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George Will Wants the American People to Enjoy More Immigration, Good and Hard
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That’s classic. The only thing better would have been if Will had announced:

“And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what The Economy can do for you—ask what you can do for The Economy. And for immigrants. Them, too. But just don’t ask what’s in the interests of the American people. That’s un-American and un-Democratic.”

 
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  1. Gravity without mass. A superstitial man.

    • LOL: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Pericles
    Lol, excellent.
    , @Henry_Bowman U.C.
    George Will is an atheist which makes him a fool.
    , @AnotherDad

    Gravity without mass. A superstitial man.
     
    Funny ... and spot on.

    To me--a "conservative" not interested in actually conservating anything.

    Will is actually worse that the rentier pols like Romney or Ryan, as Will actually claims to be an "intellectual". But for all his reading and supposed "erudition", his "intellect" has been unable to fathom that you can't conserve a culture or even a set of values, without conserving the people to whom they belong.

    In contrast, as empty and ridiculous as all the left intellectualism is yammering about "white privilege", "patriarchy" and "oppression", at least it's coherent politically. Their idea that there's some diverse rainbow hued utopia out there is probably the dumbest intellectual idea yet ... but at least their intellectual work and policy suggestions are directly on target in seeking to destroy what they hate--traditional Western Christian civilization.

    In contrast George Will is a "conservative" who works to destroy the people, culture and nation that produces what he claims to value.
    , @dr kill
    And he buys his hair at the bazaar as Barr. Come on, Man.
    , @Lagertha
    where are all my comments????????
    , @RWS
    That is amusing -- thanks!
  2. When can we send him to Israel?

  3. He’s just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.

    • Replies: @Lot
    “He’s just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.”

    Yes he is. And that is one economic niche with no Mexican immigrant competition.
    , @Twodees Partain
    Yep, he used to pretend to be a conservative. Now he doesn't even pretend any longer but Conservative Inc. still claims him as one of their own.
    , @Art Deco
    National Review cut ties with him in 1983 when they trashed one of his books. He'd been on the contributor list for about a decade.

    Will at one time had a distinctive voice worth reading (derived, in part, from having been a lapsed professor, unusual among newspaper columnists of his generation). In the last 15 years, he's been a poster child for mandatory retirement (derived, in part no doubt, from listening to his wife, who is the echt Inside Washington type).
  4. Will never got a job. Why should anyone else?

  5. @Alden
    He's just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.

    “He’s just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.”

    Yes he is. And that is one economic niche with no Mexican immigrant competition.

    • LOL: trelane
    • Replies: @216
    National Review has gleefully hired and over-promoted lots of Asian immigrants.

    What they haven't done is pushed Rich Lowry to hand over the editorship.
    , @bored identity
    Really?

    What about that crypto-haplo - I_ɡ_l_ˈiː_z_iə_z_ θ_ˈɪ_k Marranito who just recently fatwaed the Great Awokening on America?

    https://thefederalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Matthew-Yglesias-Is-Super-Smart.png

    Let bored identity guess:

    The only reason Mattetito is not camping with the rest of his TabuLa Raza compatriots in front of local Home Depot is because he is much smarter than 99.9 % of native, pundit-aspiring, blue-eyed devils.

    Oy, Caramba!

    https://otb.cachefly.net/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/matthew_yglesias.jpg
    , @bored identity
    Really?

    What about that crypto-haplo - I_ɡ_l_ˈiː_z_iə_z_ θ_ˈɪ_k Maranito who just recently fatwaed the Great Awokening on America?

    https://thefederalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Matthew-Yglesias-Is-Super-Smart.png

    Let bored identity guess:

    Mattetito is not camping in front of his local Home Depot with the rest of his TabuLa Raza compatriots, ONLY because he is smarter than 99.9 % of native, pundit-aspiring, blue-eyed devils.

    https://otb.cachefly.net/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/matthew_yglesias.jpg
    , @Prester John
    Though I agree with Will concerning the dangers of out-of-control government, I have otherwise soured on him over the years--particularly concerning the subject at hand, wherein he exhibits typical Beltway myopia.
  6. I believe Will is a rather religious man.

    Someone should remind him of a few Bible verses, e.g. “the love of money is the root of all evil”; “gain the world, lose your soul.”

    • Replies: @syonredux

    I believe Will is a rather religious man.
     
    Not really....

    Will is a self-described "amiable, low voltage atheist."
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Will#Religious_beliefs
    , @Federalist
    George Will is an atheist, but he can go to hell all the same.
    , @Art Deco
    His daughter was baptized ca. 1981, but his public remarks in the last 20 years have been hostile. John Derbyshire and Stephen Chapman of the Chicago Tribune have had the same turnabout.
    , @MarcB.
    Will's dissatisfied with his chances of ever regaining relevance so he made a calculated decision to leave as much scorched earth in his wake as possible as he makes his exit.
    , @Alden
    I once had a vague impression he was a Catholic. Or went to a catholic school. Or taught a course in Conservative Fuddy Duddyism at some Catholic college. Something Catholic
  7. With all his articles, interviews, opinions, lately, and now, inconceivably, full-on-board, with endless immigration. He pontificates more than ever, about the morality and necessity to have the world’s poor bust down our borders. It is obvious he has accepted the money from you know who, to lash at the bodies of Deplorables until they submit to the ultimate dominion of the Oligarchs/Technocrats/Bankers, who own the Dem party. He had to find a new patron once he so vaingloriously announced that he has left the Republican party. He is a world-class hypocrite and jerk. I hated him 30 years ago.

    • Agree: Abe, TWS, Charles Pewitt
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    With all his articles, interviews, opinions, lately, and now, inconceivably, full-on-board, with endless immigration. He pontificates more than ever, about the morality and necessity to have the world’s poor bust down our borders.

    Meant to type: with endless immigration, he pontificates more than ever, about the morality...

    not that it matters, but it grates on my nerves when I don't proofread!
  8. Can he really believe that b.s.?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    It's what's believed by everyone with whom he associates. He went from a faculty household in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois to Trinity College in Hartford to Oxford to Princeton to the University of Toronto to Michigan State to the ranks of what critics call 'courtier intellectuals' in Washington (which included berths at National Review and the Washington Post Writers' Group). He lived in a handsome section of Montgomery County, Md. 'ere decamping to Georgetown. His first wife was (and remains, I believe) a lobbyist for the social services industry. His second wife is a lobbyist and pr agent for various business interests (betwixt and between stints doing pr for politicians e.g. Bob Dole). One of his children is an associate with a BigLaw firm, posted to Hong Kong. The closest he's been to vernacular Americans would be his middle son (an FBI agent) and his first set of in-laws (who ran a luncheonette in Hartford, Ct); the late Mr. and Mrs. Marion are likely to have given him a somewhat off-center perspective on the immigrant experience and they were French Canadians.
  9. As much as immigrants need the economy? Hmm. So basically as many human beings there are In the world who could survive a trip to U.S. territory and who have material wants and needs. Meaning most people on earth. Why not just say you’re for unlimited immigration?

    George Will is as boring as there are people in the world who aren’t economically satisfied.

  10. More immigrants, Scotty! Faster!

    Captain! The ship can’t take it!

    That’s an order, Mr. Scott.

    Aye, Captain.

  11. The cucks were never anything but the Washington Generals. Bring in the crowds losing hooray

  12. So is Will saying that immigrants are a burden or a boon? I don’t understand.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    George is saying that immigrants are good for the Economy and the Economy is here to serve immigrants, and nobody/nothing else (e.g., the American people) matters in this relationship.
    , @Lot
    Immigration from India is punishment/reparations for people who resembled Americans colonizing India 70-200 years.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/07/opinion/immigration-reparations.html
  13. I only Enoch Powell hadn’t used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell’s “rivers of blood” rhetoric.

    At least that’s been one of the longest-lived alibis “conservatives” have used to explain why they just never seem to be able to restrict immigration. Unto the second generation:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg Betrays Fans By Opposing Enoch Powell’s Famous Speech
    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/04/14/jacob-rees-mogg-betrays-fans-opposing-enoch-powells-famous-speech/

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I only Enoch Powell hadn’t used such inflammatory language
     
    And what "inflammatory language" was that? All I see, from his own words, is

    How dare I stir up trouble and inflame feelings by repeating such a conversation?

    The answer is that I do not have the right not to do so.

    The "inflammation", if any, is from the people he quoted. "Enoch Powell was right" will turn into "Enoch Powell was a cuck."


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/3643823/Enoch-Powells-Rivers-of-Blood-speech.html
    , @Dan Hayes
    Cagey Beast:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg's unfortunate comments can either be attributed to misplaced filial devotion or inherited political crassness. Too bad, since until these unfortunate utterances I had held JR-M in high regard!
    , @TWS
    If you call understating the naked truth, 'inflammatory'.
    , @Massimo Heitor

    I only Enoch Powell hadn’t used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell’s “rivers of blood” rhetoric.
     
    No. Powell's speech was fine. Many influential people were eager to twist Powell's words in the most negative light possible, and even people like you accept that. Politics follows culture. When enough of the culture deems a particular view such as immigration restriction unacceptable, politics will likely follow.

    BTW, Powell called the speech the "Birmingham Speech". Opponents branded it the "River of Blood" speech. The exact quote was actually more mild and reasonable:

    "as I look ahead, I am filled with foreboding; like the Roman, I seem to see 'the River Tiber foaming with much blood'."
     
    , @anonymous
    god i hate this boomer horseshit. please drown yourself in a golf course pond.


    yeah, its enoch powell's fault, not our enemies. if you just cuck more they'll be sure to listen to you next time! because if there's anything you haven't tried it's completely cucking on every fucking issue of culture and politics and language that ever fucking arose in your lifetime.

    for "conservatives" cucking--like socialism for liberals--just hasn't been tried hard enough!

    "he made it impothibble!", the cuck lisped. yes, enoch made it impossible. not retarded cuckservatives who tripped all over themselves to do things like declare martin luther king and nelson mandela (both literally communist agents intentionally destroying white anglo societies) their heroes.


    what a humiliating thing for you to write.

  14. I agree with the goggle-headed old mummy – let’s welcome as many immigrants as the economy can take. The economy can take minus 10,000,000 immigrants.

    • Agree: bomag
  15. Homo economicus.

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle. Exactly.

    Now the likes of Will, David French, Jonah Goldberg are pleading for civility. No civility for these bastards, I want their world destroyed.

    I will vote hardcore socialist Bernie, hardcore crazy Ocasio-Cortez before I will ever again pull the lever for a Cuck. The Cucks are the major problem. They are the backstabbers. Just say no to Cucks.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Daniel H:

    Another Buchanan witticism: Dershowitz always appears to have his ears cocked for the wail of an ambulance.
    , @MBlanc46
    There probably can’t be a party-political way forward—if there can be a party-political way forward—without the demise of the Repubs.
    , @Charles Pewitt

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle. Exactly.

     

    That sonofabitch poodle boy bastard George Will once puffed out his chicken chest at Pat Buchanan on a TV show to show off his shirt that was made somewhere else besides America, and he was proud to do it.

    George Will is like that dickhead who said it didn't matter whether it was potato chips or computer chips that a nation made.

    George Will is a treasonous globalizer rat!
    , @William Badwhite

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle.
     
    America's grandmother. Will is and always has been an effete putz.
    , @Stan d Mute

    I will vote hardcore socialist Bernie, hardcore crazy Ocasio-Cortez before I will ever again pull the lever for a Cuck.
     
    Easier said than done, at least for me. I voted for the mulatto communist as protest against J Treason McStain and Mittens Bigamy. But it’s one thing to check the box and another thing to put the ballot in the mail I found. Both times I fed my vote to my shredder.

    Still, staying home and letting the imbeciles decide seems to be working great as a strategy of accelerationism.
    , @Cuckshamers Local 319
    I confess, 30+ years ago I thought Will was cool.

    Well he may have been the man of the hour back then, but he has not aged well. Vs in the 15 years I've been reading Steve he has only grown in my estimation, simply because Steve keeps speaking harsh truth even when it costs him.

    Reading Will now would be painful. I recall a line from many years ago, from memory approximately "In the future America will interbreed to become a nice healthy shade of light brown." In 2019 that's the definition of cuck. Farewell, George Will, you and your bow tie.
  16. I date you guys to read Adam Serwer and John Green and Hank Green from the vlogbrothers

    You will change your mind

    America was built on evil and People of Color will pull us out of our rut

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    If we’re built on evil, why would we deserve it?
    , @Steve in Greensboro
    And take us to the sunlit uplands of places like Congo and Zimbabwe.
    , @216
    Your asking us to take "chick-lit" writers seriously?

    Given that Steve is allegedly read by lots of journos that don't credit him, why not get Sarah Jeong fired, and give Steve her job.

    After all, white men are only able to attract loser Asian women like Sarah. It's not like she's going to suffer.
    , @Louis Renault
    Would that be the new POC folks or the old ones still on welfare going into those 7,000,000 unfilled jobs?
  17. @Ian Smith
    So is Will saying that immigrants are a burden or a boon? I don’t understand.

    George is saying that immigrants are good for the Economy and the Economy is here to serve immigrants, and nobody/nothing else (e.g., the American people) matters in this relationship.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    "The economy needs immigration as much as the immigrants need the economy"
     
    This is both logically and factually false AND glib and shallow. It’s the worst of both worlds as far as opinions go. And if it were insincere, too, it would complete the trifecta.
    , @Alec Leamas
    Ahhh, you can hear the patriotic sportsball chants now, can't you? "North American GDP Zone One! North American GDP Zone One!"
  18. Will is still alive?

    Was he ever?

    • Replies: @bomag
    LOL

    Will is one of those Conservatives who conserve nothing.
  19. It used to be that conservatives could count on other conservatives having similar political views. If nothing else, the Trump administration has greatly clarified who stands where.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    the Trump administration has greatly clarified who stands where.
     
    Who stands where?
    , @Kolya Krassotkin
    Will is a paycheck conservative, who, like all good whores, tries to give whoever pays him the most the greatest satisfaction.
  20. A commenter once wrote something in the comments to this blog along the lines of this, “If we take in the whole world, the USA will have 100 percent of global GDP.”

    • LOL: Arclight, Hail
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    I have to concede, I can’t find a flaw in that argument.
    , @Twinkie

    A commenter once wrote something in the comments to this blog along the lines of this, “If we take in the whole world, the USA will have 100 percent of global GDP.”
     
    That’s similar to “If we made everyone in the world an American, then there would be zero illegal immigration.”
  21. I think Will is an atheist, actually.

    And note that no one hears about “standard of living” anymore. Back when I was boy, America used to boast about having the “world’s highest standard of living.” Now all you hear about is “world’s largest economy.”

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    The countries that perhaps have higher standards of living have demographic differences that are........ controversial if you point them out.
    , @TTSSYF
    Quite true.
    , @Prester John
    He is, tho' like the late Nat Hentoff ( a liberal atheist) he not only supports religious liberty but he is also anti-abortion .
    , @Simply Simon
    Isn't standard of living a relative term applied to each individual? You can bet George has a very high standard of living compared to some slob living under a bridge. Which BTW, we have large numbers living under throughout the USA. Traveling through that liberal Mecca of Austin Texas I find that under the bridge and overpasses some of the inhabitants have set up rather elaborate housekeeping facilities. The Austin City Council agonizes daily about what can be done about these eyesores always talking of more affordable housing which is a joke because even those with moderate incomes can no longer afford housing in Austin. The Council can only mean free housing but the conundrum is how to satisfy the NIMBY crowd.
    , @Alden
    California has one third of the welfare population of the entire country. We’re also the world’s 5th largest economy. I’ve wondered if all those EBT cards used at Walmart and Home Depot have contributed to California’s rise from 8th to 5th largest economy in the last few years?
  22. @Cagey Beast
    I only Enoch Powell hadn't used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell's "rivers of blood" rhetoric.

    At least that's been one of the longest-lived alibis "conservatives" have used to explain why they just never seem to be able to restrict immigration. Unto the second generation:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg Betrays Fans By Opposing Enoch Powell’s Famous Speech
    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/04/14/jacob-rees-mogg-betrays-fans-opposing-enoch-powells-famous-speech/

    I only Enoch Powell hadn’t used such inflammatory language

    And what “inflammatory language” was that? All I see, from his own words, is

    How dare I stir up trouble and inflame feelings by repeating such a conversation?

    The answer is that I do not have the right not to do so.

    The “inflammation”, if any, is from the people he quoted. “Enoch Powell was right” will turn into “Enoch Powell was a cuck.”

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/3643823/Enoch-Powells-Rivers-of-Blood-speech.html

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    Read the second paragraph of his post now.
  23. He’s been the prog-left’s trained seal for two generations–spins the beach ball on the end of his nose, and then does some barking.

    The perfect stereotype stand-in for a country club Republican–arrogant, snug, entitled, bow-tie wearing, with professorial diction. His whole public persona is a parody of himself.

    A member in good standing of the Queensberry Rules Republicans, who would never stoop so low as to break a sweat (much less fight) in order to win–let the other guy win and be gracious in defeat. Propriety and decorum as a gentleman are the highest attributes in life.

    I heard he’s written a few books on baseball–another activity he knows only from the bleachers…

    • Replies: @riches
    George Will "A member in good standing of the Queensberry Rules Republicans, who ... let the other guy win and (are) gracious in defeat."

    Explains why he's a Chicago Cubs fan.
  24. I usually wonder if a given public figure is stupid or evil. But that level of stupid IS evil so my question doesn’t matter.

  25. @Tiny Duck
    I date you guys to read Adam Serwer and John Green and Hank Green from the vlogbrothers

    You will change your mind

    America was built on evil and People of Color will pull us out of our rut

    If we’re built on evil, why would we deserve it?

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    You have to “date” TD to get the answer. He can whisper it you over a romantic candlelight dinner.
  26. @Alden
    He's just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.

    Yep, he used to pretend to be a conservative. Now he doesn’t even pretend any longer but Conservative Inc. still claims him as one of their own.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    I think most Congressional Republicans (who work against Trump) and Independents, Never-Trumpers, former Republicans, realize that they are doomed - nobody likes them or respects them anymore. George Will is just making the usual rounds of vacuous interviews so Democrats/Progressives will buy his latest full-of-crap, unctuous piece-of-trash, book.

    Republicans will never win, ever again, if they do not get behind Trump these next 16 months. There is time, after Trump's 2nd term to get behind more stately, gracious, measured-in-their-words presidents, like Haley or Crenshaw (his eye patch will win the election!) . But, Conservatives are finished if they do not back Trump, now . People are watching them, and loathing the ones that cave to Globalists and Progressives, or do last-minute backstabbing like McCain and Flake/Corker did.

  27. • Replies: @ben tillman
    They have no idea what socialism is:

    The split on positive and negative views of socialism also seems to be affected by what Americans believe the word means. The poll found 49% of Americans believe socialism is a system dependent on a dictatorship while 46% of Americans think socialism means a democratic government.
     
    , @Forbes
    Polling is used as clickbait and propaganda--questions are structured to achieve predetermined responses so that stories can be written producing the desired results.

    E.g. see 2016 Brexit, US presidential election results versus "polling."

    In other words, "polling" is useless for understanding public opinion.
    , @Blonnlass
    "WILL THE CUCK with his hands in his pockets feels COCKY all day!"
    , @Alden
    When capitalism fails, countries turn socialist.
  28. @bomag
    I believe Will is a rather religious man.

    Someone should remind him of a few Bible verses, e.g. "the love of money is the root of all evil"; "gain the world, lose your soul."

    I believe Will is a rather religious man.

    Not really….

    Will is a self-described “amiable, low voltage atheist.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Will#Religious_beliefs

    • Replies: @bomag
    Thanks.

    I recall from the days when I read him on a regular basis that he is friendly toward religious belief, especially Catholicism.
    , @bored identity
    bored identity strongly believes that Deep State Devils recalibrate Good Will's Cucking Voltage Tolerance on daily basis :


    https://bainbridgevet.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/A2385.jpg



    https://mediaequalizer.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/maxresdefault-e1525956455698.jpg
    , @bored identity
    bored identity strongly believes that Deep State Devils recalibrate Good Will's Cucking Voltage Tolerance on daily basis :





    https://bainbridgevet.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/A2385.jpg



    https://mediaequalizer.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/maxresdefault-e1525956455698.jpg
    , @Sextus Empiricus
    “low voltage“

    Sounds like one of those nicknames Trump likes to give to opponents.
  29. The other side gets the insufferable dorks this time. Sounds good to me.

    “At a dinner with Churchill, Ribbentrop had said that, in a future war with Britain, Germany would have the Italians on its side. Churchill, referring to Italy’s poor record in the First World War, responded with one of his devastating verbal flashes: ‘That’s only fair – we had them last time.’”

    • LOL: Twinkie
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Italy’s poor record in the First World War
     
    Erwin Rommel, who went on to great fame leading the Afrika Korps and later Panzerarmee Afrika, including Italian troops, in WW II, won Pour Le Merite, Imperial Germany’s highest military honor for valor in WW I against the Italians:

    In two and a half days, from 25 to 27 October, Rommel and his 150 men captured 81 guns and 9,000 men (including 150 officers), at the loss of six dead and 30 wounded.[26] Rommel achieved this remarkable success by taking advantage of the terrain to outflank the Italian forces, attacking from unexpected directions or behind enemy lines, and taking the initiative to attack when he had orders to the contrary. In one instance, the Italian forces, taken by surprise and believing that their lines had collapsed, surrendered after a brief firefight.[27]
     
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erwin_Rommel
    , @Corn
    Speaking of Ribbentrop I read once when Hitler appointed Ribbentrop Foreign Minister Goering or another of Hitler’s lieutenants argued against it.

    Hitler defended his choice, “But Ribbentrop knows Lord So and So and Ambassador ThatGuy and President Numbgums.”

    To which Hitler’s subordinate replied, “Yes, but unfortunately they know Ribbentrop.”
  30. @istevefan
    A commenter once wrote something in the comments to this blog along the lines of this, "If we take in the whole world, the USA will have 100 percent of global GDP."

    I have to concede, I can’t find a flaw in that argument.

  31. @Desiderius
    If we’re built on evil, why would we deserve it?

    You have to “date” TD to get the answer. He can whisper it you over a romantic candlelight dinner.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    Sounds like fun. I'm up for it. We can try to outdo each other.

    And the cool thing is, no matter how vocal we get, they can't throw us out da restaurant, 'coz we so woke.
  32. And how many immigrants will George Will host in his house, or even in his neighborhood? Vibrancy for thee, but not for me, says the hypocrite George Will.

    • Replies: @Gazza90
    My church is a few houses away from George Will's home and I live less than a quarter-mile from him. I can assure you that if you see an Amerindian (or really any poc) in his neighborhood they are almost certainly a nanny, landscaper, etc.
  33. Labor shortages are simply caused by employers paying below market wages to their workers. Too many of the establishment right act like a bunch of econ 101 flunkies.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Broadly. Geographic constraints play a role. Convincing middle class people to move alaska is difficult.
  34. The Economy is the god of most of the GOP. Just as Diversity is the god of the Democrats. They aren’t really opposing religions. There is a new synthesis: With more Diversity we can have an even stronger Economy and with a stronger Economy, we can have greater Diversity.

    All we cannot have is a nation.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    We can however have a country and the minority on the wrong side of that question are exactly the people who need a good long stint out of power, if for nothing more than to get their shit together.
    , @Justvisiting

    The Economy is the god of most of the GOP. Just as Diversity is the god of the Democrats. They aren’t really opposing religions. There is a new synthesis: With more Diversity we can have an even stronger Economy and with a stronger Economy, we can have greater Diversity.
     
    The synthesis (which you accurately described) is internally contradictory (and just plain stupid).

    Diversity brings in low IQ people who can't produce or create much of anything, and therefore consume more resources than they produce (in a welfare state--in the third world they just starve or loot).

    Diversity (affirmative action) in a strong economy destroys shareholder value, reduces productivity, and slows (and eventually halts) economic growth.

    That is why the GOP is called the stupid party and the Democratic Party the evil one.
  35. @Reg Cæsar

    I only Enoch Powell hadn’t used such inflammatory language
     
    And what "inflammatory language" was that? All I see, from his own words, is

    How dare I stir up trouble and inflame feelings by repeating such a conversation?

    The answer is that I do not have the right not to do so.

    The "inflammation", if any, is from the people he quoted. "Enoch Powell was right" will turn into "Enoch Powell was a cuck."


    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/3643823/Enoch-Powells-Rivers-of-Blood-speech.html

    Read the second paragraph of his post now.

  36. @Alfa158
    You have to “date” TD to get the answer. He can whisper it you over a romantic candlelight dinner.

    Sounds like fun. I’m up for it. We can try to outdo each other.

    And the cool thing is, no matter how vocal we get, they can’t throw us out da restaurant, ‘coz we so woke.

  37. @Tiny Duck
    I date you guys to read Adam Serwer and John Green and Hank Green from the vlogbrothers

    You will change your mind

    America was built on evil and People of Color will pull us out of our rut

    And take us to the sunlit uplands of places like Congo and Zimbabwe.

  38. We should take under-utilized homes like Mr. Will’s and stuff a few more families in there, of the most vibrant kind, just as it was depicted in Dr. Zvivago. I’m sure his convictions on this matter are so strong he’d welcome his new flatmates with open arms, and possibly some lectures on the glories of baseball.

  39. “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your economy can do for you—ask what you can do for your economy. And for immigrants.”

    That brings Horace’s quote to mind:

    Dulce et decorum est pro oeconomia mori.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Dulce et decorum est pro oeconomia mori.
     
    Sadly, they aren’t doing enough “pro oeconomia mori.” I wish they would. ;)
  40. @Cagey Beast
    I only Enoch Powell hadn't used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell's "rivers of blood" rhetoric.

    At least that's been one of the longest-lived alibis "conservatives" have used to explain why they just never seem to be able to restrict immigration. Unto the second generation:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg Betrays Fans By Opposing Enoch Powell’s Famous Speech
    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/04/14/jacob-rees-mogg-betrays-fans-opposing-enoch-powells-famous-speech/

    Cagey Beast:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg’s unfortunate comments can either be attributed to misplaced filial devotion or inherited political crassness. Too bad, since until these unfortunate utterances I had held JR-M in high regard!

  41. As of five years ago, the top names in California were Garcia, Hernandez, and Lopez. In Hawaii, they were Lee, Wong, and Kim. Japanese still outnumber Chinese and Koreans in Hawaii, I think, but they have too many surnames.

    The only other state with no English surnames in the top three was New Mexico. Possibly North Dakota, too, if their Johnsons and Andersons are mostly Swedish.

    You could sort out “Anderson states”, where that name is in the top three, or “Johnson states”, where that is number one. I bet those ten states will show up well on all kinds of metrics.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Japanese still outnumber Chinese and Koreans in Hawaii, I think, but they have too many surnames.
     
    Surnames don’t really reflect ancestry percentages all that well in Hawaii these days.

    When I was at a hospital for a meeting recently, I talked to white female ob/gyn doc, one Dr. Kim. She told me that she was assigned to delivering a baby for a Mrs. Nakamura. A nurse told Mrs. Nakamura that Dr. Kim would be with her soon. So when Dr. Kim finally entered the room, the doc and the patient looked at each other and paused for a second. Mrs. Nakamura was blonde and blue-eyed, just like Dr. Kim.

    Expectations not met. Mutually.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    The ubiguitousness of "Smith" continues to amaze me.
  42. @Lot
    “He’s just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.”

    Yes he is. And that is one economic niche with no Mexican immigrant competition.

    National Review has gleefully hired and over-promoted lots of Asian immigrants.

    What they haven’t done is pushed Rich Lowry to hand over the editorship.

    • Replies: @IHTG
    Reihan Salam and Ramesh Ponnuru >>>>> George Will
    , @Desiderius
    Lowry and his coven are best ignored. Sometimes they’ll write something useful and the rest of the time they are generally irrelevant. That’s best that can be hoped for.
  43. Ugh. Cucks.

    [Spits in disgust]

    They are worse than the enemy.

    • Replies: @Tired of Not Winning
    Cucks and neocons are the filthy fifth columnists among conservatives, the proponents of fake conservatism. Their media outlets include the National Review, Economist, Wall Street Journal, Breitbart, Fox News, among others.

    They view the US as a for-profit corporation and/or a vessel state of Israel, nothing more.

  44. @Ian Smith
    So is Will saying that immigrants are a burden or a boon? I don’t understand.

    Immigration from India is punishment/reparations for people who resembled Americans colonizing India 70-200 years.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/07/opinion/immigration-reparations.html

    • Replies: @DB Cooper
    India never respects its neighbors borders either. Britain gifted the people in South Asia a country and once the country was created it has invaded and land grabbed every single of its neighbors. Here is a selected list:

    1947 Annexation of Kashmir:
    http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/02/06/indias-shame/
    http://thediplomat.com/2015/08/kashmirs-young-rebels/
    1949 Annexation of Manipur:
    http://www.tehelka.com/manipurs-merger-with-india-was-a-forced-annexation/
    http://www.passblue.com/2017/09/05/in-lush-manipur-women-work-for-peace-as-militarization-marches-on/
    1949 Annexation of Tripura:
    http://www.crescent-online.net/2009/09/the-myths-of-one-nation-and-one-hinduism-in-india-zawahir-siddique-2316-articles.html
    1951 Annexation of South Tibet:
    http://kanglaonline.com/2011/06/khathing-the-taking-of-tawang/
    http://www.mainstreamweekly.net/article2582.html
    http://chasfreeman.net/india-pakistan-and-china/
    1954 Annexation of Nagaland:
    http://morungexpress.com/desire-nagas-live-separate-nation-deserved/
    http://nagalandmusings.blogspot.com/2013/01/indias-untold-genocide-of-nagas.html
    1954 Attempt annexation of Sikkim and Bhutan (Failed):
    http://redbarricade.blogspot.hk/2013/01/twisted-truth.html
    1961 Annexation of Goa:
    http://www.ruleoflaw.org.au/the-annexation-of-goa/
    http://www.historytoday.com/richard-cavendish/goa-falls-indian-troops
    http://goa-invasion-1961.blogspot.in/2013/09/india-pirated-goa-china-is-regaining_16.html
    1962 Annexation of Kalapani, Nepal:
    http://www.eurasiareview.com/07032012-indian-hegemony-in-nepal-oped/
    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1239348
    http://www.sharnoffsglobalviews.com/land-disputes-116/
    1962 Aggression against China:
    http://gregoryclark.net/redif.html
    http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/news-events/podcasts/renewed-tension-indiachina-border-whos-blame
    1971 Annexation of Turtuk, Pakistan:
    http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/nation/suddenly-indian
    1972 Annexation of Tin Bigha, Bangladesh:
    http://www.dhakatribune.com/op-ed/2014/feb/20/killing-fields
    1975 Annexation of Sikkim (the whole country):
    http://nepalitimes.com/issue/35/Nation/9621#.UohjPHQo6LA
    http://www.passblue.com/2015/07/22/a-small-himalayan-kingdom-remembers-its-lost-independence/
    http://www.amazon.com/Smash-Grab-Annexation-Sunanda-Datta-Ray/dp/9383260386
    http://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy/International-Relations/Indian-hegemonism-drags-Himalayan-kingdom-into-oblivion
    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/annexation-of-sikkim-by-india-was-not-legal-wangchuk-namgyal/1/391498.html
    1983 (Aborted) Attempted invasion of Mauritius:
    http://thediplomat.com/2013/03/when-india-almost-invaded-mauritius/
    1987 Invasion of Sri Lanka
    http://www.asiantribune.com/node/63316
    1990 (Failed) First Attempted annexation of Bhutan:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1990/10/07/world/india-based-groups-seek-to-disrupt-bhutan.html
    2006 Annexation of Duars, Bhutan:
    http://wangchasangey.blogspot.in/2015/11/different-kind-of-anxieties-on.html#comment-form
    2013 Annexation of Moreh, Myanmar:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nehginpao-kipgen/easing-indiamyanmar-borde_b_4633040.html
    2017 Aggression against China:
    http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2017/07/06/sikkim-stand-off-china-india-collide-himalayas/
    http://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2102555/indias-china-war-round-two
    https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/07/11/china-india-standoff-modi-has-bitten-off-more-than-he-can-chew/
    2017 (Failed) Second Attempted annexation of Bhutan:
    http://wangchasangey.blogspot.com/2017/08/the-strategy-behind-india-doklam.html
    http://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/article/2106709/india-must-find-face-saving-pretext-and-withdraw-doklam
    2018 (Thwarted) Attempt invasion of the Maldives
    https://www.ft.com/content/332a5b1a-1155-11e8-8cb6-b9ccc4c4dbbb
    https://thewire.in/223916/keep-off-maldives-yameen-government-tells-indian-military/?utm_source=alsoread

    , @Twinkie

    Immigration from India is punishment/reparations for people who resembled Americans colonizing India 70-200 years.
     
    I don’t resembled those colonizers. Why are they punishing me with Indian immigrants?

    http://www.unz.com/anepigone/heightism-and-weightism/#comment-3168756
  45. 216 says:
    @Tiny Duck
    I date you guys to read Adam Serwer and John Green and Hank Green from the vlogbrothers

    You will change your mind

    America was built on evil and People of Color will pull us out of our rut

    Your asking us to take “chick-lit” writers seriously?

    Given that Steve is allegedly read by lots of journos that don’t credit him, why not get Sarah Jeong fired, and give Steve her job.

    After all, white men are only able to attract loser Asian women like Sarah. It’s not like she’s going to suffer.

  46. Anon[307] • Disclaimer says:

    I didn’t know he had a Ph.D.: Dr. Will.

    Here’s a take-down of him in The Week by center-left Damon Linker:

    The sad, sorry decline of George F. Will
    https://theweek.com/articles/446227/sad-sorry-decline-george-f

    The title makes it sound like you could swap in Mickey Kaus’s name.

    Anyway, half the take-down concerns a column that sent Twitter into an uproar, but which is quite excellent in my opinion.

    George Will: Colleges become the victims of progressivism
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/george-will-college-become-the-victims-of-progressivism/2014/06/06/e90e73b4-eb50-11e3-9f5c-9075d5508f0a_story.html

    And then there’s the notorious rape column in which Will asserts that (you guessed it) “progressivism” has made “victimhood a coveted status that confers privileges,” thereby inspiring “the supposed campus epidemic of rape, a.k.a. ‘sexual assault.’”

    That’s right: George Will, Ph.D., believes that under the influence of “progressivism,” young women on college campuses across America are (en masse? individually?) seeking privileges (economic? political? cultural?) by getting themselves known as rape victims — because that is a “coveted status.”

    Sure it’s sexist, condescending, and callously dismissive, as thousands of critics have already noted. But here’s what bothers me even more than that: it’s outrageously stupid, transparently absurd.

    Can Will truly believe that female college students are behaving the way he claims they are — faking sexual assaults because it confers benefits on them? If he does, what does that imply about his broader capacity to think, analyze, and opine?

    The example Will gives is a student who had been having hook-up sex with a fellow student for three months. They were in her bed together. He makes a move. She “basically said” (does that mean “she said”?) “No.” “A few minutes later (lying with her permission in her bed, remember) he makes another move.

    I just kind of laid there and didn’t do anything — I had already said no. I was just tired and wanted to go to bed. I let him finish. I pulled my panties back on and went to sleep.”

    In other words, “I could have just said ‘No’ again, or said ‘Not tonight,’ or pushed him off, but hey, I was sleepy, so I figured to avoid any exertion I’d just let myself get raped instead. I mean, jeez, didn’t he know from my previous tone of voice that my No had a 120 minute expiration?”

    A month and a half later she report to the school (not the police) that she had been raped.

    There are many more like this. I think Will’s very reasonable point is that rape, and sexual assault, have changed in meaning, expanding in the way that marketers call brand extension, e.g., Oreo ice cream. Expanded to include mild annoyances that you let happen if it will save the effort of saying ‘No.’ And I think also that young women perceive experiences that in the past they would have considered to be consensual as criminal. And I think that the shame that young women used to feel about rape-rape is not felt about campus “rape.”

    And at least some women, as Will noted, such as the Rolling Stone subject and mattress girl, do in fact get off on having a status of rape victim (just as long as everyone knows it wasn’t an alley rape by a black guy with a gun, but rather, a “I consulted with my gender studies professor a few weeks later and realized it was a rape” rape).

    • Replies: @IHTG
    Damon Linker isn't exactly "center-left". He's a kind of odd liberal-paleocon hybrid.
    , @Anonymous
    It would seem that the existence of U.Va. Jackie sufficiently refutes Linker's quite gallant notion that a Western female would never, but NEVER voluntarily advertise herself as rape victim. Technically, she couldn't advertise her own rape because of that not going through the formality of occurring-- but she certainly claimed the status.

    As Bertrand Russell put it the existence of a thing is absolute proof of its possibility
    , @liljoe
    Never heard of Damon Linker, and after reading his "take down" I can see why. Restating a position followed by get-a-load-of-this-guy posturing is hardly a takedown.
    Not a defender of George Will at all but that was weak
  47. @Lot
    “He’s just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.”

