Chicago. They saved the wrong one!


    Better than a mushroom cloud beyond right field would be an extinct volcano, as at Les Murakami Baseball Stadium:


    https://iamoffthetrack.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/imag0307.jpg


    This is a nice print of Rockwood Field in Birmingham, the oldest park in baseball:


    https://render.fineartamerica.com/images/rendered/medium/print/images-medium-5/10-rickwood-field-frank-romeo.jpg

    It's well-preserved, even though the Barons moved to a new park years ago.


    Besides Rickwood, the one I want to visit before my last out is the 1924-vintage Koshien Stadium, home of the Hanshin Tigers, whose fans are kind of like the Cubs, Red Sox, and Brooklyn Dodgers' all rolled into one. The rest of Japanese baseball appears to have moved indoors.

    https://hiahyogo.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/p7021225.jpg

    https://stadiumjourney.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Koshien3rdBase_preview.jpeg

    Do I want to know what those balloons are supposed to be?

  38. @Dan Hayes
    Bigdicknick:

    John Birch Society VINDICATED!

    In my younger days I did a research project on the flouridation issue, and it turns out that flouride was a by-product of aluminum production during WWII.

    Alcoa couldn’t figure out what to do with the waste–and some bright scientist on staff came up with the “its good for your teeth” idea.

    The public relations carrots and stick team worked on the dental professional association and political carrot and sticks team went to work on the local politicians and voila–flouridation of public water supplies.

    If there were any side effects you could be certain Alcoa could care less.

    And that…is the history of flouridation–it was a kleptocratic corporate plot, not a commie one.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    This is not true either. The introduction of fluoride was a public health measure and a very cost effective one, costing only around $1/person/year and saving many millions of teeth.

    Fluoride is actually a byproduct of phosphate fertilizer production.

    Aluminum fluoride is used in the production of aluminum (and is highly toxic). The fluoride that goes in water is sodium fluoride or, nowadays hexafluorosilicic acid. Hexafluorosilicic acid is a PRECURSOR chemical to aluminum fluoride, not a by-product. I suppose since Alcoa needed large quantities of hexafluorosilicic acid anyway for its smelters, dental use was a secondary market for a product that they were making already anyway, but that's not the same thing as getting rid of a byproduct. The entire market for dental fluoride is a rounding error compared to the amount needed for their smelters. Smelters use this stuff by the ton. For water fluoridation, the recommended concentration is .7 ppm. In other words for every million pounds (125,000 gallons) of water, you need to add .7 lbs. of fluoride - not a big market.
  39. C’mon, it’s just the Cubs’ season going up in smoke yet again

    • Replies: @Kyle
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3fT8bGSRzGE
  40. @JimB

    About 66% of U.S. residents receive fluoridated water. A new study finds increased levels of fluoride exposure during pregnancy were associated with declines in IQ in children
     
    Yeah, but the study subjects were Canadian, not American. And the researchers did not control for race. Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim and Caribbean immigrants live, fluoridate their water. Overwhelmingly white rural Canada gets their water from wells and aquifers, hence no added fluoride. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation.

    “The prevalence of dental caries in a population is not inversely related to the concentration of fluoride in enamel, and a higher concentration of enamel fluoride is not necessarily more efficacious in preventing dental caries.” SOURCE: CDC. 2001. Recommendations for using fluoride to prevent and control dental caries in the United States. Mortality and Morbidity Weekly Review 50(RR14):1-42.

    The Fluoride Deception: An Interview with Christopher Bryson –

    Dr. Griffin Cole: FDA Should Ban All Fluoride Supplements –

    http://fluoridealert.org/

  41. @Justvisiting
    In my younger days I did a research project on the flouridation issue, and it turns out that flouride was a by-product of aluminum production during WWII.

    Alcoa couldn't figure out what to do with the waste--and some bright scientist on staff came up with the "its good for your teeth" idea.

    The public relations carrots and stick team worked on the dental professional association and political carrot and sticks team went to work on the local politicians and voila--flouridation of public water supplies.

    If there were any side effects you could be certain Alcoa could care less.

    And that...is the history of flouridation--it was a kleptocratic corporate plot, not a commie one.