    Yes he is. And that is one economic niche with no Mexican immigrant competition.

    Really?

    What about that crypto-haplo – I_ɡ_l_ˈiː_z_iə_z_ θ_ˈɪ_k Marranito who just recently fatwaed the Great Awokening on America?

    Let bored identity guess:

    The only reason Mattetito is not camping with the rest of his TabuLa Raza compatriots in front of local Home Depot is because he is much smarter than 99.9 % of native, pundit-aspiring, blue-eyed devils.

    Oy, Caramba!

  48. @Daniel H
    Homo economicus.

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle. Exactly.

    Now the likes of Will, David French, Jonah Goldberg are pleading for civility. No civility for these bastards, I want their world destroyed.

    I will vote hardcore socialist Bernie, hardcore crazy Ocasio-Cortez before I will ever again pull the lever for a Cuck. The Cucks are the major problem. They are the backstabbers. Just say no to Cucks.

    Daniel H:

    Another Buchanan witticism: Dershowitz always appears to have his ears cocked for the wail of an ambulance.

  49. George Will is another boomer obssessed with money. You would think that someone who has death staring him in the face would be less materialistic. His generation betrayed the sacred trust of passing along traditions and culture to their children and keeping a cohesive high trust society. In my neighborhood few raised flags for Memorial Day. It’s a mostly Hispanic neighborhood. A few people put up Christmas lights. Hardly anyone gives out candy on Halloween. I do it in gratitude to those who gave me candy so many years ago creating wonderful memories.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    He’s not talking about money. He aims to recreate the whole world in his image. His unchecked snobbery has driven him mad.
  50. If George Will were a bottle of milk you found in the back of your fridge, can you imagine how bad it would smell if you opened it?

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    The only quibble I have with that comment is it implies there was a time when George Will was fresh.

    I think more of what my mother told me about life during WW II, when the best of everything went to the soldiers. Once my mother was taking a train and asked for milk. Instead of the Grade A milk we are used to, she was served Grade C milk. She said it was kind of grey colored.

    If you imagine a bottle of Grade C milk that had been sitting in the back of the fridge for many decades, I think you get the true essence of George Will.
  51. “The economy” needs to be abolished as the measure of a successful country. Instead quality of life, life expectancy, GPD per capita, expendable income, happiness, etc. should be the main measurements.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    Other than GDP per capita, those are BS statistics. What's a quality life? Life expectancy? Will the US adopt the habit of pointing out that Africans in America live longer than Africans in Africa? Expendable income? Through the power of handwavium math, let me explain how you're money ahead of we double the taxes most Americans actually pay, but you get a Medicaid card! Give a free pot EBT card, and a disturbing number of our fellow "citizens" would be happy.
  52. Rich man confused by stagnant wages, blames blaming schools (?): https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/07/education-isnt-enough/590611/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

    Fails ctrl-f immi test…

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes

    "people who see education as a cure-all have largely ignored the metric most predictive of a child’s educational success: household income.

    The scientific literature on this subject is robust, and the consensus overwhelming. The lower your parents’ income, the lower your likely level of educational attainment. Period."
     
    The essential difference between them and us.
  53. @Tiny Duck
    I date you guys to read Adam Serwer and John Green and Hank Green from the vlogbrothers

    You will change your mind

    America was built on evil and People of Color will pull us out of our rut

    Would that be the new POC folks or the old ones still on welfare going into those 7,000,000 unfilled jobs?

  54. Yet Will, who lives in the oh so vibrant DC area, chooses to live in the rich, mostly all white suburb of Chevy Chase, MD.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    He’s talking about us, not him. He lives in abstractland where he can be protected from any possible introspection, being mere anecdote, not data; a thing, not a concept.

    He knows we won’t do anything about it. Or thinks he does.
    , @Moses
    Oh dear. Chevy Chase is 88% White.

    http://www.city-data.com/city/Chevy-Chase-Maryland.html

    George Will loves 3rd world diversity, as long as it's for YOU and not for HIM.

    Ugh. These cucks are the WORST.
  55. This video was banned on Youtube this week. Dedicated to those who died on D-Day for freedom or something.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    Perhaps related:

    https://twitter.com/GarbHum/status/1137459170485997569

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-06-10/facebook-has-banned-word-honk-violating-their-community-standards

  56. @Daniel H
    Homo economicus.

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle. Exactly.

    Now the likes of Will, David French, Jonah Goldberg are pleading for civility. No civility for these bastards, I want their world destroyed.

    I will vote hardcore socialist Bernie, hardcore crazy Ocasio-Cortez before I will ever again pull the lever for a Cuck. The Cucks are the major problem. They are the backstabbers. Just say no to Cucks.

    There probably can’t be a party-political way forward—if there can be a party-political way forward—without the demise of the Repubs.

    • Agree: Daniel H
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    The Ryanites are already well on the way to dead. Have some patience. Meatspace>Media.
    , @AnotherDad

    There probably can’t be a party-political way forward—if there can be a party-political way forward—without the demise of the Repubs.
     
    Disagree.

    The American political system--coupled with the sheer size of the country--tend to generate a two party system. While there have been several third party blooms and fads, we haven't actually had a third party launch and replace since the Republicans replaced the dying Whigs.

    No the way forward is straightforward: conservatives actually interested in conserving something--our race, culture and nation--and willing to work for the benefit of their middle class voters, take over the Republican party.
  57. @Lot
    Immigration from India is punishment/reparations for people who resembled Americans colonizing India 70-200 years.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/07/opinion/immigration-reparations.html

    India never respects its neighbors borders either. Britain gifted the people in South Asia a country and once the country was created it has invaded and land grabbed every single of its neighbors. Here is a selected list:

    1947 Annexation of Kashmir:
    http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/02/06/indias-shame/
    http://thediplomat.com/2015/08/kashmirs-young-rebels/
    1949 Annexation of Manipur:
    http://www.tehelka.com/manipurs-merger-with-india-was-a-forced-annexation/
    http://www.passblue.com/2017/09/05/in-lush-manipur-women-work-for-peace-as-militarization-marches-on/
    1949 Annexation of Tripura:
    http://www.crescent-online.net/2009/09/the-myths-of-one-nation-and-one-hinduism-in-india-zawahir-siddique-2316-articles.html
    1951 Annexation of South Tibet:
    http://kanglaonline.com/2011/06/khathing-the-taking-of-tawang/
    http://www.mainstreamweekly.net/article2582.html
    http://chasfreeman.net/india-pakistan-and-china/
    1954 Annexation of Nagaland:
    http://morungexpress.com/desire-nagas-live-separate-nation-deserved/
    http://nagalandmusings.blogspot.com/2013/01/indias-untold-genocide-of-nagas.html
    1954 Attempt annexation of Sikkim and Bhutan (Failed):
    http://redbarricade.blogspot.hk/2013/01/twisted-truth.html
    1961 Annexation of Goa:
    http://www.ruleoflaw.org.au/the-annexation-of-goa/
    http://www.historytoday.com/richard-cavendish/goa-falls-indian-troops
    http://goa-invasion-1961.blogspot.in/2013/09/india-pirated-goa-china-is-regaining_16.html
    1962 Annexation of Kalapani, Nepal:
    http://www.eurasiareview.com/07032012-indian-hegemony-in-nepal-oped/
    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1239348
    http://www.sharnoffsglobalviews.com/land-disputes-116/
    1962 Aggression against China:
    http://gregoryclark.net/redif.html
    http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/news-events/podcasts/renewed-tension-indiachina-border-whos-blame
    1971 Annexation of Turtuk, Pakistan:
    http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/nation/suddenly-indian
    1972 Annexation of Tin Bigha, Bangladesh:
    http://www.dhakatribune.com/op-ed/2014/feb/20/killing-fields
    1975 Annexation of Sikkim (the whole country):
    http://nepalitimes.com/issue/35/Nation/9621#.UohjPHQo6LA
    http://www.passblue.com/2015/07/22/a-small-himalayan-kingdom-remembers-its-lost-independence/

    http://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy/International-Relations/Indian-hegemonism-drags-Himalayan-kingdom-into-oblivion
    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/annexation-of-sikkim-by-india-was-not-legal-wangchuk-namgyal/1/391498.html
    1983 (Aborted) Attempted invasion of Mauritius:
    http://thediplomat.com/2013/03/when-india-almost-invaded-mauritius/
    1987 Invasion of Sri Lanka
    http://www.asiantribune.com/node/63316
    1990 (Failed) First Attempted annexation of Bhutan:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1990/10/07/world/india-based-groups-seek-to-disrupt-bhutan.html
    2006 Annexation of Duars, Bhutan:
    http://wangchasangey.blogspot.in/2015/11/different-kind-of-anxieties-on.html#comment-form
    2013 Annexation of Moreh, Myanmar:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nehginpao-kipgen/easing-indiamyanmar-borde_b_4633040.html
    2017 Aggression against China:
    http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2017/07/06/sikkim-stand-off-china-india-collide-himalayas/
    http://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2102555/indias-china-war-round-two
    https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/07/11/china-india-standoff-modi-has-bitten-off-more-than-he-can-chew/
    2017 (Failed) Second Attempted annexation of Bhutan:
    http://wangchasangey.blogspot.com/2017/08/the-strategy-behind-india-doklam.html
    http://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/article/2106709/india-must-find-face-saving-pretext-and-withdraw-doklam
    2018 (Thwarted) Attempt invasion of the Maldives
    https://www.ft.com/content/332a5b1a-1155-11e8-8cb6-b9ccc4c4dbbb
    https://thewire.in/223916/keep-off-maldives-yameen-government-tells-indian-military/?utm_source=alsoread

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    1975 Annexation of Sikkim (the whole country):
     
    I was watching Sikkim travelogues just yesterday. Now I remember why I was fascinated by the place as a kid. I want to go to Gangtok.

    But what language is Harish Bali speaking here? Incomprehensible English? Hinglish? Pidgin? Something native with odd English phrases thrown in at random?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYIiDBAarW4
    , @Reg Cæsar

    1961 Annexation of Goa:
     
    A lot of Goans have Portuguese names (Dinesh D'Souza!), though I think the language has died out, as it has in Macau. It thrives elsewhere.

    Gaston Dorren has a fascinating chapter in Babel: Around the World in Twenty Languages about how, despite having similar empires with similar origins and fates, Portuguese is a major world language today, while his own Dutch has disappeared internationally. (Unless you include Afrikaans and Papiamento as "Dutch".)

    Not everything stuck, though. Portugal drives on the right, but at least four former colonies-- Goa, Macau, East Timor, and Mozambique-- drive on the left.
  58. “I’m for as much immigration as the economy can take. The economy needs immigration as much as the immigrants need the economy”

    On the surface this implies that the immigrants are needed for employment to serve the economy. So what happens if the immigrant doesn’t have a job? Does that mean he has to go back? What happens when inevitably automation replaces jobs that immigrants occupy? Does that mean they have to go back? Why should an immigrant be entitled to lifetime residency and even citizenship if he no longer has a job?

    Of course some will point out that it is immaterial to GDP whether the immigrant has a job. For even an unemployed immigrant will receive government bennies which increases government spending. And since government spending is a component of GDP, and since the unemployed immigrant will spend a portion of his bennies at the local branch of Globo-Homo, Inc. that too will factor in to boosting GDP.

    Therefore, this would suggest that if the economy is your only barometer, there is no limit to the amount of immigrants you are willing to accept since GDP will increase regardless of employment status.

    Now quality of life is a different matter. Think about China. They have the largest GDP. It is orders of magnitude above Switzerland. But in which one would George Will, and anyone with a pulse, choose to live? Too bad those with a platform are not considering that. They only see the economy.

    • Agree: GermanReader2
  59. In my younger days I pretty much worshiped at the Altar of George Will. I owned (still own, I guess) virtually every collection of his columns up until about 15 years ago. I’ve actually read them all, too.

    His columns are usually clever, sometimes enlightening, always articulate plugs for what is basically respectable center-right D.C. Republican ideology. He is Mitt Romney if Mitt Romney had something remotely like a personality (which is not to say that Will has much of a personality).

    George Will frankly couldn’t give two shits for middle-class America anymore than Mitt Romney does.

    Here is Will in 2014, when the problem with unaccompanied minors began:

    We ought to say to these children, ‘Welcome to America, you’re going to go to school and get a job and become Americans. We have 3,141 counties in this country. That would be 20 per county. The idea that we can’t assimilate these eight-year-old criminals with their teddy bears is preposterous.”

    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too small to worry about

    And here he is eight years earlier, on the 2006 amnesty putsch:

    We are not going to take the draconian police measures necessary to deport 11 million people. They would fill 200,000 buses in a caravan stretching bumper-to-bumper from San Diego to Alaska — where, by the way, 26,000 Latinos live. And there are no plausible incentives to get the 11 million to board the buses. – March 30, 2006

    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too big to do anything about.

    Which is it? Too small to worry about or too big to do anything about? Where is the Goldilocks middle, where it’s big enough to worry about but small enough to do something about?

    The irony is that George Will has written on multiple occasions about the US airline industry, which handles (last time I checked) over 700 million passengers per year. Deporting every single illegal immigrant in a single year would amount to less than 2% of annual US airline traffic. Illegal immigration is a big problem, but this is a big country. George Will damn well knows that, but instead of talking intelligently about the matter he turns it into some seemingly unsolvable math problem.

    But Will is even more fanatical than I have already pointed out:

    Conservatives should favor a policy of encouraging unlimited immigration by educated people with math, engineering, technology or science skills that America’s education system is not sufficiently supplying.

    So he wants unlimited “skilled” immigration. And he effectively wants unlimited unskilled immigration, as well. All without ever bothering to point out how all of this unlimited immigration is supposed to benefit the American people. Because they can make shit here in the US rather than making it in their home countries and shipping it here on giant container ships?

    The other irony is that one of Will’s latest columns is a rant against the new SAT “adversity score” and how it’s driven by identity politics. Because as we all know the way to end identity politics’ increasing domination of US policy is to import tens of millions more people who benefit from it.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    So to continue, the only problem with George Will's views on (il)legal immigration is that it undermines pretty much every thing he has ever claimed to believe in. There will be no conservatism left in an America overrun by mass immigration, because most immigrants, increasingly riled up by the Left's hatred of traditional Americans, have no desire to defend traditional American culture or values.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    That would be 20 per county.
     
    That would be a majority of children in Loving County, Texas, until recently the least-populated in the US.

    Until Hawaii erected a new county consisting of her old leper colony. Will Will send 20 children there?


    Under Hawaii state law, the Director of the Hawaii Department of Health, who is appointed by the Governor, also serves as the Mayor of Kalawao County.


    https://live.staticflickr.com/5836/30213586486_b238aacee2_b.jpg
    , @Mr. Anon

    But Will is even more fanatical than I have already pointed out:

    "Conservatives should favor a policy of encouraging unlimited immigration by educated people with math, engineering, technology or science skills that America’s education system is not sufficiently supplying."
     
    Because America just doesn't have enough Uber drivers with engineering degrees from Rawalpindi Tech and a 2.5 GPA.
    , @Clyde

    George Will frankly couldn’t give two shits for middle-class America anymore than Mitt Romney does.
     
    Two crappy crabby spiteful ol bitches who will be dead soon enough. Après nous le déluge.
    , @Moses
    A few minutes of Googling did not yield Will's home address.

    He wouldn't be one of those espousing unlimited 3rd world immigration who lives nowhere near diversity in a supermajority White ZIP code, would he?

    It's all so tiresome.

  60. @Lot
    “He’s just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.”

    Yes he is. And that is one economic niche with no Mexican immigrant competition.

    Really?

    What about that crypto-haplo – I_ɡ_l_ˈiː_z_iə_z_ θ_ˈɪ_k Maranito who just recently fatwaed the Great Awokening on America?

    Let bored identity guess:

    Mattetito is not camping in front of his local Home Depot with the rest of his TabuLa Raza compatriots, ONLY because he is smarter than 99.9 % of native, pundit-aspiring, blue-eyed devils.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Is that Matthew Yglesias?
  61. @Wilkey
    In my younger days I pretty much worshiped at the Altar of George Will. I owned (still own, I guess) virtually every collection of his columns up until about 15 years ago. I've actually read them all, too.

    His columns are usually clever, sometimes enlightening, always articulate plugs for what is basically respectable center-right D.C. Republican ideology. He is Mitt Romney if Mitt Romney had something remotely like a personality (which is not to say that Will has much of a personality).

    George Will frankly couldn't give two shits for middle-class America anymore than Mitt Romney does.

    Here is Will in 2014, when the problem with unaccompanied minors began:


    We ought to say to these children, ‘Welcome to America, you’re going to go to school and get a job and become Americans. We have 3,141 counties in this country. That would be 20 per county. The idea that we can’t assimilate these eight-year-old criminals with their teddy bears is preposterous.”
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too small to worry about

    And here he is eight years earlier, on the 2006 amnesty putsch:


    We are not going to take the draconian police measures necessary to deport 11 million people. They would fill 200,000 buses in a caravan stretching bumper-to-bumper from San Diego to Alaska — where, by the way, 26,000 Latinos live. And there are no plausible incentives to get the 11 million to board the buses. - March 30, 2006
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too big to do anything about.

    Which is it? Too small to worry about or too big to do anything about? Where is the Goldilocks middle, where it's big enough to worry about but small enough to do something about?

    The irony is that George Will has written on multiple occasions about the US airline industry, which handles (last time I checked) over 700 million passengers per year. Deporting every single illegal immigrant in a single year would amount to less than 2% of annual US airline traffic. Illegal immigration is a big problem, but this is a big country. George Will damn well knows that, but instead of talking intelligently about the matter he turns it into some seemingly unsolvable math problem.

    But Will is even more fanatical than I have already pointed out:


    Conservatives should favor a policy of encouraging unlimited immigration by educated people with math, engineering, technology or science skills that America's education system is not sufficiently supplying.
     
    So he wants unlimited "skilled" immigration. And he effectively wants unlimited unskilled immigration, as well. All without ever bothering to point out how all of this unlimited immigration is supposed to benefit the American people. Because they can make shit here in the US rather than making it in their home countries and shipping it here on giant container ships?

    The other irony is that one of Will's latest columns is a rant against the new SAT "adversity score" and how it's driven by identity politics. Because as we all know the way to end identity politics' increasing domination of US policy is to import tens of millions more people who benefit from it.

    So to continue, the only problem with George Will’s views on (il)legal immigration is that it undermines pretty much every thing he has ever claimed to believe in. There will be no conservatism left in an America overrun by mass immigration, because most immigrants, increasingly riled up by the Left’s hatred of traditional Americans, have no desire to defend traditional American culture or values.

    • Replies: @Clyde

    So to continue, the only problem with George Will’s views on (il)legal immigration is that it undermines pretty much every thing he has ever claimed to believe in. There will be no conservatism left in an America overrun by mass immigration, because most immigrants, increasingly riled up by the Left’s hatred of traditional Americans, have no desire to defend traditional American culture or values.
     
    IOW he thinks he is a genius but he is irrational on legal/illegal immigration. I mean, how hard is this to figure this one out? But as you say, Will could give a shit. At his age he might half farm out his columns.
  62. @Cagey Beast
    I only Enoch Powell hadn't used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell's "rivers of blood" rhetoric.

    At least that's been one of the longest-lived alibis "conservatives" have used to explain why they just never seem to be able to restrict immigration. Unto the second generation:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg Betrays Fans By Opposing Enoch Powell’s Famous Speech
    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/04/14/jacob-rees-mogg-betrays-fans-opposing-enoch-powells-famous-speech/

    If you call understating the naked truth, ‘inflammatory’.

  63. Didn’t know he’s an atheist. I’m glad Trump’s win has ended his influence.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  64. @MalePaleStale
    George Will is another boomer obssessed with money. You would think that someone who has death staring him in the face would be less materialistic. His generation betrayed the sacred trust of passing along traditions and culture to their children and keeping a cohesive high trust society. In my neighborhood few raised flags for Memorial Day. It's a mostly Hispanic neighborhood. A few people put up Christmas lights. Hardly anyone gives out candy on Halloween. I do it in gratitude to those who gave me candy so many years ago creating wonderful memories.

    He’s not talking about money. He aims to recreate the whole world in his image. His unchecked snobbery has driven him mad.

  65. @DB Cooper
    India never respects its neighbors borders either. Britain gifted the people in South Asia a country and once the country was created it has invaded and land grabbed every single of its neighbors. Here is a selected list:

    1947 Annexation of Kashmir:
    http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/02/06/indias-shame/
    http://thediplomat.com/2015/08/kashmirs-young-rebels/
    1949 Annexation of Manipur:
    http://www.tehelka.com/manipurs-merger-with-india-was-a-forced-annexation/
    http://www.passblue.com/2017/09/05/in-lush-manipur-women-work-for-peace-as-militarization-marches-on/
    1949 Annexation of Tripura:
    http://www.crescent-online.net/2009/09/the-myths-of-one-nation-and-one-hinduism-in-india-zawahir-siddique-2316-articles.html
    1951 Annexation of South Tibet:
    http://kanglaonline.com/2011/06/khathing-the-taking-of-tawang/
    http://www.mainstreamweekly.net/article2582.html
    http://chasfreeman.net/india-pakistan-and-china/
    1954 Annexation of Nagaland:
    http://morungexpress.com/desire-nagas-live-separate-nation-deserved/
    http://nagalandmusings.blogspot.com/2013/01/indias-untold-genocide-of-nagas.html
    1954 Attempt annexation of Sikkim and Bhutan (Failed):
    http://redbarricade.blogspot.hk/2013/01/twisted-truth.html
    1961 Annexation of Goa:
    http://www.ruleoflaw.org.au/the-annexation-of-goa/
    http://www.historytoday.com/richard-cavendish/goa-falls-indian-troops
    http://goa-invasion-1961.blogspot.in/2013/09/india-pirated-goa-china-is-regaining_16.html
    1962 Annexation of Kalapani, Nepal:
    http://www.eurasiareview.com/07032012-indian-hegemony-in-nepal-oped/
    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1239348
    http://www.sharnoffsglobalviews.com/land-disputes-116/
    1962 Aggression against China:
    http://gregoryclark.net/redif.html
    http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/news-events/podcasts/renewed-tension-indiachina-border-whos-blame
    1971 Annexation of Turtuk, Pakistan:
    http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/nation/suddenly-indian
    1972 Annexation of Tin Bigha, Bangladesh:
    http://www.dhakatribune.com/op-ed/2014/feb/20/killing-fields
    1975 Annexation of Sikkim (the whole country):
    http://nepalitimes.com/issue/35/Nation/9621#.UohjPHQo6LA
    http://www.passblue.com/2015/07/22/a-small-himalayan-kingdom-remembers-its-lost-independence/
    http://www.amazon.com/Smash-Grab-Annexation-Sunanda-Datta-Ray/dp/9383260386
    http://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy/International-Relations/Indian-hegemonism-drags-Himalayan-kingdom-into-oblivion
    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/annexation-of-sikkim-by-india-was-not-legal-wangchuk-namgyal/1/391498.html
    1983 (Aborted) Attempted invasion of Mauritius:
    http://thediplomat.com/2013/03/when-india-almost-invaded-mauritius/
    1987 Invasion of Sri Lanka
    http://www.asiantribune.com/node/63316
    1990 (Failed) First Attempted annexation of Bhutan:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1990/10/07/world/india-based-groups-seek-to-disrupt-bhutan.html
    2006 Annexation of Duars, Bhutan:
    http://wangchasangey.blogspot.in/2015/11/different-kind-of-anxieties-on.html#comment-form
    2013 Annexation of Moreh, Myanmar:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nehginpao-kipgen/easing-indiamyanmar-borde_b_4633040.html
    2017 Aggression against China:
    http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2017/07/06/sikkim-stand-off-china-india-collide-himalayas/
    http://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2102555/indias-china-war-round-two
    https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/07/11/china-india-standoff-modi-has-bitten-off-more-than-he-can-chew/
    2017 (Failed) Second Attempted annexation of Bhutan:
    http://wangchasangey.blogspot.com/2017/08/the-strategy-behind-india-doklam.html
    http://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/article/2106709/india-must-find-face-saving-pretext-and-withdraw-doklam
    2018 (Thwarted) Attempt invasion of the Maldives
    https://www.ft.com/content/332a5b1a-1155-11e8-8cb6-b9ccc4c4dbbb
    https://thewire.in/223916/keep-off-maldives-yameen-government-tells-indian-military/?utm_source=alsoread

    1975 Annexation of Sikkim (the whole country):

    I was watching Sikkim travelogues just yesterday. Now I remember why I was fascinated by the place as a kid. I want to go to Gangtok.

    But what language is Harish Bali speaking here? Incomprehensible English? Hinglish? Pidgin? Something native with odd English phrases thrown in at random?

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    But what language is Harish Bali speaking here? Incomprehensible English? Hinglish? Pidgin? Something native with odd English phrases thrown in at random?
     
    Hindi as it is spoken these days by urban North Indian hipsters, college-educated types who have had their formal education entirely in the English language. When speaking Hindi, they lean heavily on English, which comes more naturally to them.

    The stigma associated with the bastardized form (as being a sign of a coddled rich private school kid) is now mostly gone, and you hear it all over TV now.

    The reliance on English is so great, that many Bollywood actors and actresses require their Hindi dialogue scripts to be in Romanized form, because they read Hindi in the native Sanskritic script very slowly, and with difficulty.

    , @DB Cooper
    India invaded and annexed Sikkim Saddam Hussein style (sending in a column of army trucks to Gangtok instead of a column of tanks to Kuwait city) fifteen years before Iraq invaded and annexed Kuwait. The Sikkim king was arrested and kept in solidary confinement till his death. His American wife Queen Hope Cooke managed to escape back to the state before the Indian army moved in. Hope Cooke is still alive and lives in New York.

    Too bad Sikkim does not have oil and that's why no one cares.
  66. George Will is a Reagan era corporatist trickle-down economics supporter. Much of what he supports follows from that. Did Will support the Reagan era amnesty?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Did Will support the Reagan era amnesty?
     
    You mean, did Will and Reagan support the O'Neill era windfall gift to aliens?

    trickle-down economics
     
    Careful. Most people who use that phrase mean trickle down from you. What percentage of the world is poorer than you? Ninety? Ninety-five?
    , @Pericles

    George Will is a Reagan era corporatist trickle-down economics supporter.

     

    Trickle away, George.
  67. @MBlanc46
    There probably can’t be a party-political way forward—if there can be a party-political way forward—without the demise of the Repubs.

    The Ryanites are already well on the way to dead. Have some patience. Meatspace>Media.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    I’m old. I can’t wait very long.
  68. @PiltdownMan
    George Will is a Reagan era corporatist trickle-down economics supporter. Much of what he supports follows from that. Did Will support the Reagan era amnesty?

    Did Will support the Reagan era amnesty?

    You mean, did Will and Reagan support the O’Neill era windfall gift to aliens?

    trickle-down economics

    Careful. Most people who use that phrase mean trickle down from you. What percentage of the world is poorer than you? Ninety? Ninety-five?

  69. Anonymous[415] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    1975 Annexation of Sikkim (the whole country):
     
    I was watching Sikkim travelogues just yesterday. Now I remember why I was fascinated by the place as a kid. I want to go to Gangtok.

    But what language is Harish Bali speaking here? Incomprehensible English? Hinglish? Pidgin? Something native with odd English phrases thrown in at random?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYIiDBAarW4

    But what language is Harish Bali speaking here? Incomprehensible English? Hinglish? Pidgin? Something native with odd English phrases thrown in at random?

    Hindi as it is spoken these days by urban North Indian hipsters, college-educated types who have had their formal education entirely in the English language. When speaking Hindi, they lean heavily on English, which comes more naturally to them.

    The stigma associated with the bastardized form (as being a sign of a coddled rich private school kid) is now mostly gone, and you hear it all over TV now.

    The reliance on English is so great, that many Bollywood actors and actresses require their Hindi dialogue scripts to be in Romanized form, because they read Hindi in the native Sanskritic script very slowly, and with difficulty.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The reliance on English is so great, that many Bollywood actors and actresses require their Hindi dialogue scripts to be in Romanized form, because they read Hindi in the native Sanskritic script very slowly, and with difficulty.
     
    I don't blame them. It reads left-to-right, but slants in a way that makes it look easier to read the other way.

    What is it with India and Southeast Asia? Every damned language has to have its own particular script. Like ours, though, every last one descends from the Phoenician. Why can't they share alphabets, like the users of Roman, Cyrillic, and Arabic do?

    No, they have to be like the Greeks and Koreans. So special.
  70. @AceDeuce
    Yet Will, who lives in the oh so vibrant DC area, chooses to live in the rich, mostly all white suburb of Chevy Chase, MD.

    He’s talking about us, not him. He lives in abstractland where he can be protected from any possible introspection, being mere anecdote, not data; a thing, not a concept.

    He knows we won’t do anything about it. Or thinks he does.

  71. @Wilkey
    In my younger days I pretty much worshiped at the Altar of George Will. I owned (still own, I guess) virtually every collection of his columns up until about 15 years ago. I've actually read them all, too.

    His columns are usually clever, sometimes enlightening, always articulate plugs for what is basically respectable center-right D.C. Republican ideology. He is Mitt Romney if Mitt Romney had something remotely like a personality (which is not to say that Will has much of a personality).

    George Will frankly couldn't give two shits for middle-class America anymore than Mitt Romney does.

    Here is Will in 2014, when the problem with unaccompanied minors began:


    We ought to say to these children, ‘Welcome to America, you’re going to go to school and get a job and become Americans. We have 3,141 counties in this country. That would be 20 per county. The idea that we can’t assimilate these eight-year-old criminals with their teddy bears is preposterous.”
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too small to worry about

    And here he is eight years earlier, on the 2006 amnesty putsch:


    We are not going to take the draconian police measures necessary to deport 11 million people. They would fill 200,000 buses in a caravan stretching bumper-to-bumper from San Diego to Alaska — where, by the way, 26,000 Latinos live. And there are no plausible incentives to get the 11 million to board the buses. - March 30, 2006
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too big to do anything about.

    Which is it? Too small to worry about or too big to do anything about? Where is the Goldilocks middle, where it's big enough to worry about but small enough to do something about?

    The irony is that George Will has written on multiple occasions about the US airline industry, which handles (last time I checked) over 700 million passengers per year. Deporting every single illegal immigrant in a single year would amount to less than 2% of annual US airline traffic. Illegal immigration is a big problem, but this is a big country. George Will damn well knows that, but instead of talking intelligently about the matter he turns it into some seemingly unsolvable math problem.

    But Will is even more fanatical than I have already pointed out:


    Conservatives should favor a policy of encouraging unlimited immigration by educated people with math, engineering, technology or science skills that America's education system is not sufficiently supplying.
     
    So he wants unlimited "skilled" immigration. And he effectively wants unlimited unskilled immigration, as well. All without ever bothering to point out how all of this unlimited immigration is supposed to benefit the American people. Because they can make shit here in the US rather than making it in their home countries and shipping it here on giant container ships?

    The other irony is that one of Will's latest columns is a rant against the new SAT "adversity score" and how it's driven by identity politics. Because as we all know the way to end identity politics' increasing domination of US policy is to import tens of millions more people who benefit from it.

    That would be 20 per county.

    That would be a majority of children in Loving County, Texas, until recently the least-populated in the US.

    Until Hawaii erected a new county consisting of her old leper colony. Will Will send 20 children there?

    Under Hawaii state law, the Director of the Hawaii Department of Health, who is appointed by the Governor, also serves as the Mayor of Kalawao County.

  72. @Ibound1
    The Economy is the god of most of the GOP. Just as Diversity is the god of the Democrats. They aren’t really opposing religions. There is a new synthesis: With more Diversity we can have an even stronger Economy and with a stronger Economy, we can have greater Diversity.

    All we cannot have is a nation.

    We can however have a country and the minority on the wrong side of that question are exactly the people who need a good long stint out of power, if for nothing more than to get their shit together.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
    We need them out of power to keep the country as a country and not as two lines on a map filled with nothing but corporations, their serfs and bread and circuses.
  73. Anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:
    @Roger
    It used to be that conservatives could count on other conservatives having similar political views. If nothing else, the Trump administration has greatly clarified who stands where.

    the Trump administration has greatly clarified who stands where.

    Who stands where?

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    The neo-conservatives and ideological conservatives have made the short, happy journey Leftward.
  74. @Daniel H
    George Will and the rest of the Cucks can stuff this:

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/new-poll-a-majority-of-women-between-18-and-54-support-socialism

    They have no idea what socialism is:

    The split on positive and negative views of socialism also seems to be affected by what Americans believe the word means. The poll found 49% of Americans believe socialism is a system dependent on a dictatorship while 46% of Americans think socialism means a democratic government.

  75. George Will should go back to pretending to like baseball.

    • LOL: HammerJack
  76. And George Will will tell you that America’s dirt is so magic that the mere fact of immigrants treading on such dirt will halt, and reverse one of the most serious issues facing this country: the almost certain disappearance of groundwater supplies in much of the United States. Yeah, don’t worry, each immigrant brings with him/her an allotment of 35,000 gallons of water per year (typical per capita usage) strapped to his/her back. No problem.

  77. @Reg Cæsar

    1975 Annexation of Sikkim (the whole country):
     
    I was watching Sikkim travelogues just yesterday. Now I remember why I was fascinated by the place as a kid. I want to go to Gangtok.

    But what language is Harish Bali speaking here? Incomprehensible English? Hinglish? Pidgin? Something native with odd English phrases thrown in at random?


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYIiDBAarW4

    India invaded and annexed Sikkim Saddam Hussein style (sending in a column of army trucks to Gangtok instead of a column of tanks to Kuwait city) fifteen years before Iraq invaded and annexed Kuwait. The Sikkim king was arrested and kept in solidary confinement till his death. His American wife Queen Hope Cooke managed to escape back to the state before the Indian army moved in. Hope Cooke is still alive and lives in New York.

    Too bad Sikkim does not have oil and that’s why no one cares.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Your account is disingenuous and misleading. The annexation of Sikkim by India is much more analogous to the annexation of California or Texas to the U.S.A than it is to any nefarious invasion – it was done at the request of the people. The Sikkim State Congress and its prime minister requested assistance from India in overthrowing the monarchy and, later, requested annexation to India as well. Earlier still, Indian forces had entered Sikkim at the request of its monarch for their assistance quelling popular revolts against his rule (one must be careful what one wishes for, and beware of entangling alliances...).

    Incidentally, if you want to learn about a nonpareil adventuress – a real adventuress' adventuress! – get a load of this disgusting Hope Wallace (née Cooke, formerly Namgyal) creature – a real parasite who never faced a consequence for an action or worked for anything a day of her life (and she is still at it, as you mention). Her parents might better have named her "Despair" to help warn men away from her.

  78. Anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:
    @bored identity
    Really?

    What about that crypto-haplo - I_ɡ_l_ˈiː_z_iə_z_ θ_ˈɪ_k Maranito who just recently fatwaed the Great Awokening on America?

    https://thefederalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Matthew-Yglesias-Is-Super-Smart.png

    Let bored identity guess:

    Mattetito is not camping in front of his local Home Depot with the rest of his TabuLa Raza compatriots, ONLY because he is smarter than 99.9 % of native, pundit-aspiring, blue-eyed devils.

    https://otb.cachefly.net/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/matthew_yglesias.jpg

    Is that Matthew Yglesias?

    • Replies: @bored identity
    Que?
    , @Lot
    Looks like him from college.
  79. @Steve Sailer
    George is saying that immigrants are good for the Economy and the Economy is here to serve immigrants, and nobody/nothing else (e.g., the American people) matters in this relationship.

    “The economy needs immigration as much as the immigrants need the economy”

    This is both logically and factually false AND glib and shallow. It’s the worst of both worlds as far as opinions go. And if it were insincere, too, it would complete the trifecta.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    I don't see why. The whole economic system and way of life in the US is very dependent on Social Security and Medicare, and it seems logical to the average person like me, who is not a trained economist, that the whole edifice is like a pyramid, that constantly demands a new and wider layer of younger consumers and producers at the bottom of the pyramid to nourish and renew the structure.

    What would be the difference between a few million people from Florida migrating to other states due to flooding and global warming and a few million people migrating from Central America to the temperate zones of the US and Canada to the north due to the failed states of Central America becoming unlivable for those who do not own a private army, or belong to one?

    It seems to me that rather than threaten each other with tariffs, the three nations of North America (US, Canada, and Mexico) ought to get together to formulate a plan to resettle those who want to abandon Central America. After all there is still a huge amount of unoccupied land left in the continent (especially in Alaska) and if the Russians and Argentinians were to join in on the enterprise and open up Siberia and Tierra del Fuego, then even more espacio habitable would be available for the teeming hordes of Tegucigalpa, Guatemala City, and San Salvador.

    There have always been immigration laws and people holding up their hands to say enough is enough, although the immgration laws of the past have a quaint look to them now.

    The Chinese Exclusion Act was enacted in response to hostility to Chinese workers at a time when the supply of gold in the California Gold Rush was drying up. Of course California later had the Silicon Chip Rush to fill up the jobs deficit, until most of the jobs where then exported to... China by US corporations.

    The fifty-cent immigration tax has been replaced by taxes and fees of thousands of dollars for medical tests, certified documents, and application and biometrics fees, which is great business for the US. Just to get a replacement for a lost Certificate of Naturalization or Consular Record of Birth Abroad is now $750.00, a fee which even the likes of Ted Cruz apparently have a hard time coming up with.

    https://www.dol.wa.gov/driverslicense/images/consular-report-of-birth-abroad.jpg

    I would have though D. Trump would be all in favor of further increasing these fees to make immigration even more profitable.

    Among the first laws passed to limit immigration were the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Immigration Act, both enacted in 1882. The Chinese Exclusion Act prohibited the entry of Chinese laborers into the country for 10 years, while the Immigration Act established a 50-cent tax to enter the country, to be paid by each immigrant upon entry. The Immigration Act also excluded "any convict, lunatic, idiot, or any person unable to take care of him or herself without becoming a public charge" from entry altogether.

    The Immigration Act of 1882 set a precedent for barring categories of individuals from entry, and the next major immigration law, the Immigration Act of 1891, expanded these categories to include polygamists, individuals convicted of crimes of moral depravity, and those with contagious diseases that posed a threat to public health. The law also created the first federal agency dedicated to enforcing immigration law, the Office of the Superintendent of Immigration within the Treasury Department

    https://ballotpedia.org/History_of_immigration_policy_in_the_United_States

    https://www.julienslive.com/images/lot/1655/165543_0.jpg
  80. @istevefan
    A commenter once wrote something in the comments to this blog along the lines of this, "If we take in the whole world, the USA will have 100 percent of global GDP."

    A commenter once wrote something in the comments to this blog along the lines of this, “If we take in the whole world, the USA will have 100 percent of global GDP.”

    That’s similar to “If we made everyone in the world an American, then there would be zero illegal immigration.”

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    I've started reciting Sailer's "toilet paper" argument to people. As in, if we have a billion immigrants, we can all get rich just selling toilet paper to each other. People need toilet paper, right? And the more people the more toilet paper, right? So we all just buy toilet paper at Costco and sell it to all the billions of each other and retire off the spread, right?
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    In your example it all depends on how one defines the first clause. An aggressive interpretation would be akin to Manifest Destiny, Generalplan Ost, or Macrophage Rapid Convergence.
    , @TheJester

    That’s similar to “If we made everyone in the world an American, then there would be zero illegal immigration.”
     
    I sense your sarcasm. The Roman's tried that and it didn't work. Making everyone in the Roman Empire a citizen allowed those from alien cultures and religions to become Roman soldiers accessing the roots of Roman national power ... and then the rot began. Roman emperors, foreshadowing Obama, even adopted foreign religions in the hope of unifying a now diverse people. Sound familiar?

    Going forward, it was inevitable that sooner rather than later the barbarians would become officers and generals in the Legions powerful enough to "make" or "break" Roman emperors and Roman institutions. They, of course, broke them.

    As they say, the rest is history .... as an ode to the adverse impact of diversity on cultures, religions, peoples. and empires. Diversity is a short run thing.
  81. I have not read George Will in decades (the local newspaper dropped his column), but recently I saw his essay on impeachment

    https://www.troyrecord.com/opinion/george-will-trump-the-idea-of-an-aesthetic-impeachment/article_84abe474-8731-11e9-a53f-d7801cb7927e.html

    in which he wrote: “Impeachment can be retrospective, for offenses committed, or prospective, to prevent probable future injuries to the nation.”

    Really? That’s not what the Constitution says. Article II, Section 4: “The President, Vice President, and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.”

    But according to George Will, impeachment is a punishment for future crimes. Holy Philip K. Dick! Shades of

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minority_Report_(film)

    • Replies: @Justvisiting
    Actually Will is more radical than Philip Dick's dystopian vision.

    Since the future crimes haven't been thought of yet Will is extending Pre-crime to Pre-thought.

    This fits in well with the Silicon Valley and Chinese elite's vision of using data to determine pre-thought.

    They want citizens to think about thinking only correct thoughts--otherwise off to the prison camps for re-education they go.
  82. @Desiderius
    The other side gets the insufferable dorks this time. Sounds good to me.

    “At a dinner with Churchill, Ribbentrop had said that, in a future war with Britain, Germany would have the Italians on its side. Churchill, referring to Italy’s poor record in the First World War, responded with one of his devastating verbal flashes: ‘That’s only fair – we had them last time.’”

    Italy’s poor record in the First World War

    Erwin Rommel, who went on to great fame leading the Afrika Korps and later Panzerarmee Afrika, including Italian troops, in WW II, won Pour Le Merite, Imperial Germany’s highest military honor for valor in WW I against the Italians:

    In two and a half days, from 25 to 27 October, Rommel and his 150 men captured 81 guns and 9,000 men (including 150 officers), at the loss of six dead and 30 wounded.[26] Rommel achieved this remarkable success by taking advantage of the terrain to outflank the Italian forces, attacking from unexpected directions or behind enemy lines, and taking the initiative to attack when he had orders to the contrary. In one instance, the Italian forces, taken by surprise and believing that their lines had collapsed, surrendered after a brief firefight.[27]

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erwin_Rommel

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    OK, the Italians weren't as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians. That's pretty much the whole of WWI outside the Western Front -- the Germans rushing around on multiple fronts to shore up their allies. The Germans were the best, man for man.
    , @William Badwhite
    One challenge facing Italy from a military perspective (in the 20th century) is that its a fake country of different peoples that were cobbled together. Its not really a nation. Their hearts just weren't in it.

    I suspect the future US military will face similar challenges - the "tip of the spear" whites aren't going to want to fight on behalf of a bunch of hindus, mexicans, and chinamen. The enlisted ranks will likely keep getting some (via economic lures), but I suspect the traditional American officer classes will winnow. Just using the Badwhites as an example: we have fought (as officers) in every major American conflict going back to the French and Indian Wars (except Vietnam - one branch was too old, another was too young, and one guy was in the USAF but stationed in Germany).

    It would never occur to any of us to join today and my brothers and I would actively discourage any of our sons from joining. The US military will continue to get officers of course, but it'll be the Major Nadal's and the Lt. Col D'Quantravious types, as well as the bickering school girls on the U.S.S. Florida. That would have serious ramifications in a serious WW1/WW2 type conflict.

  83. @anon
    “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your economy can do for you—ask what you can do for your economy. And for immigrants.”

    That brings Horace's quote to mind:

    Dulce et decorum est pro oeconomia mori.

    Dulce et decorum est pro oeconomia mori.

    Sadly, they aren’t doing enough “pro oeconomia mori.” I wish they would. 😉

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    That’s part of the joke. Try to look up the real quote. The fault lies in Will’s stargazing.
  84. @Anonymous
    Is that Matthew Yglesias?

    Que?

  85. @Reg Cæsar
    As of five years ago, the top names in California were Garcia, Hernandez, and Lopez. In Hawaii, they were Lee, Wong, and Kim. Japanese still outnumber Chinese and Koreans in Hawaii, I think, but they have too many surnames.

    The only other state with no English surnames in the top three was New Mexico. Possibly North Dakota, too, if their Johnsons and Andersons are mostly Swedish.

    You could sort out "Anderson states", where that name is in the top three, or "Johnson states", where that is number one. I bet those ten states will show up well on all kinds of metrics.

    https://blogs.ancestry.com/cm/files/2014/12/Surname-Map-1.png

    Japanese still outnumber Chinese and Koreans in Hawaii, I think, but they have too many surnames.

    Surnames don’t really reflect ancestry percentages all that well in Hawaii these days.

    When I was at a hospital for a meeting recently, I talked to white female ob/gyn doc, one Dr. Kim. She told me that she was assigned to delivering a baby for a Mrs. Nakamura. A nurse told Mrs. Nakamura that Dr. Kim would be with her soon. So when Dr. Kim finally entered the room, the doc and the patient looked at each other and paused for a second. Mrs. Nakamura was blonde and blue-eyed, just like Dr. Kim.

    Expectations not met. Mutually.

  86. @Lot
    Immigration from India is punishment/reparations for people who resembled Americans colonizing India 70-200 years.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/07/opinion/immigration-reparations.html

    Immigration from India is punishment/reparations for people who resembled Americans colonizing India 70-200 years.

    I don’t resembled those colonizers. Why are they punishing me with Indian immigrants?

    http://www.unz.com/anepigone/heightism-and-weightism/#comment-3168756

    • Replies: @BengaliCanadianDude
    To be honest, you're not white. They complain about you too
  87. Off topic but may be of interest to you from the Times Literary Supplement

    Bayes vs Fischer view of statistics and the replication crisis

    https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/thomas-bayes-science-crisis/

    I obtained an MS in statistics from ASU about 25 years ago. As you know, ASU is an enormous school and across the University there must have been more than 100 graduate level statistics courses in the ASU catalog — graduate level statistics courses thru school of business, school of engineering (Industrial Engineering), Economics, Dept of Mathematics and specialized courses in Psychology, Genetics, etc. And yet, there was not a single course offered in Bayesian statistics. To gain some exposure to Bayesian Stats I had to arrange an independent study class for credit towards my degree.

    I always found the logic of Bayesian compelling but there seems to be little interest among academics.

  88. Will is the very model of a modern movement Conservative: a completely useless establishment hack who has conserved exactly nothing.

    • Replies: @OhioJoeJoe
    “Will is the very model of a modern movement Conservative: a completely useless establishment hack who has conserved exactly nothing.”

    The coralary: he’s the poster boy for ”Boomerism” - they are retiring, they have their homes in enclaves, they accepted America produces nothing, they have theirs... really, why wouldn’t you kids just be happy with Taco Trucks?

  89. Homo Economicus or maybe we can call him Homo Bugmanis. A completely deracinated species whose hivemind NPC mentality causes him embrace the parasitic “invade the world invite the world” ponzi scheme economy even when it’s side effects become clearer and clearer.

  90. @Wilkey
    In my younger days I pretty much worshiped at the Altar of George Will. I owned (still own, I guess) virtually every collection of his columns up until about 15 years ago. I've actually read them all, too.

    His columns are usually clever, sometimes enlightening, always articulate plugs for what is basically respectable center-right D.C. Republican ideology. He is Mitt Romney if Mitt Romney had something remotely like a personality (which is not to say that Will has much of a personality).

    George Will frankly couldn't give two shits for middle-class America anymore than Mitt Romney does.

    Here is Will in 2014, when the problem with unaccompanied minors began:


    We ought to say to these children, ‘Welcome to America, you’re going to go to school and get a job and become Americans. We have 3,141 counties in this country. That would be 20 per county. The idea that we can’t assimilate these eight-year-old criminals with their teddy bears is preposterous.”
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too small to worry about

    And here he is eight years earlier, on the 2006 amnesty putsch:


    We are not going to take the draconian police measures necessary to deport 11 million people. They would fill 200,000 buses in a caravan stretching bumper-to-bumper from San Diego to Alaska — where, by the way, 26,000 Latinos live. And there are no plausible incentives to get the 11 million to board the buses. - March 30, 2006
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too big to do anything about.

    Which is it? Too small to worry about or too big to do anything about? Where is the Goldilocks middle, where it's big enough to worry about but small enough to do something about?

    The irony is that George Will has written on multiple occasions about the US airline industry, which handles (last time I checked) over 700 million passengers per year. Deporting every single illegal immigrant in a single year would amount to less than 2% of annual US airline traffic. Illegal immigration is a big problem, but this is a big country. George Will damn well knows that, but instead of talking intelligently about the matter he turns it into some seemingly unsolvable math problem.

    But Will is even more fanatical than I have already pointed out:


    Conservatives should favor a policy of encouraging unlimited immigration by educated people with math, engineering, technology or science skills that America's education system is not sufficiently supplying.
     
    So he wants unlimited "skilled" immigration. And he effectively wants unlimited unskilled immigration, as well. All without ever bothering to point out how all of this unlimited immigration is supposed to benefit the American people. Because they can make shit here in the US rather than making it in their home countries and shipping it here on giant container ships?

    The other irony is that one of Will's latest columns is a rant against the new SAT "adversity score" and how it's driven by identity politics. Because as we all know the way to end identity politics' increasing domination of US policy is to import tens of millions more people who benefit from it.

    But Will is even more fanatical than I have already pointed out:

    “Conservatives should favor a policy of encouraging unlimited immigration by educated people with math, engineering, technology or science skills that America’s education system is not sufficiently supplying.”

    Because America just doesn’t have enough Uber drivers with engineering degrees from Rawalpindi Tech and a 2.5 GPA.

  91. @Twinkie

    Dulce et decorum est pro oeconomia mori.
     
    Sadly, they aren’t doing enough “pro oeconomia mori.” I wish they would. ;)

    That’s part of the joke. Try to look up the real quote. The fault lies in Will’s stargazing.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    That’s part of the joke. Try to look up the real quote.
     
    Oh, I know the original quote ("pro patria"). I was playing along - meaning, in jest, that I wished the people pushing for "the biggest economy at all costs" were willing to and did die for their causes a bit more.
  92. @Twinkie

    Italy’s poor record in the First World War
     
    Erwin Rommel, who went on to great fame leading the Afrika Korps and later Panzerarmee Afrika, including Italian troops, in WW II, won Pour Le Merite, Imperial Germany’s highest military honor for valor in WW I against the Italians:

    In two and a half days, from 25 to 27 October, Rommel and his 150 men captured 81 guns and 9,000 men (including 150 officers), at the loss of six dead and 30 wounded.[26] Rommel achieved this remarkable success by taking advantage of the terrain to outflank the Italian forces, attacking from unexpected directions or behind enemy lines, and taking the initiative to attack when he had orders to the contrary. In one instance, the Italian forces, taken by surprise and believing that their lines had collapsed, surrendered after a brief firefight.[27]
     
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erwin_Rommel

    OK, the Italians weren’t as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians. That’s pretty much the whole of WWI outside the Western Front — the Germans rushing around on multiple fronts to shore up their allies. The Germans were the best, man for man.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    OK, the Italians weren’t as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians.
     
    I don't think that's quite true, but would depend on the time period in question.

    In WW II, in any case, the Italians were notorious for breaking on contact with... the British, the Russians, and later the Americans. Pretty much anyone who could fight. They did very poorly against the Greeks even when the Axis Powers were ascendant.

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, "Americans? Our Italians."

    The Germans were the best, man for man.
     
    They certainly were during WW II. Martin van Creveld did a nice study of that early in his career:

    https://www.amazon.com/Fighting-Power-Performance-1939-1945-Contributions/dp/0313091579
    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    Yes, but unfortunately they tried to encourage their Turkish allies and others by firing up the Mohammedans. As the Kaiser said:

    “Now the whole scheme must be ruthlessly exposed, the mask of Christian readiness for peace which England has shown to the world must be rudely torn off, and her Pharisaic protestation of peace pilloried! And our consuls in Turkey and India, our agents, &c., must rouse the whole Mohammedan world to a wild rebellion against this hated, deceitful, unscrupulous nation of shopkeepers. If we are to bleed to death, England shall at least lose India.”

    So WW1 stirred up international Jihad, on top of everything else.
    , @Charles Pewitt

    OK, the Italians weren’t as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians. That’s pretty much the whole of WWI outside the Western Front — the Germans rushing around on multiple fronts to shore up their allies. The Germans were the best, man for man.

     

    It's OKAY To Be German.

    It's OKAY To Be White.

    It's OKAY To Have German Ancestry That Sailed To Virginia Before The American Secessionary War From The British Empire.

    It's OKAY To Have A German Ancestor And An Irish Ancestor Who Fought In The American Secessionary War From The British Empire.

    The commenter who wrote a while back that there weren't too many Germans in the Southern colonies is way the Hell off base. There were plenty of Germans in the South before the American Secessionary War from the British Empire.
    , @Desiderius
    Bravery was not among their shortcomings unless perhaps in excess.
    , @Lot
    The death ratio on the Italian front was about 3:2 Italian/Austrian. But the Italians won in the end, and the low number of Italian ally casualties on that front suggests it was an overwhelmingly Italian victory.

    Italy had 58 divisions fighting there compared to a combined 5 British/French and suffered 650k dead compared to 1k British.
    , @donut
    Just before The Franco-German War of 1870 one of Bismarck's subordinates asked him what he would do if the British came to the aid of the French and landed a force on the North Sea coast . Bismarck replied that he would send a policeman to arrest them .
  93. Anonymous[177] • Disclaimer says:

    (Slightly) O.T.

    According to this morning’s news reports, a senior British primatologist has claimed that UK customs regularly seize ‘significant’ quantities of ‘chimpanzee meat’ – as confirmed by DNA analysis – being shipped in from west Africa, to be sold as a ‘delicacy’ in towns ‘with a large west African population, (that is the entire urban UK).

    Apparently, chimp meat is often served a weddings, christenings and funerals…….

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    ‘chimpanzee meat’ – as confirmed by DNA analysis
     
    Which they share 98% with us, right? This is on the cusp of cannibalism.

    Don't try serving man's best friend, though. Not in old Blighty.

    If the meat is bad and causes nausea, will you literally "chimp out"?

  94. @MBlanc46
    There probably can’t be a party-political way forward—if there can be a party-political way forward—without the demise of the Repubs.

    There probably can’t be a party-political way forward—if there can be a party-political way forward—without the demise of the Repubs.

    Disagree.

    The American political system–coupled with the sheer size of the country–tend to generate a two party system. While there have been several third party blooms and fads, we haven’t actually had a third party launch and replace since the Republicans replaced the dying Whigs.

    No the way forward is straightforward: conservatives actually interested in conserving something–our race, culture and nation–and willing to work for the benefit of their middle class voters, take over the Republican party.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I'm disappointed in you.

    The F.U.S.A., in the Republicrats & Democratans (like China's Communists and Mexico's P.R.I.), has, de facto one-party rile and has done for at least fifty years. The ostensible differences and disputes are all kabuki theatre.

    (Anyone not hip to this situation is not paying attention or else is trying to keep you in thrall.)
    , @MBlanc46
    I agree about the two-party system. I’m not convinced that the Repubs must continue to be one if them.
  95. @Desiderius
    That’s part of the joke. Try to look up the real quote. The fault lies in Will’s stargazing.

    That’s part of the joke. Try to look up the real quote.

    Oh, I know the original quote (“pro patria”). I was playing along – meaning, in jest, that I wished the people pushing for “the biggest economy at all costs” were willing to and did die for their causes a bit more.

  96. @Steve Sailer
    OK, the Italians weren't as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians. That's pretty much the whole of WWI outside the Western Front -- the Germans rushing around on multiple fronts to shore up their allies. The Germans were the best, man for man.

    OK, the Italians weren’t as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians.

    I don’t think that’s quite true, but would depend on the time period in question.

    In WW II, in any case, the Italians were notorious for breaking on contact with… the British, the Russians, and later the Americans. Pretty much anyone who could fight. They did very poorly against the Greeks even when the Axis Powers were ascendant.

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, “Americans? Our Italians.”

    The Germans were the best, man for man.

    They certainly were during WW II. Martin van Creveld did a nice study of that early in his career:

    https://www.amazon.com/Fighting-Power-Performance-1939-1945-Contributions/dp/0313091579

    • Replies: @Daniel H
    >>The Germans were the best, man for man.

    Well, man for man is meaningless. Man for man the Germans bested the Red Army -right?- , but the Red Army marched into Berlin. 'Nuff said.

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.. Significant statistical factoid (gleaned from my recollections of David Glantz's writings). In 1942, Germany and her allies occupied/controlled a landmass that had at least 150% the GDP of the Soviet Union, maybe as high as 180%, yet in 1942 - a very critical year of the war - Germany produced approximately 4,000 top of the line fighting tanks. In the same year the Soviet Union produced close to 20,000 top of the line fighting tanks.(Don't forget, at this point all of Ukraine, Belorussia and the Baltics were in German hands). A similar ratio pertained in the production of artillery, self-propelled guns, machine guns, aircraft, .... (and no, the Soviet Union didn't need no stinkin' lend lease). The Soviet Union was tougher, smarter, meaner. The Russian was/is clearly a superior man to the German, and I think we can all see that today.
    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, “Americans? Our Italians.”

     

    A rather amusing comment in light of the future poverty of British infantry performance in France, 1944.
    , @ben tillman

    They certainly were during WW II. Martin van Creveld did a nice study of that early in his career:
     
    There's a lot of interesting stuff in there, which I know through reading Boyd and Richerson's discussion of the topic in their Complex societies : The evolutionary origins of a crude superorganism.
    , @William Badwhite
    The American army at the time of Kasserine Pass really wasn't ready and was poorly equipped. They did not perform well. They improved greatly over the course of the war. Comments from British should be taken with their (deserved) inferiority complex in mind.
  97. I’m confused too. You can say immigrants are a possible burden on the economy but we have a moral duty to take them in that should override the fear of economic damage. We take as many as the economy will bear. You can say that immigration is good for the economy as a thing in itself. I disagree with both arguments but they at least don’t contradict each other in isolation. He seems to be saying both at the same time. Like a good citizen of Oceania he has two contradictory arguments within the same paragraph and it probably makes total sense to him. Although perhaps one could give him the benefit of the doubt and he possibly concedes a threshold to the economic benefit. One he somehow thinks we haven’t reached.

  98. @Neil Templeton
    Gravity without mass. A superstitial man.

    Lol, excellent.

  99. @Clifford Brown
    This video was banned on Youtube this week. Dedicated to those who died on D-Day for freedom or something.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyQkTqFB1rs
    • Replies: @Olorin
    How speciesist, denying Canada Geese a platform for comment!
  100. @PiltdownMan
    George Will is a Reagan era corporatist trickle-down economics supporter. Much of what he supports follows from that. Did Will support the Reagan era amnesty?

    George Will is a Reagan era corporatist trickle-down economics supporter.

    Trickle away, George.

  101. OT

    • Replies: @eah
    https://twitter.com/JessMKnoll/status/655475643522666496
    , @Kylie
    Jessica Knoll is even wackier than this tripe demonstrates.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4989886/amp/Jessica-Knoll-reveals-went-date-rapist.html
    , @S. Anonyia
    This woman will eventually get fat, because she thinks way too much about food. All the mental effort of writing this article, and it's simply about her love/hate relationship with food. Blah blah blah, food, body, food, shame, food. She doesn't even talk about the types/flavors of food she finds appealing, just...food. And how she wants to be applauded for eating.

    Anyone who thinks about food too much will have health problems.
  102. @eah
    OT

    https://twitter.com/nytopinion/status/1137783432661143552

  103. George Will is a fossil. Nobody listens to him, anymore. But when he did have influence, he guided America into the immigration hell hole we find ourselves in today. He sold the lie that once third world people joined the American economy, it would transform them into Americans. Hispanics were natural family values conservatives so Hispanic immigration would strengthen Republicans in the long run. Well, the long run is now, and 40 millions Hispanics are voting 2:1 for Democrats — and since they are low information voters, it doesn’t matter what platform you run on. It doesn’t matter if the economy is prosperous. It doesn’t matter whether unemployment is 2% or 20%. Hispanics will vote 2:1 for Democrats.

  104. That would be George Will, sports machine. I’ll listen to George Will on this topic when he cultivates a George Hamilton tan and dons a Zorro the Gay-Blade costume.

  105. @Pericles
    Perhaps related:

    https://twitter.com/GarbHum/status/1137459170485997569

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-06-10/facebook-has-banned-word-honk-violating-their-community-standards

    How speciesist, denying Canada Geese a platform for comment!

  106. @Sgt. Joe Friday
    I think Will is an atheist, actually.

    And note that no one hears about "standard of living" anymore. Back when I was boy, America used to boast about having the "world's highest standard of living." Now all you hear about is "world's largest economy."

    The countries that perhaps have higher standards of living have demographic differences that are…….. controversial if you point them out.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The countries that perhaps have higher standards of living have demographic differences that are…….. controversial if you point them out.
     
    Liechtenstein is about to be surpassed by Macau for the highest standard of living, or at least the highest per capita income. Hey, the house wins in the end.

    I stayed in Macau in 1985. There were rats in the streets and a giant roach on my hotel bed.


    https://previews.123rf.com/images/jovannig/jovannig1504/jovannig150400506/39367193-macau-night-skyline-china-.jpg
  107. @TheMediumIsTheMassage
    "The economy" needs to be abolished as the measure of a successful country. Instead quality of life, life expectancy, GPD per capita, expendable income, happiness, etc. should be the main measurements.

    Other than GDP per capita, those are BS statistics. What’s a quality life? Life expectancy? Will the US adopt the habit of pointing out that Africans in America live longer than Africans in Africa? Expendable income? Through the power of handwavium math, let me explain how you’re money ahead of we double the taxes most Americans actually pay, but you get a Medicaid card! Give a free pot EBT card, and a disturbing number of our fellow “citizens” would be happy.

  108. @Steve Sailer
    OK, the Italians weren't as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians. That's pretty much the whole of WWI outside the Western Front -- the Germans rushing around on multiple fronts to shore up their allies. The Germans were the best, man for man.

    Yes, but unfortunately they tried to encourage their Turkish allies and others by firing up the Mohammedans. As the Kaiser said:

    “Now the whole scheme must be ruthlessly exposed, the mask of Christian readiness for peace which England has shown to the world must be rudely torn off, and her Pharisaic protestation of peace pilloried! And our consuls in Turkey and India, our agents, &c., must rouse the whole Mohammedan world to a wild rebellion against this hated, deceitful, unscrupulous nation of shopkeepers. If we are to bleed to death, England shall at least lose India.”

    So WW1 stirred up international Jihad, on top of everything else.

  109. @216
    National Review has gleefully hired and over-promoted lots of Asian immigrants.

    What they haven't done is pushed Rich Lowry to hand over the editorship.

    Reihan Salam and Ramesh Ponnuru >>>>> George Will

    • Replies: @BengaliCanadianDude
    Unironically this. Reihan is genuinely a good writer
  110. @Anon
    I didn't know he had a Ph.D.: Dr. Will.

    Here's a take-down of him in The Week by center-left Damon Linker:

    The sad, sorry decline of George F. Will
    https://theweek.com/articles/446227/sad-sorry-decline-george-f

    The title makes it sound like you could swap in Mickey Kaus's name.

    Anyway, half the take-down concerns a column that sent Twitter into an uproar, but which is quite excellent in my opinion.

    George Will: Colleges become the victims of progressivism
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/george-will-college-become-the-victims-of-progressivism/2014/06/06/e90e73b4-eb50-11e3-9f5c-9075d5508f0a_story.html

    And then there's the notorious rape column in which Will asserts that (you guessed it) "progressivism" has made "victimhood a coveted status that confers privileges," thereby inspiring "the supposed campus epidemic of rape, a.k.a. 'sexual assault.'"

    That's right: George Will, Ph.D., believes that under the influence of "progressivism," young women on college campuses across America are (en masse? individually?) seeking privileges (economic? political? cultural?) by getting themselves known as rape victims — because that is a "coveted status."

    Sure it's sexist, condescending, and callously dismissive, as thousands of critics have already noted. But here's what bothers me even more than that: it's outrageously stupid, transparently absurd.

    Can Will truly believe that female college students are behaving the way he claims they are — faking sexual assaults because it confers benefits on them? If he does, what does that imply about his broader capacity to think, analyze, and opine?
     

    The example Will gives is a student who had been having hook-up sex with a fellow student for three months. They were in her bed together. He makes a move. She "basically said" (does that mean "she said"?) "No." "A few minutes later (lying with her permission in her bed, remember) he makes another move.

    "I just kind of laid there and didn’t do anything — I had already said no. I was just tired and wanted to go to bed. I let him finish. I pulled my panties back on and went to sleep."

    In other words, "I could have just said 'No' again, or said 'Not tonight,' or pushed him off, but hey, I was sleepy, so I figured to avoid any exertion I'd just let myself get raped instead. I mean, jeez, didn't he know from my previous tone of voice that my No had a 120 minute expiration?"

    A month and a half later she report to the school (not the police) that she had been raped.

    There are many more like this. I think Will's very reasonable point is that rape, and sexual assault, have changed in meaning, expanding in the way that marketers call brand extension, e.g., Oreo ice cream. Expanded to include mild annoyances that you let happen if it will save the effort of saying 'No.' And I think also that young women perceive experiences that in the past they would have considered to be consensual as criminal. And I think that the shame that young women used to feel about rape-rape is not felt about campus "rape."

    And at least some women, as Will noted, such as the Rolling Stone subject and mattress girl, do in fact get off on having a status of rape victim (just as long as everyone knows it wasn't an alley rape by a black guy with a gun, but rather, a "I consulted with my gender studies professor a few weeks later and realized it was a rape" rape).

    Damon Linker isn’t exactly “center-left”. He’s a kind of odd liberal-paleocon hybrid.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Just quoting Wikipedia. I'm not familiar with his writing.

    The Week
     
    is kind of hard to pin down on its politics.
    , @Desiderius
    He's the rare progsnob who knows we're here and something of what we're on about. He never fails to assure his readers which side he plays for while also leaving no doubt in his writing. Such a belt and suspenders approach seems de rigeur among the ruling class these days.
  111. @Sgt. Joe Friday
    I think Will is an atheist, actually.

    And note that no one hears about "standard of living" anymore. Back when I was boy, America used to boast about having the "world's highest standard of living." Now all you hear about is "world's largest economy."

    Quite true.

  112. @Twinkie

    OK, the Italians weren’t as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians.
     
    I don't think that's quite true, but would depend on the time period in question.

    In WW II, in any case, the Italians were notorious for breaking on contact with... the British, the Russians, and later the Americans. Pretty much anyone who could fight. They did very poorly against the Greeks even when the Axis Powers were ascendant.

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, "Americans? Our Italians."

    The Germans were the best, man for man.
     
    They certainly were during WW II. Martin van Creveld did a nice study of that early in his career:

    https://www.amazon.com/Fighting-Power-Performance-1939-1945-Contributions/dp/0313091579

    >>The Germans were the best, man for man.

    Well, man for man is meaningless. Man for man the Germans bested the Red Army -right?- , but the Red Army marched into Berlin. ‘Nuff said.

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.. Significant statistical factoid (gleaned from my recollections of David Glantz’s writings). In 1942, Germany and her allies occupied/controlled a landmass that had at least 150% the GDP of the Soviet Union, maybe as high as 180%, yet in 1942 – a very critical year of the war – Germany produced approximately 4,000 top of the line fighting tanks. In the same year the Soviet Union produced close to 20,000 top of the line fighting tanks.(Don’t forget, at this point all of Ukraine, Belorussia and the Baltics were in German hands). A similar ratio pertained in the production of artillery, self-propelled guns, machine guns, aircraft, …. (and no, the Soviet Union didn’t need no stinkin’ lend lease). The Soviet Union was tougher, smarter, meaner. The Russian was/is clearly a superior man to the German, and I think we can all see that today.

    • Agree: Cortes
    • Replies: @bomag

    In 1942, Germany and her allies occupied/controlled a landmass that had at least 150% the GDP of the Soviet Union, maybe as high as 180%
     
    Misleading. Occupied territories didn't have the infrastructure for war-fighting production; they were a net cost.

    Germany was poor, resource-wise. Their fighting-strength/unit-of-supply was quite high.

    the Soviet Union didn’t need no stinkin’ lend lease
     
    The truck shipments were a key component of the Soviet victory.
    , @Desiderius
    Soviet statistics aren't worth the paper they're printed on.

    Stalin beat Hitler the same way Kutuzov beat Napoleon (and Houston Santa Anna). Uncivilized big distances are hell on logistics.
    , @Moses

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.
     
    Soviet machine gunners placed behind the front lines with orders to shoot any man not advancing on the enemy has a way of bracing the spine.

    Come on. Any serious student of WW2 knows that the Germans ran rings around everyone in terms of combat effectiveness. Better weapons, better unit leadership, better morale. German units were famous for regrouping and launching lightning fast counter-attacks.

    Read Adolf Von Schell's "Battle Leadership" to understand the German way of leading small units and making fast, effective decisions during the fog of battle. https://www.amazon.com/Battle-Leadership-Adolf-von-Schell-ebook/dp/B06WP692F8

    German panzers captured hundreds of thousands of Soviets in the advance into Ukraine and Russia. Hitler stupidly had his 3rd army take Stalingrad where the German advantages of armor and maneuver were nullified. It was super human how long the exhausted, freezing, ill-supplied 3rd army lasted in Stalingrad after Zhukov cut them off.

    The Germans cut through American lines like a hot knife through butter during the Battle of the Bulge. No contest.

    The allies won because they had more -- more men, more tanks, more planes. That's it.

    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    the Soviet Union didn’t need no stinkin’ lend lease

     

    This incredibly silly statement is enough to sink your entire argument.

    This is a true internet "laugh out loud" moment.

    In lieu of quoting American Lend-Lease stats, including the 10,000+ armored vehicles sent from America to Russia in 1941, let alone the very large amount of stuff the British gave Stalin, I will quote General Zhukov:


    Now they say that the allies never helped us, but it can't be denied that the Americans gave us so many goods without which we wouldn't have been able to form our reserves and continue the war.

    We didn’t have explosives, gunpowder. We didn’t have anything to charge our rifle cartridges with. The Americans really saved us with their gunpowder and explosives. And how much sheet steel they gave us! How could we have produced our tanks without American steel? But now they make it seem as if we had an abundance of all that. Without American trucks we wouldn’t have had anything to pull our artillery with.
     

    Emphasis mine.

    The greatest Soviet hero of the "Great Patriotic War" is in complete opposition to you.

    You have two options at this point:

    You can either concede that you are dead wrong, or admit that you are a Soviet agent recruited by Alger Hiss. Or maybe you're a Russian "Sovok." Whatever.

  113. @Wilkey
    In my younger days I pretty much worshiped at the Altar of George Will. I owned (still own, I guess) virtually every collection of his columns up until about 15 years ago. I've actually read them all, too.

    His columns are usually clever, sometimes enlightening, always articulate plugs for what is basically respectable center-right D.C. Republican ideology. He is Mitt Romney if Mitt Romney had something remotely like a personality (which is not to say that Will has much of a personality).

    George Will frankly couldn't give two shits for middle-class America anymore than Mitt Romney does.

    Here is Will in 2014, when the problem with unaccompanied minors began:


    We ought to say to these children, ‘Welcome to America, you’re going to go to school and get a job and become Americans. We have 3,141 counties in this country. That would be 20 per county. The idea that we can’t assimilate these eight-year-old criminals with their teddy bears is preposterous.”
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too small to worry about

    And here he is eight years earlier, on the 2006 amnesty putsch:


    We are not going to take the draconian police measures necessary to deport 11 million people. They would fill 200,000 buses in a caravan stretching bumper-to-bumper from San Diego to Alaska — where, by the way, 26,000 Latinos live. And there are no plausible incentives to get the 11 million to board the buses. - March 30, 2006
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too big to do anything about.

    Which is it? Too small to worry about or too big to do anything about? Where is the Goldilocks middle, where it's big enough to worry about but small enough to do something about?

    The irony is that George Will has written on multiple occasions about the US airline industry, which handles (last time I checked) over 700 million passengers per year. Deporting every single illegal immigrant in a single year would amount to less than 2% of annual US airline traffic. Illegal immigration is a big problem, but this is a big country. George Will damn well knows that, but instead of talking intelligently about the matter he turns it into some seemingly unsolvable math problem.

    But Will is even more fanatical than I have already pointed out:


    Conservatives should favor a policy of encouraging unlimited immigration by educated people with math, engineering, technology or science skills that America's education system is not sufficiently supplying.
     
    So he wants unlimited "skilled" immigration. And he effectively wants unlimited unskilled immigration, as well. All without ever bothering to point out how all of this unlimited immigration is supposed to benefit the American people. Because they can make shit here in the US rather than making it in their home countries and shipping it here on giant container ships?

    The other irony is that one of Will's latest columns is a rant against the new SAT "adversity score" and how it's driven by identity politics. Because as we all know the way to end identity politics' increasing domination of US policy is to import tens of millions more people who benefit from it.

    George Will frankly couldn’t give two shits for middle-class America anymore than Mitt Romney does.

    Two crappy crabby spiteful ol bitches who will be dead soon enough. Après nous le déluge.

  114. During the Second World War a German had become a US Citizen, but really was still loyal to Germany and was helping escaped Germans from prison camps. One officer was so disgusted that he testified against the traitor. The evil man was sentenced to death.

    Why does Will think the Democrats will spare him and his family?

    • Agree: bomag
  115. @Wilkey
    So to continue, the only problem with George Will's views on (il)legal immigration is that it undermines pretty much every thing he has ever claimed to believe in. There will be no conservatism left in an America overrun by mass immigration, because most immigrants, increasingly riled up by the Left's hatred of traditional Americans, have no desire to defend traditional American culture or values.