    This is not true either. The introduction of fluoride was a public health measure and a very cost effective one, costing only around $1/person/year and saving many millions of teeth.

    Fluoride is actually a byproduct of phosphate fertilizer production.

    Aluminum fluoride is used in the production of aluminum (and is highly toxic). The fluoride that goes in water is sodium fluoride or, nowadays hexafluorosilicic acid. Hexafluorosilicic acid is a PRECURSOR chemical to aluminum fluoride, not a by-product. I suppose since Alcoa needed large quantities of hexafluorosilicic acid anyway for its smelters, dental use was a secondary market for a product that they were making already anyway, but that’s not the same thing as getting rid of a byproduct. The entire market for dental fluoride is a rounding error compared to the amount needed for their smelters. Smelters use this stuff by the ton. For water fluoridation, the recommended concentration is .7 ppm. In other words for every million pounds (125,000 gallons) of water, you need to add .7 lbs. of fluoride – not a big market.

    • Agree: Kyle
    • Replies: @Alden
    As always, thanks for the real information.
  42. Far away things being in the same sharp focus as very near things in a photo looks fake. Also, the people are not bald from having had their hair flash ignited and then blown off.

    Re precious bodily fluids. http://dose-response.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Jones-1.pdf
    As with most poisons in low doses fluoride has a hormetic effect. Also Porphyromonas gingivalis “an invasive and evasive opportunistic oral pathogen that is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis” is a “‘keystone’ biofilm species in orchestrating a host response”. It is now strongly suspected that P. gingivalis causes heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, diabetes, Parkinson’s, preterm birth, the [much feared] pancreatic cancer, oh and Alzheimers.

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/good-oral-health-may-help-protect-against-alzheimerrsquos

    Gingivitis (gum disease) has been linked to a higher risk of heart disease, but a recent study says that the bacteria that cause gingivitis also may be connected to Alzheimer’s disease. The study was published Jan. 23, 2019, in Science Advances.

    Scientists have previously found that this species of bacteria, called Porphyromonas gingivalis, can move from the mouth to the brain. Once in the brain, the bacteria release enzymes called gingipains that can destroy nerve cells, which in turn can lead to memory loss and eventually Alzheimer’s.

    Are your gums-teeth junctions bulletproof, or are they something else ?

    There is only one way to deal with P. gingivalis. Total commitment. Nuke them with post- flossing chlorhexidine, and brush with fluoride toothpaste twice a day. Gengigel and Vitamin C to heal gums. Don’t overdo the Colgate Peroxyl.

    • Replies: @newrouter
    I wonder what aperture that photograph was made with (f11 ,f16)?
  43. @JimB

    About 66% of U.S. residents receive fluoridated water. A new study finds increased levels of fluoride exposure during pregnancy were associated with declines in IQ in children
     
    Yeah, but the study subjects were Canadian, not American. And the researchers did not control for race. Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim and Caribbean immigrants live, fluoridate their water. Overwhelmingly white rural Canada gets their water from wells and aquifers, hence no added fluoride. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation.

    Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim

    Errr….not so sure about that one, chief.

    I grew up in a Muslim household( but not Muslim anymore), and had friends who were Muslim. I don’t ever recall that happening. In fact, that might even be a bit of a euphemism. It didn’t happen. Full stop.

  44. @JimB

    About 66% of U.S. residents receive fluoridated water. A new study finds increased levels of fluoride exposure during pregnancy were associated with declines in IQ in children
     
    Yeah, but the study subjects were Canadian, not American. And the researchers did not control for race. Urban areas in Canada, where the Muslim and Caribbean immigrants live, fluoridate their water. Overwhelmingly white rural Canada gets their water from wells and aquifers, hence no added fluoride. Correlation does not necessarily imply causation.

    So the Swiss are just trying to save money?

  45. @Sean
    Far away things being in the same sharp focus as very near things in a photo looks fake. Also, the people are not bald from having had their hair flash ignited and then blown off.