    So to continue, the only problem with George Will’s views on (il)legal immigration is that it undermines pretty much every thing he has ever claimed to believe in. There will be no conservatism left in an America overrun by mass immigration, because most immigrants, increasingly riled up by the Left’s hatred of traditional Americans, have no desire to defend traditional American culture or values.

    IOW he thinks he is a genius but he is irrational on legal/illegal immigration. I mean, how hard is this to figure this one out? But as you say, Will could give a shit. At his age he might half farm out his columns.

  116. @Twinkie

    OK, the Italians weren’t as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians.
     
    I don't think that's quite true, but would depend on the time period in question.

    In WW II, in any case, the Italians were notorious for breaking on contact with... the British, the Russians, and later the Americans. Pretty much anyone who could fight. They did very poorly against the Greeks even when the Axis Powers were ascendant.

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, "Americans? Our Italians."

    The Germans were the best, man for man.
     
    They certainly were during WW II. Martin van Creveld did a nice study of that early in his career:

    https://www.amazon.com/Fighting-Power-Performance-1939-1945-Contributions/dp/0313091579

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, “Americans? Our Italians.”

    A rather amusing comment in light of the future poverty of British infantry performance in France, 1944.

    • Replies: @jim jones
    There were more British soldiers than Americans involved in D Day:

    https://www.dday-overlord.com/en/d-day/figures
    , @Twinkie

    A rather amusing comment in light of the future poverty of British infantry performance in France, 1944.
     
    Indeed. On the other hand, they had been bled much longer than we had by that stage of the war.
  117. @DB Cooper
    India invaded and annexed Sikkim Saddam Hussein style (sending in a column of army trucks to Gangtok instead of a column of tanks to Kuwait city) fifteen years before Iraq invaded and annexed Kuwait. The Sikkim king was arrested and kept in solidary confinement till his death. His American wife Queen Hope Cooke managed to escape back to the state before the Indian army moved in. Hope Cooke is still alive and lives in New York.

    Too bad Sikkim does not have oil and that's why no one cares.

    Your account is disingenuous and misleading. The annexation of Sikkim by India is much more analogous to the annexation of California or Texas to the U.S.A than it is to any nefarious invasion – it was done at the request of the people. The Sikkim State Congress and its prime minister requested assistance from India in overthrowing the monarchy and, later, requested annexation to India as well. Earlier still, Indian forces had entered Sikkim at the request of its monarch for their assistance quelling popular revolts against his rule (one must be careful what one wishes for, and beware of entangling alliances…).

    Incidentally, if you want to learn about a nonpareil adventuress – a real adventuress’ adventuress! – get a load of this disgusting Hope Wallace (née Cooke, formerly Namgyal) creature – a real parasite who never faced a consequence for an action or worked for anything a day of her life (and she is still at it, as you mention). Her parents might better have named her “Despair” to help warn men away from her.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    re: Hope Cookies vs. the Sic'ems

    Well, manufacturing a dog-in-this-fight was apparently beyond the powers of our best PR/lobbying firms
    , @DB Cooper
    " it was done at the request of the people"

    Yes I know. This is the narrative pushed by India. According to India 97% of the Sikkimese voted to join India. This is disingenuous. Saddam Hussein also said 99% of Iraqis voted for him. You believe that?

    India engineered for years to annex Sikkim including creating resentment against the king among the gullible Sikkimese. Sort of like how India meddles in the internal affairs of Nepal, Sri Lanka and the Maldives. When the times come a referendum was presented to the people whether to vote for the king or to vote for democracy, not knowing that voting for democracy meant being annexed by the shithole. And that's what had happened. India took the vote as a holy writ and invaded and annexed the kingdom. Hey India is not invading a country, India is spreading democracy!

    Come to think of it. Which country's citizen wants to join the shithole India? And joining them en masse by 97%?

    , @DB Cooper
    It is you who are disingenuous.

    ” it was done at the request of the people”
    Yes I know. This is the narrative pushed by India. According to India 97% of the Sikkimese voted to join India. This is disingenuous. Saddam Hussein also said 99% of Iraqis voted for him. You believe that?
    India engineered for years to annex Sikkim including creating resentment against the king among the gullible Sikkimese. Sort of like how India meddles in the internal affairs of Nepal, Sri Lanka and the Maldives. When the times come a referendum was presented to the people whether to vote for the king or to vote for democracy, not knowing that voting for democracy meant being annexed by the India. And that’s what had happened. India took the vote as a holy writ and invaded and annexed the kingdom.

    Come to think of it. Which country’s citizen wants to join India? And joining it en masse by 97%?

  118. @Alden
    He's just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.

    National Review cut ties with him in 1983 when they trashed one of his books. He’d been on the contributor list for about a decade.

    Will at one time had a distinctive voice worth reading (derived, in part, from having been a lapsed professor, unusual among newspaper columnists of his generation). In the last 15 years, he’s been a poster child for mandatory retirement (derived, in part no doubt, from listening to his wife, who is the echt Inside Washington type).

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Barnard
    Not entirely, National Review still runs Will's syndicated column on their website.
    , @Desiderius

    derived, in part no doubt, from listening to his wife
     
    The Krugman/Kaepernick syndrome.

    See also: the Laura Bush Administration (Katrina-Palin).
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    Like you, I'm old enough to have read him for some time and he was indeed a very trenchant commentator. But once you're in your 70's your formative circumstances are so far removed from current technologies and sociology it's very hard to adjust and re-frame. Will is back in Reagan's America, thinking about immigration in terms of a few Soviet Jewish refuseniks and a discreet few hundred thousand Mexicans. 75 years of age is a good time to leave public life.

    And then there's Trump, currently on his third and peak act of American public life. Incredible.
    , @Prester John
    I heard a story that back in the 80s Will became embroiled in a major family kerfuffle when he was caught bunking in with Kate Graham's daughter, Lally Weymouth, which led to his (first) wife tossing all his things out on the lawn of their house with a note reading in essence "persona non grata." Don't know if this story is true. What IS true, however, was his failure to disclose a potential conflict of interest while serving as a commentator at ABC when it turned out that he was not only personal friends with Nancy Reagan but was in essence serving as an unofficial adviser. These days--particularly in light of the Donna Brazile controversy. Will's sniping at old man Bush throughout '92--at one point he suggested that he step down--may have been instrumental in tilting the wheels towards The Boy Wonder of Arkansas.
  119. @syonredux

    I believe Will is a rather religious man.
     
    Not really....

    Will is a self-described "amiable, low voltage atheist."
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Will#Religious_beliefs

    Thanks.

    I recall from the days when I read him on a regular basis that he is friendly toward religious belief, especially Catholicism.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    He's never written much about matters religious, and in his younger years it was mostly the odd nose-tweak of Anglican clergy. He was a social conservative and particularly vigorous contra the practice of abortion. I don't think he's changed his views in the intervening years. He just doesn't write about it anymore.
  120. Anonymous[112] • Disclaimer says:

    Basically, the whole rationale for the concept of ‘trade’ – the concept upon which 9/10ths of economics rests upon – is the notion that is more efficient to move goods and the fruit of production to the people rather than having the people move toward the goods and production.

  121. @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Can he really believe that b.s.?

    It’s what’s believed by everyone with whom he associates. He went from a faculty household in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois to Trinity College in Hartford to Oxford to Princeton to the University of Toronto to Michigan State to the ranks of what critics call ‘courtier intellectuals’ in Washington (which included berths at National Review and the Washington Post Writers’ Group). He lived in a handsome section of Montgomery County, Md. ‘ere decamping to Georgetown. His first wife was (and remains, I believe) a lobbyist for the social services industry. His second wife is a lobbyist and pr agent for various business interests (betwixt and between stints doing pr for politicians e.g. Bob Dole). One of his children is an associate with a BigLaw firm, posted to Hong Kong. The closest he’s been to vernacular Americans would be his middle son (an FBI agent) and his first set of in-laws (who ran a luncheonette in Hartford, Ct); the late Mr. and Mrs. Marion are likely to have given him a somewhat off-center perspective on the immigrant experience and they were French Canadians.

    • Agree: Thea
    • Replies: @Liberty Mike
    "Vernacular Americans" I like the phrase, but it should not apply to an FBI agent, who, after all, is feeding at the public trough and is nothing more than a foot soldier for the warfare / welfare / progressive /globo-homo / diversitopia state.
  122. @AnotherDad

    There probably can’t be a party-political way forward—if there can be a party-political way forward—without the demise of the Repubs.
     
    Disagree.

    The American political system--coupled with the sheer size of the country--tend to generate a two party system. While there have been several third party blooms and fads, we haven't actually had a third party launch and replace since the Republicans replaced the dying Whigs.

    No the way forward is straightforward: conservatives actually interested in conserving something--our race, culture and nation--and willing to work for the benefit of their middle class voters, take over the Republican party.

    I’m disappointed in you.

    The F.U.S.A., in the Republicrats & Democratans (like China’s Communists and Mexico’s P.R.I.), has, de facto one-party rile and has done for at least fifty years. The ostensible differences and disputes are all kabuki theatre.

    (Anyone not hip to this situation is not paying attention or else is trying to keep you in thrall.)

  123. @Art Deco
    National Review cut ties with him in 1983 when they trashed one of his books. He'd been on the contributor list for about a decade.

    Will at one time had a distinctive voice worth reading (derived, in part, from having been a lapsed professor, unusual among newspaper columnists of his generation). In the last 15 years, he's been a poster child for mandatory retirement (derived, in part no doubt, from listening to his wife, who is the echt Inside Washington type).

    Not entirely, National Review still runs Will’s syndicated column on their website.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Sorry, missed that.
  124. @Daniel H
    >>The Germans were the best, man for man.

    Well, man for man is meaningless. Man for man the Germans bested the Red Army -right?- , but the Red Army marched into Berlin. 'Nuff said.

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.. Significant statistical factoid (gleaned from my recollections of David Glantz's writings). In 1942, Germany and her allies occupied/controlled a landmass that had at least 150% the GDP of the Soviet Union, maybe as high as 180%, yet in 1942 - a very critical year of the war - Germany produced approximately 4,000 top of the line fighting tanks. In the same year the Soviet Union produced close to 20,000 top of the line fighting tanks.(Don't forget, at this point all of Ukraine, Belorussia and the Baltics were in German hands). A similar ratio pertained in the production of artillery, self-propelled guns, machine guns, aircraft, .... (and no, the Soviet Union didn't need no stinkin' lend lease). The Soviet Union was tougher, smarter, meaner. The Russian was/is clearly a superior man to the German, and I think we can all see that today.

    In 1942, Germany and her allies occupied/controlled a landmass that had at least 150% the GDP of the Soviet Union, maybe as high as 180%

    Misleading. Occupied territories didn’t have the infrastructure for war-fighting production; they were a net cost.

    Germany was poor, resource-wise. Their fighting-strength/unit-of-supply was quite high.

    the Soviet Union didn’t need no stinkin’ lend lease

    The truck shipments were a key component of the Soviet victory.

  125. For anyone who is bored enough to wonder what a Paleo Liberal is:

    Imagine the complete opposite of George Will.

    Or, the complete opposite of the Bush clan.
    Or, here in Wisconsin, the opposite of Paul Ryan and Scott Walker.

    You now have a pretty good idea of a Paleo Liberal.

    To be fair, occasionally I will agree with Will. It is impossible to disagree with anyone 100% of the time.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Imagine the complete opposite of George Will.

    Church-goer. Non-intellectual. Childless bachelor. Working-class born and bred. Wage-earner. Ethnic. Grew up in New Jersey but living in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Not much interested in public affairs, and bored by baseball.
  126. @bomag
    I believe Will is a rather religious man.

    Someone should remind him of a few Bible verses, e.g. "the love of money is the root of all evil"; "gain the world, lose your soul."

    George Will is an atheist, but he can go to hell all the same.

    • Replies: @Anonymousse
    Shades of Chesterton... great line
  127. @IHTG
    Damon Linker isn't exactly "center-left". He's a kind of odd liberal-paleocon hybrid.

    Just quoting Wikipedia. I’m not familiar with his writing.

    The Week

    is kind of hard to pin down on its politics.

  128. Anon[320] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Seattle yoga teacher’s ‘Undoing Whiteness’ class: Founded on deep purpose, it’s triggered outrage

    https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/seattle-yoga-teachers-undoing-whiteness-class/

    A Yoga business is offering classes similar to campus grievance studies, or the corporate struggle sessions that HR makes you attend. But now any white lady can pay to get ‘splained to by a frigid feminist librarian manqué.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Founded on deep purpose, it’s triggered outrage
     
    Navy secret project?

    http://img07.deviantart.net/97dc/i/2013/363/5/8/black_fish_by_crazyasian1-d6zz03s.jpg
  129. @bomag
    I believe Will is a rather religious man.

    Someone should remind him of a few Bible verses, e.g. "the love of money is the root of all evil"; "gain the world, lose your soul."

    His daughter was baptized ca. 1981, but his public remarks in the last 20 years have been hostile. John Derbyshire and Stephen Chapman of the Chicago Tribune have had the same turnabout.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    All married into a different faith?
  130. @Barnard
    Not entirely, National Review still runs Will's syndicated column on their website.

    Sorry, missed that.

  131. The Economy Needs Immigrants To Survive

    The Economy is destroying the environment

    Looks to me like an obvious solution presents itself

  132. @Art Deco
    National Review cut ties with him in 1983 when they trashed one of his books. He'd been on the contributor list for about a decade.

    Will at one time had a distinctive voice worth reading (derived, in part, from having been a lapsed professor, unusual among newspaper columnists of his generation). In the last 15 years, he's been a poster child for mandatory retirement (derived, in part no doubt, from listening to his wife, who is the echt Inside Washington type).

    derived, in part no doubt, from listening to his wife

    The Krugman/Kaepernick syndrome.

    See also: the Laura Bush Administration (Katrina-Palin).

  133. George Will is a dumbass. Instead of trying to get his head out of his ass, he wastes his time with baseball trivia.

  134. @Desiderius
    We can however have a country and the minority on the wrong side of that question are exactly the people who need a good long stint out of power, if for nothing more than to get their shit together.

    We need them out of power to keep the country as a country and not as two lines on a map filled with nothing but corporations, their serfs and bread and circuses.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Yes, that is the first priority.

    Other benefits will accrue.
  135. @Paleo Liberal
    For anyone who is bored enough to wonder what a Paleo Liberal is:

    Imagine the complete opposite of George Will.

    Or, the complete opposite of the Bush clan.
    Or, here in Wisconsin, the opposite of Paul Ryan and Scott Walker.

    You now have a pretty good idea of a Paleo Liberal.

    To be fair, occasionally I will agree with Will. It is impossible to disagree with anyone 100% of the time.

    Imagine the complete opposite of George Will.

    Church-goer. Non-intellectual. Childless bachelor. Working-class born and bred. Wage-earner. Ethnic. Grew up in New Jersey but living in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Not much interested in public affairs, and bored by baseball.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    A marker of the decadence of American Liberalism™ is how it has been reduced to defining itself by what/who it is not and getting even that comically wrong.

    No, you're the opposite of neither Orange Man nor George Will, however much you wish you were.
  136. @IHTG
    Damon Linker isn't exactly "center-left". He's a kind of odd liberal-paleocon hybrid.

    He’s the rare progsnob who knows we’re here and something of what we’re on about. He never fails to assure his readers which side he plays for while also leaving no doubt in his writing. Such a belt and suspenders approach seems de rigeur among the ruling class these days.

  137. @bomag
    Thanks.

    I recall from the days when I read him on a regular basis that he is friendly toward religious belief, especially Catholicism.

    He’s never written much about matters religious, and in his younger years it was mostly the odd nose-tweak of Anglican clergy. He was a social conservative and particularly vigorous contra the practice of abortion. I don’t think he’s changed his views in the intervening years. He just doesn’t write about it anymore.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    I don’t think he’s changed his views in the intervening years. He just doesn’t write about it anymore.
     
    His class doesn't handle defeat well. They just sort of wall it off and pretend it isn't there.
  138. @Daniel H
    >>The Germans were the best, man for man.

    Well, man for man is meaningless. Man for man the Germans bested the Red Army -right?- , but the Red Army marched into Berlin. 'Nuff said.

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.. Significant statistical factoid (gleaned from my recollections of David Glantz's writings). In 1942, Germany and her allies occupied/controlled a landmass that had at least 150% the GDP of the Soviet Union, maybe as high as 180%, yet in 1942 - a very critical year of the war - Germany produced approximately 4,000 top of the line fighting tanks. In the same year the Soviet Union produced close to 20,000 top of the line fighting tanks.(Don't forget, at this point all of Ukraine, Belorussia and the Baltics were in German hands). A similar ratio pertained in the production of artillery, self-propelled guns, machine guns, aircraft, .... (and no, the Soviet Union didn't need no stinkin' lend lease). The Soviet Union was tougher, smarter, meaner. The Russian was/is clearly a superior man to the German, and I think we can all see that today.

    Soviet statistics aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on.

    Stalin beat Hitler the same way Kutuzov beat Napoleon (and Houston Santa Anna). Uncivilized big distances are hell on logistics.

    • Replies: @Thea
    Yes. Invading the USSR was an own goal. If Hitler really thought Stalin would invade Germany, he should have waited and let that happen where he’d have had the advantage.
    , @Simply Simon
    "Uncivilized big distances are hell on logistics."
    True enough, but the US is capable of moving troops and armament long distances as proved by WWII, Korea and Iraq. If the Soviet Union had the climate say of North Africa I don't think the Russians would have been able to stop the Germans. Bitter cold trumped Hitler.
  139. OT says:

    OT

    The Vatican rejects World War T in a document directed at Catholic educators.

    Male and Female He Created Them: Towards a path of dialogue on the question of gender in education

    http://www.educatio.va/content/dam/cec/Documenti/19_0997_INGLESE.pdf
    https://zenit.org/articles/new-vatican-document-provides-schools-with-guidance-on-gender-issues/

    These guys are anti-trans, etc., but they sound like they have gotten there by reading way too much gender theory literature, having absorbed its convoluted and wordy style.

    Gender theory (especially in its most radical forms) speaks of a gradual process of denaturalization, that is a move away from nature and towards an absolute option for the decision of the feelings of the human In this understanding of things, the view of both sexuality identity and the family become subject to the same ‘liquidity’ and ‘fluidity’ that characterize other aspects of post-modern culture, often founded on nothing more than a confused concept of freedom in the realm of feelings and wants, or momentary desires provoked by emotional impulses and the will of the individual, as opposed to anything based on the truths of existence.

    The generic concept of “non-discrimination” often hides an ideology that denies the difference as well as natural reciprocity that exists between men and women. “Instead of combatting wrongful interpretations of sexual difference that would diminish the fundamental importance of that difference for human dignity, such a proposal would simply eliminate it by proposing procedures and practices that make it irrelevant for a person’s development and for human relationships. But the utopia of the ‘neuter’ eliminates both human dignity in sexual distinctiveness and the personal nature of the generation of new life.

    The process of identifying sexual identity is made more difficult by the fictitious construct known as “gender neuter” or “third gender”, which has the effect of obscuring the fact that a person’s sex is a structural determinant of male or female Efforts to go beyond the constitutive male-female sexual difference, such as the ideas of “intersex” or “transgender”, lead to a masculinity or feminity that is ambiguous, even though (in a self-contradictory way), these concepts themselves actually presuppose the very sexual difference that they propose to negate or supersede. Similar theories aim to annihilate the concept of ‘nature’, (that is, everything we have been given as a pre-existing foundation of our being and action in the world), while at the same time implicitly reaffirming its existence.

    Children enjoy the right to “grow up in a family with a father and a mother capable of creating a suitable environment for the child’s development and emotional maturity” and “continuing to grow up and mature in a correct relationship represent- ed by the masculinity and femininity of a father and a mother and thus preparing for affective maturity”. It is precisely within the nucleus of the family unit that children can learn how to recognize the value and the beauty of the differences between the two sexes.

    New York Times take (by a secular Jewish journalist aided by an Italian stringer):

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/10/world/europe/vatican-francis-gender-identity-sexuality.html

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    They got the convoluted and wordy honestly (from their theological education). There have been few Hemingways among the Great Doctors of the church. If you've got the time, they've got the doctrine.
  140. @Art Deco
    He's never written much about matters religious, and in his younger years it was mostly the odd nose-tweak of Anglican clergy. He was a social conservative and particularly vigorous contra the practice of abortion. I don't think he's changed his views in the intervening years. He just doesn't write about it anymore.

    I don’t think he’s changed his views in the intervening years. He just doesn’t write about it anymore.

    His class doesn’t handle defeat well. They just sort of wall it off and pretend it isn’t there.

  141. @Ibound1
    We need them out of power to keep the country as a country and not as two lines on a map filled with nothing but corporations, their serfs and bread and circuses.

    Yes, that is the first priority.

    Other benefits will accrue.

  142. @Art Deco
    National Review cut ties with him in 1983 when they trashed one of his books. He'd been on the contributor list for about a decade.

    Will at one time had a distinctive voice worth reading (derived, in part, from having been a lapsed professor, unusual among newspaper columnists of his generation). In the last 15 years, he's been a poster child for mandatory retirement (derived, in part no doubt, from listening to his wife, who is the echt Inside Washington type).

    Like you, I’m old enough to have read him for some time and he was indeed a very trenchant commentator. But once you’re in your 70’s your formative circumstances are so far removed from current technologies and sociology it’s very hard to adjust and re-frame. Will is back in Reagan’s America, thinking about immigration in terms of a few Soviet Jewish refuseniks and a discreet few hundred thousand Mexicans. 75 years of age is a good time to leave public life.

    And then there’s Trump, currently on his third and peak act of American public life. Incredible.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Bulletproof self-confidence is a helluva drug. Back when it came with the water a good upbringing involved taking some of the edge off. In these days of fallen and falling T-levels and sperm counts Trump towers above it all like a colossus. A sometimes autistic colossus, but that autism served as his superpower protecting him from an increasingly destructive zeitgeist.

    Trump has his own Geist; he has no need of the Times'.
  143. @Anonymous

    the Trump administration has greatly clarified who stands where.
     
    Who stands where?

    The neo-conservatives and ideological conservatives have made the short, happy journey Leftward.

  144. George Will is an evil globalizer geezer who pushes nation-wrecking mass legal immigration and illegal immigration.

    George Will is a poodle boy stooge for the JEW/WASP ruling class of the American Empire.

    George Will pushes sovereignty-sapping, job-killing trade deal scams.

    George Will pushes globalization, financialization, multiculturalism, mass legal immigration, illegal immigration and White race replacement.

    George Will is a treasonous rat who attacks the European Christian ancestral core of the United States.

    George Will is pushing for White Genocide Worldwide.

    Tweets from 2015:

  145. @Reg Cæsar
    As of five years ago, the top names in California were Garcia, Hernandez, and Lopez. In Hawaii, they were Lee, Wong, and Kim. Japanese still outnumber Chinese and Koreans in Hawaii, I think, but they have too many surnames.

    The only other state with no English surnames in the top three was New Mexico. Possibly North Dakota, too, if their Johnsons and Andersons are mostly Swedish.

    You could sort out "Anderson states", where that name is in the top three, or "Johnson states", where that is number one. I bet those ten states will show up well on all kinds of metrics.

    https://blogs.ancestry.com/cm/files/2014/12/Surname-Map-1.png

    The ubiguitousness of “Smith” continues to amaze me.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    I've only met one in my entire life.
    , @Lagertha
    Blacksmiths and iron-forgers in general, were key to building a civilization.
  146. @Art Deco
    Imagine the complete opposite of George Will.

    Church-goer. Non-intellectual. Childless bachelor. Working-class born and bred. Wage-earner. Ethnic. Grew up in New Jersey but living in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Not much interested in public affairs, and bored by baseball.

    A marker of the decadence of American Liberalism™ is how it has been reduced to defining itself by what/who it is not and getting even that comically wrong.

    No, you’re the opposite of neither Orange Man nor George Will, however much you wish you were.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    Too much truth to that.

    I get frustrated when I see prominent Congress Creatures and Senators go against proposals they previously supported because Trump. For example, Diane Feinstein called one of Trump’s immigration proposals “white supremicist” even though it was similar to proposals she supported when Bill Clinton was in office. She wrote an opinion piece saying it wouldn’t have allowed her grandparents to escape from the Czar. I am serious.

    Compare that to Mitch McConnell’s eight year tantrum when Obama was in office. The only difference is Trump hasn’t been in office for 8 years.

    Our nation and our planet are facing existential crises now. Some scientists predict the human race may not survive another century. Yet we are fighting over the deck chairs on the Titanic.

    We won’t face existential threats because it would be “bad for the economy”, meaning addressing the issues might cut into the quarterly profits of our oligarchs.

    The oligarchs are happy to pit left against right, white against non-white, “woke” against MAGA, Antifa against alt-right etc. These battles keep us peasants in our place and keep us from uniting against the oligarchs
  147. @Twinkie

    A commenter once wrote something in the comments to this blog along the lines of this, “If we take in the whole world, the USA will have 100 percent of global GDP.”
     
    That’s similar to “If we made everyone in the world an American, then there would be zero illegal immigration.”

    I’ve started reciting Sailer’s “toilet paper” argument to people. As in, if we have a billion immigrants, we can all get rich just selling toilet paper to each other. People need toilet paper, right? And the more people the more toilet paper, right? So we all just buy toilet paper at Costco and sell it to all the billions of each other and retire off the spread, right?

    • LOL: bomag
  148. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Richard A.
    Labor shortages are simply caused by employers paying below market wages to their workers. Too many of the establishment right act like a bunch of econ 101 flunkies.

    Broadly. Geographic constraints play a role. Convincing middle class people to move alaska is difficult.

  149. @Desiderius
    Soviet statistics aren't worth the paper they're printed on.

    Stalin beat Hitler the same way Kutuzov beat Napoleon (and Houston Santa Anna). Uncivilized big distances are hell on logistics.

    Yes. Invading the USSR was an own goal. If Hitler really thought Stalin would invade Germany, he should have waited and let that happen where he’d have had the advantage.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    Two problems with that.

    1. Many military minds at the time felt that whichever side attacked first would have a large advantage. The Nazis believed the Soviets were planning to attack. The Soviets believed the Nazis were planning to attack. As long as both sides firmly believed they had an advantage by attacking first, someone was going to stage a preemptive strike.

    Especially since the Nazis uses the blitzkrieg style of attack, which depends on the first strike.

    2. The Nazis believed time was of the essence. If they struck quickly, they could strike before the Soviet troops were all in position. More important, they could strike before the weather got too bad.

    Where that failed: The Nazis, like Napoleon before them, got bogged down and were stuck in Russia during the winter.
    Add to that the fact that it was the most severe winter in 30 years.


    To be fair, we have no idea what would’ve happened had the Nazis avoided attacking the USSR. Suppose the Soviet Army had plenty of time to get into position. Consider the level of paranoia of Stalin. At some point the Red Army would be ready to fight an offensive battle. At that point they would attack the Nazis.
  150. @Art Deco
    His daughter was baptized ca. 1981, but his public remarks in the last 20 years have been hostile. John Derbyshire and Stephen Chapman of the Chicago Tribune have had the same turnabout.

    All married into a different faith?

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Chapman's wife is at least nominally Jewish; his mother-in-law was born in Germany https://fernschumerchapman.com/blog/). Derbyshire has said the Chinese are 'the least religious and most supersititious people in the world", but hasn't said much about his wife; he resisted his father's atheism growing up, but then adopted it more or less at age 60. George Will's first wife was raised Catholic and his 2d Presbyterian.
  151. @OT
    OT

    The Vatican rejects World War T in a document directed at Catholic educators.

    Male and Female He Created Them: Towards a path of dialogue on the question of gender in education

    http://www.educatio.va/content/dam/cec/Documenti/19_0997_INGLESE.pdf
    https://zenit.org/articles/new-vatican-document-provides-schools-with-guidance-on-gender-issues/

    These guys are anti-trans, etc., but they sound like they have gotten there by reading way too much gender theory literature, having absorbed its convoluted and wordy style.


    Gender theory (especially in its most radical forms) speaks of a gradual process of denaturalization, that is a move away from nature and towards an absolute option for the decision of the feelings of the human In this understanding of things, the view of both sexuality identity and the family become subject to the same ‘liquidity’ and ‘fluidity’ that characterize other aspects of post-modern culture, often founded on nothing more than a confused concept of freedom in the realm of feelings and wants, or momentary desires provoked by emotional impulses and the will of the individual, as opposed to anything based on the truths of existence.
     

    The generic concept of “non-discrimination” often hides an ideology that denies the difference as well as natural reciprocity that exists between men and women. “Instead of combatting wrongful interpretations of sexual difference that would diminish the fundamental importance of that difference for human dignity, such a proposal would simply eliminate it by proposing procedures and practices that make it irrelevant for a person’s development and for human relationships. But the utopia of the ‘neuter’ eliminates both human dignity in sexual distinctiveness and the personal nature of the generation of new life.
     

    The process of identifying sexual identity is made more difficult by the fictitious construct known as “gender neuter” or “third gender”, which has the effect of obscuring the fact that a person’s sex is a structural determinant of male or female Efforts to go beyond the constitutive male-female sexual difference, such as the ideas of “intersex” or “transgender”, lead to a masculinity or feminity that is ambiguous, even though (in a self-contradictory way), these concepts themselves actually presuppose the very sexual difference that they propose to negate or supersede. Similar theories aim to annihilate the concept of ‘nature’, (that is, everything we have been given as a pre-existing foundation of our being and action in the world), while at the same time implicitly reaffirming its existence.
     

    Children enjoy the right to “grow up in a family with a father and a mother capable of creating a suitable environment for the child’s development and emotional maturity” and “continuing to grow up and mature in a correct relationship represent- ed by the masculinity and femininity of a father and a mother and thus preparing for affective maturity”. It is precisely within the nucleus of the family unit that children can learn how to recognize the value and the beauty of the differences between the two sexes.
     
    New York Times take (by a secular Jewish journalist aided by an Italian stringer):

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/10/world/europe/vatican-francis-gender-identity-sexuality.html

    They got the convoluted and wordy honestly (from their theological education). There have been few Hemingways among the Great Doctors of the church. If you’ve got the time, they’ve got the doctrine.

  152. @Steve Sailer
    OK, the Italians weren't as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians. That's pretty much the whole of WWI outside the Western Front -- the Germans rushing around on multiple fronts to shore up their allies. The Germans were the best, man for man.

    OK, the Italians weren’t as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians. That’s pretty much the whole of WWI outside the Western Front — the Germans rushing around on multiple fronts to shore up their allies. The Germans were the best, man for man.

    It’s OKAY To Be German.

    It’s OKAY To Be White.

    It’s OKAY To Have German Ancestry That Sailed To Virginia Before The American Secessionary War From The British Empire.

    It’s OKAY To Have A German Ancestor And An Irish Ancestor Who Fought In The American Secessionary War From The British Empire.

    The commenter who wrote a while back that there weren’t too many Germans in the Southern colonies is way the Hell off base. There were plenty of Germans in the South before the American Secessionary War from the British Empire.

  153. @Daniel H
    Homo economicus.

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle. Exactly.

    Now the likes of Will, David French, Jonah Goldberg are pleading for civility. No civility for these bastards, I want their world destroyed.

    I will vote hardcore socialist Bernie, hardcore crazy Ocasio-Cortez before I will ever again pull the lever for a Cuck. The Cucks are the major problem. They are the backstabbers. Just say no to Cucks.

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle. Exactly.

    That sonofabitch poodle boy bastard George Will once puffed out his chicken chest at Pat Buchanan on a TV show to show off his shirt that was made somewhere else besides America, and he was proud to do it.

    George Will is like that dickhead who said it didn’t matter whether it was potato chips or computer chips that a nation made.

    George Will is a treasonous globalizer rat!

  154. Will always has been condescending, nay arrogant, toward Americans not of his exhaulted social class. It’s not his neighborhood that will turn into the barrio, it’s yours. Not a word about low wage Americans made unemployed and unemployable by an endless supply of cheap labor, not a word about Americans inundated by foreign tongues and excoriated by immigrant lobbies smelling victory in their war against traditional America. Will is a mountebank.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    well, the schadenfreude we can all enjoy is: most immigrants (illegal or not) want to be where the action is: cities....and wealthier areas that surround cities. I think all suburbs which surround dynamic cities, are doomed; or, it will be too late to push poor people elsewhere - just like the homeless in SF.

    Most poor immigrants are looking for rich people/wealthy areas, to give them work - there is just nothing to do out in the middle of Ohio, Nebraska, Nevada (good God!), Texas, Georgia. No, rural towns will be largely ignored, and every exhurb/suburb will be in play as that is were the rich are.
  155. @Wilkey
    In my younger days I pretty much worshiped at the Altar of George Will. I owned (still own, I guess) virtually every collection of his columns up until about 15 years ago. I've actually read them all, too.

    His columns are usually clever, sometimes enlightening, always articulate plugs for what is basically respectable center-right D.C. Republican ideology. He is Mitt Romney if Mitt Romney had something remotely like a personality (which is not to say that Will has much of a personality).

    George Will frankly couldn't give two shits for middle-class America anymore than Mitt Romney does.

    Here is Will in 2014, when the problem with unaccompanied minors began:


    We ought to say to these children, ‘Welcome to America, you’re going to go to school and get a job and become Americans. We have 3,141 counties in this country. That would be 20 per county. The idea that we can’t assimilate these eight-year-old criminals with their teddy bears is preposterous.”
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too small to worry about

    And here he is eight years earlier, on the 2006 amnesty putsch:


    We are not going to take the draconian police measures necessary to deport 11 million people. They would fill 200,000 buses in a caravan stretching bumper-to-bumper from San Diego to Alaska — where, by the way, 26,000 Latinos live. And there are no plausible incentives to get the 11 million to board the buses. - March 30, 2006
     
    IOW, the problem of illegal immigration is too big to do anything about.

    Which is it? Too small to worry about or too big to do anything about? Where is the Goldilocks middle, where it's big enough to worry about but small enough to do something about?

    The irony is that George Will has written on multiple occasions about the US airline industry, which handles (last time I checked) over 700 million passengers per year. Deporting every single illegal immigrant in a single year would amount to less than 2% of annual US airline traffic. Illegal immigration is a big problem, but this is a big country. George Will damn well knows that, but instead of talking intelligently about the matter he turns it into some seemingly unsolvable math problem.

    But Will is even more fanatical than I have already pointed out:


    Conservatives should favor a policy of encouraging unlimited immigration by educated people with math, engineering, technology or science skills that America's education system is not sufficiently supplying.
     
    So he wants unlimited "skilled" immigration. And he effectively wants unlimited unskilled immigration, as well. All without ever bothering to point out how all of this unlimited immigration is supposed to benefit the American people. Because they can make shit here in the US rather than making it in their home countries and shipping it here on giant container ships?

    The other irony is that one of Will's latest columns is a rant against the new SAT "adversity score" and how it's driven by identity politics. Because as we all know the way to end identity politics' increasing domination of US policy is to import tens of millions more people who benefit from it.

    A few minutes of Googling did not yield Will’s home address.

    He wouldn’t be one of those espousing unlimited 3rd world immigration who lives nowhere near diversity in a supermajority White ZIP code, would he?

    It’s all so tiresome.

    • Replies: @Prester John
    "... a supermajority White ZIP code"

    Yeah, where the only non-whites consist of landscape workers and sundry versions of Rosa the Housekeeper.
  156. George Will is for a Ginsberg/Kagan run SCOTUS. He almost got his wish in 2016, and he’s hoping for it in 2020.

    Fortunately, not even the dimmest dim-bulb Right-winger now believes George Will is one of us. He’s a complete Globalist, Free trader, open borders freak, who socially liberal. Other than not wanting to gut the Defense Department or socialize business, its hard to see how he’s a man of the Right.

    I think he’s been living on prior glory for almost 25 years. ABC put him on TV as “The Conservative” and he became outrageously famous in the 1980’s and early 90s. But once talk radio and Cable News got more popular he faded from view. Now, he’s mostly noticed by old people like me.

    • Replies: @Lot
    Yes. Being wrong on migration isn’t made up for by being right on every other issue. Not that Reagan-Bush GOPe was right on tariffs, Iraq, tax cuts for the rich, getting rid of antitrust laws, etc.
  157. @AceDeuce
    Yet Will, who lives in the oh so vibrant DC area, chooses to live in the rich, mostly all white suburb of Chevy Chase, MD.

    Oh dear. Chevy Chase is 88% White.

    http://www.city-data.com/city/Chevy-Chase-Maryland.html

    George Will loves 3rd world diversity, as long as it’s for YOU and not for HIM.

    Ugh. These cucks are the WORST.

    • Replies: @AceDeuce
    And most of the other 12% are wealthy Asians-guaranteed.
  158. I’ve been reading George F Will’s columns since the 80s and have mixed reactions to him. Like many conservatives he very good at pointing out the flaws in liberalism but doesn’t do so well at defending conservatism. He’s been posting red flags on this for decades.

    He’s OK with the designated hitter in American League baseball. This take some big strategy decisions out of a close game in favor a fan pleasing home run hitter. The DH rule sucks. But then he doesn’t like the focus on home runs in modern baseball either.

    He was horrified by Jason Richwine’s research on latinos’ lackluster success in America but had no data of his own to rebut it.

    He likes to inform us that California, for example, has long history of producing influential Republican governors but doesn’t seem to grasp that replacing the population of California might have some effect on this trend. California has magic dirt. (Is “magic dirt” a Sailerism? If so, it is the best. It’s better than “Invade the World, Invite the World” for its subtlety. I could safely wear a “Magic Dirt” t-shirt here in CA)

    Ever since Trump called him “overrated” he’s been nuts, at once complaining about Trump’s coarseness and then calling everyone who endorses a Trump policy a lapdog.

    I do hold admiration for Will in regards to the way he treats his son Jon, who is afflicted with Down’s syndrome. Early pregnancy testing and abortion is making the Jon’s of this world disappear without a trace. They are easier to deal with if you have some money, but it’s hard no matter what.

    • Replies: @Lot
    The dirt is magic in one sense: any able-bodied young man can magically see his labor go from 50 cents an hour in India/Honduras to $16+ in the bay area. And rent isn’t that bad if you live dorm style 4 or 6 to a bedroom.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The DH rule sucks.
     
    It isn't baseball. It's football.

    American football, that is. In association football, as in real baseball, once you're out of the game, you're out of the game.
    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    Bill James, a real baseball analyst, has been lambasting the DH rule for decades.

    And he's right.

    It's a ridiculous rule.

    They have a position for large, relatively slow guys who are on the team just to hit. It's called "first base." Learn to field a ground ball, Big Papi.
  159. @Daniel H
    >>The Germans were the best, man for man.

    Well, man for man is meaningless. Man for man the Germans bested the Red Army -right?- , but the Red Army marched into Berlin. 'Nuff said.

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.. Significant statistical factoid (gleaned from my recollections of David Glantz's writings). In 1942, Germany and her allies occupied/controlled a landmass that had at least 150% the GDP of the Soviet Union, maybe as high as 180%, yet in 1942 - a very critical year of the war - Germany produced approximately 4,000 top of the line fighting tanks. In the same year the Soviet Union produced close to 20,000 top of the line fighting tanks.(Don't forget, at this point all of Ukraine, Belorussia and the Baltics were in German hands). A similar ratio pertained in the production of artillery, self-propelled guns, machine guns, aircraft, .... (and no, the Soviet Union didn't need no stinkin' lend lease). The Soviet Union was tougher, smarter, meaner. The Russian was/is clearly a superior man to the German, and I think we can all see that today.

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.

    Soviet machine gunners placed behind the front lines with orders to shoot any man not advancing on the enemy has a way of bracing the spine.

    Come on. Any serious student of WW2 knows that the Germans ran rings around everyone in terms of combat effectiveness. Better weapons, better unit leadership, better morale. German units were famous for regrouping and launching lightning fast counter-attacks.

    Read Adolf Von Schell’s “Battle Leadership” to understand the German way of leading small units and making fast, effective decisions during the fog of battle. https://www.amazon.com/Battle-Leadership-Adolf-von-Schell-ebook/dp/B06WP692F8

    German panzers captured hundreds of thousands of Soviets in the advance into Ukraine and Russia. Hitler stupidly had his 3rd army take Stalingrad where the German advantages of armor and maneuver were nullified. It was super human how long the exhausted, freezing, ill-supplied 3rd army lasted in Stalingrad after Zhukov cut them off.

    The Germans cut through American lines like a hot knife through butter during the Battle of the Bulge. No contest.

    The allies won because they had more — more men, more tanks, more planes. That’s it.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The German genius for counter-attacking was transferred to their World Cup teams for decades, as Henry Kissinger pointed out. I recall in 1994 the Mexican team was in fantastic shape versus the aged Germans so they pushed like crazy on offense, but each time they made a slip up the wily Germans would suddenly score.
    , @Prester John
    The Wehrmacht was a formidable fighting machine. And it is often forgotten--though not by Patton who was fully aware of the possibility-- how close they came to driving the allies back into the sea during The Bulge. Of course, the likelihood would have been that the Germans would have followed the allies into the drink, pursued by a Red Army which at that point in time might arguably have been the greatest fighting force in history and whose soldiers fought with unsurpassed fury.
    , @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    German panzers captured hundreds of thousands of Soviets in the advance into Ukraine and Russia. Hitler stupidly had his 3rd army take Stalingrad where the German advantages of armor and maneuver were nullified. It was super human how long the exhausted, freezing, ill-supplied 3rd army lasted in Stalingrad after Zhukov cut them off.

     

    I am not convinced that the Germans ever had enough men to make Fall Blau work, period. They gave one army (or army group, I forget which) the work of three or four.

    But you're right that that was a mistake.

    , @Beckow

    Any serious student of WW2 knows that the Germans ran rings around everyone in terms of combat effectiveness.
     
    Sometimes they did, but most of the time after 1942-3 they didn't. They fought well as long as the troops were on a high from winning. Some Germans also fought well once they were broken by the Red Army in 1943, but they were a minority of the usual hyper-disciplined and suicide-addicted morons one finds in most armies. But most Germans just tried to survive. It could also be that the highest quality troops were mostly dead by then.

    Regarding shooting deserters: that was pretty much the same with Germans and Red Army - both were brutal. There were even teenage Germans killed for 'cowardice' all the way through May 1945. Germans had numerical superiority at the beginning, people forget that they were joined by almost all of continental Europe in their attack on the east. In 1945, the Reichstag in Berlin was defended to the end by French SS volunteers (Charlemagne division). There were famously more French who died fighting for Germany than against it and same is true about Belgians, Dutch, Norwegians, etc...

    At the end Red Army was better at fighting, they enjoyed it more. They had resilience that most Germans lacked. The machine guns behind the front are a myth based on some penal batallions, you extrapolate from irrelevant minutia. War is about total human and physical destruction and it takes a certain personality to win in a total war; people who put on socks the right way, trim their body hair, and count the change in their pocket loose at the end. Wehrmacht was competent, but not that great. They lost, so by definition they were second-best.
  160. @Steve Sailer
    George is saying that immigrants are good for the Economy and the Economy is here to serve immigrants, and nobody/nothing else (e.g., the American people) matters in this relationship.

    Ahhh, you can hear the patriotic sportsball chants now, can’t you? “North American GDP Zone One! North American GDP Zone One!”

    • LOL: Rosie
  161. @Daniel H
    Homo economicus.

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle. Exactly.

    Now the likes of Will, David French, Jonah Goldberg are pleading for civility. No civility for these bastards, I want their world destroyed.

    I will vote hardcore socialist Bernie, hardcore crazy Ocasio-Cortez before I will ever again pull the lever for a Cuck. The Cucks are the major problem. They are the backstabbers. Just say no to Cucks.

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle.

    America’s grandmother. Will is and always has been an effete putz.

  162. These assholes should be reminded, often and forcibly, that “The Economy” is a product of, and for the American people and not vice versa,

  163. Someone needs to grab that dead cat off of Will’s ancient head.

    A party whose positions of their talking heads resemble those of the opposition, and are in contrast to the positions of the people, is evidence for an overdue revolution due to a fatal corruption of democracy.

  164. @Cagey Beast
    I only Enoch Powell hadn't used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell's "rivers of blood" rhetoric.

    At least that's been one of the longest-lived alibis "conservatives" have used to explain why they just never seem to be able to restrict immigration. Unto the second generation:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg Betrays Fans By Opposing Enoch Powell’s Famous Speech
    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/04/14/jacob-rees-mogg-betrays-fans-opposing-enoch-powells-famous-speech/

    I only Enoch Powell hadn’t used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell’s “rivers of blood” rhetoric.

    No. Powell’s speech was fine. Many influential people were eager to twist Powell’s words in the most negative light possible, and even people like you accept that. Politics follows culture. When enough of the culture deems a particular view such as immigration restriction unacceptable, politics will likely follow.

    BTW, Powell called the speech the “Birmingham Speech”. Opponents branded it the “River of Blood” speech. The exact quote was actually more mild and reasonable:

    “as I look ahead, I am filled with foreboding; like the Roman, I seem to see ‘the River Tiber foaming with much blood’.”

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Disagree. Powell's speech was a madcap whinge against migrants from the Caribbean. The source country populations were and are circumscribed. Certain social problems among West Indians in Britain are a great deal more common than they are among native British, but they're not much of a cultural challenge. In re Pakistanis, the source country population is 30x as large and they have all sorts of features which make them indigestible in ways Anglophone Caribbeans are not.
    , @Anonymous
    I always thought this Burmingum Speech to-do was probably an instance of Eddie Izzard's "70% how you look" bit
    , @Cagey Beast
    No. Powell’s speech was fine. Many influential people were eager to twist Powell’s words in the most negative light possible...

    Yes, that was my point.

    ... and even people like you accept that.

    ...whatever that means.

    Politics follows culture.

    Not necessarily, especially in the era of mass culture and mass media. Terms like: "gate-keeping", "astroturfing", "gas-lighting", "the elephant in the room". "manufacturing consent" and "dynamic silencing" were adopted to help explain just how artificial our political culture had become in the television era. Enoch Powell was arguably the one of the first big kills that television scored for itself in the West.

    When enough of the culture deems a particular view such as immigration restriction unacceptable, politics will likely follow.

    Powell had the public on his side in this case.
  165. @Desiderius
    A marker of the decadence of American Liberalism™ is how it has been reduced to defining itself by what/who it is not and getting even that comically wrong.

    No, you're the opposite of neither Orange Man nor George Will, however much you wish you were.

    Too much truth to that.

    I get frustrated when I see prominent Congress Creatures and Senators go against proposals they previously supported because Trump. For example, Diane Feinstein called one of Trump’s immigration proposals “white supremicist” even though it was similar to proposals she supported when Bill Clinton was in office. She wrote an opinion piece saying it wouldn’t have allowed her grandparents to escape from the Czar. I am serious.

    Compare that to Mitch McConnell’s eight year tantrum when Obama was in office. The only difference is Trump hasn’t been in office for 8 years.

    Our nation and our planet are facing existential crises now. Some scientists predict the human race may not survive another century. Yet we are fighting over the deck chairs on the Titanic.

    We won’t face existential threats because it would be “bad for the economy”, meaning addressing the issues might cut into the quarterly profits of our oligarchs.

    The oligarchs are happy to pit left against right, white against non-white, “woke” against MAGA, Antifa against alt-right etc. These battles keep us peasants in our place and keep us from uniting against the oligarchs

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    And, the seed-vault in Svalbard is ready....as is the gene bank of animals which have gone extinct (recent ones)...and, the plans to de-populate can resume.
  166. @Twinkie

    A commenter once wrote something in the comments to this blog along the lines of this, “If we take in the whole world, the USA will have 100 percent of global GDP.”
     
    That’s similar to “If we made everyone in the world an American, then there would be zero illegal immigration.”

    In your example it all depends on how one defines the first clause. An aggressive interpretation would be akin to Manifest Destiny, Generalplan Ost, or Macrophage Rapid Convergence.

  167. @Anon
    OT

    Seattle yoga teacher’s ‘Undoing Whiteness’ class: Founded on deep purpose, it’s triggered outrage

    https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/seattle-yoga-teachers-undoing-whiteness-class/

    A Yoga business is offering classes similar to campus grievance studies, or the corporate struggle sessions that HR makes you attend. But now any white lady can pay to get 'splained to by a frigid feminist librarian manqué.

    Founded on deep purpose, it’s triggered outrage

    Navy secret project?

  168. Immigration is a big and complex issue.

    Big, meaning that the impacts of immigration changes are huge.

    Complex: do people have the right to preserve their culture? Their language? Their identity? To value an unbroken chain that connects people with their biological or cultural ancestors and work to see their values and some identity passed on to future generations? To oppose those things being undermined?

    George Will doesn’t even mention the topic in his recent book, yet has launched into this multi-year rage against Trump and immigration restriction. This speaks very poorly, that a prominent pundit like George Will is so publically emotional and fanatical and confident in his view on immigration yet, he doesn’t seriously write about it and explore it calmly and reasonably. Will didn’t even discuss the topic in his recent book.

  169. Can we rename George Cuckle’s the Clown and Globalist Service Animal?

  170. @Twinkie

    OK, the Italians weren’t as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians.
     
    I don't think that's quite true, but would depend on the time period in question.

    In WW II, in any case, the Italians were notorious for breaking on contact with... the British, the Russians, and later the Americans. Pretty much anyone who could fight. They did very poorly against the Greeks even when the Axis Powers were ascendant.

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, "Americans? Our Italians."

    The Germans were the best, man for man.
     
    They certainly were during WW II. Martin van Creveld did a nice study of that early in his career:

    https://www.amazon.com/Fighting-Power-Performance-1939-1945-Contributions/dp/0313091579

    They certainly were during WW II. Martin van Creveld did a nice study of that early in his career:

    There’s a lot of interesting stuff in there, which I know through reading Boyd and Richerson’s discussion of the topic in their Complex societies : The evolutionary origins of a crude superorganism.

  171. @Twinkie

    Italy’s poor record in the First World War
     
    Erwin Rommel, who went on to great fame leading the Afrika Korps and later Panzerarmee Afrika, including Italian troops, in WW II, won Pour Le Merite, Imperial Germany’s highest military honor for valor in WW I against the Italians:

    In two and a half days, from 25 to 27 October, Rommel and his 150 men captured 81 guns and 9,000 men (including 150 officers), at the loss of six dead and 30 wounded.[26] Rommel achieved this remarkable success by taking advantage of the terrain to outflank the Italian forces, attacking from unexpected directions or behind enemy lines, and taking the initiative to attack when he had orders to the contrary. In one instance, the Italian forces, taken by surprise and believing that their lines had collapsed, surrendered after a brief firefight.[27]
     
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erwin_Rommel

    One challenge facing Italy from a military perspective (in the 20th century) is that its a fake country of different peoples that were cobbled together. Its not really a nation. Their hearts just weren’t in it.

    I suspect the future US military will face similar challenges – the “tip of the spear” whites aren’t going to want to fight on behalf of a bunch of hindus, mexicans, and chinamen. The enlisted ranks will likely keep getting some (via economic lures), but I suspect the traditional American officer classes will winnow. Just using the Badwhites as an example: we have fought (as officers) in every major American conflict going back to the French and Indian Wars (except Vietnam – one branch was too old, another was too young, and one guy was in the USAF but stationed in Germany).

    It would never occur to any of us to join today and my brothers and I would actively discourage any of our sons from joining. The US military will continue to get officers of course, but it’ll be the Major Nadal’s and the Lt. Col D’Quantravious types, as well as the bickering school girls on the U.S.S. Florida. That would have serious ramifications in a serious WW1/WW2 type conflict.

    • Agree: ThreeCranes
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    When you think about it, the Italian propensity to surrender en masse to British forces in the north African desert was intensely 'dishonorable', but on a purely base instinct and reckoning - they were thrown into Mussolini's ego stroking bloodshed, they were out-gunned, basically the 'cause' wasn't worth a damn let alone life or limb - the decision was eminently rational.
    , @L Woods
    A serious “near-peer” conflict is exactly what they’re always carping on about. They’re delusional. But, the pointy end remains quite white/male, for some reason. Perhaps my generation will be the last to suffer the illusion that it has any stake in things.
    , @ThreeCranes

    "aren’t going to want to fight on behalf of a bunch of..."
     
    No one will. And that's the downfall of any diverse, multicultural society.

    Your's is just an excellent observation; one that I hadn't seen or considered before. It reduces the issue right down to the very essence. It's like a group of people faced with a distasteful chore, each waiting for the other to take it on. By they time someone gets motivated, it's too late.
  172. @Moses

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.
     
    Soviet machine gunners placed behind the front lines with orders to shoot any man not advancing on the enemy has a way of bracing the spine.

    Come on. Any serious student of WW2 knows that the Germans ran rings around everyone in terms of combat effectiveness. Better weapons, better unit leadership, better morale. German units were famous for regrouping and launching lightning fast counter-attacks.

    Read Adolf Von Schell's "Battle Leadership" to understand the German way of leading small units and making fast, effective decisions during the fog of battle. https://www.amazon.com/Battle-Leadership-Adolf-von-Schell-ebook/dp/B06WP692F8

    German panzers captured hundreds of thousands of Soviets in the advance into Ukraine and Russia. Hitler stupidly had his 3rd army take Stalingrad where the German advantages of armor and maneuver were nullified. It was super human how long the exhausted, freezing, ill-supplied 3rd army lasted in Stalingrad after Zhukov cut them off.

    The Germans cut through American lines like a hot knife through butter during the Battle of the Bulge. No contest.

    The allies won because they had more -- more men, more tanks, more planes. That's it.

    The German genius for counter-attacking was transferred to their World Cup teams for decades, as Henry Kissinger pointed out. I recall in 1994 the Mexican team was in fantastic shape versus the aged Germans so they pushed like crazy on offense, but each time they made a slip up the wily Germans would suddenly score.

    • Replies: @Prester John
    Reminds me of the '67 Green Bay Packer team (Lombardi's last championship team as coach). If you read Jerry Kramer's "Instant Replay" the Packers were old and had experienced lots of injuries. And yet--they won the Super Bowl that year.
    , @Twinkie

    The German genius for counter-attacking
     
    Von Manstein wanted to conduct a series of retreats and counterattacks to bleed the Soviets dry after 1942 with what substantial mobile reserves the Germans still had. Instead Hitler was fixated on the cult of the attack and threw those reserves away with Zitadelle (aka Kursk). After that, there was no salvaging the war for the Germans though Hitler kept harboring fantasies of having Frederick the Great’s luck at the 11th hour.
    , @Cortes
    Oddly enough, they chose not to exploit their genius for the counter-attack in starting both the World Wars they lost by electing to strike first.

    Schlieffen Plan or Blitzkrieg. Counter-attacks?
  173. @Twinkie

    Immigration from India is punishment/reparations for people who resembled Americans colonizing India 70-200 years.
     
    I don’t resembled those colonizers. Why are they punishing me with Indian immigrants?

    http://www.unz.com/anepigone/heightism-and-weightism/#comment-3168756

    To be honest, you’re not white. They complain about you too

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    To be honest, you’re not white. They complain about you too
     
    Yes. Just a lot less than about Indians.
  174. @Twinkie

    OK, the Italians weren’t as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians.
     
    I don't think that's quite true, but would depend on the time period in question.

    In WW II, in any case, the Italians were notorious for breaking on contact with... the British, the Russians, and later the Americans. Pretty much anyone who could fight. They did very poorly against the Greeks even when the Axis Powers were ascendant.

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, "Americans? Our Italians."

    The Germans were the best, man for man.
     
    They certainly were during WW II. Martin van Creveld did a nice study of that early in his career:

    https://www.amazon.com/Fighting-Power-Performance-1939-1945-Contributions/dp/0313091579

    The American army at the time of Kasserine Pass really wasn’t ready and was poorly equipped. They did not perform well. They improved greatly over the course of the war. Comments from British should be taken with their (deserved) inferiority complex in mind.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    The American army at the time of Kasserine Pass really wasn’t ready and was poorly equipped. They did not perform well. They improved greatly over the course of the war.
     
    It was not an equipment issue. Our soldiers were inexperienced and led by inexperienced officers. And, yes, they got a lot better. Just not better enough to match the Germans per capita. But they didn’t have to in order to win. We had material abundance on our side. We always have.
  175. @Thea
    Yes. Invading the USSR was an own goal. If Hitler really thought Stalin would invade Germany, he should have waited and let that happen where he’d have had the advantage.

    Two problems with that.

    1. Many military minds at the time felt that whichever side attacked first would have a large advantage. The Nazis believed the Soviets were planning to attack. The Soviets believed the Nazis were planning to attack. As long as both sides firmly believed they had an advantage by attacking first, someone was going to stage a preemptive strike.

    Especially since the Nazis uses the blitzkrieg style of attack, which depends on the first strike.

    2. The Nazis believed time was of the essence. If they struck quickly, they could strike before the Soviet troops were all in position. More important, they could strike before the weather got too bad.

    Where that failed: The Nazis, like Napoleon before them, got bogged down and were stuck in Russia during the winter.
    Add to that the fact that it was the most severe winter in 30 years.

    To be fair, we have no idea what would’ve happened had the Nazis avoided attacking the USSR. Suppose the Soviet Army had plenty of time to get into position. Consider the level of paranoia of Stalin. At some point the Red Army would be ready to fight an offensive battle. At that point they would attack the Nazis.

    • Replies: @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan
    This is all correct, but let me add a few things:

    First of all, it is a fact that most Western observers (American, French, and British) believed that the Soviet Union would collapse almost immediately following a strong German attack. The Soviets had won exactly one battle in decades - the Battle of Khalkhin Gol against Japan. Otherwise, they had been routed by Pildsudki's Poles; unable to actually win a total victory against the Imperial Japanese; and thoroughly embarrassed by tiny Finland during the Winter War. Their performance against overmatched Poland in 1939, which was under Western and German observation, was also rated as poor. And of course this was all after the well-known purge of the Soviet generals in 1937-38. Well into the war, Hitler told Mannerheim that he had not expected such strong Soviet resistance as was encountered. Hitler was not alone in his pre-war expectations. Everyone, to some degree possibly including the Soviet leadership, believed that the Soviet Union would collapse.

    (I am prepared to cite sources for this first point, but I don't have them on hand at the moment)

    Second, putting aside the myth that "Lebensraum" was the primary motivation at the time, the truth is that Hitler was in a difficult position vis-a-vis the Anglosphere and the Soviet Union. The former, in the shape of Great Britain, he had failed to knock out of the war. And they refused to negotiate, knowing that America, led by the Roosevelt clique, would take any opportunity to intervene on Britain's side. It was apparent for resource-poor, navy-less Germany that only a permanent guarantee of Eastern resources could enable it to knock out Britain and/or build for itself any long-term security.

    The problem there was that the Soviets, despite the Ribbentrop Pact, had become increasingly aggressive against territory that was guaranteed to Germany by the Pact itself. They were threatening the absolutely crucial Bessarabian oil fields. They were beginning to threaten cutting off resource transfers to the Germans. And finally, the Germans were aware that Churchill's government was attempting to create an anti-German pact with the Soviets.

    The German government's perception was that it had no choice but to break the Pact and attack Stalin before he did the same.

    And, even without the Suvorov "Icebreaker" theory (about which I have doubts), there is ample historical evidence to suggest that the German perception had plenty of merit to it.

    As you yourself say:


    At some point the Red Army would be ready to fight an offensive battle. At that point they would attack the Nazis.
     
    Exactly.
    , @Thea
    Even before the winter the Wehrmacht was bogged down by mud(Rasputitsa). They were taken by complete surprise that Russian weather held dangers outside Of winter.

    There were other indications this was a bad plan but Hitler ignored the advice of some of his smartest and most loyal generals who said it would fail.

    There was no excuse for the lack of understanding on the German part other than hubris and poor planning. They also over looked that the Soviets held some brilliant generals and fierce ground troops who marched on even when underfed and underarmed. They sometimes entered battle and had to take weapons from dead comrades. The Japanese warned them about Zhukov and the Estonians and Bulgarians considered them delusional idiots for the attempt
    , @gcochran
    "The Nazis believed the Soviets were planning to attack. " no. Maybe someday.
    , @Anonymous
    We don't know what Stalin was planning but it's likely his intended policy towards Germany was the one he eventually executed against the Japanese: remain passive and nonthreatening until the Germans were worn out from fighting other capitalist powers, then attack them without warning.
  176. geo will – a pretender.

    i remember him from the 80s, usually on his knees to netanyahoo or some other jew.

    small intellect. liar.

    another example that nothings can “make it”.

  177. @Reg Cæsar
    Will is still alive?

    Was he ever?

    LOL

    Will is one of those Conservatives who conserve nothing.

  178. @Interested Bystander
    If George Will were a bottle of milk you found in the back of your fridge, can you imagine how bad it would smell if you opened it?

    The only quibble I have with that comment is it implies there was a time when George Will was fresh.

    I think more of what my mother told me about life during WW II, when the best of everything went to the soldiers. Once my mother was taking a train and asked for milk. Instead of the Grade A milk we are used to, she was served Grade C milk. She said it was kind of grey colored.

    If you imagine a bottle of Grade C milk that had been sitting in the back of the fridge for many decades, I think you get the true essence of George Will.

    • Agree: Prester John
    • Replies: @Simply Simon
    That grey, Grade C milk your mother was served was skim milk, i.e., after all the cream was removed by a separator. During WWII we sold the separated cream to the local dairy and fed the leftover to the hogs. Hopefully the cream we sold was converted to butter for the troops, since butter was rationed in the stores. Incidentally, that milk originated from our cows and one of the more detestable jobs I had was to help draw the milk from those beasts before heading off to school often in the dark and the cold. Not complaining--it builds character I've been told.
  179. If we abolish the welfare state:

    • the flow of tax leeches, into this country, will be stopped dead in its tracks.

    • some 5M, illegal, tax leeches will go back to Latin America, and

    • some 50M, legal, tax leeches will go back to whatever European s^hole their great-*-grandparents came from.

    • Agree: BengaliCanadianDude
    • Replies: @Corn
    But they won’t vote to abolish the welfare state Mr. Libertarian
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    some 50M, legal, tax leeches will go back to whatever European s^hole their great-*-grandparents came from.

    What is the basis for this statement?
  180. @Desiderius
    All married into a different faith?

    Chapman’s wife is at least nominally Jewish; his mother-in-law was born in Germany https://fernschumerchapman.com/blog/). Derbyshire has said the Chinese are ‘the least religious and most supersititious people in the world”, but hasn’t said much about his wife; he resisted his father’s atheism growing up, but then adopted it more or less at age 60. George Will’s first wife was raised Catholic and his 2d Presbyterian.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    I was sort of joking. Whatever that miasma is that has settled over Will’s (and Chapman’s) social circle, it is utterly irreligious and few can resist its inexorable pull.

    Derbyshire may be a case of returning to his filial roots as most conservative men do at one point or another. As with the others, probably doesn’t hurt relations with the wife either. Doesn’t help that the CoE has been so gung ho on the whole Globohomocorp agenda.
  181. @Mark Spahn (West Seneca, NY)
    I have not read George Will in decades (the local newspaper dropped his column), but recently I saw his essay on impeachment

    https://www.troyrecord.com/opinion/george-will-trump-the-idea-of-an-aesthetic-impeachment/article_84abe474-8731-11e9-a53f-d7801cb7927e.html

    in which he wrote: "Impeachment can be retrospective, for offenses committed, or prospective, to prevent probable future injuries to the nation."

    Really? That's not what the Constitution says. Article II, Section 4: "The President, Vice President, and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors."

    But according to George Will, impeachment is a punishment for future crimes. Holy Philip K. Dick! Shades of

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minority_Report_(film)

    Actually Will is more radical than Philip Dick’s dystopian vision.

    Since the future crimes haven’t been thought of yet Will is extending Pre-crime to Pre-thought.

    This fits in well with the Silicon Valley and Chinese elite’s vision of using data to determine pre-thought.

    They want citizens to think about thinking only correct thoughts–otherwise off to the prison camps for re-education they go.

  182. @Massimo Heitor

    I only Enoch Powell hadn’t used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell’s “rivers of blood” rhetoric.
     
    No. Powell's speech was fine. Many influential people were eager to twist Powell's words in the most negative light possible, and even people like you accept that. Politics follows culture. When enough of the culture deems a particular view such as immigration restriction unacceptable, politics will likely follow.

    BTW, Powell called the speech the "Birmingham Speech". Opponents branded it the "River of Blood" speech. The exact quote was actually more mild and reasonable:

    "as I look ahead, I am filled with foreboding; like the Roman, I seem to see 'the River Tiber foaming with much blood'."
     

    Disagree. Powell’s speech was a madcap whinge against migrants from the Caribbean. The source country populations were and are circumscribed. Certain social problems among West Indians in Britain are a great deal more common than they are among native British, but they’re not much of a cultural challenge. In re Pakistanis, the source country population is 30x as large and they have all sorts of features which make them indigestible in ways Anglophone Caribbeans are not.

    • Disagree: Lot, Desiderius
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The main problem with your analysis is the appalling (genetic) propensity for 'west Indians' to steal, rob, rape, maim and murder.

    Scarcely a day passes in today's London without some nasty, worthless black murdering an innocent victim for goods of trivial value.

    On balance, they are wicked and wretched people of whom Britain would infinitely better off without.
    , @BengaliCanadianDude
    Blacks commit crime at a far greater rate than the Mirpuris, negroid
  183. Anonymous[195] • Disclaimer says:
    @William Badwhite
    One challenge facing Italy from a military perspective (in the 20th century) is that its a fake country of different peoples that were cobbled together. Its not really a nation. Their hearts just weren't in it.

    I suspect the future US military will face similar challenges - the "tip of the spear" whites aren't going to want to fight on behalf of a bunch of hindus, mexicans, and chinamen. The enlisted ranks will likely keep getting some (via economic lures), but I suspect the traditional American officer classes will winnow. Just using the Badwhites as an example: we have fought (as officers) in every major American conflict going back to the French and Indian Wars (except Vietnam - one branch was too old, another was too young, and one guy was in the USAF but stationed in Germany).

    It would never occur to any of us to join today and my brothers and I would actively discourage any of our sons from joining. The US military will continue to get officers of course, but it'll be the Major Nadal's and the Lt. Col D'Quantravious types, as well as the bickering school girls on the U.S.S. Florida. That would have serious ramifications in a serious WW1/WW2 type conflict.

    When you think about it, the Italian propensity to surrender en masse to British forces in the north African desert was intensely ‘dishonorable’, but on a purely base instinct and reckoning – they were thrown into Mussolini’s ego stroking bloodshed, they were out-gunned, basically the ’cause’ wasn’t worth a damn let alone life or limb – the decision was eminently rational.

  184. …They only see the economy.

    They only see the relative size of the economy. I would add another point that often gets lost: not all ‘economy’ is useful in even a very minimum sense. Lots of modern economic activity is pointless, repetitive and delivers zero benefits.

    There is the meta-economy: activity on top of actual work that serves no purpose except institutional busy-work. A simple test is that if it can’t be explained, it is probably not actual work. It has been monetised, because greed, self-preservation and ‘corruption’ are endemic in over-crowded, competitive environments. But it is not work, so adding it to the ‘economy’ is a fiction, it doesn’t really need to get done and it doesn’t benefit anyone. Only the monetary ‘reward’ benefits someone. We might as well cut the nonsense and simply provide a reward so those ‘workers’ can consume.

    If you subtract meta-economy and all the related activities that are useless and shouldn’t be monetised, the actual quality of life hasn’t budged much in 2 generations (other than technology). For young it is actually worse. Pyramid schemes are based on growth fantasies, trends that can’t be sustained, they always eventually collapse.

  185. @Desiderius
    The other side gets the insufferable dorks this time. Sounds good to me.

    “At a dinner with Churchill, Ribbentrop had said that, in a future war with Britain, Germany would have the Italians on its side. Churchill, referring to Italy’s poor record in the First World War, responded with one of his devastating verbal flashes: ‘That’s only fair – we had them last time.’”

    Speaking of Ribbentrop I read once when Hitler appointed Ribbentrop Foreign Minister Goering or another of Hitler’s lieutenants argued against it.

    Hitler defended his choice, “But Ribbentrop knows Lord So and So and Ambassador ThatGuy and President Numbgums.”

    To which Hitler’s subordinate replied, “Yes, but unfortunately they know Ribbentrop.”

    • Replies: @Prester John
    Wasn't aware of this incident. Typical Churchill.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    To which Hitler’s subordinate replied, “Yes, but unfortunately they know Ribbentrop.”
     
    So do Monty Python. He appeared as "Ron Vibbentrop" in a skit.
  186. Anonymous[195] • Disclaimer says:
    @Art Deco
    Disagree. Powell's speech was a madcap whinge against migrants from the Caribbean. The source country populations were and are circumscribed. Certain social problems among West Indians in Britain are a great deal more common than they are among native British, but they're not much of a cultural challenge. In re Pakistanis, the source country population is 30x as large and they have all sorts of features which make them indigestible in ways Anglophone Caribbeans are not.

    The main problem with your analysis is the appalling (genetic) propensity for ‘west Indians’ to steal, rob, rape, maim and murder.

    Scarcely a day passes in today’s London without some nasty, worthless black murdering an innocent victim for goods of trivial value.

    On balance, they are wicked and wretched people of whom Britain would infinitely better off without.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    The homicide rate among West Indians living in Britain is elevated compared to what's normal in Western Europe. At about 6 per 100,000, doesn't look that bad compared to the U.S., Russia, or a menu of East European countries.
  187. Anonymous[766] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    I didn't know he had a Ph.D.: Dr. Will.

    Here's a take-down of him in The Week by center-left Damon Linker:

    The sad, sorry decline of George F. Will
    https://theweek.com/articles/446227/sad-sorry-decline-george-f

    The title makes it sound like you could swap in Mickey Kaus's name.

    Anyway, half the take-down concerns a column that sent Twitter into an uproar, but which is quite excellent in my opinion.

    George Will: Colleges become the victims of progressivism
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/george-will-college-become-the-victims-of-progressivism/2014/06/06/e90e73b4-eb50-11e3-9f5c-9075d5508f0a_story.html

    And then there's the notorious rape column in which Will asserts that (you guessed it) "progressivism" has made "victimhood a coveted status that confers privileges," thereby inspiring "the supposed campus epidemic of rape, a.k.a. 'sexual assault.'"

    That's right: George Will, Ph.D., believes that under the influence of "progressivism," young women on college campuses across America are (en masse? individually?) seeking privileges (economic? political? cultural?) by getting themselves known as rape victims — because that is a "coveted status."

    Sure it's sexist, condescending, and callously dismissive, as thousands of critics have already noted. But here's what bothers me even more than that: it's outrageously stupid, transparently absurd.

    Can Will truly believe that female college students are behaving the way he claims they are — faking sexual assaults because it confers benefits on them? If he does, what does that imply about his broader capacity to think, analyze, and opine?
     

    The example Will gives is a student who had been having hook-up sex with a fellow student for three months. They were in her bed together. He makes a move. She "basically said" (does that mean "she said"?) "No." "A few minutes later (lying with her permission in her bed, remember) he makes another move.

    "I just kind of laid there and didn’t do anything — I had already said no. I was just tired and wanted to go to bed. I let him finish. I pulled my panties back on and went to sleep."

    In other words, "I could have just said 'No' again, or said 'Not tonight,' or pushed him off, but hey, I was sleepy, so I figured to avoid any exertion I'd just let myself get raped instead. I mean, jeez, didn't he know from my previous tone of voice that my No had a 120 minute expiration?"

    A month and a half later she report to the school (not the police) that she had been raped.

    There are many more like this. I think Will's very reasonable point is that rape, and sexual assault, have changed in meaning, expanding in the way that marketers call brand extension, e.g., Oreo ice cream. Expanded to include mild annoyances that you let happen if it will save the effort of saying 'No.' And I think also that young women perceive experiences that in the past they would have considered to be consensual as criminal. And I think that the shame that young women used to feel about rape-rape is not felt about campus "rape."

    And at least some women, as Will noted, such as the Rolling Stone subject and mattress girl, do in fact get off on having a status of rape victim (just as long as everyone knows it wasn't an alley rape by a black guy with a gun, but rather, a "I consulted with my gender studies professor a few weeks later and realized it was a rape" rape).

    It would seem that the existence of U.Va. Jackie sufficiently refutes Linker’s quite gallant notion that a Western female would never, but NEVER voluntarily advertise herself as rape victim. Technically, she couldn’t advertise her own rape because of that not going through the formality of occurring– but she certainly claimed the status.

    As Bertrand Russell put it the existence of a thing is absolute proof of its possibility

  188. @Moses
    Oh dear. Chevy Chase is 88% White.

    http://www.city-data.com/city/Chevy-Chase-Maryland.html

    George Will loves 3rd world diversity, as long as it's for YOU and not for HIM.

    Ugh. These cucks are the WORST.

    And most of the other 12% are wealthy Asians-guaranteed.

  189. OT: AOC is complaining that Congress didn’t give itself (and her) a pay raise. She really knows how to tick off her supporters.

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/its-not-even-a-raise-aoc-upset-at-congressional-democrats-for-tabling-raise

    • Replies: @Prester John
    It's who we are.
  190. @Twinkie

    A commenter once wrote something in the comments to this blog along the lines of this, “If we take in the whole world, the USA will have 100 percent of global GDP.”
     
    That’s similar to “If we made everyone in the world an American, then there would be zero illegal immigration.”

    That’s similar to “If we made everyone in the world an American, then there would be zero illegal immigration.”

    I sense your sarcasm. The Roman’s tried that and it didn’t work. Making everyone in the Roman Empire a citizen allowed those from alien cultures and religions to become Roman soldiers accessing the roots of Roman national power … and then the rot began. Roman emperors, foreshadowing Obama, even adopted foreign religions in the hope of unifying a now diverse people. Sound familiar?