    Re precious bodily fluids. http://dose-response.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Jones-1.pdf
    As with most poisons in low doses fluoride has a hormetic effect. Also Porphyromonas gingivalis "an invasive and evasive opportunistic oral pathogen that is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis" is a "‘keystone’ biofilm species in orchestrating a host response". It is now strongly suspected that P. gingivalis causes heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, diabetes, Parkinson's, preterm birth, the [much feared] pancreatic cancer, oh and Alzheimers.


    https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/good-oral-health-may-help-protect-against-alzheimerrsquos

    Gingivitis (gum disease) has been linked to a higher risk of heart disease, but a recent study says that the bacteria that cause gingivitis also may be connected to Alzheimer's disease. The study was published Jan. 23, 2019, in Science Advances.

    Scientists have previously found that this species of bacteria, called Porphyromonas gingivalis, can move from the mouth to the brain. Once in the brain, the bacteria release enzymes called gingipains that can destroy nerve cells, which in turn can lead to memory loss and eventually Alzheimer's.
     

    Are your gums-teeth junctions bulletproof, or are they something else ?

    There is only one way to deal with P. gingivalis. Total commitment. Nuke them with post- flossing chlorhexidine, and brush with fluoride toothpaste twice a day. Gengigel and Vitamin C to heal gums. Don't overdo the Colgate Peroxyl.

    I wonder what aperture that photograph was made with (f11 ,f16)?

  46. @Reg Cæsar

    I marvel at the success of the Cubs. I recall,as a yoot,watching the Cubs play on a cool,drizzly day,in the 1960s,before a “crowd” of 77 people.
     
    Must have been an exhibition, or batting practice. The lowest official attendance ever at Wrigley, according to Andy Pafko's biography, was his major league debut in 1943: 342.

    SABR confirms this:

    https://sabr.org/research/andy-pafko-darling-1945-cubs

    Perhaps you were at the one in 1966 with an attendance of 530:

    https://www.bleedcubbieblue.com/2016/9/22/13015498/cubs-attendance-530-september-1966


    Of course, these are only official figures. Maybe they're grossly inflated!

    It’s well known that many Cubs fans are not people.

  47. @Achmed E. Newman

    Then don’t go to any games out east. Every city on the Atlantic seaboard is windier than Chicago.
     
    What??? Most of baseball season is during the summer, and almost all of the East, unless you are 5 miles from the coast, gets only very light wind in the summer. The wind picks up for thunderstorms, and that's the only time you can feel that nice cool air coming down from 10,000 ft or higher and the wind with it.

    Chicago gets the wind generated from a cycle of the air over land being warmer, rising, and letting the cooler air from over the lake come blowing in to replace it. This is a really localized effect, same as with the sea breezes at the coast, but that effect only goes for a few miles. Atlanta is waaaay inland, Philly is too (yes I know it's on a wide section of the Delaware), maybe Boston and Baltimore get some wind.

    At the ruins of Shea Stadium, now called "Citi Field" the wind's not the problem. You just can't hear shit every minute and a half, when a plane climbs out off Giardia. It's much better now, however, than when they were 727s and 737-100/200s... well unless you LIKE airplanes!

    Come to Fenway Park in April or October. Bring your woolies.

    FYI, Boston is the windiest major city in America, as anyone who has spent time on Commonwealth Avenue during the winter can attest.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2015/10/28/windiest-city-usa-jackson-chicago/74744454/

  48. @Known Fact
    C'mon, it's just the Cubs' season going up in smoke yet again

  49. @Jack D
    This is not true either. The introduction of fluoride was a public health measure and a very cost effective one, costing only around $1/person/year and saving many millions of teeth.

    Fluoride is actually a byproduct of phosphate fertilizer production.

    Aluminum fluoride is used in the production of aluminum (and is highly toxic). The fluoride that goes in water is sodium fluoride or, nowadays hexafluorosilicic acid. Hexafluorosilicic acid is a PRECURSOR chemical to aluminum fluoride, not a by-product. I suppose since Alcoa needed large quantities of hexafluorosilicic acid anyway for its smelters, dental use was a secondary market for a product that they were making already anyway, but that's not the same thing as getting rid of a byproduct. The entire market for dental fluoride is a rounding error compared to the amount needed for their smelters. Smelters use this stuff by the ton. For water fluoridation, the recommended concentration is .7 ppm. In other words for every million pounds (125,000 gallons) of water, you need to add .7 lbs. of fluoride - not a big market.

    As always, thanks for the real information.

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