    Going forward, it was inevitable that sooner rather than later the barbarians would become officers and generals in the Legions powerful enough to “make” or “break” Roman emperors and Roman institutions. They, of course, broke them.

    As they say, the rest is history …. as an ode to the adverse impact of diversity on cultures, religions, peoples. and empires. Diversity is a short run thing.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Going forward...
     
    Is there an alternative?
    , @Twinkie

    Empire
     
    That’s where the rot began. Full stop.

    But the Roman had a long run. We should be so blessed.

  191. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, “Americans? Our Italians.”

     

    A rather amusing comment in light of the future poverty of British infantry performance in France, 1944.

    There were more British soldiers than Americans involved in D Day:

    https://www.dday-overlord.com/en/d-day/figures

    • Replies: @bjondo
    There were more British soldiers than Americans involved in D Day

    only fair.
    the brits started the war.
    , @Anonymous
    Why was there a D Day at all?

    Prior to D Day, the Allies had conquered half of Italy, and Rome itself was surrendered to the Allies without a fight shortly before D Day. Marseille, Munich and Vienna are within less than 500 miles of Rome, within convenient bombing range.

    The simple truth is that FDR knowingly and willingly lived for years in a state of co-dependence surrounded by Stalin's agents - they helped him stay in power, he helped them by quietly working for Stalin rather than America. This co-dependence probably started before FDR ran for president, and continued throughout his presidential career. Hoover and many others were wise to what happened, hence Hoover's devastating publication of "Freedom Betrayed."
  192. @Lot
    “He’s just another National Review old fuddy duddy codger pretending to be an intellectual.”

    Yes he is. And that is one economic niche with no Mexican immigrant competition.

    Though I agree with Will concerning the dangers of out-of-control government, I have otherwise soured on him over the years–particularly concerning the subject at hand, wherein he exhibits typical Beltway myopia.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Myopia, or the fact that the same guys who pay him are importing all the cheap labor.
  193. Anonymous[766] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon
    Your account is disingenuous and misleading. The annexation of Sikkim by India is much more analogous to the annexation of California or Texas to the U.S.A than it is to any nefarious invasion – it was done at the request of the people. The Sikkim State Congress and its prime minister requested assistance from India in overthrowing the monarchy and, later, requested annexation to India as well. Earlier still, Indian forces had entered Sikkim at the request of its monarch for their assistance quelling popular revolts against his rule (one must be careful what one wishes for, and beware of entangling alliances...).

    Incidentally, if you want to learn about a nonpareil adventuress – a real adventuress' adventuress! – get a load of this disgusting Hope Wallace (née Cooke, formerly Namgyal) creature – a real parasite who never faced a consequence for an action or worked for anything a day of her life (and she is still at it, as you mention). Her parents might better have named her "Despair" to help warn men away from her.

    re: Hope Cookies vs. the Sic’ems

    Well, manufacturing a dog-in-this-fight was apparently beyond the powers of our best PR/lobbying firms

  194. @Steve Sailer
    The German genius for counter-attacking was transferred to their World Cup teams for decades, as Henry Kissinger pointed out. I recall in 1994 the Mexican team was in fantastic shape versus the aged Germans so they pushed like crazy on offense, but each time they made a slip up the wily Germans would suddenly score.

    Reminds me of the ’67 Green Bay Packer team (Lombardi’s last championship team as coach). If you read Jerry Kramer’s “Instant Replay” the Packers were old and had experienced lots of injuries. And yet–they won the Super Bowl that year.

  195. @Honesthughgrant
    George Will is for a Ginsberg/Kagan run SCOTUS. He almost got his wish in 2016, and he's hoping for it in 2020.

    Fortunately, not even the dimmest dim-bulb Right-winger now believes George Will is one of us. He's a complete Globalist, Free trader, open borders freak, who socially liberal. Other than not wanting to gut the Defense Department or socialize business, its hard to see how he's a man of the Right.

    I think he's been living on prior glory for almost 25 years. ABC put him on TV as "The Conservative" and he became outrageously famous in the 1980's and early 90s. But once talk radio and Cable News got more popular he faded from view. Now, he's mostly noticed by old people like me.

    Yes. Being wrong on migration isn’t made up for by being right on every other issue. Not that Reagan-Bush GOPe was right on tariffs, Iraq, tax cuts for the rich, getting rid of antitrust laws, etc.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    What the hell is this meme "tax cuts for the rich"? The poorest Americans are rich by world standards, so any tax cut for anybody could be described that way.

    In a sense, immigration is a tax cut for the rich-- the employer.
  196. Anonymous[766] • Disclaimer says:
    @Massimo Heitor

    I only Enoch Powell hadn’t used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell’s “rivers of blood” rhetoric.
     
    No. Powell's speech was fine. Many influential people were eager to twist Powell's words in the most negative light possible, and even people like you accept that. Politics follows culture. When enough of the culture deems a particular view such as immigration restriction unacceptable, politics will likely follow.

    BTW, Powell called the speech the "Birmingham Speech". Opponents branded it the "River of Blood" speech. The exact quote was actually more mild and reasonable:

    "as I look ahead, I am filled with foreboding; like the Roman, I seem to see 'the River Tiber foaming with much blood'."
     

    I always thought this Burmingum Speech to-do was probably an instance of Eddie Izzard’s “70% how you look” bit

  197. @jJay
    I've been reading George F Will's columns since the 80s and have mixed reactions to him. Like many conservatives he very good at pointing out the flaws in liberalism but doesn't do so well at defending conservatism. He's been posting red flags on this for decades.

    He's OK with the designated hitter in American League baseball. This take some big strategy decisions out of a close game in favor a fan pleasing home run hitter. The DH rule sucks. But then he doesn't like the focus on home runs in modern baseball either.

    He was horrified by Jason Richwine's research on latinos' lackluster success in America but had no data of his own to rebut it.

    He likes to inform us that California, for example, has long history of producing influential Republican governors but doesn't seem to grasp that replacing the population of California might have some effect on this trend. California has magic dirt. (Is "magic dirt" a Sailerism? If so, it is the best. It's better than "Invade the World, Invite the World" for its subtlety. I could safely wear a "Magic Dirt" t-shirt here in CA)

    Ever since Trump called him "overrated" he's been nuts, at once complaining about Trump's coarseness and then calling everyone who endorses a Trump policy a lapdog.

    I do hold admiration for Will in regards to the way he treats his son Jon, who is afflicted with Down's syndrome. Early pregnancy testing and abortion is making the Jon's of this world disappear without a trace. They are easier to deal with if you have some money, but it's hard no matter what.

    The dirt is magic in one sense: any able-bodied young man can magically see his labor go from 50 cents an hour in India/Honduras to $16+ in the bay area. And rent isn’t that bad if you live dorm style 4 or 6 to a bedroom.

  198. As I have been at pains to explain to you, it is conservatives who favor immigration (whatever lip service they give to opposing it), because it lowers wages and prevents unionization. Conservatives favor big business. Big Business’s primary bugaboo is all those damned wages they have to shell out. If only they didn’t have to shell out all those damned wages, we would live in Paradise.

    Immigration solves this problem for Big Business. Making all conservatives happy.

  199. @DB Cooper
    India never respects its neighbors borders either. Britain gifted the people in South Asia a country and once the country was created it has invaded and land grabbed every single of its neighbors. Here is a selected list:

    1947 Annexation of Kashmir:
    http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/02/06/indias-shame/
    http://thediplomat.com/2015/08/kashmirs-young-rebels/
    1949 Annexation of Manipur:
    http://www.tehelka.com/manipurs-merger-with-india-was-a-forced-annexation/
    http://www.passblue.com/2017/09/05/in-lush-manipur-women-work-for-peace-as-militarization-marches-on/
    1949 Annexation of Tripura:
    http://www.crescent-online.net/2009/09/the-myths-of-one-nation-and-one-hinduism-in-india-zawahir-siddique-2316-articles.html
    1951 Annexation of South Tibet:
    http://kanglaonline.com/2011/06/khathing-the-taking-of-tawang/
    http://www.mainstreamweekly.net/article2582.html
    http://chasfreeman.net/india-pakistan-and-china/
    1954 Annexation of Nagaland:
    http://morungexpress.com/desire-nagas-live-separate-nation-deserved/
    http://nagalandmusings.blogspot.com/2013/01/indias-untold-genocide-of-nagas.html
    1954 Attempt annexation of Sikkim and Bhutan (Failed):
    http://redbarricade.blogspot.hk/2013/01/twisted-truth.html
    1961 Annexation of Goa:
    http://www.ruleoflaw.org.au/the-annexation-of-goa/
    http://www.historytoday.com/richard-cavendish/goa-falls-indian-troops
    http://goa-invasion-1961.blogspot.in/2013/09/india-pirated-goa-china-is-regaining_16.html
    1962 Annexation of Kalapani, Nepal:
    http://www.eurasiareview.com/07032012-indian-hegemony-in-nepal-oped/
    http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1239348
    http://www.sharnoffsglobalviews.com/land-disputes-116/
    1962 Aggression against China:
    http://gregoryclark.net/redif.html
    http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/news-events/podcasts/renewed-tension-indiachina-border-whos-blame
    1971 Annexation of Turtuk, Pakistan:
    http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/nation/suddenly-indian
    1972 Annexation of Tin Bigha, Bangladesh:
    http://www.dhakatribune.com/op-ed/2014/feb/20/killing-fields
    1975 Annexation of Sikkim (the whole country):
    http://nepalitimes.com/issue/35/Nation/9621#.UohjPHQo6LA
    http://www.passblue.com/2015/07/22/a-small-himalayan-kingdom-remembers-its-lost-independence/
    http://www.amazon.com/Smash-Grab-Annexation-Sunanda-Datta-Ray/dp/9383260386
    http://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy/International-Relations/Indian-hegemonism-drags-Himalayan-kingdom-into-oblivion
    http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/annexation-of-sikkim-by-india-was-not-legal-wangchuk-namgyal/1/391498.html
    1983 (Aborted) Attempted invasion of Mauritius:
    http://thediplomat.com/2013/03/when-india-almost-invaded-mauritius/
    1987 Invasion of Sri Lanka
    http://www.asiantribune.com/node/63316
    1990 (Failed) First Attempted annexation of Bhutan:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1990/10/07/world/india-based-groups-seek-to-disrupt-bhutan.html
    2006 Annexation of Duars, Bhutan:
    http://wangchasangey.blogspot.in/2015/11/different-kind-of-anxieties-on.html#comment-form
    2013 Annexation of Moreh, Myanmar:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nehginpao-kipgen/easing-indiamyanmar-borde_b_4633040.html
    2017 Aggression against China:
    http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2017/07/06/sikkim-stand-off-china-india-collide-himalayas/
    http://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2102555/indias-china-war-round-two
    https://www.counterpunch.org/2017/07/11/china-india-standoff-modi-has-bitten-off-more-than-he-can-chew/
    2017 (Failed) Second Attempted annexation of Bhutan:
    http://wangchasangey.blogspot.com/2017/08/the-strategy-behind-india-doklam.html
    http://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/article/2106709/india-must-find-face-saving-pretext-and-withdraw-doklam
    2018 (Thwarted) Attempt invasion of the Maldives
    https://www.ft.com/content/332a5b1a-1155-11e8-8cb6-b9ccc4c4dbbb
    https://thewire.in/223916/keep-off-maldives-yameen-government-tells-indian-military/?utm_source=alsoread

    1961 Annexation of Goa:

    A lot of Goans have Portuguese names (Dinesh D’Souza!), though I think the language has died out, as it has in Macau. It thrives elsewhere.

    Gaston Dorren has a fascinating chapter in Babel: Around the World in Twenty Languages about how, despite having similar empires with similar origins and fates, Portuguese is a major world language today, while his own Dutch has disappeared internationally. (Unless you include Afrikaans and Papiamento as “Dutch”.)

    Not everything stuck, though. Portugal drives on the right, but at least four former colonies– Goa, Macau, East Timor, and Mozambique– drive on the left.

  200. @Sgt. Joe Friday
    I think Will is an atheist, actually.

    And note that no one hears about "standard of living" anymore. Back when I was boy, America used to boast about having the "world's highest standard of living." Now all you hear about is "world's largest economy."

    He is, tho’ like the late Nat Hentoff ( a liberal atheist) he not only supports religious liberty but he is also anti-abortion .

  201. @Corn
    Speaking of Ribbentrop I read once when Hitler appointed Ribbentrop Foreign Minister Goering or another of Hitler’s lieutenants argued against it.

    Hitler defended his choice, “But Ribbentrop knows Lord So and So and Ambassador ThatGuy and President Numbgums.”

    To which Hitler’s subordinate replied, “Yes, but unfortunately they know Ribbentrop.”

    Wasn’t aware of this incident. Typical Churchill.

  202. @Corn
    Speaking of Ribbentrop I read once when Hitler appointed Ribbentrop Foreign Minister Goering or another of Hitler’s lieutenants argued against it.

    Hitler defended his choice, “But Ribbentrop knows Lord So and So and Ambassador ThatGuy and President Numbgums.”

    To which Hitler’s subordinate replied, “Yes, but unfortunately they know Ribbentrop.”

    To which Hitler’s subordinate replied, “Yes, but unfortunately they know Ribbentrop.”

    So do Monty Python. He appeared as “Ron Vibbentrop” in a skit.

  203. @William Badwhite
    One challenge facing Italy from a military perspective (in the 20th century) is that its a fake country of different peoples that were cobbled together. Its not really a nation. Their hearts just weren't in it.

    I suspect the future US military will face similar challenges - the "tip of the spear" whites aren't going to want to fight on behalf of a bunch of hindus, mexicans, and chinamen. The enlisted ranks will likely keep getting some (via economic lures), but I suspect the traditional American officer classes will winnow. Just using the Badwhites as an example: we have fought (as officers) in every major American conflict going back to the French and Indian Wars (except Vietnam - one branch was too old, another was too young, and one guy was in the USAF but stationed in Germany).

    It would never occur to any of us to join today and my brothers and I would actively discourage any of our sons from joining. The US military will continue to get officers of course, but it'll be the Major Nadal's and the Lt. Col D'Quantravious types, as well as the bickering school girls on the U.S.S. Florida. That would have serious ramifications in a serious WW1/WW2 type conflict.

    A serious “near-peer” conflict is exactly what they’re always carping on about. They’re delusional. But, the pointy end remains quite white/male, for some reason. Perhaps my generation will be the last to suffer the illusion that it has any stake in things.

  204. @eah
    OT

    https://twitter.com/nytopinion/status/1137783432661143552
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Jessica Knoll is even wackier than this tripe demonstrates.
     
    Is she related to the infamous Grassy Knoll of the '60s?
  205. @jJay
    I've been reading George F Will's columns since the 80s and have mixed reactions to him. Like many conservatives he very good at pointing out the flaws in liberalism but doesn't do so well at defending conservatism. He's been posting red flags on this for decades.

    He's OK with the designated hitter in American League baseball. This take some big strategy decisions out of a close game in favor a fan pleasing home run hitter. The DH rule sucks. But then he doesn't like the focus on home runs in modern baseball either.

    He was horrified by Jason Richwine's research on latinos' lackluster success in America but had no data of his own to rebut it.

    He likes to inform us that California, for example, has long history of producing influential Republican governors but doesn't seem to grasp that replacing the population of California might have some effect on this trend. California has magic dirt. (Is "magic dirt" a Sailerism? If so, it is the best. It's better than "Invade the World, Invite the World" for its subtlety. I could safely wear a "Magic Dirt" t-shirt here in CA)

    Ever since Trump called him "overrated" he's been nuts, at once complaining about Trump's coarseness and then calling everyone who endorses a Trump policy a lapdog.

    I do hold admiration for Will in regards to the way he treats his son Jon, who is afflicted with Down's syndrome. Early pregnancy testing and abortion is making the Jon's of this world disappear without a trace. They are easier to deal with if you have some money, but it's hard no matter what.

    The DH rule sucks.

    It isn’t baseball. It’s football.

    American football, that is. In association football, as in real baseball, once you’re out of the game, you’re out of the game.

  206. @Kylie
    Jessica Knoll is even wackier than this tripe demonstrates.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4989886/amp/Jessica-Knoll-reveals-went-date-rapist.html

    Jessica Knoll is even wackier than this tripe demonstrates.

    Is she related to the infamous Grassy Knoll of the ’60s?

    • LOL: Kylie
  207. @TheJester

    That’s similar to “If we made everyone in the world an American, then there would be zero illegal immigration.”
     
    I sense your sarcasm. The Roman's tried that and it didn't work. Making everyone in the Roman Empire a citizen allowed those from alien cultures and religions to become Roman soldiers accessing the roots of Roman national power ... and then the rot began. Roman emperors, foreshadowing Obama, even adopted foreign religions in the hope of unifying a now diverse people. Sound familiar?

    Going forward, it was inevitable that sooner rather than later the barbarians would become officers and generals in the Legions powerful enough to "make" or "break" Roman emperors and Roman institutions. They, of course, broke them.

    As they say, the rest is history .... as an ode to the adverse impact of diversity on cultures, religions, peoples. and empires. Diversity is a short run thing.

    Going forward…

    Is there an alternative?

  208. @Moses

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.
     
    Soviet machine gunners placed behind the front lines with orders to shoot any man not advancing on the enemy has a way of bracing the spine.

    Come on. Any serious student of WW2 knows that the Germans ran rings around everyone in terms of combat effectiveness. Better weapons, better unit leadership, better morale. German units were famous for regrouping and launching lightning fast counter-attacks.

    Read Adolf Von Schell's "Battle Leadership" to understand the German way of leading small units and making fast, effective decisions during the fog of battle. https://www.amazon.com/Battle-Leadership-Adolf-von-Schell-ebook/dp/B06WP692F8

    German panzers captured hundreds of thousands of Soviets in the advance into Ukraine and Russia. Hitler stupidly had his 3rd army take Stalingrad where the German advantages of armor and maneuver were nullified. It was super human how long the exhausted, freezing, ill-supplied 3rd army lasted in Stalingrad after Zhukov cut them off.

    The Germans cut through American lines like a hot knife through butter during the Battle of the Bulge. No contest.

    The allies won because they had more -- more men, more tanks, more planes. That's it.

    The Wehrmacht was a formidable fighting machine. And it is often forgotten–though not by Patton who was fully aware of the possibility– how close they came to driving the allies back into the sea during The Bulge. Of course, the likelihood would have been that the Germans would have followed the allies into the drink, pursued by a Red Army which at that point in time might arguably have been the greatest fighting force in history and whose soldiers fought with unsurpassed fury.

  209. >>Read Adolf Von Schell’s “Battle Leadership” to understand the German way of leading small units and making fast, effective decisions during the fog of battle.

    German emphasis on elite combat formations, with the majority of the army to provide support and logistics for the combat wings, despite their superior field leadership, resourcefulness, capability turned out to be a bug, not a feature. David Glantz provides statistics that show that during the Battle of Stalingrad, German units had a 6 to 1 kill ratio versus Soviet unit. Didn’t matter, because even though German attacking formation could kill/wound 6 Soviets for any one of their own, they were still bled white. And whereas in the Red Army every man was a frontline solider, Germany had specialized combat formations. When these were whittled down, despite still having a huge fighting force, the wounded German army was barely a little more competent than the still standing Red Army. The ferocious fighting force that was the German Army 1939-1941, never existed again post 1942, despite it’s still huge numbers.

    When Paulus was first surrounded at Stalingrad, initial plans were made to break out. If a breakout were to occur he demanded that at least 20,000 fresh frontline combat troops be airlifted in in to assist in the breakout. Hitler’s army staff flunkies, who did not have combat leadership experience could not understand why this should necessary. Anybody who was a field officer in the German army knew precisely why this would be necessary. Paulus claimed that as things stood in November 2018, when the Red Army closed the circle there were only about 30,000 frontline German troops able to fight out of the pocket. This was out of a force that initially numbered 290,000 soldiers. And at this point the force had not been enervated by hunger and siege. At any given time, approximately 10% of the German land army was front line, combat ready. And when these frontline fighters were killed or wounded, they were not easy to replace.

    • Replies: @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    At any given time, approximately 10% of the German land army was front line, combat ready.

     

    I suspect that this is probably a shallow criticism of the German land army for one reason: how many land armies of modern, post-19th century warfare have a front line, combat ready capacity of higher than 10-20%? And I mean good soldiers, not just the clerks and cooks that the U.S. Army had to throw into battle in January '45 because its replacement structure was deeply flawed. I'm prepared to be proven wrong if you have the stats.

    As an aside, I guarantee that the front line, combat readiness of the U.S. Army *today* SURE AS HELL ain't above 10%.

  210. @Daniel H
    George Will and the rest of the Cucks can stuff this:

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/new-poll-a-majority-of-women-between-18-and-54-support-socialism

    Polling is used as clickbait and propaganda–questions are structured to achieve predetermined responses so that stories can be written producing the desired results.

    E.g. see 2016 Brexit, US presidential election results versus “polling.”

    In other words, “polling” is useless for understanding public opinion.

  211. @jim jones
    There were more British soldiers than Americans involved in D Day:

    https://www.dday-overlord.com/en/d-day/figures

    There were more British soldiers than Americans involved in D Day

    only fair.
    the brits started the war.

  212. @anon
    Rich man confused by stagnant wages, blames blaming schools (?): https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/07/education-isnt-enough/590611/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

    Fails ctrl-f immi test...

    “people who see education as a cure-all have largely ignored the metric most predictive of a child’s educational success: household income.

    The scientific literature on this subject is robust, and the consensus overwhelming. The lower your parents’ income, the lower your likely level of educational attainment. Period.”

    The essential difference between them and us.

  213. @Art Deco
    It's what's believed by everyone with whom he associates. He went from a faculty household in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois to Trinity College in Hartford to Oxford to Princeton to the University of Toronto to Michigan State to the ranks of what critics call 'courtier intellectuals' in Washington (which included berths at National Review and the Washington Post Writers' Group). He lived in a handsome section of Montgomery County, Md. 'ere decamping to Georgetown. His first wife was (and remains, I believe) a lobbyist for the social services industry. His second wife is a lobbyist and pr agent for various business interests (betwixt and between stints doing pr for politicians e.g. Bob Dole). One of his children is an associate with a BigLaw firm, posted to Hong Kong. The closest he's been to vernacular Americans would be his middle son (an FBI agent) and his first set of in-laws (who ran a luncheonette in Hartford, Ct); the late Mr. and Mrs. Marion are likely to have given him a somewhat off-center perspective on the immigrant experience and they were French Canadians.

    “Vernacular Americans” I like the phrase, but it should not apply to an FBI agent, who, after all, is feeding at the public trough and is nothing more than a foot soldier for the warfare / welfare / progressive /globo-homo / diversitopia state.

  214. @Paleo Liberal
    Two problems with that.

    1. Many military minds at the time felt that whichever side attacked first would have a large advantage. The Nazis believed the Soviets were planning to attack. The Soviets believed the Nazis were planning to attack. As long as both sides firmly believed they had an advantage by attacking first, someone was going to stage a preemptive strike.

    Especially since the Nazis uses the blitzkrieg style of attack, which depends on the first strike.

    2. The Nazis believed time was of the essence. If they struck quickly, they could strike before the Soviet troops were all in position. More important, they could strike before the weather got too bad.

    Where that failed: The Nazis, like Napoleon before them, got bogged down and were stuck in Russia during the winter.
    Add to that the fact that it was the most severe winter in 30 years.


    To be fair, we have no idea what would’ve happened had the Nazis avoided attacking the USSR. Suppose the Soviet Army had plenty of time to get into position. Consider the level of paranoia of Stalin. At some point the Red Army would be ready to fight an offensive battle. At that point they would attack the Nazis.

    This is all correct, but let me add a few things:

    First of all, it is a fact that most Western observers (American, French, and British) believed that the Soviet Union would collapse almost immediately following a strong German attack. The Soviets had won exactly one battle in decades – the Battle of Khalkhin Gol against Japan. Otherwise, they had been routed by Pildsudki’s Poles; unable to actually win a total victory against the Imperial Japanese; and thoroughly embarrassed by tiny Finland during the Winter War. Their performance against overmatched Poland in 1939, which was under Western and German observation, was also rated as poor. And of course this was all after the well-known purge of the Soviet generals in 1937-38. Well into the war, Hitler told Mannerheim that he had not expected such strong Soviet resistance as was encountered. Hitler was not alone in his pre-war expectations. Everyone, to some degree possibly including the Soviet leadership, believed that the Soviet Union would collapse.

    (I am prepared to cite sources for this first point, but I don’t have them on hand at the moment)

    Second, putting aside the myth that “Lebensraum” was the primary motivation at the time, the truth is that Hitler was in a difficult position vis-a-vis the Anglosphere and the Soviet Union. The former, in the shape of Great Britain, he had failed to knock out of the war. And they refused to negotiate, knowing that America, led by the Roosevelt clique, would take any opportunity to intervene on Britain’s side. It was apparent for resource-poor, navy-less Germany that only a permanent guarantee of Eastern resources could enable it to knock out Britain and/or build for itself any long-term security.

    The problem there was that the Soviets, despite the Ribbentrop Pact, had become increasingly aggressive against territory that was guaranteed to Germany by the Pact itself. They were threatening the absolutely crucial Bessarabian oil fields. They were beginning to threaten cutting off resource transfers to the Germans. And finally, the Germans were aware that Churchill’s government was attempting to create an anti-German pact with the Soviets.

    The German government’s perception was that it had no choice but to break the Pact and attack Stalin before he did the same.

    And, even without the Suvorov “Icebreaker” theory (about which I have doubts), there is ample historical evidence to suggest that the German perception had plenty of merit to it.

    As you yourself say:

    At some point the Red Army would be ready to fight an offensive battle. At that point they would attack the Nazis.

    Exactly.

  215. @jJay
    I've been reading George F Will's columns since the 80s and have mixed reactions to him. Like many conservatives he very good at pointing out the flaws in liberalism but doesn't do so well at defending conservatism. He's been posting red flags on this for decades.

    He's OK with the designated hitter in American League baseball. This take some big strategy decisions out of a close game in favor a fan pleasing home run hitter. The DH rule sucks. But then he doesn't like the focus on home runs in modern baseball either.

    He was horrified by Jason Richwine's research on latinos' lackluster success in America but had no data of his own to rebut it.

    He likes to inform us that California, for example, has long history of producing influential Republican governors but doesn't seem to grasp that replacing the population of California might have some effect on this trend. California has magic dirt. (Is "magic dirt" a Sailerism? If so, it is the best. It's better than "Invade the World, Invite the World" for its subtlety. I could safely wear a "Magic Dirt" t-shirt here in CA)

    Ever since Trump called him "overrated" he's been nuts, at once complaining about Trump's coarseness and then calling everyone who endorses a Trump policy a lapdog.

    I do hold admiration for Will in regards to the way he treats his son Jon, who is afflicted with Down's syndrome. Early pregnancy testing and abortion is making the Jon's of this world disappear without a trace. They are easier to deal with if you have some money, but it's hard no matter what.

    Bill James, a real baseball analyst, has been lambasting the DH rule for decades.

    And he’s right.

    It’s a ridiculous rule.

    They have a position for large, relatively slow guys who are on the team just to hit. It’s called “first base.” Learn to field a ground ball, Big Papi.

  216. @Anonymous
    Is that Matthew Yglesias?

    Looks like him from college.

  217. @Daniel H
    >>Read Adolf Von Schell’s “Battle Leadership” to understand the German way of leading small units and making fast, effective decisions during the fog of battle.

    German emphasis on elite combat formations, with the majority of the army to provide support and logistics for the combat wings, despite their superior field leadership, resourcefulness, capability turned out to be a bug, not a feature. David Glantz provides statistics that show that during the Battle of Stalingrad, German units had a 6 to 1 kill ratio versus Soviet unit. Didn't matter, because even though German attacking formation could kill/wound 6 Soviets for any one of their own, they were still bled white. And whereas in the Red Army every man was a frontline solider, Germany had specialized combat formations. When these were whittled down, despite still having a huge fighting force, the wounded German army was barely a little more competent than the still standing Red Army. The ferocious fighting force that was the German Army 1939-1941, never existed again post 1942, despite it's still huge numbers.

    When Paulus was first surrounded at Stalingrad, initial plans were made to break out. If a breakout were to occur he demanded that at least 20,000 fresh frontline combat troops be airlifted in in to assist in the breakout. Hitler's army staff flunkies, who did not have combat leadership experience could not understand why this should necessary. Anybody who was a field officer in the German army knew precisely why this would be necessary. Paulus claimed that as things stood in November 2018, when the Red Army closed the circle there were only about 30,000 frontline German troops able to fight out of the pocket. This was out of a force that initially numbered 290,000 soldiers. And at this point the force had not been enervated by hunger and siege. At any given time, approximately 10% of the German land army was front line, combat ready. And when these frontline fighters were killed or wounded, they were not easy to replace.

    At any given time, approximately 10% of the German land army was front line, combat ready.

    I suspect that this is probably a shallow criticism of the German land army for one reason: how many land armies of modern, post-19th century warfare have a front line, combat ready capacity of higher than 10-20%? And I mean good soldiers, not just the clerks and cooks that the U.S. Army had to throw into battle in January ’45 because its replacement structure was deeply flawed. I’m prepared to be proven wrong if you have the stats.

    As an aside, I guarantee that the front line, combat readiness of the U.S. Army *today* SURE AS HELL ain’t above 10%.

  218. @Daniel H
    >>The Germans were the best, man for man.

    Well, man for man is meaningless. Man for man the Germans bested the Red Army -right?- , but the Red Army marched into Berlin. 'Nuff said.

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.. Significant statistical factoid (gleaned from my recollections of David Glantz's writings). In 1942, Germany and her allies occupied/controlled a landmass that had at least 150% the GDP of the Soviet Union, maybe as high as 180%, yet in 1942 - a very critical year of the war - Germany produced approximately 4,000 top of the line fighting tanks. In the same year the Soviet Union produced close to 20,000 top of the line fighting tanks.(Don't forget, at this point all of Ukraine, Belorussia and the Baltics were in German hands). A similar ratio pertained in the production of artillery, self-propelled guns, machine guns, aircraft, .... (and no, the Soviet Union didn't need no stinkin' lend lease). The Soviet Union was tougher, smarter, meaner. The Russian was/is clearly a superior man to the German, and I think we can all see that today.

    the Soviet Union didn’t need no stinkin’ lend lease

    This incredibly silly statement is enough to sink your entire argument.

    This is a true internet “laugh out loud” moment.

    In lieu of quoting American Lend-Lease stats, including the 10,000+ armored vehicles sent from America to Russia in 1941, let alone the very large amount of stuff the British gave Stalin, I will quote General Zhukov:

    Now they say that the allies never helped us, but it can’t be denied that the Americans gave us so many goods without which we wouldn’t have been able to form our reserves and continue the war.

    We didn’t have explosives, gunpowder. We didn’t have anything to charge our rifle cartridges with. The Americans really saved us with their gunpowder and explosives. And how much sheet steel they gave us! How could we have produced our tanks without American steel? But now they make it seem as if we had an abundance of all that. Without American trucks we wouldn’t have had anything to pull our artillery with.

    Emphasis mine.

    The greatest Soviet hero of the “Great Patriotic War” is in complete opposition to you.

    You have two options at this point:

    You can either concede that you are dead wrong, or admit that you are a Soviet agent recruited by Alger Hiss. Or maybe you’re a Russian “Sovok.” Whatever.

  219. @Moses

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.
     
    Soviet machine gunners placed behind the front lines with orders to shoot any man not advancing on the enemy has a way of bracing the spine.

    Come on. Any serious student of WW2 knows that the Germans ran rings around everyone in terms of combat effectiveness. Better weapons, better unit leadership, better morale. German units were famous for regrouping and launching lightning fast counter-attacks.

    Read Adolf Von Schell's "Battle Leadership" to understand the German way of leading small units and making fast, effective decisions during the fog of battle. https://www.amazon.com/Battle-Leadership-Adolf-von-Schell-ebook/dp/B06WP692F8

    German panzers captured hundreds of thousands of Soviets in the advance into Ukraine and Russia. Hitler stupidly had his 3rd army take Stalingrad where the German advantages of armor and maneuver were nullified. It was super human how long the exhausted, freezing, ill-supplied 3rd army lasted in Stalingrad after Zhukov cut them off.

    The Germans cut through American lines like a hot knife through butter during the Battle of the Bulge. No contest.

    The allies won because they had more -- more men, more tanks, more planes. That's it.

    German panzers captured hundreds of thousands of Soviets in the advance into Ukraine and Russia. Hitler stupidly had his 3rd army take Stalingrad where the German advantages of armor and maneuver were nullified. It was super human how long the exhausted, freezing, ill-supplied 3rd army lasted in Stalingrad after Zhukov cut them off.

    I am not convinced that the Germans ever had enough men to make Fall Blau work, period. They gave one army (or army group, I forget which) the work of three or four.

    But you’re right that that was a mistake.

  220. @Massimo Heitor

    I only Enoch Powell hadn’t used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell’s “rivers of blood” rhetoric.
     
    No. Powell's speech was fine. Many influential people were eager to twist Powell's words in the most negative light possible, and even people like you accept that. Politics follows culture. When enough of the culture deems a particular view such as immigration restriction unacceptable, politics will likely follow.

    BTW, Powell called the speech the "Birmingham Speech". Opponents branded it the "River of Blood" speech. The exact quote was actually more mild and reasonable:

    "as I look ahead, I am filled with foreboding; like the Roman, I seem to see 'the River Tiber foaming with much blood'."
     

    No. Powell’s speech was fine. Many influential people were eager to twist Powell’s words in the most negative light possible…

    Yes, that was my point.

    … and even people like you accept that.

    …whatever that means.

    Politics follows culture.

    Not necessarily, especially in the era of mass culture and mass media. Terms like: “gate-keeping”, “astroturfing”, “gas-lighting”, “the elephant in the room”. “manufacturing consent” and “dynamic silencing” were adopted to help explain just how artificial our political culture had become in the television era. Enoch Powell was arguably the one of the first big kills that television scored for itself in the West.

    When enough of the culture deems a particular view such as immigration restriction unacceptable, politics will likely follow.

    Powell had the public on his side in this case.

  221. @The Anti-Gnostic
    The ubiguitousness of "Smith" continues to amaze me.

    I’ve only met one in my entire life.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    What part of Wyoming do you live in?
  222. @Lagertha
    With all his articles, interviews, opinions, lately, and now, inconceivably, full-on-board, with endless immigration. He pontificates more than ever, about the morality and necessity to have the world's poor bust down our borders. It is obvious he has accepted the money from you know who, to lash at the bodies of Deplorables until they submit to the ultimate dominion of the Oligarchs/Technocrats/Bankers, who own the Dem party. He had to find a new patron once he so vaingloriously announced that he has left the Republican party. He is a world-class hypocrite and jerk. I hated him 30 years ago.

    With all his articles, interviews, opinions, lately, and now, inconceivably, full-on-board, with endless immigration. He pontificates more than ever, about the morality and necessity to have the world’s poor bust down our borders.

    Meant to type: with endless immigration, he pontificates more than ever, about the morality…

    not that it matters, but it grates on my nerves when I don’t proofread!

  223. @William Badwhite
    One challenge facing Italy from a military perspective (in the 20th century) is that its a fake country of different peoples that were cobbled together. Its not really a nation. Their hearts just weren't in it.

    I suspect the future US military will face similar challenges - the "tip of the spear" whites aren't going to want to fight on behalf of a bunch of hindus, mexicans, and chinamen. The enlisted ranks will likely keep getting some (via economic lures), but I suspect the traditional American officer classes will winnow. Just using the Badwhites as an example: we have fought (as officers) in every major American conflict going back to the French and Indian Wars (except Vietnam - one branch was too old, another was too young, and one guy was in the USAF but stationed in Germany).

    It would never occur to any of us to join today and my brothers and I would actively discourage any of our sons from joining. The US military will continue to get officers of course, but it'll be the Major Nadal's and the Lt. Col D'Quantravious types, as well as the bickering school girls on the U.S.S. Florida. That would have serious ramifications in a serious WW1/WW2 type conflict.

    “aren’t going to want to fight on behalf of a bunch of…”

    No one will. And that’s the downfall of any diverse, multicultural society.

    Your’s is just an excellent observation; one that I hadn’t seen or considered before. It reduces the issue right down to the very essence. It’s like a group of people faced with a distasteful chore, each waiting for the other to take it on. By they time someone gets motivated, it’s too late.

  224. A lot of thought provoking comments here on this thread. I feel like a guy at a banquet buffet.

  225. @Art Deco
    National Review cut ties with him in 1983 when they trashed one of his books. He'd been on the contributor list for about a decade.

    Will at one time had a distinctive voice worth reading (derived, in part, from having been a lapsed professor, unusual among newspaper columnists of his generation). In the last 15 years, he's been a poster child for mandatory retirement (derived, in part no doubt, from listening to his wife, who is the echt Inside Washington type).

    I heard a story that back in the 80s Will became embroiled in a major family kerfuffle when he was caught bunking in with Kate Graham’s daughter, Lally Weymouth, which led to his (first) wife tossing all his things out on the lawn of their house with a note reading in essence “persona non grata.” Don’t know if this story is true. What IS true, however, was his failure to disclose a potential conflict of interest while serving as a commentator at ABC when it turned out that he was not only personal friends with Nancy Reagan but was in essence serving as an unofficial adviser. These days–particularly in light of the Donna Brazile controversy. Will’s sniping at old man Bush throughout ’92–at one point he suggested that he step down–may have been instrumental in tilting the wheels towards The Boy Wonder of Arkansas.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    I believe at least one of his neighbors (employed by the Washington Post) has gone on the record saying that Madeleine Will did precisely that, and the pile of his effects did include a sign, 'Take it somewhere else, buster". His divorce from his wife was protracted (2+ years of negotiations); it didn't include shacking up with Weymouth, who shortly got her talons into another married dude. Take a look at pictures of Weymouth in her prime, ca. 1965. She's always been unattractive and she spends money frivolously (haut couture). It's difficult to imagine someone not on the make who would take an interest in her. (The rap on her subsequent paramour, Eric Breindel, was that he was always on the make).
    , @Art Deco
    Will's pretty much trashed every President who has held office since he began writing his column in 1973, Ronald Reagan the exception. His hostility to George Bush the Elder was intense and personal.
  226. @Steve Sailer
    OK, the Italians weren't as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians. That's pretty much the whole of WWI outside the Western Front -- the Germans rushing around on multiple fronts to shore up their allies. The Germans were the best, man for man.

    Bravery was not among their shortcomings unless perhaps in excess.

  227. @Twodees Partain
    Yep, he used to pretend to be a conservative. Now he doesn't even pretend any longer but Conservative Inc. still claims him as one of their own.

    I think most Congressional Republicans (who work against Trump) and Independents, Never-Trumpers, former Republicans, realize that they are doomed nobody likes them or respects them anymore. George Will is just making the usual rounds of vacuous interviews so Democrats/Progressives will buy his latest full-of-crap, unctuous piece-of-trash, book.

    Republicans will never win, ever again, if they do not get behind Trump these next 16 months. There is time, after Trump’s 2nd term to get behind more stately, gracious, measured-in-their-words presidents, like Haley or Crenshaw (his eye patch will win the election!) . But, Conservatives are finished if they do not back Trump, now . People are watching them, and loathing the ones that cave to Globalists and Progressives, or do last-minute backstabbing like McCain and Flake/Corker did.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    I see what you're saying from the standpoint of electoral politics. Some republicans who are opposing Trump's policies can be seen as differing from the neocon element that Trump has surrounded himself with by appointment. The "nevertrumpers" are assholes, mostly neocons themeleves who are now stuck outside the Trump orbit even while he toes the same line that they toed during the '16 campaign.

    Will is one of them, IMO.
  228. I seem to recall a reference in Brian Doherty’s Radicals for Capitalism That related a story about Will being taken with anarcho-capitalism by a younger Murray Rothbard before heading to the UK for graduate school. Unfortunately, I don’t have the book at hand to find the reference.

    Not that Will is some secret AnCap or anything, but nevertheless this might provide some interesting if only tangential insight into Will’s genealogy of thought.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Not that Will is some secret AnCap
     
    Doesn't even seem much of a secret anymore if he's for Open Borders and WWT.
  229. @216
    National Review has gleefully hired and over-promoted lots of Asian immigrants.

    What they haven't done is pushed Rich Lowry to hand over the editorship.

    Lowry and his coven are best ignored. Sometimes they’ll write something useful and the rest of the time they are generally irrelevant. That’s best that can be hoped for.

  230. Anon[247] • Disclaimer says:

    Will lives in a very white area. He is concerned only for those in his daily orbit and the stock market. He defends this with vague appeals to various “principals”.

    If you are a working white person, nearly every suggestion Will makes will push you nearer to poverty and less physical security, yet he is advertised as a conservative by the post.

    Will wont be missed by many. He wont be cited by anyone either. He will be totally forgotten 20 years after his death.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    He'll be remembered, as are Quisling, and Walter Duranty. As a pile of shit.
  231. @Art Deco
    Chapman's wife is at least nominally Jewish; his mother-in-law was born in Germany https://fernschumerchapman.com/blog/). Derbyshire has said the Chinese are 'the least religious and most supersititious people in the world", but hasn't said much about his wife; he resisted his father's atheism growing up, but then adopted it more or less at age 60. George Will's first wife was raised Catholic and his 2d Presbyterian.

    I was sort of joking. Whatever that miasma is that has settled over Will’s (and Chapman’s) social circle, it is utterly irreligious and few can resist its inexorable pull.

    Derbyshire may be a case of returning to his filial roots as most conservative men do at one point or another. As with the others, probably doesn’t hurt relations with the wife either. Doesn’t help that the CoE has been so gung ho on the whole Globohomocorp agenda.

  232. @Neil Templeton
    Gravity without mass. A superstitial man.

    George Will is an atheist which makes him a fool.

  233. @The Anti-Gnostic
    The ubiguitousness of "Smith" continues to amaze me.

    Blacksmiths and iron-forgers in general, were key to building a civilization.

  234. @Moses

    And, the Red Army/Soviet Union clearly had more passion to win. More guts. More will.
     
    Soviet machine gunners placed behind the front lines with orders to shoot any man not advancing on the enemy has a way of bracing the spine.

    Come on. Any serious student of WW2 knows that the Germans ran rings around everyone in terms of combat effectiveness. Better weapons, better unit leadership, better morale. German units were famous for regrouping and launching lightning fast counter-attacks.

    Read Adolf Von Schell's "Battle Leadership" to understand the German way of leading small units and making fast, effective decisions during the fog of battle. https://www.amazon.com/Battle-Leadership-Adolf-von-Schell-ebook/dp/B06WP692F8

    German panzers captured hundreds of thousands of Soviets in the advance into Ukraine and Russia. Hitler stupidly had his 3rd army take Stalingrad where the German advantages of armor and maneuver were nullified. It was super human how long the exhausted, freezing, ill-supplied 3rd army lasted in Stalingrad after Zhukov cut them off.

    The Germans cut through American lines like a hot knife through butter during the Battle of the Bulge. No contest.

    The allies won because they had more -- more men, more tanks, more planes. That's it.

    Any serious student of WW2 knows that the Germans ran rings around everyone in terms of combat effectiveness.

    Sometimes they did, but most of the time after 1942-3 they didn’t. They fought well as long as the troops were on a high from winning. Some Germans also fought well once they were broken by the Red Army in 1943, but they were a minority of the usual hyper-disciplined and suicide-addicted morons one finds in most armies. But most Germans just tried to survive. It could also be that the highest quality troops were mostly dead by then.

    Regarding shooting deserters: that was pretty much the same with Germans and Red Army – both were brutal. There were even teenage Germans killed for ‘cowardice‘ all the way through May 1945. Germans had numerical superiority at the beginning, people forget that they were joined by almost all of continental Europe in their attack on the east. In 1945, the Reichstag in Berlin was defended to the end by French SS volunteers (Charlemagne division). There were famously more French who died fighting for Germany than against it and same is true about Belgians, Dutch, Norwegians, etc…

    At the end Red Army was better at fighting, they enjoyed it more. They had resilience that most Germans lacked. The machine guns behind the front are a myth based on some penal batallions, you extrapolate from irrelevant minutia. War is about total human and physical destruction and it takes a certain personality to win in a total war; people who put on socks the right way, trim their body hair, and count the change in their pocket loose at the end. Wehrmacht was competent, but not that great. They lost, so by definition they were second-best.

  235. His head has all the toupee it can take, I know that. Shouldn’t he change that thing out for one that looks somewhat like an older man’s hair?

    Don’t expect new ideas, or self-awareness, from a guy who hasn’t changed his rug in decades.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    to me, a sign of a toupee' (these days) is a deep sense of insecurity which always presents itself with class-loathing, a feeling of superiority, despite not looking hot anymore.
  236. @Spirit of the Fighting 69th
    Will always has been condescending, nay arrogant, toward Americans not of his exhaulted social class. It's not his neighborhood that will turn into the barrio, it's yours. Not a word about low wage Americans made unemployed and unemployable by an endless supply of cheap labor, not a word about Americans inundated by foreign tongues and excoriated by immigrant lobbies smelling victory in their war against traditional America. Will is a mountebank.

    well, the schadenfreude we can all enjoy is: most immigrants (illegal or not) want to be where the action is: cities….and wealthier areas that surround cities. I think all suburbs which surround dynamic cities, are doomed; or, it will be too late to push poor people elsewhere – just like the homeless in SF.

    Most poor immigrants are looking for rich people/wealthy areas, to give them work – there is just nothing to do out in the middle of Ohio, Nebraska, Nevada (good God!), Texas, Georgia. No, rural towns will be largely ignored, and every exhurb/suburb will be in play as that is were the rich are.

  237. @Anonymous
    The main problem with your analysis is the appalling (genetic) propensity for 'west Indians' to steal, rob, rape, maim and murder.

    Scarcely a day passes in today's London without some nasty, worthless black murdering an innocent victim for goods of trivial value.

    On balance, they are wicked and wretched people of whom Britain would infinitely better off without.

    The homicide rate among West Indians living in Britain is elevated compared to what’s normal in Western Europe. At about 6 per 100,000, doesn’t look that bad compared to the U.S., Russia, or a menu of East European countries.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Their general criminality is off the charts massive.

    Of course, the powers-that-be hide it - probably like those dubious statistics you quote.

    What I do know is that a very big majority of adult male 'west Indians' in the UK are on the police national DNA database.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    That's a metric for a specific crime, and they're still committing homicide at 3x the rate of American whites, and 5x the rate of European whites. That's enough to know which neighborhoods to avoid.
  238. @Dennis Dale
    His head has all the toupee it can take, I know that. Shouldn't he change that thing out for one that looks somewhat like an older man's hair?

    Don't expect new ideas, or self-awareness, from a guy who hasn't changed his rug in decades.

    to me, a sign of a toupee’ (these days) is a deep sense of insecurity which always presents itself with class-loathing, a feeling of superiority, despite not looking hot anymore.

  239. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer
    OK, the Italians weren't as good in WWI as Germans led by Rommel. Yet, the Italians were as brave as the Austrians. That's pretty much the whole of WWI outside the Western Front -- the Germans rushing around on multiple fronts to shore up their allies. The Germans were the best, man for man.

    The death ratio on the Italian front was about 3:2 Italian/Austrian. But the Italians won in the end, and the low number of Italian ally casualties on that front suggests it was an overwhelmingly Italian victory.

    Italy had 58 divisions fighting there compared to a combined 5 British/French and suffered 650k dead compared to 1k British.

  240. @Paleo Liberal
    Too much truth to that.

    I get frustrated when I see prominent Congress Creatures and Senators go against proposals they previously supported because Trump. For example, Diane Feinstein called one of Trump’s immigration proposals “white supremicist” even though it was similar to proposals she supported when Bill Clinton was in office. She wrote an opinion piece saying it wouldn’t have allowed her grandparents to escape from the Czar. I am serious.

    Compare that to Mitch McConnell’s eight year tantrum when Obama was in office. The only difference is Trump hasn’t been in office for 8 years.

    Our nation and our planet are facing existential crises now. Some scientists predict the human race may not survive another century. Yet we are fighting over the deck chairs on the Titanic.

    We won’t face existential threats because it would be “bad for the economy”, meaning addressing the issues might cut into the quarterly profits of our oligarchs.

    The oligarchs are happy to pit left against right, white against non-white, “woke” against MAGA, Antifa against alt-right etc. These battles keep us peasants in our place and keep us from uniting against the oligarchs

    And, the seed-vault in Svalbard is ready….as is the gene bank of animals which have gone extinct (recent ones)…and, the plans to de-populate can resume.

  241. @Paleo Liberal
    Two problems with that.

    1. Many military minds at the time felt that whichever side attacked first would have a large advantage. The Nazis believed the Soviets were planning to attack. The Soviets believed the Nazis were planning to attack. As long as both sides firmly believed they had an advantage by attacking first, someone was going to stage a preemptive strike.

    Especially since the Nazis uses the blitzkrieg style of attack, which depends on the first strike.

    2. The Nazis believed time was of the essence. If they struck quickly, they could strike before the Soviet troops were all in position. More important, they could strike before the weather got too bad.

    Where that failed: The Nazis, like Napoleon before them, got bogged down and were stuck in Russia during the winter.
    Add to that the fact that it was the most severe winter in 30 years.


    To be fair, we have no idea what would’ve happened had the Nazis avoided attacking the USSR. Suppose the Soviet Army had plenty of time to get into position. Consider the level of paranoia of Stalin. At some point the Red Army would be ready to fight an offensive battle. At that point they would attack the Nazis.

    Even before the winter the Wehrmacht was bogged down by mud(Rasputitsa). They were taken by complete surprise that Russian weather held dangers outside Of winter.

    There were other indications this was a bad plan but Hitler ignored the advice of some of his smartest and most loyal generals who said it would fail.

    There was no excuse for the lack of understanding on the German part other than hubris and poor planning. They also over looked that the Soviets held some brilliant generals and fierce ground troops who marched on even when underfed and underarmed. They sometimes entered battle and had to take weapons from dead comrades. The Japanese warned them about Zhukov and the Estonians and Bulgarians considered them delusional idiots for the attempt

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Hitler just thought of Russia as a big France. It had taken about a month of fighting to defeat the French, and since Russia had a population about 4-5 times that of France, he assumed it would take about that number of months to defeat the Russians. Major fighting would be over by October/November--before the weather turned really bad--and the war would be over by Christmas.

    No need for the winter clothing that the Germans infamously failed to bring with them, as by the time it got really cold the war would be over and the troops would be in their winter quarters, not fighting battles outside.
  242. David Brooks discusses astrology’s increased popularity with The Ladies and the Rise of Mindfulness.

    The third great rising spiritual force is mindfulness, which seems to be everywhere. The fourth is wokeness, what some have called the Great Awokening.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/10/opinion/astrology-occult-millennials.html

  243. anonymous[751] • Disclaimer says:
    @Cagey Beast
    I only Enoch Powell hadn't used such inflammatory language back in 1968. He made it impossible for conservatives to suggest immigration restrictions for five decades and on both sides of the Atlantic. George Will is just trying to regain the credibility conservatism lost thanks to Powell's "rivers of blood" rhetoric.

    At least that's been one of the longest-lived alibis "conservatives" have used to explain why they just never seem to be able to restrict immigration. Unto the second generation:

    Jacob Rees-Mogg Betrays Fans By Opposing Enoch Powell’s Famous Speech
    https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/04/14/jacob-rees-mogg-betrays-fans-opposing-enoch-powells-famous-speech/

    god i hate this boomer horseshit. please drown yourself in a golf course pond.

    yeah, its enoch powell’s fault, not our enemies. if you just cuck more they’ll be sure to listen to you next time! because if there’s anything you haven’t tried it’s completely cucking on every fucking issue of culture and politics and language that ever fucking arose in your lifetime.

    for “conservatives” cucking–like socialism for liberals–just hasn’t been tried hard enough!

    “he made it impothibble!”, the cuck lisped. yes, enoch made it impossible. not retarded cuckservatives who tripped all over themselves to do things like declare martin luther king and nelson mandela (both literally communist agents intentionally destroying white anglo societies) their heroes.

    what a humiliating thing for you to write.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Two things:
    1) I'm not a Boomer.
    2) Please read my second paragraph.
    , @Intelligent Dasein
    If you would rein in your histrionics for a moment, you would realize that CageyBeast was not agreeing with that sentiment.
  244. @BengaliCanadianDude
    To be honest, you're not white. They complain about you too

    To be honest, you’re not white. They complain about you too

    Yes. Just a lot less than about Indians.

    • Replies: @BengaliCanadianDude
    "a lot less"

    LOL nice try trying to join them, but the sentiments are the same for you. Boo hoo
    , @Desiderius
    We don’t complain about patriots like Twinkie. Assimilation and under 10% of the population and everything is A OK.
    , @Clyde

    Yes. Just a lot less than about Indians.
     
    I favor Koreans over Indians living here. Indians would love to swamp us and they are doing so in some regions via their H1B racketeering.

    From an India news source--
    H1B Visa ‘Premium’ Processing Starts; Indian Spouses Of H1B Visa Holders Sue US Govt. Over Delayed H4 Visa
     
  245. Related the LAT has an article on working witches by its female science reporter.

    If there is an idiot superstition women will go for it.

    Frauds and charlatans all. Preying on stupid women.

    Yes by all means give women the vote.

  246. @William Badwhite
    The American army at the time of Kasserine Pass really wasn't ready and was poorly equipped. They did not perform well. They improved greatly over the course of the war. Comments from British should be taken with their (deserved) inferiority complex in mind.

    The American army at the time of Kasserine Pass really wasn’t ready and was poorly equipped. They did not perform well. They improved greatly over the course of the war.

    It was not an equipment issue. Our soldiers were inexperienced and led by inexperienced officers. And, yes, they got a lot better. Just not better enough to match the Germans per capita. But they didn’t have to in order to win. We had material abundance on our side. We always have.

    • Replies: @Whiskey
    That wasn't true. While the Germans had the best machine gun and good small unit tactics the were hobbled by lack of logistical support. Rommel lacked enough fuel trucks to press home his advances in North Africa and was decimated by Allied air in the late stages.

    American troops down to a corporal could call in artillery fire and had more and better supplies across the Atlantic than Germans in next door France.

    When the Germans arrived in Greece through friendly territory they were starving. Logistics was that bad.

    Germans lacked effective close air support against a competent enemy. The Stuka was a sitting duck against the Allies. Their tanks broke down often and achieved limited mobility in tough terrain. After Crete they never again attempted a large scale paratroop operation. They had no effective long range air transport or heavy bombers.

    Germans were over rated. Yes they crushed Poland and the French. And the shambolic early Soviet Army.

    Against the American offensive in France they collapsed like the French when outflanked by Patton. They cut and ran through the Falaise Gap.
    , @William Badwhite
    The M4 tanks were pretty bad, but you're correct they had lots of them.

    Our soldiers were inexperienced and led by inexperienced officers.
     
    Everyone was inexperienced, it was early in the war (for the US). Gen'l Fredendall was relieved by Eisenhower soon after.

    There were a lot of poor officers taking up spots in the inter-war years. Makes sense in a way - the type of things one does to be promoted in peacetime don't necessarily make good combat officers. Read about the Navy's submarine situation in the Pacific early in the war - to its credit they quickly realized they needed to make room for more aggressive younger commanders (Mush Morton, Dick O'Kane) so moved many older commanders out to pasture.
    , @Moses

    And, yes, they got a lot better.
     
    Same thing in the Pacific theater.

    American naval and carrier forces were green and inept as hell right after Pearl Harbor.

    The Imperial Japanese Navy not only had more carriers, but their crews and pilots were real professionals -- WAY better trained and highly experienced. Superior planes too until the F6F Hellcat was introduced in 1943.

    Fortunately for the Americans Admiral Yamamoto made a series of strategic blunders plus the Americans got lucky a few times (incredibly lucky at Midway). It gave the American Navy time to learn and improve, which to their credit they did rapidly.

    The Japanese system simply could not replace losses of highly skilled carrier pilots. They tended to treat pilots as expendable and had poor pilot recovery efforts. Their carrier damage control teams were terrible too.

    The day of Pearl Harbor the Japanese Navy was unquestionably superior to the American Navy. The problem for the Japanese was every day after that the American Navy got stronger whilst the Japanese Navy got weaker.

    The outcome always was inevitable.

    , @Moses

    We had material abundance on our side. We always have.
     
    The Germans were shocked that Americans would expend dozens of rounds of expensive high explosive artillery to take out 2 man fortified bunker, whereas the Germans would have used a small unit to attack it.

    "So this is how a rich man conducts war," I recall one German officer saying in a WW2 book I read.
  247. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    When a captured British officer was interrogated by the Germans after the Battle of Kasserine Pass (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Kasserine_Pass) and asked of his opinion about the fighting quality of his American allies, he replied, “Americans? Our Italians.”

     

    A rather amusing comment in light of the future poverty of British infantry performance in France, 1944.

    A rather amusing comment in light of the future poverty of British infantry performance in France, 1944.

    Indeed. On the other hand, they had been bled much longer than we had by that stage of the war.

  248. @Abolish_public_education
    If we abolish the welfare state:

    • the flow of tax leeches, into this country, will be stopped dead in its tracks.

    • some 5M, illegal, tax leeches will go back to Latin America, and

    • some 50M, legal, tax leeches will go back to whatever European s^hole their great-*-grandparents came from.

    But they won’t vote to abolish the welfare state Mr. Libertarian

  249. @Steve Sailer
    The German genius for counter-attacking was transferred to their World Cup teams for decades, as Henry Kissinger pointed out. I recall in 1994 the Mexican team was in fantastic shape versus the aged Germans so they pushed like crazy on offense, but each time they made a slip up the wily Germans would suddenly score.

    The German genius for counter-attacking

    Von Manstein wanted to conduct a series of retreats and counterattacks to bleed the Soviets dry after 1942 with what substantial mobile reserves the Germans still had. Instead Hitler was fixated on the cult of the attack and threw those reserves away with Zitadelle (aka Kursk). After that, there was no salvaging the war for the Germans though Hitler kept harboring fantasies of having Frederick the Great’s luck at the 11th hour.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Hitler seems to have been in a daze after the loss of Stalingrad. He lost his mojo. The Old Hitler was crazy unpredictable, and would have attacked anywhere but Kursk, since it was such an obvious target.
  250. @Twinkie

    "The economy needs immigration as much as the immigrants need the economy"
     
    This is both logically and factually false AND glib and shallow. It’s the worst of both worlds as far as opinions go. And if it were insincere, too, it would complete the trifecta.

    I don’t see why. The whole economic system and way of life in the US is very dependent on Social Security and Medicare, and it seems logical to the average person like me, who is not a trained economist, that the whole edifice is like a pyramid, that constantly demands a new and wider layer of younger consumers and producers at the bottom of the pyramid to nourish and renew the structure.

    What would be the difference between a few million people from Florida migrating to other states due to flooding and global warming and a few million people migrating from Central America to the temperate zones of the US and Canada to the north due to the failed states of Central America becoming unlivable for those who do not own a private army, or belong to one?

    It seems to me that rather than threaten each other with tariffs, the three nations of North America (US, Canada, and Mexico) ought to get together to formulate a plan to resettle those who want to abandon Central America. After all there is still a huge amount of unoccupied land left in the continent (especially in Alaska) and if the Russians and Argentinians were to join in on the enterprise and open up Siberia and Tierra del Fuego, then even more espacio habitable would be available for the teeming hordes of Tegucigalpa, Guatemala City, and San Salvador.

    There have always been immigration laws and people holding up their hands to say enough is enough, although the immgration laws of the past have a quaint look to them now.

    The Chinese Exclusion Act was enacted in response to hostility to Chinese workers at a time when the supply of gold in the California Gold Rush was drying up. Of course California later had the Silicon Chip Rush to fill up the jobs deficit, until most of the jobs where then exported to… China by US corporations.

    The fifty-cent immigration tax has been replaced by taxes and fees of thousands of dollars for medical tests, certified documents, and application and biometrics fees, which is great business for the US. Just to get a replacement for a lost Certificate of Naturalization or Consular Record of Birth Abroad is now $750.00, a fee which even the likes of Ted Cruz apparently have a hard time coming up with.

    I would have though D. Trump would be all in favor of further increasing these fees to make immigration even more profitable.

    Among the first laws passed to limit immigration were the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Immigration Act, both enacted in 1882. The Chinese Exclusion Act prohibited the entry of Chinese laborers into the country for 10 years, while the Immigration Act established a 50-cent tax to enter the country, to be paid by each immigrant upon entry. The Immigration Act also excluded “any convict, lunatic, idiot, or any person unable to take care of him or herself without becoming a public charge” from entry altogether.

    The Immigration Act of 1882 set a precedent for barring categories of individuals from entry, and the next major immigration law, the Immigration Act of 1891, expanded these categories to include polygamists, individuals convicted of crimes of moral depravity, and those with contagious diseases that posed a threat to public health. The law also created the first federal agency dedicated to enforcing immigration law, the Office of the Superintendent of Immigration within the Treasury Department

    https://ballotpedia.org/History_of_immigration_policy_in_the_United_States

    https://www.julienslive.com/images/lot/1655/165543_0.jpg

    • Replies: @Tired of Not Winning

    I would have though D. Trump would be all in favor of further increasing these fees to make immigration even more profitable.
     
    I've always thought the US is stupid to give away our most prized commodity, the green card, for free. We should charge $10 million per green card, and end all chain migration, including for immediate family members, they have to get their own green cards, $10m each for the spouse and for each kid.

    On one condition: it should never be sold to anyone who has ever worked for any foreign government in any capacity. This is to prevent the world's kleptocrats from buying it with their ill gotten gains.
    , @Art Deco
    that the whole edifice is like a pyramid, that constantly demands a new and wider layer of younger consumers and producers at the bottom of the pyramid to nourish and renew the structure.

    It doesn't. Actual pyramid schemes collapse in a matter of months. When Richard Epstein calls Social Security a 'Ponzi' scheme, he's scamming himself or scamming you.

    What would keep Social Security sound would be (1) amended review procedures to rein in the ever more lax definition of 'disability', (2) cohort specific retirement ages, so that the ratio of the retired population to the working population is stable, and (3) birth cohorts which are not declining in size.

    As for Medicare, its problems part and parcel of problems in financing medical care and l/t care generally. Keep in mind that > 60% of medical and lt care spending is not on the elderly.
    , @Twinkie

    whole economic system
     
    Man does not live by bread alone. Man is a social animal - he derives his sense of well-being from community. Unfortunately a historically high level of foreign-born population and especially migration from countries whose migrants display low rates of assimilation is damaging that sense of community.

    http://latinosreadytovote.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Asimmiliation.gif
    , @TWS
    You're joking I hope.
    , @MarkinLA
    that the whole edifice is like a pyramid, that constantly demands a new and wider layer of younger consumers and producers at the bottom of the pyramid to nourish and renew the structure.

    If wages hadn't stagnated for the last 40 years, the picture of SS would look much rosier. The deficits and national debt would be much smaller. Letting in low skill largely welfare dependent workers is the exact opposite of anything that will save SS no matter how many you let in. I fact, it will hasten the collapse.
  251. Has anyone ever asked an immigration fetishist: Is there a point at which you can say, “We’ve got enough people now. It is time to stop importing them.”

  252. @Neil Templeton
    Gravity without mass. A superstitial man.

    Gravity without mass. A superstitial man.

    Funny … and spot on.

    To me–a “conservative” not interested in actually conservating anything.

    Will is actually worse that the rentier pols like Romney or Ryan, as Will actually claims to be an “intellectual”. But for all his reading and supposed “erudition”, his “intellect” has been unable to fathom that you can’t conserve a culture or even a set of values, without conserving the people to whom they belong.

    In contrast, as empty and ridiculous as all the left intellectualism is yammering about “white privilege”, “patriarchy” and “oppression”, at least it’s coherent politically. Their idea that there’s some diverse rainbow hued utopia out there is probably the dumbest intellectual idea yet … but at least their intellectual work and policy suggestions are directly on target in seeking to destroy what they hate–traditional Western Christian civilization.

    In contrast George Will is a “conservative” who works to destroy the people, culture and nation that produces what he claims to value.

    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt

    To me–a “conservative” not interested in actually conservating anything.

     


    Will is actually worse that the rentier pols like Romney or Ryan, as Will actually claims to be an “intellectual”. But for all his reading and supposed “erudition”, his “intellect” has been unable to fathom that you can’t conserve a culture or even a set of values, without conserving the people to whom they belong.

     


    In contrast George Will is a “conservative” who works to destroy the people, culture and nation that produces what he claims to value.

     

    Tweet from 2015:

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/636228616632803328
  253. @Sgt. Joe Friday
    I think Will is an atheist, actually.

    And note that no one hears about "standard of living" anymore. Back when I was boy, America used to boast about having the "world's highest standard of living." Now all you hear about is "world's largest economy."

    Isn’t standard of living a relative term applied to each individual? You can bet George has a very high standard of living compared to some slob living under a bridge. Which BTW, we have large numbers living under throughout the USA. Traveling through that liberal Mecca of Austin Texas I find that under the bridge and overpasses some of the inhabitants have set up rather elaborate housekeeping facilities. The Austin City Council agonizes daily about what can be done about these eyesores always talking of more affordable housing which is a joke because even those with moderate incomes can no longer afford housing in Austin. The Council can only mean free housing but the conundrum is how to satisfy the NIMBY crowd.

  254. George Will is not a conservative. He’s a cuckservative. Big difference.

    Yuge.

  255. @Lot
    Yes. Being wrong on migration isn’t made up for by being right on every other issue. Not that Reagan-Bush GOPe was right on tariffs, Iraq, tax cuts for the rich, getting rid of antitrust laws, etc.

    What the hell is this meme “tax cuts for the rich”? The poorest Americans are rich by world standards, so any tax cut for anybody could be described that way.

    In a sense, immigration is a tax cut for the rich– the employer.

    • Replies: @Lot
    In the US context this means the top 1% of adults by income or wealth.
  256. @Jonathan Mason
    I don't see why. The whole economic system and way of life in the US is very dependent on Social Security and Medicare, and it seems logical to the average person like me, who is not a trained economist, that the whole edifice is like a pyramid, that constantly demands a new and wider layer of younger consumers and producers at the bottom of the pyramid to nourish and renew the structure.

    What would be the difference between a few million people from Florida migrating to other states due to flooding and global warming and a few million people migrating from Central America to the temperate zones of the US and Canada to the north due to the failed states of Central America becoming unlivable for those who do not own a private army, or belong to one?

    It seems to me that rather than threaten each other with tariffs, the three nations of North America (US, Canada, and Mexico) ought to get together to formulate a plan to resettle those who want to abandon Central America. After all there is still a huge amount of unoccupied land left in the continent (especially in Alaska) and if the Russians and Argentinians were to join in on the enterprise and open up Siberia and Tierra del Fuego, then even more espacio habitable would be available for the teeming hordes of Tegucigalpa, Guatemala City, and San Salvador.

    There have always been immigration laws and people holding up their hands to say enough is enough, although the immgration laws of the past have a quaint look to them now.

    The Chinese Exclusion Act was enacted in response to hostility to Chinese workers at a time when the supply of gold in the California Gold Rush was drying up. Of course California later had the Silicon Chip Rush to fill up the jobs deficit, until most of the jobs where then exported to... China by US corporations.

    The fifty-cent immigration tax has been replaced by taxes and fees of thousands of dollars for medical tests, certified documents, and application and biometrics fees, which is great business for the US. Just to get a replacement for a lost Certificate of Naturalization or Consular Record of Birth Abroad is now $750.00, a fee which even the likes of Ted Cruz apparently have a hard time coming up with.

    https://www.dol.wa.gov/driverslicense/images/consular-report-of-birth-abroad.jpg

    I would have though D. Trump would be all in favor of further increasing these fees to make immigration even more profitable.

    Among the first laws passed to limit immigration were the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Immigration Act, both enacted in 1882. The Chinese Exclusion Act prohibited the entry of Chinese laborers into the country for 10 years, while the Immigration Act established a 50-cent tax to enter the country, to be paid by each immigrant upon entry. The Immigration Act also excluded "any convict, lunatic, idiot, or any person unable to take care of him or herself without becoming a public charge" from entry altogether.

    The Immigration Act of 1882 set a precedent for barring categories of individuals from entry, and the next major immigration law, the Immigration Act of 1891, expanded these categories to include polygamists, individuals convicted of crimes of moral depravity, and those with contagious diseases that posed a threat to public health. The law also created the first federal agency dedicated to enforcing immigration law, the Office of the Superintendent of Immigration within the Treasury Department

    https://ballotpedia.org/History_of_immigration_policy_in_the_United_States

    https://www.julienslive.com/images/lot/1655/165543_0.jpg

    I would have though D. Trump would be all in favor of further increasing these fees to make immigration even more profitable.

    I’ve always thought the US is stupid to give away our most prized commodity, the green card, for free. We should charge $10 million per green card, and end all chain migration, including for immediate family members, they have to get their own green cards, $10m each for the spouse and for each kid.

    On one condition: it should never be sold to anyone who has ever worked for any foreign government in any capacity. This is to prevent the world’s kleptocrats from buying it with their ill gotten gains.

    • Replies: @anon
    We should charge $10 million per green card, and end all chain migration, including for immediate family members, they have to get their own green cards, $10m each for the spouse and for each kid.

    Why should we issue any at all?
  257. @Twinkie

    The American army at the time of Kasserine Pass really wasn’t ready and was poorly equipped. They did not perform well. They improved greatly over the course of the war.
     
    It was not an equipment issue. Our soldiers were inexperienced and led by inexperienced officers. And, yes, they got a lot better. Just not better enough to match the Germans per capita. But they didn’t have to in order to win. We had material abundance on our side. We always have.

    That wasn’t true. While the Germans had the best machine gun and good small unit tactics the were hobbled by lack of logistical support. Rommel lacked enough fuel trucks to press home his advances in North Africa and was decimated by Allied air in the late stages.

    American troops down to a corporal could call in artillery fire and had more and better supplies across the Atlantic than Germans in next door France.

    When the Germans arrived in Greece through friendly territory they were starving. Logistics was that bad.

    Germans lacked effective close air support against a competent enemy. The Stuka was a sitting duck against the Allies. Their tanks broke down often and achieved limited mobility in tough terrain. After Crete they never again attempted a large scale paratroop operation. They had no effective long range air transport or heavy bombers.

    Germans were over rated. Yes they crushed Poland and the French. And the shambolic early Soviet Army.

    Against the American offensive in France they collapsed like the French when outflanked by Patton. They cut and ran through the Falaise Gap.

    • Replies: @Twinkie
    Read van Creveld's book.
  258. @AnotherDad

    Gravity without mass. A superstitial man.
     
    Funny ... and spot on.

    To me--a "conservative" not interested in actually conservating anything.

    Will is actually worse that the rentier pols like Romney or Ryan, as Will actually claims to be an "intellectual". But for all his reading and supposed "erudition", his "intellect" has been unable to fathom that you can't conserve a culture or even a set of values, without conserving the people to whom they belong.

    In contrast, as empty and ridiculous as all the left intellectualism is yammering about "white privilege", "patriarchy" and "oppression", at least it's coherent politically. Their idea that there's some diverse rainbow hued utopia out there is probably the dumbest intellectual idea yet ... but at least their intellectual work and policy suggestions are directly on target in seeking to destroy what they hate--traditional Western Christian civilization.

    In contrast George Will is a "conservative" who works to destroy the people, culture and nation that produces what he claims to value.

    To me–a “conservative” not interested in actually conservating anything.

    Will is actually worse that the rentier pols like Romney or Ryan, as Will actually claims to be an “intellectual”. But for all his reading and supposed “erudition”, his “intellect” has been unable to fathom that you can’t conserve a culture or even a set of values, without conserving the people to whom they belong.

    In contrast George Will is a “conservative” who works to destroy the people, culture and nation that produces what he claims to value.

    Tweet from 2015:

  259. @Redneck farmer
    The countries that perhaps have higher standards of living have demographic differences that are........ controversial if you point them out.

    The countries that perhaps have higher standards of living have demographic differences that are…….. controversial if you point them out.

    Liechtenstein is about to be surpassed by Macau for the highest standard of living, or at least the highest per capita income. Hey, the house wins in the end.

    I stayed in Macau in 1985. There were rats in the streets and a giant roach on my hotel bed.

  260. Anonymous[344] • Disclaimer says:

    I can imagine a few decades from now when the captions of all pictures of famous moments in American military history(Washington crossing the Delaware, Raising of the flag on Iwo Jima, etc) will only mention how much each action raised the GDP. Nothing about freedom or self determination. Just the important stuff.

  261. @Anonymous
    (Slightly) O.T.


    According to this morning's news reports, a senior British primatologist has claimed that UK customs regularly seize 'significant' quantities of 'chimpanzee meat' - as confirmed by DNA analysis - being shipped in from west Africa, to be sold as a 'delicacy' in towns 'with a large west African population, (that is the entire urban UK).

    Apparently, chimp meat is often served a weddings, christenings and funerals.......

    ‘chimpanzee meat’ – as confirmed by DNA analysis

    Which they share 98% with us, right? This is on the cusp of cannibalism.

    Don’t try serving man’s best friend, though. Not in old Blighty.

    If the meat is bad and causes nausea, will you literally “chimp out”?

    • Replies: @Corn
    “Which they share 98% with us, right? This is on the cusp of cannibalism”

    Agreed. I’m not really an animal rights guy but eating chimpanzees, monkeys or other primates seems wrong.
    , @TWS
    I've seen this movie, there's some great acting.
  262. @Twinkie

    The American army at the time of Kasserine Pass really wasn’t ready and was poorly equipped. They did not perform well. They improved greatly over the course of the war.
     
    It was not an equipment issue. Our soldiers were inexperienced and led by inexperienced officers. And, yes, they got a lot better. Just not better enough to match the Germans per capita. But they didn’t have to in order to win. We had material abundance on our side. We always have.

    The M4 tanks were pretty bad, but you’re correct they had lots of them.

    Our soldiers were inexperienced and led by inexperienced officers.

    Everyone was inexperienced, it was early in the war (for the US). Gen’l Fredendall was relieved by Eisenhower soon after.

    There were a lot of poor officers taking up spots in the inter-war years. Makes sense in a way – the type of things one does to be promoted in peacetime don’t necessarily make good combat officers. Read about the Navy’s submarine situation in the Pacific early in the war – to its credit they quickly realized they needed to make room for more aggressive younger commanders (Mush Morton, Dick O’Kane) so moved many older commanders out to pasture.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    The M4 tanks were pretty bad, but you’re correct they had lots of them.
     
    And M4's were mechanically very reliable and had pretty good cross-country mobility.
  263. @Twinkie

    To be honest, you’re not white. They complain about you too
     
    Yes. Just a lot less than about Indians.

    “a lot less”

    LOL nice try trying to join them, but the sentiments are the same for you. Boo hoo

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    LOL nice try trying to join them, but the sentiments are the same for you. Boo hoo
     
    Too late. I have already joined them. My wife is as heritage American as it gets (one ancestor was a Continental Army officer). Her people have taken me in as one of their own and I shall defend them - my adopted tribe - to the last drop of my blood. And I certainly educate my children to love their mother's and grandparents' people.
  264. @Reg Cæsar
    What the hell is this meme "tax cuts for the rich"? The poorest Americans are rich by world standards, so any tax cut for anybody could be described that way.

    In a sense, immigration is a tax cut for the rich-- the employer.

    In the US context this means the top 1% of adults by income or wealth.

  265. @IHTG
    Reihan Salam and Ramesh Ponnuru >>>>> George Will

    Unironically this. Reihan is genuinely a good writer

  266. @Anon
    OT: AOC is complaining that Congress didn't give itself (and her) a pay raise. She really knows how to tick off her supporters.

    https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/its-not-even-a-raise-aoc-upset-at-congressional-democrats-for-tabling-raise

    It’s who we are.

  267. @Federalist
    George Will is an atheist, but he can go to hell all the same.

    Shades of Chesterton… great line

  268. @Moses
    A few minutes of Googling did not yield Will's home address.

    He wouldn't be one of those espousing unlimited 3rd world immigration who lives nowhere near diversity in a supermajority White ZIP code, would he?

    It's all so tiresome.

    “… a supermajority White ZIP code”

    Yeah, where the only non-whites consist of landscape workers and sundry versions of Rosa the Housekeeper.

  269. @Charles Erwin Wilson 3
    And how many immigrants will George Will host in his house, or even in his neighborhood? Vibrancy for thee, but not for me, says the hypocrite George Will.

    My church is a few houses away from George Will’s home and I live less than a quarter-mile from him. I can assure you that if you see an Amerindian (or really any poc) in his neighborhood they are almost certainly a nanny, landscaper, etc.

  270. @Autochthon
    Your account is disingenuous and misleading. The annexation of Sikkim by India is much more analogous to the annexation of California or Texas to the U.S.A than it is to any nefarious invasion – it was done at the request of the people. The Sikkim State Congress and its prime minister requested assistance from India in overthrowing the monarchy and, later, requested annexation to India as well. Earlier still, Indian forces had entered Sikkim at the request of its monarch for their assistance quelling popular revolts against his rule (one must be careful what one wishes for, and beware of entangling alliances...).

    Incidentally, if you want to learn about a nonpareil adventuress – a real adventuress' adventuress! – get a load of this disgusting Hope Wallace (née Cooke, formerly Namgyal) creature – a real parasite who never faced a consequence for an action or worked for anything a day of her life (and she is still at it, as you mention). Her parents might better have named her "Despair" to help warn men away from her.

    ” it was done at the request of the people”

    Yes I know. This is the narrative pushed by India. According to India 97% of the Sikkimese voted to join India. This is disingenuous. Saddam Hussein also said 99% of Iraqis voted for him. You believe that?

    India engineered for years to annex Sikkim including creating resentment against the king among the gullible Sikkimese. Sort of like how India meddles in the internal affairs of Nepal, Sri Lanka and the Maldives. When the times come a referendum was presented to the people whether to vote for the king or to vote for democracy, not knowing that voting for democracy meant being annexed by the shithole. And that’s what had happened. India took the vote as a holy writ and invaded and annexed the kingdom. Hey India is not invading a country, India is spreading democracy!

    Come to think of it. Which country’s citizen wants to join the shithole India? And joining them en masse by 97%?

  271. @TheJester

    That’s similar to “If we made everyone in the world an American, then there would be zero illegal immigration.”
     
    I sense your sarcasm. The Roman's tried that and it didn't work. Making everyone in the Roman Empire a citizen allowed those from alien cultures and religions to become Roman soldiers accessing the roots of Roman national power ... and then the rot began. Roman emperors, foreshadowing Obama, even adopted foreign religions in the hope of unifying a now diverse people. Sound familiar?

    Going forward, it was inevitable that sooner rather than later the barbarians would become officers and generals in the Legions powerful enough to "make" or "break" Roman emperors and Roman institutions. They, of course, broke them.

    As they say, the rest is history .... as an ode to the adverse impact of diversity on cultures, religions, peoples. and empires. Diversity is a short run thing.

    Empire

    That’s where the rot began. Full stop.

    But the Roman had a long run. We should be so blessed.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    We’re kind of (less than) half-assedly doing the whole empire thing and the Roman Republic lasted 600 years. There is a chance we follow Steve, stop invading/inviting, and enjoy another 300 years or so as a Republic.
  272. @Jonathan Mason
    I don't see why. The whole economic system and way of life in the US is very dependent on Social Security and Medicare, and it seems logical to the average person like me, who is not a trained economist, that the whole edifice is like a pyramid, that constantly demands a new and wider layer of younger consumers and producers at the bottom of the pyramid to nourish and renew the structure.

    What would be the difference between a few million people from Florida migrating to other states due to flooding and global warming and a few million people migrating from Central America to the temperate zones of the US and Canada to the north due to the failed states of Central America becoming unlivable for those who do not own a private army, or belong to one?

    It seems to me that rather than threaten each other with tariffs, the three nations of North America (US, Canada, and Mexico) ought to get together to formulate a plan to resettle those who want to abandon Central America. After all there is still a huge amount of unoccupied land left in the continent (especially in Alaska) and if the Russians and Argentinians were to join in on the enterprise and open up Siberia and Tierra del Fuego, then even more espacio habitable would be available for the teeming hordes of Tegucigalpa, Guatemala City, and San Salvador.

    There have always been immigration laws and people holding up their hands to say enough is enough, although the immgration laws of the past have a quaint look to them now.

    The Chinese Exclusion Act was enacted in response to hostility to Chinese workers at a time when the supply of gold in the California Gold Rush was drying up. Of course California later had the Silicon Chip Rush to fill up the jobs deficit, until most of the jobs where then exported to... China by US corporations.

    The fifty-cent immigration tax has been replaced by taxes and fees of thousands of dollars for medical tests, certified documents, and application and biometrics fees, which is great business for the US. Just to get a replacement for a lost Certificate of Naturalization or Consular Record of Birth Abroad is now $750.00, a fee which even the likes of Ted Cruz apparently have a hard time coming up with.

    https://www.dol.wa.gov/driverslicense/images/consular-report-of-birth-abroad.jpg

    I would have though D. Trump would be all in favor of further increasing these fees to make immigration even more profitable.

    Among the first laws passed to limit immigration were the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Immigration Act, both enacted in 1882. The Chinese Exclusion Act prohibited the entry of Chinese laborers into the country for 10 years, while the Immigration Act established a 50-cent tax to enter the country, to be paid by each immigrant upon entry. The Immigration Act also excluded "any convict, lunatic, idiot, or any person unable to take care of him or herself without becoming a public charge" from entry altogether.

    The Immigration Act of 1882 set a precedent for barring categories of individuals from entry, and the next major immigration law, the Immigration Act of 1891, expanded these categories to include polygamists, individuals convicted of crimes of moral depravity, and those with contagious diseases that posed a threat to public health. The law also created the first federal agency dedicated to enforcing immigration law, the Office of the Superintendent of Immigration within the Treasury Department

    https://ballotpedia.org/History_of_immigration_policy_in_the_United_States

    https://www.julienslive.com/images/lot/1655/165543_0.jpg

    that the whole edifice is like a pyramid, that constantly demands a new and wider layer of younger consumers and producers at the bottom of the pyramid to nourish and renew the structure.

    It doesn’t. Actual pyramid schemes collapse in a matter of months. When Richard Epstein calls Social Security a ‘Ponzi’ scheme, he’s scamming himself or scamming you.

    What would keep Social Security sound would be (1) amended review procedures to rein in the ever more lax definition of ‘disability’, (2) cohort specific retirement ages, so that the ratio of the retired population to the working population is stable, and (3) birth cohorts which are not declining in size.

    As for Medicare, its problems part and parcel of problems in financing medical care and l/t care generally. Keep in mind that > 60% of medical and lt care spending is not on the elderly.

    • Replies: @Romanian

    What would keep Social Security sound would be (1) amended review procedures to rein in the ever more lax definition of ‘disability’, (2) cohort specific retirement ages, so that the ratio of the retired population to the working population is stable, and (3) birth cohorts which are not declining in size.
     
    Do you think no 2 is in any way politically feasible?
  273. @Jonathan Mason
    I don't see why. The whole economic system and way of life in the US is very dependent on Social Security and Medicare, and it seems logical to the average person like me, who is not a trained economist, that the whole edifice is like a pyramid, that constantly demands a new and wider layer of younger consumers and producers at the bottom of the pyramid to nourish and renew the structure.

    What would be the difference between a few million people from Florida migrating to other states due to flooding and global warming and a few million people migrating from Central America to the temperate zones of the US and Canada to the north due to the failed states of Central America becoming unlivable for those who do not own a private army, or belong to one?

    It seems to me that rather than threaten each other with tariffs, the three nations of North America (US, Canada, and Mexico) ought to get together to formulate a plan to resettle those who want to abandon Central America. After all there is still a huge amount of unoccupied land left in the continent (especially in Alaska) and if the Russians and Argentinians were to join in on the enterprise and open up Siberia and Tierra del Fuego, then even more espacio habitable would be available for the teeming hordes of Tegucigalpa, Guatemala City, and San Salvador.

    There have always been immigration laws and people holding up their hands to say enough is enough, although the immgration laws of the past have a quaint look to them now.

    The Chinese Exclusion Act was enacted in response to hostility to Chinese workers at a time when the supply of gold in the California Gold Rush was drying up. Of course California later had the Silicon Chip Rush to fill up the jobs deficit, until most of the jobs where then exported to... China by US corporations.

    The fifty-cent immigration tax has been replaced by taxes and fees of thousands of dollars for medical tests, certified documents, and application and biometrics fees, which is great business for the US. Just to get a replacement for a lost Certificate of Naturalization or Consular Record of Birth Abroad is now $750.00, a fee which even the likes of Ted Cruz apparently have a hard time coming up with.

    https://www.dol.wa.gov/driverslicense/images/consular-report-of-birth-abroad.jpg

    I would have though D. Trump would be all in favor of further increasing these fees to make immigration even more profitable.

    Among the first laws passed to limit immigration were the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Immigration Act, both enacted in 1882. The Chinese Exclusion Act prohibited the entry of Chinese laborers into the country for 10 years, while the Immigration Act established a 50-cent tax to enter the country, to be paid by each immigrant upon entry. The Immigration Act also excluded "any convict, lunatic, idiot, or any person unable to take care of him or herself without becoming a public charge" from entry altogether.

    The Immigration Act of 1882 set a precedent for barring categories of individuals from entry, and the next major immigration law, the Immigration Act of 1891, expanded these categories to include polygamists, individuals convicted of crimes of moral depravity, and those with contagious diseases that posed a threat to public health. The law also created the first federal agency dedicated to enforcing immigration law, the Office of the Superintendent of Immigration within the Treasury Department

    https://ballotpedia.org/History_of_immigration_policy_in_the_United_States

    https://www.julienslive.com/images/lot/1655/165543_0.jpg

    whole economic system

    Man does not live by bread alone. Man is a social animal – he derives his sense of well-being from community. Unfortunately a historically high level of foreign-born population and especially migration from countries whose migrants display low rates of assimilation is damaging that sense of community.

    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    Well the Canadians assimilate well because Canada is pretty much US-lite, and the Philippine immigrants are mostly wives of servicemen with mixed race children, so they would assimilate better and would probably know the language before they came, or pick it up from their children.

    The problem with the effect on communities comes about largely when there are large communities of one immigrant type in a location. I live in a small town in Florida, and it is not really a problem. We have some Filipinos, Haitians, and Indians in town. My daughter's teacher is a Filipina, I buy my gasoline from an Indian guy and his wife, I have near neighbors who are Haitian, there is a Mexican restaurant down the road, I have a Vietnamese doctor and so on. They all have their place. None have any detrimental effect on the community.

    It is well known that the US, well-developed as it is, is incapable of producing enough doctors or nurses or even apple-pickers to services its own needs, while other countries like Cuba and India have a surplus that they are able to export.

    The rich man in his castle,
    The poor man at his gate,
    God made them high and lowly,
    And ordered their estate.
  274. @Twinkie

    Empire
     
    That’s where the rot began. Full stop.

    But the Roman had a long run. We should be so blessed.

    We’re kind of (less than) half-assedly doing the whole empire thing and the Roman Republic lasted 600 years. There is a chance we follow Steve, stop invading/inviting, and enjoy another 300 years or so as a Republic.

  275. @Steve Sailer
    The German genius for counter-attacking was transferred to their World Cup teams for decades, as Henry Kissinger pointed out. I recall in 1994 the Mexican team was in fantastic shape versus the aged Germans so they pushed like crazy on offense, but each time they made a slip up the wily Germans would suddenly score.

    Oddly enough, they chose not to exploit their genius for the counter-attack in starting both the World Wars they lost by electing to strike first.

    Schlieffen Plan or Blitzkrieg. Counter-attacks?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    If Stalin had tried invading Germany in, say, 1942 or 1943, he would have been routed. The German counterattack would have taken Moscow.
  276. @Neil Templeton
    Gravity without mass. A superstitial man.

    And he buys his hair at the bazaar as Barr. Come on, Man.

  277. @Twinkie

    To be honest, you’re not white. They complain about you too
     
    Yes. Just a lot less than about Indians.

    We don’t complain about patriots like Twinkie. Assimilation and under 10% of the population and everything is A OK.

    • Agree: Clyde
    • Replies: @PJouvet

    We don’t complain about patriots like Twinkie. Assimilation and under 10% of the population and everything is A OK.
     
    Who complains about Koreans in the first place?? I can’t think of an ethnic group which has its shit together more than Koreans. God, family, country.

    And 10%? Maybe 50%. Is there a more aesthetically pleasing mix than white and Korean?

    https://www.allkpop.com/upload/2016/03/content/buzz_1458075193_gigi_moon.jpg
  278. @Twinkie

    To be honest, you’re not white. They complain about you too
     
    Yes. Just a lot less than about Indians.

    Yes. Just a lot less than about Indians.

    I favor Koreans over Indians living here. Indians would love to swamp us and they are doing so in some regions via their H1B racketeering.

    From an India news source–
    H1B Visa ‘Premium’ Processing Starts; Indian Spouses Of H1B Visa Holders Sue US Govt. Over Delayed H4 Visa

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    I favor Koreans over Indians living here. Indians would love to swamp us and they are doing so in some regions via their H1B racketeering.
     
    I don't disagree, but I'd like to reduce immigration drastically, period (Indian or otherwise).

    Even with Koreans, too many here would reduce assimilation. In any case, it is a moot point with Koreans as immigration from Korea has declined dramatically. In the last ten years measured, the number of people identifying as Korean in the United States actually declined, largely because of reverse-migration and assimilation.

    On the other hand, the Indian population has exploded. It is the fastest growing legal immigrant group in the U.S. And, unfortunately, they display an assimilation index closer to Mexicans than to Koreans. They fit the profile of the classic "alien overlords" - i.e. highly select cohorts/high achievement/high income combined with a low assimilation index (and low intermarriage rates with natives even with the American-born generations).
  279. @Desiderius
    Soviet statistics aren't worth the paper they're printed on.

    Stalin beat Hitler the same way Kutuzov beat Napoleon (and Houston Santa Anna). Uncivilized big distances are hell on logistics.

    “Uncivilized big distances are hell on logistics.”
    True enough, but the US is capable of moving troops and armament long distances as proved by WWII, Korea and Iraq. If the Soviet Union had the climate say of North Africa I don’t think the Russians would have been able to stop the Germans. Bitter cold trumped Hitler.

    • Replies: @Cortes
    The myth of General Winter, Simon?

    Really.

    Try looking at the English Tory MP Alan Clark’s “Barbarossa” which gives Guderian and the rest ample rope to hang themselves with their excuses for not smashing everything in their way.

    Coulda bin contenders...
    , @Desiderius
    When big distances are uncivilized, there's always a reason. In Russia, often enough bitter cold is the culprit.

    Germany lacked the experience with big distance (and, crucially, big area) that the U. S. enjoyed natively.
  280. @Daniel H
    Homo economicus.

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle. Exactly.

    Now the likes of Will, David French, Jonah Goldberg are pleading for civility. No civility for these bastards, I want their world destroyed.

    I will vote hardcore socialist Bernie, hardcore crazy Ocasio-Cortez before I will ever again pull the lever for a Cuck. The Cucks are the major problem. They are the backstabbers. Just say no to Cucks.

    I will vote hardcore socialist Bernie, hardcore crazy Ocasio-Cortez before I will ever again pull the lever for a Cuck.

    Easier said than done, at least for me. I voted for the mulatto communist as protest against J Treason McStain and Mittens Bigamy. But it’s one thing to check the box and another thing to put the ballot in the mail I found. Both times I fed my vote to my shredder.

    Still, staying home and letting the imbeciles decide seems to be working great as a strategy of accelerationism.

  281. @Daniel H
    Homo economicus.

    Pat Buchanan once referred to Will as a yapping poodle. Exactly.

    Now the likes of Will, David French, Jonah Goldberg are pleading for civility. No civility for these bastards, I want their world destroyed.

    I will vote hardcore socialist Bernie, hardcore crazy Ocasio-Cortez before I will ever again pull the lever for a Cuck. The Cucks are the major problem. They are the backstabbers. Just say no to Cucks.

    I confess, 30+ years ago I thought Will was cool.

    Well he may have been the man of the hour back then, but he has not aged well. Vs in the 15 years I’ve been reading Steve he has only grown in my estimation, simply because Steve keeps speaking harsh truth even when it costs him.

    Reading Will now would be painful. I recall a line from many years ago, from memory approximately “In the future America will interbreed to become a nice healthy shade of light brown.” In 2019 that’s the definition of cuck. Farewell, George Will, you and your bow tie.

  282. @Simply Simon
    "Uncivilized big distances are hell on logistics."
    True enough, but the US is capable of moving troops and armament long distances as proved by WWII, Korea and Iraq. If the Soviet Union had the climate say of North Africa I don't think the Russians would have been able to stop the Germans. Bitter cold trumped Hitler.

    The myth of General Winter, Simon?

    Really.

    Try looking at the English Tory MP Alan Clark’s “Barbarossa” which gives Guderian and the rest ample rope to hang themselves with their excuses for not smashing everything in their way.

    Coulda bin contenders…

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
    Thanks, I 'll have to read "Barbarossa."
  283. @Paleo Liberal
    The only quibble I have with that comment is it implies there was a time when George Will was fresh.

    I think more of what my mother told me about life during WW II, when the best of everything went to the soldiers. Once my mother was taking a train and asked for milk. Instead of the Grade A milk we are used to, she was served Grade C milk. She said it was kind of grey colored.

    If you imagine a bottle of Grade C milk that had been sitting in the back of the fridge for many decades, I think you get the true essence of George Will.

    That grey, Grade C milk your mother was served was skim milk, i.e., after all the cream was removed by a separator. During WWII we sold the separated cream to the local dairy and fed the leftover to the hogs. Hopefully the cream we sold was converted to butter for the troops, since butter was rationed in the stores. Incidentally, that milk originated from our cows and one of the more detestable jobs I had was to help draw the milk from those beasts before heading off to school often in the dark and the cold. Not complaining–it builds character I’ve been told.

    • Replies: @Interested Bystander
    Better than reading George Will column...
  284. @Reg Cæsar

    ‘chimpanzee meat’ – as confirmed by DNA analysis
     
    Which they share 98% with us, right? This is on the cusp of cannibalism.

    Don't try serving man's best friend, though. Not in old Blighty.

    If the meat is bad and causes nausea, will you literally "chimp out"?

    “Which they share 98% with us, right? This is on the cusp of cannibalism”

    Agreed. I’m not really an animal rights guy but eating chimpanzees, monkeys or other primates seems wrong.

  285. @Jonathan Mason
    I don't see why. The whole economic system and way of life in the US is very dependent on Social Security and Medicare, and it seems logical to the average person like me, who is not a trained economist, that the whole edifice is like a pyramid, that constantly demands a new and wider layer of younger consumers and producers at the bottom of the pyramid to nourish and renew the structure.

    What would be the difference between a few million people from Florida migrating to other states due to flooding and global warming and a few million people migrating from Central America to the temperate zones of the US and Canada to the north due to the failed states of Central America becoming unlivable for those who do not own a private army, or belong to one?

    It seems to me that rather than threaten each other with tariffs, the three nations of North America (US, Canada, and Mexico) ought to get together to formulate a plan to resettle those who want to abandon Central America. After all there is still a huge amount of unoccupied land left in the continent (especially in Alaska) and if the Russians and Argentinians were to join in on the enterprise and open up Siberia and Tierra del Fuego, then even more espacio habitable would be available for the teeming hordes of Tegucigalpa, Guatemala City, and San Salvador.

    There have always been immigration laws and people holding up their hands to say enough is enough, although the immgration laws of the past have a quaint look to them now.

    The Chinese Exclusion Act was enacted in response to hostility to Chinese workers at a time when the supply of gold in the California Gold Rush was drying up. Of course California later had the Silicon Chip Rush to fill up the jobs deficit, until most of the jobs where then exported to... China by US corporations.

    The fifty-cent immigration tax has been replaced by taxes and fees of thousands of dollars for medical tests, certified documents, and application and biometrics fees, which is great business for the US. Just to get a replacement for a lost Certificate of Naturalization or Consular Record of Birth Abroad is now $750.00, a fee which even the likes of Ted Cruz apparently have a hard time coming up with.

    https://www.dol.wa.gov/driverslicense/images/consular-report-of-birth-abroad.jpg

    I would have though D. Trump would be all in favor of further increasing these fees to make immigration even more profitable.

    Among the first laws passed to limit immigration were the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Immigration Act, both enacted in 1882. The Chinese Exclusion Act prohibited the entry of Chinese laborers into the country for 10 years, while the Immigration Act established a 50-cent tax to enter the country, to be paid by each immigrant upon entry. The Immigration Act also excluded "any convict, lunatic, idiot, or any person unable to take care of him or herself without becoming a public charge" from entry altogether.

    The Immigration Act of 1882 set a precedent for barring categories of individuals from entry, and the next major immigration law, the Immigration Act of 1891, expanded these categories to include polygamists, individuals convicted of crimes of moral depravity, and those with contagious diseases that posed a threat to public health. The law also created the first federal agency dedicated to enforcing immigration law, the Office of the Superintendent of Immigration within the Treasury Department

    https://ballotpedia.org/History_of_immigration_policy_in_the_United_States

    https://www.julienslive.com/images/lot/1655/165543_0.jpg

    You’re joking I hope.

  286. @Reg Cæsar

    ‘chimpanzee meat’ – as confirmed by DNA analysis
     
    Which they share 98% with us, right? This is on the cusp of cannibalism.

    Don't try serving man's best friend, though. Not in old Blighty.

    If the meat is bad and causes nausea, will you literally "chimp out"?

    I’ve seen this movie, there’s some great acting.

  287. @syonredux

    I believe Will is a rather religious man.
     
    Not really....

    Will is a self-described "amiable, low voltage atheist."
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Will#Religious_beliefs

    bored identity strongly believes that Deep State Devils recalibrate Good Will’s Cucking Voltage Tolerance on daily basis :

  288. Will seems to have the same view as Trump.

    In fact I can’t think of a single pol willing to come out against the legal immigration that is transforming (has transformed?) the country.

  289. @syonredux

    I believe Will is a rather religious man.
     
    Not really....

    Will is a self-described "amiable, low voltage atheist."
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Will#Religious_beliefs

    bored identity strongly believes that Deep State Devils recalibrate Good Will’s Cucking Voltage Tolerance on daily basis :

  290. @Twinkie

    whole economic system
     
    Man does not live by bread alone. Man is a social animal - he derives his sense of well-being from community. Unfortunately a historically high level of foreign-born population and especially migration from countries whose migrants display low rates of assimilation is damaging that sense of community.

    http://latinosreadytovote.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Asimmiliation.gif

    Well the Canadians assimilate well because Canada is pretty much US-lite, and the Philippine immigrants are mostly wives of servicemen with mixed race children, so they would assimilate better and would probably know the language before they came, or pick it up from their children.

    The problem with the effect on communities comes about largely when there are large communities of one immigrant type in a location. I live in a small town in Florida, and it is not really a problem. We have some Filipinos, Haitians, and Indians in town. My daughter’s teacher is a Filipina, I buy my gasoline from an Indian guy and his wife, I have near neighbors who are Haitian, there is a Mexican restaurant down the road, I have a Vietnamese doctor and so on. They all have their place. None have any detrimental effect on the community.

    It is well known that the US, well-developed as it is, is incapable of producing enough doctors or nurses or even apple-pickers to services its own needs, while other countries like Cuba and India have a surplus that they are able to export.

    The rich man in his castle,
    The poor man at his gate,
    God made them high and lowly,
    And ordered their estate.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Philippine immigrants are mostly wives of servicemen with mixed race children
     
    No, that's factually incorrect.

    Filipinos, Vietnamese, and Koreans have high rates of assimilation, because they have substantial Christian fractions (most Filipinos in America are Catholics and something like 80% of Koreans in America are Protestants, often evangelicals). They also have greater exposure to American culture due to the long presence of the American military in their home countries. Plus anti-communism played a big role in fostering close contacts with the United States.

    Be that as it may, the assimilation indices are what they are - there is quite a clear bifurcation. Canadians, Filipinos, Vietnamese, Koreans, and Cubans* assimilated at high rates while Mexicans, Salvadorans, Guatemalans, Chinese, and Indians do not.

    *Unfortunately, the Cuban assimilation index is tumbling down rapidly with the latest cohorts the Manhattan Institute studied.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    I think the other factor is that there's really no Filipino culture. They were Pacific Islanders conquered by the Spanish, which eviscerated whatever native culture there was.

    Ann Coulter has used the term "cultural follower," and I think it's pretty useful. If your culture is essentially just growing food and fishing and thatching the roof of your hut, and then the Catholic Spaniards show up, then that's what you're going to be.
  291. @Simply Simon
    That grey, Grade C milk your mother was served was skim milk, i.e., after all the cream was removed by a separator. During WWII we sold the separated cream to the local dairy and fed the leftover to the hogs. Hopefully the cream we sold was converted to butter for the troops, since butter was rationed in the stores. Incidentally, that milk originated from our cows and one of the more detestable jobs I had was to help draw the milk from those beasts before heading off to school often in the dark and the cold. Not complaining--it builds character I've been told.

    Better than reading George Will column…

  292. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Like you, I'm old enough to have read him for some time and he was indeed a very trenchant commentator. But once you're in your 70's your formative circumstances are so far removed from current technologies and sociology it's very hard to adjust and re-frame. Will is back in Reagan's America, thinking about immigration in terms of a few Soviet Jewish refuseniks and a discreet few hundred thousand Mexicans. 75 years of age is a good time to leave public life.

    And then there's Trump, currently on his third and peak act of American public life. Incredible.

    Bulletproof self-confidence is a helluva drug. Back when it came with the water a good upbringing involved taking some of the edge off. In these days of fallen and falling T-levels and sperm counts Trump towers above it all like a colossus. A sometimes autistic colossus, but that autism served as his superpower protecting him from an increasingly destructive zeitgeist.

    Trump has his own Geist; he has no need of the Times’.

  293. @Simply Simon
    "Uncivilized big distances are hell on logistics."
    True enough, but the US is capable of moving troops and armament long distances as proved by WWII, Korea and Iraq. If the Soviet Union had the climate say of North Africa I don't think the Russians would have been able to stop the Germans. Bitter cold trumped Hitler.

    When big distances are uncivilized, there’s always a reason. In Russia, often enough bitter cold is the culprit.

    Germany lacked the experience with big distance (and, crucially, big area) that the U. S. enjoyed natively.

    • Agree: Simply Simon
  294. @Autochthon
    Your account is disingenuous and misleading. The annexation of Sikkim by India is much more analogous to the annexation of California or Texas to the U.S.A than it is to any nefarious invasion – it was done at the request of the people. The Sikkim State Congress and its prime minister requested assistance from India in overthrowing the monarchy and, later, requested annexation to India as well. Earlier still, Indian forces had entered Sikkim at the request of its monarch for their assistance quelling popular revolts against his rule (one must be careful what one wishes for, and beware of entangling alliances...).

    Incidentally, if you want to learn about a nonpareil adventuress – a real adventuress' adventuress! – get a load of this disgusting Hope Wallace (née Cooke, formerly Namgyal) creature – a real parasite who never faced a consequence for an action or worked for anything a day of her life (and she is still at it, as you mention). Her parents might better have named her "Despair" to help warn men away from her.

    It is you who are disingenuous.

    ” it was done at the request of the people”
    Yes I know. This is the narrative pushed by India. According to India 97% of the Sikkimese voted to join India. This is disingenuous. Saddam Hussein also said 99% of Iraqis voted for him. You believe that?
    India engineered for years to annex Sikkim including creating resentment against the king among the gullible Sikkimese. Sort of like how India meddles in the internal affairs of Nepal, Sri Lanka and the Maldives. When the times come a referendum was presented to the people whether to vote for the king or to vote for democracy, not knowing that voting for democracy meant being annexed by the India. And that’s what had happened. India took the vote as a holy writ and invaded and annexed the kingdom.

    Come to think of it. Which country’s citizen wants to join India? And joining it en masse by 97%?

    • Replies: @Autochthon

    India engineered for years to annex Sikkim including creating resentment against the king among the gullible Sikkimese. Sort of like how India meddles in the internal affairs of Nepal, Sri Lanka and the Maldives.
     
    Assuming, for the sake of argument, you are correct, the Sikkim have the government they deserve. I'll no more weep for them than I do for the leftist majority of the F.U.S.A. who will soon enough have the country they want, good and hard.

    You know who isn't stupid, gullible, or having any problems with any meddling in their internal affairs? The Chinese, the Israelis, and their ilk. That's why our grandchildren will read about the Sikkim and everything else in the annals of Chinese historians.

    As to your question:

    I can attest from personal knowledge and observation that Mexinchifornia's northern sector is clamouring to be annexed by India, far beyond twenty-five per cent. Have you never been to Sacramento?!

  295. @Prester John
    Though I agree with Will concerning the dangers of out-of-control government, I have otherwise soured on him over the years--particularly concerning the subject at hand, wherein he exhibits typical Beltway myopia.

    Myopia, or the fact that the same guys who pay him are importing all the cheap labor.

  296. @Paleo Liberal
    Two problems with that.

    1. Many military minds at the time felt that whichever side attacked first would have a large advantage. The Nazis believed the Soviets were planning to attack. The Soviets believed the Nazis were planning to attack. As long as both sides firmly believed they had an advantage by attacking first, someone was going to stage a preemptive strike.

    Especially since the Nazis uses the blitzkrieg style of attack, which depends on the first strike.

    2. The Nazis believed time was of the essence. If they struck quickly, they could strike before the Soviet troops were all in position. More important, they could strike before the weather got too bad.

    Where that failed: The Nazis, like Napoleon before them, got bogged down and were stuck in Russia during the winter.
    Add to that the fact that it was the most severe winter in 30 years.


    To be fair, we have no idea what would’ve happened had the Nazis avoided attacking the USSR. Suppose the Soviet Army had plenty of time to get into position. Consider the level of paranoia of Stalin. At some point the Red Army would be ready to fight an offensive battle. At that point they would attack the Nazis.

    “The Nazis believed the Soviets were planning to attack. ” no. Maybe someday.

  297. @eah
    OT

    https://twitter.com/nytopinion/status/1137783432661143552

    This woman will eventually get fat, because she thinks way too much about food. All the mental effort of writing this article, and it’s simply about her love/hate relationship with food. Blah blah blah, food, body, food, shame, food. She doesn’t even talk about the types/flavors of food she finds appealing, just…food. And how she wants to be applauded for eating.

    Anyone who thinks about food too much will have health problems.

  298. @Cortes
    Oddly enough, they chose not to exploit their genius for the counter-attack in starting both the World Wars they lost by electing to strike first.

    Schlieffen Plan or Blitzkrieg. Counter-attacks?

    If Stalin had tried invading Germany in, say, 1942 or 1943, he would have been routed. The German counterattack would have taken Moscow.

  299. @Twinkie

    The American army at the time of Kasserine Pass really wasn’t ready and was poorly equipped. They did not perform well. They improved greatly over the course of the war.
     
    It was not an equipment issue. Our soldiers were inexperienced and led by inexperienced officers. And, yes, they got a lot better. Just not better enough to match the Germans per capita. But they didn’t have to in order to win. We had material abundance on our side. We always have.

    And, yes, they got a lot better.

    Same thing in the Pacific theater.

    American naval and carrier forces were green and inept as hell right after Pearl Harbor.

    The Imperial Japanese Navy not only had more carriers, but their crews and pilots were real professionals — WAY better trained and highly experienced. Superior planes too until the F6F Hellcat was introduced in 1943.

    Fortunately for the Americans Admiral Yamamoto made a series of strategic blunders plus the Americans got lucky a few times (incredibly lucky at Midway). It gave the American Navy time to learn and improve, which to their credit they did rapidly.

    The Japanese system simply could not replace losses of highly skilled carrier pilots. They tended to treat pilots as expendable and had poor pilot recovery efforts. Their carrier damage control teams were terrible too.

    The day of Pearl Harbor the Japanese Navy was unquestionably superior to the American Navy. The problem for the Japanese was every day after that the American Navy got stronger whilst the Japanese Navy got weaker.

    The outcome always was inevitable.

  300. @Tired of Not Winning

    I would have though D. Trump would be all in favor of further increasing these fees to make immigration even more profitable.
     
    I've always thought the US is stupid to give away our most prized commodity, the green card, for free. We should charge $10 million per green card, and end all chain migration, including for immediate family members, they have to get their own green cards, $10m each for the spouse and for each kid.

    On one condition: it should never be sold to anyone who has ever worked for any foreign government in any capacity. This is to prevent the world's kleptocrats from buying it with their ill gotten gains.

    We should charge $10 million per green card, and end all chain migration, including for immediate family members, they have to get their own green cards, $10m each for the spouse and for each kid.

    Why should we issue any at all?

    • Agree: TWS
  301. @Twinkie

    The American army at the time of Kasserine Pass really wasn’t ready and was poorly equipped. They did not perform well. They improved greatly over the course of the war.
     
    It was not an equipment issue. Our soldiers were inexperienced and led by inexperienced officers. And, yes, they got a lot better. Just not better enough to match the Germans per capita. But they didn’t have to in order to win. We had material abundance on our side. We always have.

    We had material abundance on our side. We always have.

    The Germans were shocked that Americans would expend dozens of rounds of expensive high explosive artillery to take out 2 man fortified bunker, whereas the Germans would have used a small unit to attack it.

    “So this is how a rich man conducts war,” I recall one German officer saying in a WW2 book I read.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    “So this is how a rich man conducts war,” I recall one German officer saying in a WW2 book I read.
     
    I read an account of a Japanese infantryman in the Pacific. He and the other men of his unit were cut off from resupply on an island and were starving and wearing tattered clothes. They were saving ammunition for emergencies only and conducting most of their attacks with bayonets (relying on surprises). One day he and his men came upon a campsite abandoned by American soldiers. He was shocked to find gum wrappers discarded by the Americans.

    He wrote something to the effect of "Chewing gums! Here we were living off tree barks and conserving ammunition for emergencies, and these characters were indulging in chewing gums! What other kinds of supplies do they have?"

    He wrote that he'd see American forward bases from a distance - large, well-lit at nights, with immaculate tents. He'd imagine American soldiers coming back from their patrols, resting their weary bodies on a soft cot, eating chocolate candies and chewing gums, and perhaps even entertaining themselves with a novel or two.

    He wrote that it just all seemed terribly unfair.
  302. Twinkie says: